MAXIM 71M6533G

19-5373; Rev 2; 2/12
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H
Energy Meter ICs
DATA SHEET
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
FEATURES
The Teridian™ 71M6533 and 71M6534 are third-generation
polyphase metering systems-on-chips (SoCs) with a 10MHz 8051compatible MPU core, low-power RTC, flash, and LCD driver. The
Single Converter Technology® with a 22-bit delta-sigma ADC, seven
analog inputs, digital temperature compensation, precision voltage
reference, and a 32-bit computation engine (CE) supports a wide
range of metering applications with very few external components.
• Wh Accuracy < 0.1% Over 2000:1 Range
• Exceeds IEC 62053/ANSI C12.20 Standards
• Seven Sensor Inputs with Neutral Current
Measurement
• Low-Jitter Wh and VARh Plus Two Additional
Pulse Test Outputs (4 Total, 10kHz max) with
Pulse Count
• Four-Quadrant Metering
• Phase Sequencing
• Line Frequency Count for RTC
• Digital Temperature Compensation
• Independent 32-Bit CE
• 46-64 Hz Line Frequency Range with Same
Calibration; Phase Compensation (± 7°)
• Three Battery-Backup Modes with Wake-Up
on Timer or Pushbutton:
Brownout Mode (82µA typ, 71M6533)
LCD Mode (21µA typ, DAC active)
Sleep Mode (0.7µA typ)
• Energy Display During Mains Power Failure
• 39mW (typ) Consumption at 3.3V, MPU
Clock Frequency 614kHz
• 8-Bit MPU (80515), 10MHz (max), One
Clock Cycle per Instruction with Integrated
ICE for Debug
• LCD Driver with Four Common Segment
Drivers:
Up to 228 Pixels (71M6533) or 300 Pixels
(71M6534)
• Four Dedicated + 35 (71M6533) or 48
(71M6534) Multifunction DIO Pins
• RTC for TOU Functions with Clock-Rate Adjust
Register
• Hardware Watchdog Timer, Power-Fail Monitor
• I2C/MICROWIRE® EEPROM Interface
• High-Speed Slave SPI Interface to Data RAM
• Two UARTs for IR and AMR, IR Driver with
Modulation
• Flash Memory with Security and In-System
Program Update:
128KB (71M6533/H, 71M6534)
256KB (71M6533G, 71M6534H)
• 4KB RAM
• Industrial Temperature Range
• 100-Pin (71M6533/G/H) or 120-Pin
(71M6534/H) Lead(Pb)-Free LQFP Package
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 add several new features to the
Teridian flagship 71M6513 polyphase meters, including an SPI
interface, advanced power management with < 1µA sleep current,
4KB shared RAM, and 128KB (71M6533/H, 71M6534), or 256KB
(71M6533G, 71M6534H) flash, which can be programmed in the
field with new code and/or data during meter operation. Higher
processing and sampling rates and larger memory offer a
powerful metering platform for commercial and industrial meters
with up to class 0.2 accuracy.
A complete array of ICE and development tools, programming
libraries and reference designs enable rapid development and
certification of meters that meet all ANSI and IEC electricity metering
standards worldwide.
LIVE
CT / COIL
LOAD
NEUT
LIVE
LIVE
POWER SUPPLY
NEUTRAL
CONVERTER
V3P3A V3P3SYS GNDA GNDD
IA
VA
IB
VB
IC
TERIDIAN
71M6533
71M6534
REGULATOR
TEMP
SENSOR
LCD DRIVER
DIO ,PULSE
ID
VREF
RAM
SERIAL PORTS
IR
TX
VBAT
COMPUTE
ENGINE
BATTERY
COM0..3
SEG
MOD
RX
TX
FLASH
RTC
TIMERS
V2*
ICE
PULSES,
DIO
I2C or µWire
EEPROM
MPU
V1
* 71M6534 only
DIO
OSC/ PLL
XIN
XOUT
9/24/2008
Teridian is a trademark and Single Converter Technology is a registered
trademark of Maxim Integrated Products, Inc.
MICROWIRE is a registered trademark of National Semiconductor Corp.
Rev 2
8888.8888
SEG/ DIO
RX
COMPARATOR
POWER
FAULT
WAKE-up
V2P5
VC
AMR
PWR MODE
CONTROL
32 kHz
1
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Table of Contents
1
2
2
Hardware Description .................................................................................................................... 9
1.1 Hardware Overview ............................................................................................................... 9
1.2 Analog Front End (AFE)........................................................................................................ 9
1.2.1 Signal Input Pins ......................................................................................................... 9
1.2.2 Input Multiplexer ........................................................................................................ 10
1.2.3 A/D Converter (ADC) ................................................................................................. 11
1.2.4 FIR Filter ................................................................................................................... 11
1.2.5 Voltage References ................................................................................................... 12
1.2.6 Temperature Sensor.................................................................................................. 13
1.2.7 Battery Monitor .......................................................................................................... 13
1.2.8 AFE Functional Description ....................................................................................... 13
1.3 Digital Computation Engine (CE) ....................................................................................... 14
1.3.1 Meter Equations ........................................................................................................ 15
1.3.2 Real-Time Monitor ..................................................................................................... 16
1.3.3 Pulse Generators ...................................................................................................... 16
1.3.4 Data RAM (XRAM) .................................................................................................... 16
1.3.5 CE Functional Overview ............................................................................................ 17
1.3.6 Delay Compensation ................................................................................................. 18
1.4 80515 MPU Core .................................................................................................................. 19
1.4.1 Memory Organization and Addressing ....................................................................... 19
1.4.2 Special Function Registers (SFRs) ............................................................................ 21
1.4.3 Generic 80515 Special Function Registers ................................................................ 22
1.4.4 71M6533/71M6534-Specific Special Function Registers ............................................ 25
1.4.5 Instruction Set ........................................................................................................... 26
1.4.6 UARTs ...................................................................................................................... 26
1.4.7 Timers and Counters ................................................................................................. 29
1.4.8 WD Timer (Software Watchdog Timer) ...................................................................... 30
1.4.9 Interrupts................................................................................................................... 30
1.5 On-Chip Resources............................................................................................................. 37
1.5.1 Oscillator ................................................................................................................... 37
1.5.2 PLL and Internal Clocks............................................................................................. 37
1.5.3 Real-Time Clock (RTC) ............................................................................................. 38
1.5.4 Temperature Sensor.................................................................................................. 39
1.5.5 Physical Memory ....................................................................................................... 39
1.5.6 Optical Interface ........................................................................................................ 42
1.5.7 Digital I/O .................................................................................................................. 42
1.5.8 LCD Drivers .............................................................................................................. 46
1.5.9 Battery Monitor .......................................................................................................... 47
1.5.10 EEPROM Interface .................................................................................................... 47
1.5.11 SPI Slave Port ........................................................................................................... 50
1.5.12 Hardware Watchdog Timer ........................................................................................ 53
1.5.13 Test Ports (TMUXOUT Pin) ....................................................................................... 54
1.5.14 V2 Comparator (71M6534/6534H Only) ..................................................................... 54
Functional Description ................................................................................................................ 55
2.1 Theory of Operation ............................................................................................................ 55
2.2 System Timing Summary.................................................................................................... 56
2.3 Battery Modes ..................................................................................................................... 57
2.3.1 BROWNOUT Mode ................................................................................................... 59
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
3
4
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
2.3.2 LCD Mode ................................................................................................................. 59
2.3.3 SLEEP Mode............................................................................................................. 59
2.4 Fault and Reset Behavior ................................................................................................... 65
2.4.1 Reset Mode ............................................................................................................... 65
2.4.2 Power Fault Circuit .................................................................................................... 65
2.5 Wake Up Behavior............................................................................................................... 65
2.5.1 Wake on PB .............................................................................................................. 65
2.5.2 Wake on Timer .......................................................................................................... 66
2.6 Data Flow............................................................................................................................. 66
2.7 CE/MPU Communication .................................................................................................... 67
Application Information ............................................................................................................... 68
3.1 Connection of Sensors (CT, Resistive Shunt) ................................................................... 68
3.2 Distinction between 71M6533/71M6534 and 71M6533G/H/71M6534H Parts ..................... 68
3.3 Connecting 5 V Devices...................................................................................................... 69
3.4 Temperature Measurement................................................................................................. 69
3.5 Temperature Compensation ............................................................................................... 69
3.5.1 Temperature Coefficients .......................................................................................... 69
3.5.2 Temperature Compensation for VREF ....................................................................... 71
3.5.3 System Temperature Compensation.......................................................................... 72
3.5.4 Temperature Compensation for the RTC ................................................................... 72
3.6 Connecting LCDs ................................................................................................................ 72
3.7 Connecting I2C EEPROMs .................................................................................................. 73
3.8 Connecting Three-Wire EEPROMs ..................................................................................... 73
3.9 UART0 (TX/RX) .................................................................................................................... 74
3.10 Optical Interface (UART1) ................................................................................................... 74
3.11 Connecting the V1 Pin ........................................................................................................ 75
3.12 Connecting the Reset Pin ................................................................................................... 75
3.13 Connecting the Emulator Port Pins.................................................................................... 76
3.14 Connecting a Battery .......................................................................................................... 76
3.15 Flash Programming ............................................................................................................ 77
3.16 MPU Firmware Library ........................................................................................................ 77
3.17 Crystal Oscillator ................................................................................................................ 77
3.18 Meter Calibration ................................................................................................................. 78
Firmware Interface ....................................................................................................................... 79
4.1 I/O RAM and SFR Map –Functional Order .......................................................................... 79
4.2 I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical Order......................................................................... 83
4.3 CE Interface Description..................................................................................................... 95
4.3.1 CE Program .............................................................................................................. 95
4.3.2 CE Data Format ........................................................................................................ 95
4.3.3 Constants .................................................................................................................. 95
4.3.4 Environment .............................................................................................................. 96
4.3.5 CE Calculations......................................................................................................... 97
4.3.6 CE Front End Data (Raw Data).................................................................................. 97
4.3.7 CE Status and Control ............................................................................................... 98
4.3.8 CE Transfer Variables ............................................................................................. 100
4.3.9 Temperature Measurement and Temperature Compensation .................................. 102
4.3.10 Pulse Generation..................................................................................................... 102
4.3.11 Noise Suppression and Version Parameters ............................................................ 104
4.3.12 CE Calibration Parameters ...................................................................................... 104
4.3.13 CE Flow Diagrams .................................................................................................. 105
Rev 2
3
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
5
Electrical Specifications ............................................................................................................ 107
5.1 Absolute Maximum Ratings.............................................................................................. 107
5.2 Recommended External Components ............................................................................. 108
5.3 Recommended Operating Conditions.............................................................................. 108
5.4 Performance Specifications ............................................................................................. 109
5.4.1 Input Logic Levels ................................................................................................... 109
5.4.2 Output Logic Levels................................................................................................. 109
5.4.3 Power-Fault Comparator ......................................................................................... 109
5.4.4 V2 Comparator (71M6534 only)............................................................................... 109
5.4.5 Battery Monitor ........................................................................................................ 110
5.4.6 Supply Current ........................................................................................................ 110
5.4.7 V3P3D Switch ......................................................................................................... 110
5.4.8 2.5 V Voltage Regulator........................................................................................... 111
5.4.9 Low-Power Voltage Regulator ................................................................................. 111
5.4.10 Crystal Oscillator ..................................................................................................... 111
5.4.11 Optical Interface ...................................................................................................... 111
5.4.12 LCD DAC ................................................................................................................ 112
5.4.13 LCD Drivers ............................................................................................................ 112
5.4.14 Temperature Sensor................................................................................................ 113
5.4.15 VREF and VBIAS .................................................................................................... 114
5.4.16 ADC Converter, V3P3A Referenced ........................................................................ 115
5.5 Timing Specifications ....................................................................................................... 116
5.5.1 Flash Memory ......................................................................................................... 116
5.5.2 EEPROM Interface .................................................................................................. 116
5.5.3 RESET .................................................................................................................... 116
5.5.4 RTC ........................................................................................................................ 116
5.5.5 SPI Slave Port (MISSION Mode) ............................................................................. 117
5.6 Typical Performance Data ................................................................................................ 118
5.6.1 Accuracy over Current ............................................................................................. 118
5.6.2 Accuracy over Temperature..................................................................................... 119
5.7 Package Outline Drawings ............................................................................................... 119
5.7.1 71M6533 (100-Pin LQFP)........................................................................................ 119
5.7.2 71M6534/6534H (120-Pin LQFP) ............................................................................ 120
5.8 Pinout ................................................................................................................................ 121
5.8.1 71M6533/71M6533G/71M6533H Pinout (100-Pin LQFP) ......................................... 121
5.8.2 71M6534/71M6534H Pinout (120-Pin LQFP) ........................................................... 122
5.9 Pin Descriptions................................................................................................................ 123
5.9.1 Power and Ground Pins........................................................................................... 123
5.9.2 Analog Pins ............................................................................................................. 123
5.9.3 Digital Pins .............................................................................................................. 124
5.9.4 I/O Equivalent Circuits ............................................................................................. 126
6
Ordering Information ................................................................................................................. 127
7
Related Information ................................................................................................................... 127
8
Contact Information ................................................................................................................... 127
Appendix A: Acronyms ..................................................................................................................... 128
Appendix B: Revision History ........................................................................................................... 129
4
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Figures
Figure 2: General Topology of a Chopped Amplifier ............................................................................... 12
Figure 4: AFE Block Diagram................................................................................................................. 14
Figure 5: Samples from Multiplexer Cycle .............................................................................................. 17
Figure 7: Interrupt Structure ................................................................................................................... 36
Figure 8: Optical Interface...................................................................................................................... 42
Figure 9: Connecting an External Load to DIO Pins ............................................................................... 46
Figure 11: 3-wire Interface. Write Command, HiZ=1 .............................................................................. 49
Figure 12: 3-wire Interface. Read Command. ........................................................................................ 49
Figure 13: 3-Wire Interface. Write Command when CNT=0 ................................................................... 49
Figure 15: SPI Slave Port: Read Operation with Gap ............................................................................. 51
Figure 16: SPI Slave Port: Typical Read and Write Operations .............................................................. 53
Figure 17: Functions Defined by V1 ....................................................................................................... 53
Figure 18: Voltage, Current, Momentary and Accumulated Energy......................................................... 55
Figure 19: Timing Relationship between ADC MUX and Compute Engine.............................................. 56
Figure 20: RTM Output Format .............................................................................................................. 56
Figure 21: Operation Modes State Diagram ........................................................................................... 57
Figure 23: Power-Up Timing with V3P3SYS and VBAT Tied Together ................................................... 60
Figure 24: Power-Up Timing with VBAT Only ......................................................................................... 61
Figure 25: Functional Blocks in BROWNOUT Mode ............................................................................... 62
Figure 26: Functional Blocks in LCD Mode............................................................................................. 63
Figure 28: Wake Up Timing ................................................................................................................... 66
Figure 29: MPU/CE Data Flow ............................................................................................................... 66
Figure 30: MPU/CE Communication ...................................................................................................... 67
Figure 31: Resistive Voltage Divider ...................................................................................................... 68
Figure 32: CT with Single Ended (Left) and Differential Input (Right) Connection.................................... 68
Figure 33: Resistive Shunt (Left), Rogowski Sensor (Right) ................................................................... 68
Figure 34: Error Band for VREF over Temperature (Regular-Accuracy Parts) ........................................ 71
Figure 35: Error Band for VREF over Temperature (High-Accuracy Parts) ............................................. 71
Figure 36: Connecting LCDs .................................................................................................................. 73
Figure 37: I2C EEPROM Connection...................................................................................................... 73
Figure 38: Three-Wire EEPROM Connection ......................................................................................... 74
Figure 39: Connections for UART0 ........................................................................................................ 74
Figure 40: Connection for Optical Components ...................................................................................... 75
Figure 41: Voltage Divider for V1 ........................................................................................................... 75
Figure 42: External Components for the RESET Pin: Push-Button (Left), Production Circuit (Right) ....... 76
Figure 43: External Components for the Emulator Interface ................................................................... 76
Figure 45: CE Data Flow: Multiplexer and ADC .................................................................................... 105
Figure 47: CE Data Flow: Squaring and Summation Stages ................................................................. 106
Figure 48: SPI Slave Port (MISSION Mode) Timing ............................................................................. 117
Figure 49: Wh Accuracy (0.1 A - 200 A, 240 V, Room Temperature) at Various Frequencies (Differential
Mode, CTs) .................................................................................................................................. 118
Figure 50: Typical Wh Accuracy (0.02 A - 200 A, 240 V, Room Temperature), Various Load Angles
(Differential Mode, CTs) ................................................................................................................ 118
Figure 51: 71M6533/71M6533G/71M6533H 100-Pin LQFP Package Outline ....................................... 119
Figure 52: 71M6534/6534H 120-Pin LQFP Package Outline ................................................................ 120
Figure 53: Pinout for 71M6533/71M6533G/71M6533H LQFP-100 Package ......................................... 121
Figure 54: Pinout for 71M6534/71M6534H LQFP-120 Package ........................................................... 122
Rev 2
5
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Tables
Table 1: Signals Selected for the ADC with SLOTn_SEL and SLOTn_ALTSEL (MUX_DIV[3:0] = 7) ........... 11
Table 2: ADC Resolution ....................................................................................................................... 11
Table 3: ADC RAM Locations ................................................................................................................ 12
Table 4: XRAM Locations for ADC Results ............................................................................................ 15
Table 5: Inputs Selected in Regular and Alternate Multiplexer Cycles..................................................... 15
Table 6: CKMPU Clock Frequencies ...................................................................................................... 19
Table 7: Memory Map ............................................................................................................................ 20
Table 9: Special Function Register Map ................................................................................................. 21
Table 10: Generic 80515 SFRs - Location and Reset Values ................................................................. 22
Table 11: PSW Bit Functions (SFR 0xD0) ............................................................................................... 23
Table 12: Port Registers ........................................................................................................................ 24
Table 13: Stretch Memory Cycle Width .................................................................................................. 25
Table 14: 71M6533/71M6534 Specific SFRs ......................................................................................... 25
Table 16: UART Modes ......................................................................................................................... 27
Table 18: The S1CON (UART1) Register (SFR 0x9B) ............................................................................. 28
Table 19: PCON Register Bit Description (SFR 0x87) ............................................................................. 28
Table 20: Timers/Counters Mode Description ........................................................................................ 29
Table 21: Allowed Timer/Counter Mode Combinations ........................................................................... 29
Table 22: TMOD Register Bit Description (SFR 0x89) ............................................................................ 29
Table 23: The TCON Register Bit Functions (SFR 0x88) ........................................................................ 30
Table 24: The IEN0 Bit Functions (SFR 0xA8)........................................................................................ 31
Table 25: The IEN1 Bit Functions (SFR 0xB8) ....................................................................................... 31
Table 26: The IEN2 Bit Functions (SFR 0x9A)........................................................................................ 31
Table 27: TCON Bit Functions (SFR 0x88) ............................................................................................. 32
Table 28: The T2CON Bit Functions (SFR 0xC8) ................................................................................... 32
Table 29: The IRCON Bit Functions (SFR 0xC0) .................................................................................... 32
Table 30: External MPU Interrupts ......................................................................................................... 33
Table 31: Interrupt Enable and Flag Bits ................................................................................................ 33
Table 32: Interrupt Priority Level Groups ................................................................................................ 34
Table 33: Interrupt Priority Levels .......................................................................................................... 34
Table 35: Interrupt Polling Sequence ..................................................................................................... 35
Table 36: Interrupt Vectors .................................................................................................................... 35
Table 37: Clock System Summary ......................................................................................................... 37
Table 38: Bank Switching with FL_BANK[2:0] ........................................................................................ 41
Table 39: Data/Direction Registers and Internal Resources for DIO 1-15................................................ 43
Table 40: Data/Direction Registers and Internal Resources for DIO 16-30.............................................. 43
Table 41: Data/Direction Registers and Internal Resources for DIO 36-47.............................................. 44
Table 45: EECTRL Bits for the 3-wire Interface ....................................................................................... 48
Table 46: SPI Registers ......................................................................................................................... 50
Table 47: SPI Command Description ..................................................................................................... 51
Table 49: TMUX[4:0] Selections ............................................................................................................ 54
Table 50: Available Circuit Functions ..................................................................................................... 58
Table 51: VREF Definition for the Regular Accuracy Parts ..................................................................... 70
Table 52: VREF Definition for the High-Accuracy Parts .......................................................................... 70
Table 53: I/O RAM Map – Functional Order ........................................................................................... 79
Table 54: I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical (by Bit Name) ................................................................. 83
Table 55: CE EQU[2:0] Equations and Element Input Mapping .............................................................. 97
Table 56: CE Raw Data Access Locations ............................................................................................. 97
Table 57: CESTATUS (CE RAM 0x80) Bit Definitions .............................................................................. 98
Table 59: Sag Threshold and Gain Adjust Control................................................................................ 100
Table 60: CE Transfer Variables .......................................................................................................... 100
Table 61: CE Energy Measurement Variables...................................................................................... 101
Table 62: Other Transfer Variables ...................................................................................................... 102
Table 63: CE Temperature Registers ................................................................................................... 102
Table 65: CE Parameters for Noise Suppression and Code Version..................................................... 104
Table 66: CE Calibration Parameters ................................................................................................... 104
Table 67: Absolute Maximum Ratings .................................................................................................. 107
6
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Table 68: Recommended External Components .................................................................................. 108
Table 69: Recommended Operating Conditions ................................................................................... 108
Table 70: Input Logic Levels ................................................................................................................ 109
Table 71: Output Logic Levels ............................................................................................................. 109
Table 72: Power-fault Comparator Performance Specifications ............................................................ 109
Table 73: V2 Comparator Performance Specifications ......................................................................... 109
Table 74: Battery Monitor Performance Specifications (BME = 1) ......................................................... 110
Table 75: Supply Current Performance Specifications.......................................................................... 110
Table 76: V3P3D Switch Performance Specifications........................................................................... 110
Table 77: 2.5 V Voltage Regulator Performance Specifications ............................................................ 111
Table 78: Low-Power Voltage Regulator Performance Specifications ................................................... 111
Table 79: Crystal Oscillator Performance Specifications....................................................................... 111
Table 80: Optical Interface Performance Specifications........................................................................ 111
Table 81: LCD DAC Performance Specifications.................................................................................. 112
Table 82: LCD Driver Performance Specifications................................................................................ 112
Table 83: Temperature Sensor Performance Specifications ................................................................. 113
Table 84: VREF Performance Specifications........................................................................................ 114
Table 85: ADC Converter Performance Specifications ......................................................................... 115
Table 86: Flash Memory Timing Specifications .................................................................................... 116
Table 87: EEPROM Interface Timing ................................................................................................... 116
Table 88: RESET Timing ..................................................................................................................... 116
Table 89: RTC Range for Date ............................................................................................................ 116
Table 90: SPI Slave Port (MISSION Mode) Timing............................................................................... 117
Table 91: Power and Ground Pins ....................................................................................................... 123
Table 92: Analog Pins.......................................................................................................................... 123
Table 93: Digital Pins........................................................................................................................... 124
Rev 2
7
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
VREF
V3P3A
V3P3SYS
∆Σ ADC
CONVERTER
VBIAS
FIR
VADC
MUX
22
VREF
VREF
VBAT
PLS_INV
PLS_INTERVAL
PLS_MAXWIDTH
CE_LCTN
EQU
PRE_SAMPS
SUM_CYCLES
RTM_0...3
RTM_E
CE_E
CE_PROG
16
TEMP
2.5V_NV
OSC
(32 kHz)
XIN
XOUT
RTCLK (32KHz)
MCK
PLL
MPU_DIV
CKOUT_E
V3P3D
CE
VBIAS
CK_CE
FLASH
128 KB/
256 KB
RTM
VBAT
to TMUX
VOLT
REG
RPULSE
WPULSE
LCD_ONLY
SLEEP
XPULSE
YPULSE
YPULSE
XPULSE
WPULSE
RPULSE
IAP
IAN
VA
IBP
IBN
VB
ICP
ICN
VC
IDP
IDN
GNDA GNDD
CE_DATA
32
V2P5
2.5V to logic
2.5V_NV
XRAM
4 KB
DIO_PV
DIO_PW
DIO_PX
DIO_PY
CK_MPU
RTCA_ADJ
CKTEST
RTC
2.5V_NV
TEST
MULTIPURPOSE
I/O
RST_SUBSEC
QREG,PREG
RTC_DAY
RTC_DATE
RTC_HR
RTC_MIN RTC_MO
RTC_SEC RTC_YR
TX
LCD DISPLAY
DRIVER
TEST
MODE
LCD_DAC
LCD_MODE
LCD_CLK
LCD_E
LCD_BLKMAP
LCD_SEG
LCD_Y
DIGITAL I/O
UART1
XRAM BUS
8
PB
3
4
5
3
MPU
RX
CKOUT_E
PB
DIO_DIR
DIO_R
DIO
SPI SLAVE
EEPROM I/F
EEDATA
EECTRL
4
4
4
2
Segments
5
9
DIO_1..24
24
PCSZ
PCLK
PSDI
PSDO
PCMD
8
COM0..3
2
SPE
DIO_EEX
UART2/OPTICAL
OPT_RXDIS
OPT_RXINV
OPT_TXE
OPT_TXINV
OPT_TXMOD
OPT_FDC
VBIAS*
V3*
+
V3_OK*
V2*
+
NV RAM
GP0-GP7
V2_OK*
-
EMULATOR
IRAM BUS
8
V1
POWER FAULT
ICE_E
OPT_TXE
4
7
2.5V_NV
E_RXTX
E_TCLK
E_RSTZ
ICE_E
IRAM
256B
FAULTZ
OPT_TX
OPT_RX
DIO52/SEG72*...DIO55/SEG75*
DIO47/SEG67...DIO51/SEG71
DIO46/SEG66*
DIO43/SEG63...DIO45/SEG65
DIO42/SEG62*
COM3..0
DIO41/SEG61
DIO36/SEG56*...DIO39/SEG59*
DIO29/SEG49...DIO30/SEG50
DIO28/SEG48*
DIO23/SEG43...DIO27/SEG47
DIO22/SEG42*
DIO13/SEG33...DIO21/SEG41
DIO12/SEG32*
DIO10/SEG30...DIO11/SEG31
DIO9/SEG29/YPULSE
DIO8/SEG28/XPULSE
DIO7/SEG27/RPULSE
DIO6/SEG26/WPULSE
DIO5/SEG25/SDATA
DIO4/SEG24/SDCK
DIO3
DIO2/OPT_TX
DIO1/OPT_RX
SDATA
SCLK
DIO56...DIO58
3
TEST
MUX
SEG20...SEG23
SEG19/CKTEST
SEG12 ...SEG18
SEG11/E_RST
SEG10/E_TCLK
SEG9/E_RXTX
SEG8
SEG7/MUX_SYNC
SEG6/PSDI
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG4/PSDO
SEG3/PCLK
SEG0...SEG2
TMUXOUT
TMUX[4:0]
* 71M6534 only
RESET
ICE_E
5/24/2010
Figure 1: IC Functional Block Diagram
8
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
1 Hardware Description
1.1
Hardware Overview
The Teridian 71M6533 and 71M6534 single-chip energy meter integrate all primary functional blocks
required to implement a solid-state electricity meter. Included on the chip are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
An analog front end (AFE)
An Independent digital computation engine (CE)
An 8051-compatible microprocessor (MPU) which executes one instruction per clock cycle (80515)
A voltage reference
A temperature sensor
LCD drivers
RAM and Flash memory
A real time clock (RTC)
A variety of I/O pins
Various current sensor technologies are supported including Current Transformers (CT), Resistive Shunts
and Rogowski coils.
In a typical application, the 32-bit compute engine (CE) of the 71M6533/71M6534 sequentially processes
the samples from the voltage inputs on analog input pins and performs calculations to measure active
2
2
energy (Wh) and reactive energy (VARh), as well as A h, and V h for four-quadrant metering. These
measurements are then accessed by the MPU, processed further and output using the peripheral devices
available to the MPU.
In addition to advanced measurement functions, the real time clock function allows the 71M6533/71M6534
to record time of use (TOU) metering information for multi-rate applications and to time-stamp tamper
events. Measurements can be displayed on 3.3 V LCDs commonly used in low-temperature environments.
Flexible mapping of LCD display segments facilitate integration of existing custom LCDs. Design trade-offs
between the number of LCD segments and DIO pins can be implemented in software to accommodate
various requirements.
In addition to the temperature-trimmed ultra-precision voltage reference, the on-chip digital temperature
compensation mechanism includes a temperature sensor and associated controls for correction of unwanted
temperature effects on measurement and RTC accuracy, e.g. to meet the requirements of ANSI and IEC
standards. Temperature dependent external components such as a crystal oscillator, current transformers
(CTs) and their corresponding signal conditioning circuits can be characterized and their correction factors
can be programmed to produce electricity meters with exceptional accuracy over the industrial temperature
range.
One of the two internal UARTs is adapted to support an Infrared LED with internal drive and sense
configuration and can also function as a standard UART. The optical output can be modulated at 38 kHz.
This flexibility makes it possible to implement AMR meters with an IR interface. A block diagram of the IC
is shown in Figure 1.
1.2
Analog Front End (AFE)
The AFE of the 71M6533/71M6534 consists of an input multiplexer, a delta-sigma A/D converter and a
voltage reference.
1.2.1
Signal Input Pins
All analog signal input pins are sensitive to voltage. The VA, VB, and VC pins are single-ended. Pins
IAP/IAN, IBP/IBN, ICP/ICN, and IDP/IDN can be programmed individually to be differential or single-ended.
The differential signal is applied between the InP and InN input pins. Single-ended signals are applied to
the InP input while the common signal, return, is the V3P3A pin. When using the differential mode, inputs
can be chopped, i.e., a connection from V3P3A to InP or InN alternates in each multiplexer cycle.
Rev 2
9
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
1.2.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
Input Multiplexer
The input multiplexer applies the input signals from the pins IAP/IAN, VA, IBP/IBN, VB, ICP/ICN, VC, and
IDP/IDN to the input of the ADC. Additionally, using the alternate multiplexer selection, it has the ability to
select temperature and the battery voltage. One input is applied per time slot.
The multiplexer can implement from one to 10 time slots (states) per frame as controlled by the I/O RAM
field MUX_DIV[3:0]. The multiplexer always starts at state 1 and proceeds until as many states as defined
by MUX_DIV[3:0] have been converted.
The multiplexer can be operated in two modes:
•
•
During a normal multiplexer cycle (MUX_ALT = 0), the signals selected in the I/O RAM SLOTn_SEL[3:0]
fields are processed. These are typically the signals from the IA, IB, IC, ID and VA, VB, and VC pins.
During the alternate multiplexer cycle (MUX_ALT = 1), the signals selected in the SLOTn_SEL[3:0] fields
are processed. These signals typically comprise the temperature signal (TEMP), the battery monitor
(VBAT) and some of the voltage signals such as VA, VB, and VC. To prevent unnecessary drainage on
the battery, the battery monitor is enabled only with the BME bit (IO RAM 0x2020[6]).
The alternate multiplexer cycles are usually performed infrequently (every second or so) by the MPU. In
order to prevent disruption of the voltage tracking mechanism and voltage allpass networks of the CE,
VA, VB, and VC are not replaced in the alternate cycles.
The current inputs can be configured to be used in differential mode, using the pin pairs IAP/IAN,
IBP/IBN, ICP/ICN, and IDP/IDN. The fourth current input is available to support measurement of a fourth
or neutral phase.
In a typical application, IAP/IAN, IBP/IBN, ICP/ICN, and IDP/IDN are connected to current transformers
that sense the current on each phase of the line voltage. VA, VB, and VC are typically connected to the
phase voltages via resistor dividers.
Multiplexer advance, FIR initiation and VREF chopping are controlled by the internal MUX_CTRL signal.
Additionally, MUX_CTRL launches each pass through the CE program. Conceptually, MUX_CTRL is
clocked by CK32, the 32768Hz clock from the PLL block. The behavior of MUX_CTRL is governed by
MUX_ALT, EQU[2:0], CHOP_E[1:0], and MUX_DIV[3:0].
The MUX_ALT bit requests an alternative multiplexer frame. The bit may be asserted on any MPU cycle
and may be subsequently deasserted on any cycle including the next one. A rising edge on MUX_ALT will
cause MUX_CTRL to wait until the next multiplexer frame and implement a single alternate multiplexer frame.
The inputs converted during normal and alternate frames are selectable using the pointers to signals.
SLOTn_SEL[3:0] selects the input signal for the nth state in a standard multiplexer frame, while
SLOTn_ALTSEL[3:0] selects the input for the nth state in an alternate multiplexer frame. For example, if
SLOT0_SEL[3:0] contains 0 and SLOT1_SEL[3:0] contains 1, signal selection 0, equivalent to IA (see Table 1),
will be applied for the first time slot, while signal 1, equivalent to VA, will be applied for the second time
slot. See Table 1 for a typical assignment of values for the SLOTn_SEL[3:0] and SLOTn_ALTSEL[3:0]
registers assuming seven time slots (MUX_DIV[3:0] = 7) for the processing of three voltage and current
phases plus an additional neutral current.
The correlation between signal numbers, CE memory addresses, and analog signals is given in Table 3.
For the processing of three voltage and current phases in a typical polyphase meter without neutral
measurement, MUX_DIV[3:0] is set to 6, and SLOT6_SEL[3:0] as well as SLOT6_ALTSEL[3:0] would be
empty.
10
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Table 1: Signals Selected for the ADC with SLOTn_SEL and SLOTn_ALTSEL (MUX_DIV[3:0] = 7)
Regular Slot
Time
Slot
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Alternate Slot
Typical Selections
Register
SLOT0_SEL[3:0]
SLOT1_SEL[3:0]
SLOT2_SEL[3:0]
SLOT3_SEL[3:0]
SLOT4_SEL[3:0]
SLOT5_SEL[3:0]
SLOT6_SEL[3:0]
SLOT7_SEL[3:0]
SLOT8_SEL[3:0]
SLOT9_SEL[3:0]
Signal
Number
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
–
–
–
Signal for
ADC
IA
VA
IB
VB
IC
VC
ID
–
–
–
Register
SLOT0_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT1_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT2_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT3_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT4_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT5_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT6_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT7_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT8_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT9_ALTSEL[3:0]
Typical Selections
Signal
Number
A
1
B
3
4
5
6
Signal for
ADC
TEMP
VA
VBAT
VB
IC
VC
ID
The duration of each multiplexer state depends on the number of ADC samples processed by the FIR,
which is set by FIR_LEN[1:0]. Each multiplexer state will start on the rising edge of CK32. FIR conversions
require 1, 2, or 3 CK32 cycles. The number of CK32 cycles is determined by FIR_LEN[1:0].
1.2.3
A/D Converter (ADC)
A single delta-sigma A/D converter digitizes the voltage and current inputs to the 71M6533/71M6534. The
resolution of the ADC is programmable using the I/O RAM bits M40MHZ and M26MHZ (see Table 2). The
CE code must be tailored for use with the selected ADC resolution.
Table 2: ADC Resolution
Setting for [M40MHZ,
M26MHZ]
[00], [10] or [11]
[01]
FIR_LEN[1:0]
FIR CE
Cycles
Resolution
0
1
2
0
1
2
138
288
384
186
384
588
18 bits
21 bits
22 bits
19 bits
22 bits
24 bits
Initiation of each ADC conversion is controlled by MUX_CTRL as described in Section 1.1.1. At the end of
each ADC conversion, the FIR filter output data is stored into the CE RAM location determined by the MUX
selection.
1.2.4
FIR Filter
The finite impulse response filter is an integral part of the ADC and it is optimized for use with the multiplexer.
The purpose of the FIR filter is to decimate the ADC output to the desired resolution. At the end of each
ADC conversion, the output data is stored into the fixed CE RAM location determined by the multiplexer
selection as shown in Table 3. FIR data is stored LSB justified, but shifted left by eight bits.
Rev 2
11
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Table 3: ADC RAM Locations
Signal Number
Address
(HEX)
Name
Signal Number
0
1
2
3
4
0x00
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
IA
VA
IB
VB
IC
5
6
0x0A
0x0B
1.2.5
Address
(HEX)
0x05
0x06
0x0A
0x0B
Name
VC
ID
TEMP
VBAT
Voltage References
The device includes an on-chip precision bandgap voltage reference that incorporates auto-zero techniques.
The reference is trimmed in production to minimize errors caused by component mismatch and drift. The
result is a voltage output with a predictable temperature coefficient.
The amplifier within the reference is chopper stabilized, i.e. the polarity can be switched by the MPU using
CHOP_E[1:0] (I/O RAM 0x2002[5:4]). The CHOP_E[1:0] field enables the MPU to operate the chopper
circuit in regular or inverted operation, or in toggling mode. When the chopper circuit is toggled in between
multiplexer cycles, DC offsets on the measured signals will automatically be averaged out.
The general topology of a chopped amplifier is shown in Figure 2.
A
Vinp
B
A
Vinn
A
+
G
-
B
B
A
B
Voutp
Voutn
CROSS
Figure 2: General Topology of a Chopped Amplifier
It is assumed that an offset voltage Voff appears at the positive amplifier input. With all switches, as
controlled by CROSS, in the A position, the output voltage is:
Voutp – Voutn = G (Vinp + Voff – Vinn) = G (Vinp – Vinn) + G Voff
With all switches set to the B position by applying the inverted CROSS signal, the output voltage is:
Voutn – Voutp = G (Vinn – Vinp + Voff) = G (Vinn – Vinp) + G Voff, or
Voutp – Voutn = G (Vinp – Vinn) - G Voff
Thus, when CROSS is toggled, e.g. after each multiplexer cycle, the offset will alternately appear on the
output as positive and negative, which results in the offset effectively being eliminated, regardless of its
polarity or magnitude.
When CROSS is high, the connection of the amplifier input devices is reversed. This preserves the overall
polarity of that amplifier gain; it inverts its input offset. By alternately reversing the connection, the
amplifier’s offset is averaged to zero. This removes the most significant long-term drift mechanism in the
voltage reference. The CHOP_E[1:0] field controls the behavior of CROSS. The CROSS signal will reverse
the amplifier connection in the voltage reference in order to negate the effects of its offset. On the first
CK32 rising edge after the last multiplexer state of its sequence, the multiplexer will wait one additional
CK32 cycle before beginning a new frame. At the beginning of this cycle, the value of CROSS will be
updated according to the CHOP_E[1:0] field. The extra CK32 cycle allows time for the chopped VREF to
settle. During this cycle, MUXSYNC is held high. The leading edge of MUXSYNC initiates a pass through
the CE program sequence. The beginning of the sequence is the serial readout of the four RTM words.
12
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
CHOP_E[1:0] has four states: positive, reverse, and two toggle states. In the positive state, CHOP_E[1:0]
= 01, CROSS and CHOP_CLK are held low. In the reverse state, CHOP_E[1:0] = 10, CROSS and
CHOP_CLK are held high. In the first toggle state, CHOP_E [1:0] = 00, CROSS is automatically toggled
near the end of each multiplexer frame and an ALT frame is forced during the last multiplexer frame in each
SUM cycle. It is desirable that CROSS take on alternate values during each ALT frame. For this reason,
if CHOP_E[1:0] = 00, CROSS will not toggle at the end of the multiplexer frame immediately preceding the
ALT frame in each accumulation interval.
Accumulation interval n
1
2
3
4
Multiplexer frames
Accumulation interval n+1
2519 2520 1
Alternative MUX cycle
CROSS
2
3
4
Multiplexer frames
2519 2520
Alternative MUX cycle
CROSS
Figure 3: CROSS Signal with CHOP_E[1:0] = 00
Figure 3 shows CROSS over two accumulation intervals when CHOP_E[1:0] = 00. At the end of the
first interval, CROSS is low, at the end of the second interval, CROSS is high. The offset error for
the two temperature measurements taken during the ALT multiplexer frames will be averaged to zero.
Note that the number of multiplexer frames in an accumulation interval is always even. Operation
with CHOP_E[1:0] = 00 does not require control of the chopping mechanism by the MPU while eliminating
the offset for temperature measurement.
In the second toggle state, CHOP_E[1:0] = 11, no ALT frame is forced during the last multiplexer cycle in
an accumulation interval, and CROSS always toggles near the end of each multiplexer frame.
The internal bias voltage, VBIAS (typically 1.6 V), is used by the ADC as a reference when measuring the
temperature and battery monitor signals.
1.2.6
Temperature Sensor
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 include an on-chip temperature sensor implemented as a bandgap reference.
It is used to determine the die temperature. The MPU may request an alternate multiplexer cycle containing
the temperature sensor output by asserting MUX_ALT.
The primary use of the temperature data is to determine the magnitude of compensation required to offset
the thermal drift in the system (see Section 3.5 Temperature Compensation).
1.2.7
Battery Monitor
The battery voltage is measured by the ADC during alternative multiplexer frames if the BME (Battery
Measure Enable) bit in the I/O RAM is set. While BME is set, an on-chip 45 kΩ load resistor is applied to
the battery and a scaled fraction of the battery voltage is applied to the ADC input. After each alternative
MUX frame, the result of the ADC conversion is available at XRAM address 0x0B. BME is ignored and
assumed zero when system power is not available (V1 < VBIAS). See Section 6.4.5 for details regarding
the ADC LSB size and the conversion accuracy.
1.2.8
AFE Functional Description
The AFE functions as a data acquisition system, controlled by the MPU. The main signals (IA, VA, IB,
VB, etc.) are sampled and the ADC counts obtained are stored in XRAM where they can be accessed by
the CE and, if necessary, by the MPU. Alternate multiplexer cycles are initiated less frequently by the
MPU to gather access to the slow temperature and battery signals.
Figure 4 shows the block diagram of the AFE.
Rev 2
13
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
VREF
IAP
IAN
VA
IBP
IBN
VB
ICP
ICN
VC
IDP
IDN
∆Σ ADC
CONVERTER
VBIAS
MUX
FIR
VADC
VREF
EQU
MUX_ALT
MUX_DIV
VBIAS
VREF_CAL
VREF_DIS
FIR_LEN
22
VB_REF
ADC_E
VREF
VBAT
TEMP
Figure 4: AFE Block Diagram
1.3
Digital Computation Engine (CE)
The CE, a dedicated 32-bit signal processor, performs the precision computations necessary to accurately
measure energy. The CE calculations and processes include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Multiplication of each current sample with its associated voltage sample to obtain the energy per
sample (when multiplied with the constant sample time).
Frequency-insensitive delay cancellation on all six channels (to compensate for the delay between
samples caused by the multiplexing scheme).
90° phase shifter (for VAR calculations).
Pulse generation.
Monitoring of the input signal frequency (for frequency and phase information).
Monitoring of the input signal amplitude (for sag detection).
Scaling of the processed samples based on calibration coefficients. Scaling of all samples based on
temperature compensation information.
The CE program resides in flash memory. Common access to flash memory by the CE and MPU is controlled
by a memory share circuit. Each CE instruction word is two bytes long. Allocated flash space for the CE
program cannot exceed 4096 16-bit words (8 KB). The CE program counter begins a pass through the
CE code each time multiplexer state 0 begins. The code pass ends when a HALT instruction is executed.
For proper operation, the code pass must be completed before the multiplexer cycle ends (see Section
2.2 System Timing Summary).
The CE program must begin on a 1-KB boundary of the flash address. The I/O RAM register CE_LCTN[7:0]
defines which 1-KB boundary contains the CE code. Thus, the first CE instruction is located at
1024*CE_LCTN[7:0].
The CE can access up to 4 KB of data RAM (XRAM), or 1024 32-bit data words, starting at RAM address
0x0000.
The XRAM can be accessed by the FIR filter block, the RTM circuit, the CE, and the MPU. Assigned time
slots are reserved for FIR and MPU, respectively, to prevent bus contention for XRAM data access.
The MPU can read and write the XRAM shared between the CE and MPU as the primary means of data
communication between the two processors.
Table 4 shows the CE addresses in XRAM allocated to analog inputs from the AFE.
14
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Table 4: XRAM Locations for ADC Results
Address (HEX)
Name
Description
0x00
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
0x05
0x06
0x07 – 0x09
0x0A
0x0B
IA
VA
IB
VB
IC
VC
ID
–
TEMP
VBAT
Phase A current
Phase A voltage
Phase B current
Phase B voltage
Phase C current
Phase C voltage
Neutral current
Not used
Temperature
Battery Voltage
The CE is aided by support hardware to facilitate implementation of equations, pulse counters, and
accumulators. This hardware is controlled through I/O RAM locations EQU[2:0] (equation assist), the
DIO_PV and DIO_PW (pulse count assist) bits, and PRE_SAMPS[1:0] and SUM_CYCLES[5:0] (accumulation
assist).
PRE_SAMPS[1:0] and SUM_CYCLES[5:0] support a dual-level accumulation scheme where the first
accumulator accumulates results from PRE_SAMPS[1:0] samples and the second accumulator accumulates
up to SUM_CYCLES[5:0] of the first accumulator results. The integration time for each energy output is
PRE_SAMPS[1:0] * SUM_CYCLES[5:0] / 2520.6 (with MUX_DIV[3:0] = 6). CE hardware issues the
XFER_BUSY interrupt when the accumulation is complete.
1.3.1
Meter Equations
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 provide hardware assistance to the CE in order to support various meter
equations. This assistance is controlled through the I/O RAM field EQU[2:0] (equation assist). The
Compute Engine (CE) firmware for industrial configurations can implement the equations listed in Table 5.
EQU[2:0] specifies the equation to be used based on the meter configuration and on the number of phases
used for metering.
Table 5: Inputs Selected in Regular and Alternate Multiplexer Cycles
EQU[2:0]
0
1
2
3
4
5
Description
1 element, 2 W,
1φ with neutral
current sense
Wh and VARh formula
Element
0
Element
1
Element
2
VA ∙ IA
VA ∙ IB
N/A
N/A
1 element, 3 W, 1φ VA(IA-IB)/2
2 element, 3 W,
VA ∙ IA
VB ∙ IB
3φ Delta
2 element, 4 W,
VA(IA-IB)/2
N/A
3φ Delta
2 element, 4 W,
VA(IA-IB)/2 VB(IC-IB)/2
3φ Wye
3 element, 4 W,
VA ∙ IA
VB ∙ IB
3φ Wye
Mux
Sequence
ALT Mux
Sequence
N/A
N/A
VC ∙IC
Sequence is
Sequence is
programmable
programmable with
with
SLOTn_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOTn_SEL[3:0]
N/A
VC ∙ IC
Not all CE codes support all equations.
Rev 2
15
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
1.3.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
Real-Time Monitor
The CE contains a Real-Time Monitor (RTM), which can be programmed to monitor four selectable XRAM
locations at full sample rate. The four monitored locations are serially output to the TMUXOUT pin via the
digital output multiplexer at the beginning of each CE code pass. The RTM can be enabled and disabled
with the RTM_E bit. The RTM output is clocked by CKTEST (pin SEG19/CKTEST), with the clock output
enabled by setting CKOUT_E = 1. Each RTM word is clocked out in 35 cycles and contains a leading flag
bit. See Figure 20 for the RTM output format. RTM is low when not in use.
1.3.3
Pulse Generators
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 provide four pulse generators, RPULSE, WPULSE, XPULSE and YPULSE,
as well as hardware support for the RPULSE and WPULSE pulse generators. The pulse generators can
be used to output CE status indicators, SAG for example, to DIO pins.
The polarity of the pulses may be inverted with PLS_INV bit. When this bit is set, the pulses are active
high, rather than the more usual active low. PLS_INV inverts all the pulse outputs.
XPULSE and YPULSE
Pulses generated by the CE may be exported to the XPULSE and YPULSE pulse outputs. Pins DIO8
and DIO9 are used for these pulses. Generally, the XPULSE and YPULSE outputs are updated once on
each pass of the CE code, resulting in a pulse frequency up to a maximum of 1260Hz (assuming a MUX
frame is 13 CK32 cycles).
Standard CE code permits the selection of either an energy indication or signaling of a sag event for the
YPULSE output. This method is faster than checking the sag bits by the MPU at every CE_BUSY interrupt.
See Section 5.3 CE Interface Description for details.
RPULSE and WPULSE
During each CE code pass, the hardware stores exported WPULSE and RPULSE sign bits in an 8-bit
FIFO and outputs them at a specified interval. This permits the CE code to calculate the RPULSE and
WPULSE outputs at the beginning of its code pass and to rely on hardware to spread them over the MUX
frame. The FIFO is reset at the beginning of each MUX frame. The PLS_INTERVAL register controls the
delay to the first pulse update and the interval between subsequent updates. The LSB of this register is
equivalent to 4 CK_FIR cycles. If zero, the FIFO is deactivated and the pulse outputs are updated
immediately. Thus, NINTERVAL is 4 * PLS_INTERVAL.
Since the FIFO resets at the beginning of each MUX frame, the user must specify PLS_INTERVAL so that
all of the pulse updates are output before the MUX frame completes. For instance, if the CE code outputs
6 updates per MUX interval, and if the MUX interval is 1950 cycles long, the ideal value for the interval is
1950/6/4 = 81.25. If PLS_INTERVAL = 82, the fifth output will occur too late and be lost. In this case, the
proper value for PLS_INTERVAL is 81.
Hardware also provides a maximum pulse width feature. The PLS_MAXWIDTH register selects a maximum
negative pulse width to be Nmax updates according to the formula: Nmax = (2 * PLS_MAXWIDTH + 1). If
PLS_MAXWIDTH = 255, no width checking is performed.
The WPULSE and RPULSE pulse generator outputs are available on DIO6 and DIO7, respectively. They
can also be output on OPT_TX (see OPT_TXE[1:0] for details).
1.3.4
Data RAM (XRAM)
The CE and MPU use a single general-purpose Data RAM (also referred to as XRAM). The Data RAM is
1024 32-bit words, shared between the CE and the MPU using a time-multiplex method. This reduces
MPU wait states when accessing CE data. When the MPU and CE are clocking at maximum frequency
(10 MHz), the DRAM will make up to four accesses during each 100 ns interval. These consist of two
MPU accesses, one CE access and one SPI access.
16
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The Data RAM is 32 bits wide and uses an external multiplexer so as to appear byte-wide to the MPU.
The Data RAM hardware will convert an MPU byte write operation into a read-modify-write operation that
requires two Data RAM accesses. The second access is guaranteed to be available because the MPU
cannot access the XRAM on two consecutive instructions unless it is using the same address.
In addition to the reduction of wait states, this arrangement permits the MPU to easily use unneeded CE
data memory. Likewise, the amount of memory the CE uses is not limited by the size of a dedicated CE
data RAM.
1.3.5
CE Functional Overview
The ADC processes one sample per channel per multiplexer cycle. Figure 5 shows the timing of the
samples taken during one multiplexer cycle (phases A, B, and C being processed). During an ALT
multiplexer sequence, missing samples are filled in by the CE.
The number of samples processed during one accumulation cycle is controlled by PRE_SAMPS[1:0] (I/O
RAM 0x2001[7:6]) and SUM_CYCLES[5:0] (I/O RAM 0x2001[5:0]). The integration time for each energy
output is:
PRE_SAMPS[1:0] * SUM_CYCLES[5:0] / 2520.6, where 2520.6 is the sample rate in Hz
For example, PRE_SAMPS[1:0] = 42 and SUM_CYCLES[5:0] = 50 will establish 2100 samples per accumulation
cycle. PRE_SAMPS[1:0] = 100 and SUM_CYCLES[5:0] = 21 will result in the exact same accumulation
cycle of 2100 samples or 833 ms. After an accumulation cycle is completed, the XFER_BUSY interrupt
signals to the MPU that accumulated data are available.
1/2520.6Hz = 397µs
B
IB
2/32768Hz =
61.04µs
VB
A
IC
VC
IA
VA
C
13/32768Hz = 397µs
per mux cycle
Figure 5: Samples from Multiplexer Cycle
The end of each multiplexer cycle is signaled to the MPU by the CE_BUSY interrupt. At the end of each
multiplexer cycle, status information, such as sag data and the digitized input signal, is available to the MPU.
Rev 2
17
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
833ms
20ms
XFER_BUSY
Interrupt to MPU
Figure 6: Accumulation Interval
Figure 6 shows the accumulation interval resulting from PRE_SAMPS[1:0] = 42 and SUM_CYCLES[5:0] = 50,
consisting of 2100 samples of 397µs each, followed by the XFER_BUSY interrupt. The sampling in this
example is applied to a 50 Hz signal.
There is no correlation between the line signal frequency and the choice of PRE_SAMPS[1:0] or
SUM_CYCLES[5:0] (even though when SUM_CYCLES[5:0] = 42, one set of SUM_CYCLES happens to
sample a period of 16.6 ms). Furthermore, sampling does not have to start when the line voltage crosses
the zero line, and the length of the accumulation interval need not be an integer multiple of the signal cycles.
1.3.6
Delay Compensation
When measuring the energy of a phase (i.e., Wh and VARh) in a service, the voltage and current for that
phase must be sampled at the same instant. Otherwise, the phase difference, Ф, introduces errors.
φ=
t delay
T
⋅ 360 o = t delay ⋅ f ⋅ 360 o
Where f is the frequency of the input signal and tdelay is the sampling delay between voltage and current.
In traditional meter ICs, sampling is accomplished by using two A/D converters per phase (one for voltage
and the other one for current) controlled to sample simultaneously. Our Single Converter Technology,
however, exploits the 32-bit signal processing capability of its CE to implement “constant delay” all-pass
filters. These all-pass filters correct for the conversion time difference between the voltage and the
corresponding current samples that are obtained with a single multiplexed A/D converter.
The “constant delay” all-pass filters provide a broad-band delay β that is precisely matched to the difference in sample time between the voltage and the current of a given phase. This digital filter does not
affect the amplitude of the signal, but provides a precisely controlled phase response. The delay
compensation implemented in the CE aligns the voltage samples with their corresponding current
samples by routing the voltage samples through the all-pass filter, thus delaying the voltage samples by
β, resulting in the residual phase error β – Ф. The residual phase error is negligible, and is typically less
than ±1.5 millidegrees at 100Hz, thus it does not contribute to errors in the energy measurements.
18
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
1.4
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
80515 MPU Core
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 include an 80515 MPU (8-bit, 8051-compatible) that processes most instructions
in one clock cycle. Using a 10 MHz clock results in a processing throughput of 10 MIPS. The 80515
architecture eliminates redundant bus states and implements parallel execution of fetch and execution
phases. Normally, a machine cycle is aligned with a memory fetch, therefore, most of the 1-byte instructions
are performed in a single machine cycle (MPU clock cycle). This leads to an 8x average performance
improvement (in terms of MIPS) over the Intel 8051 device running at the same clock frequency.
Table 6 shows the CKMPU frequency as a function of the allowed combinations of the MPU clock divider
MPU_DIV[2:0] and the MCK divider bits M40MHZ and M26MHZ. Actual processor clocking speed can be
adjusted to the total processing demand of the application (metering calculations, AMR management, memory
management, LCD driver management and I/O management) using the I/O RAM field MPU_DIV[2:0] and
the MCK divider bits M40MHZ and M26MHZ, as shown in Table 6.
Table 6: CKMPU Clock Frequencies
MPU_DIV [2:0]
000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ] Values
[1,0]
[0,1]
[0,0]
9.8304 MHz
4.9152 MHz
2.4576MHz
1.2288 MHz
614.4 kHz
307.2 kHz
153.6 kHz
153.6 kHz
6.5536 MHz
3.2768 MHz
1.6384 MHz
819.2 kHz
409.6 kHz
204.8 kHz
102.4 kHz
102.4 kHz
4.9152 MHz
2.4576 MHz
1.2288 MHz
614.4 kHz
307.2 kHz
153.6 kHz
76.8 kHz
76.8 kHz
Typical measurement and metering functions based on the results provided by the internal 32-bit compute
engine (CE) are available for the MPU as part of Maxim’s Teridian standard library, which provides
demonstration source code to help reduce the design cycle.
1.4.1
Memory Organization and Addressing
The 80515 MPU core incorporates the Harvard architecture with separate code and data spaces. Memory
organization in the 80515 is similar to that of the industry standard 8051. There are four memory areas:
Program memory (Flash, shared by MPU and CE), external RAM (Data RAM, shared by the CE and MPU,
Configuration or I/O RAM) and internal data memory (Internal RAM). Table 7 shows the memory map.
Program Memory
The 80515 can address up to 64 KB of program memory space from 0x0000 to 0xFFFF. Program memory
is read when the MPU fetches instructions or performs a MOVC operation. Access to program memory
above 0x7FFF is controlled by the FL_BANK[2:0] SFR register (SFR 0xB6).
After reset, the MPU starts program execution from program memory location 0x0000. The lower part of
the program memory includes reset and interrupt vectors. The interrupt vectors are spaced at 8-byte
intervals, starting from 0x0003.
MPU External Data Memory (XRAM)
Both internal and external memory is physically located on the 71M6533/71M6534 device. The external
memory referred to in this documentation is only external to the 80515 MPU core.
4 KB of RAM starting at address 0x0000 is shared by the CE and MPU. The CE normally uses the first
1 KB, leaving 3 KB for the MPU. Different versions of the CE code use varying amounts. Consult the
documentation for the specific code version being used for the exact limit.
Rev 2
19
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
If the MPU overwrites the CE’s working RAM, the CE’s output may be corrupted. If the CE is
disabled, the first 0x40 bytes of RAM are still unusable while MUX_DIV[3:0] ≠ 0 because the
71M6533/71M6534 ADC writes to these locations. Setting MUX_DIV[3:0] = 0 disables the ADC
output, preventing the CE from writing the first 0x40 bytes of RAM.
The 80515 writes into external data memory when the MPU executes a MOVX @Ri,A or MOVX
@DPTR,A instruction. The MPU reads external data memory by executing a MOVX A,@Ri or MOVX
A,@DPTR instruction (SFR PDATA provides the upper 8 bytes for the MOVX A,@Ri instruction).
Internal and External Memory Map
Table 7 shows the address, type, use and size of the various memory components.
Only the memory ranges shown in Table 7 contain physical memory.
Table 7: Memory Map
†
Address
(hex)
Memory
Technology
Memory
Type
Name
Typical Usage
Memory Size
(bytes)
00000-1FFFF
Flash Memory
Nonvolatile
Program memory
MPU Program and
non-volatile data
128 KB
00000-3FFFF†
Flash Memory
Nonvolatile
Program memory
MPU Program and
non-volatile data
256 KB†
on 1K
boundary
Flash Memory
Nonvolatile
Program memory
CE program
8 KB max.
0000-0FFF
Static RAM
Volatile
External RAM
(XRAM)
Shared by CE and
MPU
4 KB
2000-20BF,
20C8-20FF
Static RAM
Volatile
Configuration RAM
(I/O RAM)
Hardware control
256
20C0-20C7
Static RAM
Nonvolatile
(battery)
Configuration RAM
(I/O RAM)
Battery-buffered
memory
8
0000-00FF
Static RAM
Volatile
Internal RAM
Part of 80515 Core
256
For the 71M6534 only.
MOVX Addressing
There are two types of instructions differing in whether they provide an 8-bit or 16-bit indirect address to
the external data RAM.
In the first type, MOVX A,@Ri, the contents of R0 or R1 in the current register bank provide the eight
lower-ordered bits of address. The eight high-ordered bits of the address are specified with the PDATA
SFR. This method allows the user paged access (256 pages of 256 bytes each) to all ranges of the
external data RAM.
In the second type of MOVX instruction, MOVX A,@DPTR, the data pointer generates a 16-bit address.
This form is faster and more efficient when accessing very large data arrays (up to 64 KB), since no
additional instructions are needed to set up the eight high ordered bits of the address.
It is possible to mix the two MOVX types. This provides the user with four separate data pointers, two
with direct access and two with paged access, to the entire 64 KB of external memory range.
Dual Data Pointer
The Dual Data Pointer accelerates the block moves of data. The standard DPTR is a 16-bit register that
is used to address external memory or peripherals. In the 80515 core, the standard data pointer is called
DPTR, the second data pointer is called DPTR1. The data pointer select bit, located in the LSB of the DPS
register (DPS[0]), chooses the active pointer. DPTR is selected when DPS[0] = 0 and DPTR1 is selected
when DPS[0] = 1.
20
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The user switches between pointers by toggling the LSB of the DPS register. The values in the data pointers
are not affected by the LSB of the DPS register. All DPTR related instructions use the currently selected
DPTR for any activity.
The second data pointer may not be supported by certain compilers.
DPTR1 is useful for copy routines, where it can make the inner loop of the routine two instructions
faster compared to the reloading of DPTR from registers. Any interrupt routine using DPTR1 must save
and restore DPS, DPTR and DPTR1, which increases stack usage and slows down interrupt latency.
By selecting the Evatronics R80515 core in the Keil compiler project settings and by using the compiler
directive “MODC2”, dual data pointers are enabled in certain library routines.
An alternative data pointer is available in the form of the PDATA register (SFR 0xBF, sometimes referred
to as USR2). It defines the high byte of a 16-bit address when reading or writing XDATA with the instruction
MOVX A,@Ri or MOVX @Ri,A.
Internal Data Memory Map and Access
The Internal data memory provides 256 bytes (0x00 to 0xFF) of data memory. The internal data memory
address is always 1 byte wide. Table 8 shows the internal data memory map.
The Special Function Registers (SFR) occupy the upper 128 bytes. The SFR area of internal data memory
is available only by direct addressing. Indirect addressing of this area accesses the upper 128 bytes of
Internal RAM. The lower 128 bytes contain working registers and bit addressable memory. The lower 32
bytes form four banks of eight registers (R0-R7). Two bits on the program memory status word (PSW) select
which bank is in use. The next 16 bytes form a block of bit addressable memory space at addresses
0x00-0x7F. All of the bytes in the lower 128 bytes are accessible through direct or indirect addressing.
Table 8: Internal Data Memory Map
Address Range
0x80
0x30
0x20
0x00
1.4.2
0xFF
0x7F
0x2F
0x1F
Direct Addressing
Indirect Addressing
Special Function Registers (SFRs)
Byte addressable area
Bit addressable area
Register banks R0…R7
RAM
Special Function Registers (SFRs)
A map of the Special Function Registers is shown in Table 9.
Only a few addresses in the SFR memory space are occupied, the others are not implemented. A read
access to unimplemented addresses will return undefined data, while a write access will have no effect.
SFRs specific to the 71M6533/71M6534 are shown in bold print on a gray field. The registers at 0x80,
0x88, 0x90, etc., are bit addressable, all others are byte addressable. See the restrictions for the INTBITS
register in Table 14.
Table 9: Special Function Register Map
Bit
Hex/
Addressable
Bin
X000
F8
INTBITS
F0
B
E8
IFLAGS
E0
A
Rev 2
Byte Addressable
X001
X010
X011
X100
X101
X110
X111
Bin/
Hex
FF
F7
EF
E7
21
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Bit
Hex/
Addressable
Bin
X000
X001
D8
WDCON
D0
PSW
C8
T2CON
C0
IRCON
B8
IEN1
IP1
B0
P3
A8
IEN0
IP0
A0
P2
DIR2
98
S0CON
S0BUF
90
P1
DIR1
88
TCON
TMOD
80
P0
SP
1.4.3
FDS_6533_6534_004
Byte Addressable
X010
X011
S0RELH
FLSHCTL
S0RELL
DIR0
IEN2
DPS
TL0
DPL
X100
X101
X110
S1RELH
S1CON
TL1
DPH
S1BUF
ERASE
TH0
DPL1
X111
FL_BANK
PDATA
PGADR
S1RELL
EEDATA
EECTRL
TH1
DPH1
CKCON
PCON
Bin/
Hex
DF
D7
CF
C7
BF
B7
AF
A7
9F
97
8F
87
Generic 80515 Special Function Registers
Table 10 shows the location, description and reset or power-up value of the generic 80515 SFRs. Additional
descriptions of the registers can be found at the page numbers listed in the table.
Table 10: Generic 80515 SFRs - Location and Reset Values
Name
P0
SP
DPL
DPH
DPL1
DPH1
PCON
TCON
TMOD
TL0
TL1
TH0
TH1
CKCON
P1
DPS
S0CON
S0BUF
IEN2
S1CON
S1BUF
S1RELL
P2
22
Address
(Hex)
0x80
0x81
0x82
0x83
0x84
0x85
0x87
0x88
0x89
0x8A
0x8B
0x8C
0x8D
0x8E
0x90
0x92
0x98
0x99
0x9A
0x9B
0x9C
0x9D
0xA0
Reset value
Description
(Hex)
0xFF
0x07
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x01
0xFF
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0xFF
Port 0
Stack Pointer
Data Pointer Low 0
Data Pointer High 0
Data Pointer Low 1
Data Pointer High 1
UART Speed Control, Idle and Stop mode Control
Timer/Counter Control
Timer Mode Control
Timer 0, low byte
Timer 1, high byte
Timer 0, low byte
Timer 1, high byte
Clock Control (Stretch=1)
Port 1
Data Pointer select Register
Serial Port 0, Control Register
Serial Port 0, Data Buffer
Interrupt Enable Register 2
Serial Port 1, Control Register
Serial Port 1, Data Buffer
Serial Port 1, Reload Register, low byte
Port 2
Page
24
24
24
24
24
24
28
32
29
29
29
29
29
24
24
20
28
26
31
28
26
26
24
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
Name
IEN0
IP0
S0RELL
P3
IEN1
IP1
S0RELH
S1RELH
PDATA
IRCON
T2CON
PSW
WDCON
A
B
Address
(Hex)
0xA8
0xA9
0xAA
0xB0
0xB8
0xB9
0xBA
0xBB
0xBF
0xC0
0xC8
0xD0
0xD8
0xE0
0xF0
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Reset value
Description
(Hex)
0x00
0x00
0xD9
0xFF
0x00
0x00
0x03
0x03
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
0x00
Page
Interrupt Enable Register 0
Interrupt Priority Register 0
Serial Port 0, Reload Register, low byte
Port 3
Interrupt Enable Register 1
Interrupt Priority Register 1
Serial Port 0, Reload Register, high byte
Serial Port 1, Reload Register, high byte
High address byte for [email protected] - also called USR2
Interrupt Request Control Register
Polarity for INT2 and INT3
Program Status Word
Baud Rate Control Register (only WDCON[7] bit used)
Accumulator
B Register
31
34
26
24
31
34
26
26
20
32
32
23
26
23
23
Accumulator (ACC, A, SFR 0xE0):
ACC is the accumulator register. Most instructions use the accumulator to hold the operand. The
mnemonics for accumulator-specific instructions refer to accumulator as A, not ACC.
B Register (SFR 0xF0):
The B register is used during multiply and divide instructions. It can also be used as a scratch-pad register
to hold temporary data.
Program Status Word (PSW, SFR 0xD0)):
This register contains various flags and control bits for the selection of the register banks (see Table 11).
Table 11: PSW Bit Functions (SFR 0xD0)
PSW Bit
Symbol
7
6
CV
AC
5
F0
4
RS1
3
RS0
2
1
OV
–
0
P
Rev 2
Function
Carry flag.
Auxiliary Carry flag for BCD operations.
General purpose Flag 0 available for user.
F0 is not to be confused with the F0 flag in the CESTATUS register.
Register bank select control bits. The contents of RS1 and RS0 select the
working register bank:
Bank selected
Location
RS1/RS0
00
Bank 0
0x00 – 0x07
01
Bank 1
0x08 – 0x0F
10
Bank 2
0x10 – 0x17
11
Bank 3
0x18 – 0x1F
Overflow flag.
User defined flag.
Parity flag, affected by hardware to indicate odd or even number of one bits in
the Accumulator, i.e. even parity.
23
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Stack Pointer (SP, SFR 0x81):
The stack pointer is a 1-byte register initialized to 0x07 after reset. This register is incremented before
PUSH and CALL instructions, causing the stack to begin at location 0x08.
Data Pointer:
The data pointers (DPTR and DPRT1) are 2 bytes wide. The lower part is DPL(SFR 0x82) and DPL1 (SFR
0x84) and the highest is DPH (SFR 0x83) and DPH1 (SFR 0x85). The data pointers can be loaded as two
registers (e.g. MOV DPL,#data8). They are generally used to access external code or data space (e.g.
MOVC A,@A+DPTR or MOVX A,@DPTR respectively).
Program Counter:
The program counter (PC) is 2 bytes wide and initialized to 0x0000 after reset. The PC is incremented
when fetching operation code or when operating on data from program memory.
Port Registers:
The I/O ports are controlled by Special Function Registers P0, P1 and P2, as shown in Table 12. The contents
of the SFR can be observed on corresponding pins on the chip. Writing a 1 to any of the ports causes the
corresponding pin to be at high level (V3P3). Writing a 0 causes the corresponding pin to be held at a low
level (GND). The data direction registers DIR0, DIR1, and DIR2 define individual pins as input or output
pins (see Section 1.5.7 Digital I/O for details).
Table 12: Port Registers
Register
SFR
Address
R/W Description
P0
DIR0
0x80
0xA2
R/W
R/W
P1
DIR1
P2
DIR2
0x90
0x91
0xA0
0xA1
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Register for port 0 read and write operations.
Data direction register for port 0. Setting a bit to 1 means that the
corresponding pin is an output.
Register for port 1 read and write operations.
Data direction register for port 1.
Register for port 2 read and write operations.
Data direction register for port 2.
All DIO ports on the chip are bi-directional. Each of them consists of a Latch (SFR P0 to P2), an output
driver and an input buffer, therefore the MPU can output or read data through any of these ports. Even if
a DIO pin is configured as an output, the state of the pin can still be read by the MPU, for example when
counting pulses issued via DIO pins that are under CE control.
The technique of reading the status of or generating interrupts based on DIO pins configured as
outputs can be used to implement pulse counting.
Clock Stretching (CKCON[2:0], SFR 0x8E)
The CKCON[2:0] field defines the stretch memory cycles that are used for MOVX instructions when
accessing external peripherals. The practical value of this field for the 71M6533/71M6534 is to guarantee
access to XRAM between CE, MPU, and SPI. The default setting of CKCON[2:0] (001) should not be
changed.
Table 13 shows how the signals of the External Memory Interface change when stretch values are set
from 0 to 7. The widths of the signals are counted in MPU clock cycles. The post-reset state of the
CKCON[2:0] register (001), which is shown in bold in the table, performs the MOVX instructions with a
stretch value equal to 1.
24
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Table 13: Stretch Memory Cycle Width
1.4.4
CKCON[2:0]
Stretch
Value
000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Read Signal Width
memaddr
memrd
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
Write Signal Width
memaddr
memwr
2
1
3
1
4
2
5
3
6
4
7
5
8
6
9
7
71M6533/71M6534-Specific Special Function Registers
Table 14 shows the location and description of the 71M6533/71M6534-specific SFRs.
Table 14: 71M6533/71M6534 Specific SFRs
Register
SFR
(Alternate Name) Address
EEDATA
0x9E
EECTRL
ERASE
(FLSH_ERASE)
FL_BANK[2:0]
PGADDR
(FLSH_PGADR)
FLSHCRL
Rev 2
Bit Field
Name
R/W
R/W
Description
2
I C EEPROM interface data register.
I2C EEPROM interface control register.
See Section 1.5.10 EEPROM Interface for a
R/W
0x9F
description of the command and status bits
available for EECTRL.
This register is used to initiate either the Flash
0x94
W
Mass Erase cycle or the Flash Page Erase cycle.
See the Flash Memory section for details.
0xB6[2:0]
R/W Flash Bank Selection.
Flash Page Erase Address register. Contains
the flash memory page address (page 0
0xB7
R/W through page 127) that will be erased during the
Page Erase cycle (default = 0x00). Must be rewritten for each new Page Erase cycle.
Program Write Enable:
0: MOVX commands refer to XRAM Space,
normal operation (default).
0xB2[0] FLSH_PWE
R/W
1: MOVX @DPTR,A moves A to Program
Space (Flash) @ DPTR.
Mass Erase Enable:
0: Mass Erase disabled (default).
0xB2[1] FLSH_MEEN
W
1: Mass Erase enabled.
Must be re-written for each new Mass Erase cycle.
Protects flash from address CE_LCTN *1024 to
0xB2[4] WRPROT_CE*
the end of memory from flash page erase.
Protects flash from address 0 to address
0xB2[5] WRPROT_BT*
BOOT_SIZE*1024 from flash page erase.
0xB2[6] SECURE
R/W Enables security provisions that prevent external
reading of flash memory and CE program RAM.
This bit is reset on chip reset and may only be set.
Attempts to write zero are ignored.
0xB2[7] PREBOOT
R
Indicates that the preboot sequence is active.
* The WRPROT_CE and WRPROT_BT bits can only be cleared when the SECURE bit
is not set. When SECURE = 1, WRPROT_CE and WRPROT_BT can only be set to 1.
A hardware reset is required to clear these bits if SECURE = 1.
25
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Register
(Alternate Name)
IFLAGS
SFR
Address
Bit Field
Name
R/W
0xE8[0]
IE_XFER
R/W
0xE8[1]
IE_RTC
R/W
0xE8[2]
FW_COL1
R/W
0xE8[3]
FW_COL0
R/W
0xE8[4]
IE_PB
R/W
0xE8[5]
IE_WAKE
R/W
0xE8[6]
PLL_RISE
R/W
0xE8[7]
PLL_FALL
R/W
0xF8[6:0] INT6 … INT0
INTBITS
(INT0 … INT6)
FDS_6533_6534_004
0xF8[7]
WD_RST
R
W
Description
This flag monitors the XFER_BUSY interrupt. It
is set by hardware and must be cleared by the
interrupt handler.
This flag monitors the RTC_1SEC interrupt. It
is set by hardware and must be cleared by the
interrupt handler.
This flag indicates that a flash write was in
progress while the CE was busy.
This flag indicates that a flash write was
attempted when the CE was attempting to
begin a code pass.
This flag indicates that the wake-up pushbutton
was pressed.
This flag indicates that the MPU was awakened
by the autowake timer.
PLL_RISE Interrupt Flag:
Write 0 to clear the PLL_RISE interrupt flag.
PLL_FALL Interrupt Flag:
Write 0 to clear the PLL_FALL interrupt flag.
Interrupt inputs. The MPU may read these bits
to see the status of external interrupts INT0 up
to INT6. These bits do not have any memory
and are primarily intended for debug use.
The WDT is reset when a 1 is written to this bit.
Only byte operations on the entire INTBITS register should be used when
writing. The byte must have all bits set except the bits that are to be
cleared.
1.4.5
Instruction Set
All instructions of the generic 8051 microcontroller are supported. A complete list of the instruction set
and of the associated op-codes is contained in the 71M653X Software User’s Guide (SUG).
1.4.6
UARTs
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 include a UART (UART0) that can be programmed to communicate with a
variety of AMR modules and other external devices. A second UART (UART1) is connected to the optical
port, as described in the 1.5.6 Optical Interface section.
The UARTs are dedicated 2-wire serial interfaces, which can communicate with an external host processor
at up to 38,400 bits/s (with MPU clock = 1.2288 MHz). The operation of the RX and TX UART0 pins is as
follows:
•
•
UART0 RX: Serial input data are applied at this pin. Conforming to RS-232 standard, the bytes are
input LSB first.
UART0 TX: This pin is used to output the serial data. The bytes are output LSB first.
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 have several UART-related registers for the control and buffering of serial
data.
A single SFR register serves as both the transmit buffer and receive buffer (S0BUF, SFR 0x99 for UART0
and S1BUF, SFR 0x9C for UART1). When written by the MPU, SxBUF acts as the transmit buffer, and
when read by the MPU, it acts as the receive buffer. Writing data to the transmit buffer starts the transmission
by the associated UART. Received data are available by reading from the receive buffer. Both UARTs
can simultaneously transmit and receive data.
26
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
WDCON[7] selects whether timer 1 or the internal baud rate generator is used. All UART transfers are
programmable for parity enable, parity, 2 stop bits/1 stop bit and XON/XOFF options for variable
communication baud rates from 300 to 38400 bps. Table 15 shows how the baud rates are calculated.
Table 16 shows the selectable UART operation modes.
Table 15: Baud Rate Generation
Using Timer 1
(WDCON[7] = 0)
smod
2
* f CKMPU/ (384 * (256-TH1))
N/A
UART0
UART1
Using Internal Baud Rate Generator
(WDCON[7] = 1)
smod
10
2
* f CKMPU/(64 * (2 -S0REL))
10
fCKMPU/(32 * (2 -S1REL))
S0REL and S1REL are 10-bit values derived by combining bits from the respective timer reload registers
(S0RELL, S0RELH, S1RELL, S1RELH). SMOD is the SMOD bit in the SFR PCON register. TH1 is the high
byte of timer 1.
Table 16: UART Modes
UART 0
Mode 0
Mode 1
Mode 2
Mode 3
N/A
Start bit, 8 data bits, stop bit, variable
baud rate (internal baud rate generator
or timer 1)
Start bit, 8 data bits, parity, stop bit,
fixed baud rate 1/32 or 1/64 of fCKMPU
Start bit, 8 data bits, parity, stop bit,
variable baud rate (internal baud rate
generator or timer 1)
UART 1
Start bit, 8 data bits, parity, stop bit, variable
baud rate (internal baud rate generator)
Start bit, 8 data bits, stop bit, variable baud
rate (internal baud rate generator)
N/A
N/A
Parity of serial data is available through the P flag of the accumulator. 7-bit serial modes with
parity, such as those used by the FLAG protocol, can be simulated by setting and reading bit 7 of
8-bit output data. 7-bit serial modes without parity can be simulated by setting bit 7 to a constant
th
1. 8-bit serial modes with parity can be simulated by setting and reading the 9 bit, using the
control bits TB80 (S0CON[3]) and TB81 (S1CON[3]) in the S0CON (SFR 0x98) and S1CON (SFR 0x9B)
SFRs for transmit and RB81 (S1CON[2]) for receive operations.
The feature of receiving 9 bits (Mode 3 for UART0, Mode A for UART1) can be used as handshake signals
for inter-processor communication in multi-processor systems. In this case, the slave processors have bit
SM20 (S0CON[5]) for UART0, or SM21 (S1CON[5] for UART1, set to 1. When the master processor outputs
th
the slave’s address, it sets the 9 bit to 1, causing a serial port receive interrupt in all the slaves. The
slave processors compare the received byte with their address. If there is a match, the addressed slave
will clear SM20 or SM21 and receive the rest of the message. The rest of the slave’s will ignore the message.
th
After addressing the slave, the host outputs the rest of the message with the 9 bit set to 0, so no additional
serial port receive interrupts will be generated.
UART Control Registers:
The functions of UART0 and UART1 depend on the setting of the Serial Port Control Registers S0CON
and S1CON shown in Table 17 and Table 18, respectively, and the PCON register shown in Table 19.
Since the TI0, RI0, TI1 and RI1 bits are in an SFR bit addressable byte, common practice
would be to clear them with a bit operation, but this must be avoided. The hardware implements
bit operations as a byte wide read-modify-write hardware macro. If an interrupt occurs after
the read, but before the write, its flag will be cleared unintentionally.
The proper way to clear these flag bits is to write a byte mask consisting of all ones except for
a zero in the location of the bit to be cleared. The flag bits are configured in hardware to ignore
ones written to them.
Rev 2
27
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Table 17: The S0CON (UART0) Register (SFR 0x98)
Bit
Symbol
S0CON[7]
SM0
S0CON[6]
SM1
S0CON[5]
S0CON[4]
SM20
REN0
S0CON[3]
TB80
S0CON[2]
RB80
S0CON[1]
TI0
S0CON[0]
RI0
Function
The SM0 and SM1 bits set the UART0 mode:
Mode
Description
SM0
SM1
0
N/A
0
0
1
8-bit UART
0
1
2
9-bit UART
1
0
3
9-bit UART
1
1
Enables the inter-processor communication feature.
If set, enables serial reception. Cleared by software to disable reception.
The 9th transmitted data bit in Modes 2 and 3. Set or cleared by the MPU,
depending on the function it performs (parity check, multiprocessor
communication etc.)
th
In Modes 2 and 3 it is the 9 data bit received. In Mode 1, SM20 is 0, RB80
is the stop bit. In mode 0, this bit is not used. Must be cleared by software.
Transmit interrupt flag; set by hardware after completion of a serial transfer.
Must be cleared by software.
Receive interrupt flag; set by hardware after completion of a serial reception.
Must be cleared by software.
Table 18: The S1CON (UART1) Register (SFR 0x9B)
Bit
Symbol
S1CON[7]
SM
S1CON[5]
S1CON[4]
SM21
REN1
S1CON[3]
TB81
S1CON[2]
RB81
S1CON[1]
TI1
S1CON[0]
RI1
Function
Sets the baud rate and mode for UART1.
Mode
Description
Baud Rate
SM
0
A
9-bit UART
variable
1
B
8-bit UART
variable
Enables the inter-processor communication feature.
If set, enables serial reception. Cleared by software to disable reception.
The 9th transmitted data bit in Mode A. Set or cleared by the MPU, depending
on the function it performs (parity check, multiprocessor communication
etc.)
In Modes A and B, it is the 9th data bit received. In Mode B, if SM21 is 0,
RB81 is the stop bit. Must be cleared by software
Transmit interrupt flag, set by hardware after completion of a serial transfer.
Must be cleared by software.
Receive interrupt flag, set by hardware after completion of a serial reception.
Must be cleared by software.
Table 19: PCON Register Bit Description (SFR 0x87)
Bit
Symbol
PCON[7]
PCON[6:2]
PCON[1]
SMOD
–
STOP
PCON[0]
IDLE
28
Function
The SMOD bit doubles the baud rate when set
Not used.
Stops MPU flash access and MPU peripherals including timers and UARTs
when set until an external interrupt is received.
Stops MPU flash access when set until an internal interrupt is received.
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
1.4.7
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Timers and Counters
The 80515 has two 16-bit timer/counter registers: Timer 0 and Timer 1. These registers can be configured
for counter or timer operations.
In timer mode, the register is incremented every 12 MPU clock cycles. In counter mode, the register is
incremented when the falling edge is observed at the corresponding input signal T0 or T1 (T0 and T1 are
the timer gating inputs derived from certain DIO pins, see Section 1.5.7 Digital I/O). Since it takes 2 machine
cycles to recognize a 1-to-0 event, the maximum input count rate is 1/2 of the clock frequency (CKMPU).
There are no restrictions on the duty cycle, however to ensure proper recognition of the 0 or 1 state, an
input should be stable for at least 1 machine cycle.
Four operating modes can be selected for Timer 0 and Timer 1, as shown in Table 20 and Table 21. The
TMOD Register, shown in Table 22, is used to select the appropriate mode. The timer/counter operation
is controlled by the TCON Register, which is shown in
Table 23. Bits TR1 (TCON[6]) and TR0 (TCON[4]) in the TCON register start their associated timers when
set.
Table 20: Timers/Counters Mode Description
M1
M0
Mode
0
0
Mode 0
0
1
Mode 1
1
0
Mode 2
1
1
Mode 3
Function
13-bit Counter/Timer mode with 5 lower bits in the TL0 or TL1 register
and the remaining 8 bits in the TH0 or TH1 register (for Timer 0 and
Timer 1, respectively). The 3 high order bits of TL0 and TL1 are held
at zero.
16-bit Counter/Timer mode.
8-bit auto-reload Counter/Timer. The reload value is kept in TH0 or
TH1, while TL0 or TL1 is incremented every machine cycle. When
TL(x) overflows, a value from TH(x) is copied to TL(x) (where x is 0
for counter/timer 0 or 1 for counter/timer 1.
If Timer 1 M1 and M0 bits are set to 1, Timer 1 stops.
If Timer 0 M1 and M0 bits are set to 1, Timer 0 acts as two independent
8-bit Timer/Counters.
In Mode 3, TL0 is affected by TR0 and gate control bits, and sets the TF0 flag on overflow, while
TH0 is affected by the TR1 bit, and the TF1 flag is set on overflow.
Table 21 specifies the combinations of operation modes allowed for Timer 0 and Timer 1.
Table 21: Allowed Timer/Counter Mode Combinations
Timer 0 - mode 0
Timer 0 - mode 1
Timer 0 - mode 2
Mode 0
Yes
Yes
Not allowed
Timer 1
Mode 1
Yes
Yes
Not allowed
Mode 2
Yes
Yes
Yes
Table 22: TMOD Register Bit Description (SFR 0x89)
Bit
Symbol
Timer/Counter 1:
TMOD[7]
Gate
TMOD[6]
C/T
Rev 2
Function
If TMOD[7] is set, external input signal control is enabled for Counter 0.
external gate control. The TR1 bit in the TCON register (SFR 0x88) must
also be set in order for Counter 1 to increment.
With these settings Counter 1 is incremented on every falling edge of the
logic signal applied to one or more of the interrupt sources controlled by
the DI_RBP, DIO_R1, … DIO_RXX registers.
Selects timer or counter operation. When set to 1, a counter operation is
performed. When cleared to 0, the corresponding register will function as a
29
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
timer.
Selects the mode for Timer/Counter 1 as shown in Table 20.
TMOD[5:4] M1:M0
Timer/Counter 0
TMOD[3]
Gate
TMOD[2]
C/T
TMOD[1:0]
M1:M0
FDS_6533_6534_004
If TMOD[3] is set, external input signal control is enabled for Counter 0.
external gate control. The TR0 bit in the TCON register (SFR 0x88) must
also be set in order for Counter 0 to increment.
With these settings Counter 0 is incremented on every falling edge of the
logic signal applied to one or more of the interrupt sources controlled by
the DI_RBP, DIO_R1, … DIO_RXX registers.
Selects timer or counter operation. When set to 1, a counter operation is
performed. When cleared to 0, the corresponding register will function as
a timer.
Selects the mode for Timer/Counter 0, as shown in Table 20.
Table 23: The TCON Register Bit Functions (SFR 0x88)
Bit
Symbol
TCON[7]
TF1
TCON[6]
TR1
TCON[5]
TF0
TCON[4]
TR0
TCON[3]
IE1
TCON[2]
IT1
TCON[1]
IE0
TCON[0]
IT0
1.4.8
Function
The Timer 1 overflow flag is set by hardware when Timer 1 overflows.
This flag can be cleared by software and is automatically cleared when
an interrupt is processed.
Timer 1 run control bit. If cleared, Timer 1 stops.
Timer 0 overflow flag set by hardware when Timer 0 overflows. This
flag can be cleared by software and is automatically cleared when an
interrupt is processed.
Timer 0 Run control bit. If cleared, Timer 0 stops.
Interrupt 1 edge flag is set by hardware when the falling edge on external
pin int1 is observed. Cleared when an interrupt is processed.
Interrupt 1 type control bit set by the MPU. Selects either the falling
edge or low level on input pin to cause an external interrupt.
Interrupt 0 edge flag is set by hardware when the falling edge on external
pin int0 is observed. Cleared when an interrupt is processed.
Interrupt 0 type control bit. Selects either the falling edge or low level
on input pin to cause interrupt.
WD Timer (Software Watchdog Timer)
There is no internal software watchdog timer. Use the standard watchdog timer instead (see Section
1.5.12 Hardware Watchdog Timer).
1.4.9
Interrupts
The 80515 MPU provides 11 interrupt sources with four priority levels. Each source has its own request
flag(s) located in a special function register (TCON, IRCON, and SCON). Each interrupt requested by the
corresponding flag can be individually enabled or disabled by the enable bits in SFRs IEN0 (SFR 0xA8),
IEN1 (SFR 0xB8), and IEN2 (SFR 0x9A). shows the device interrupt structure.
Referring to Figure 7, interrupt sources can originate from within the 80515 MPU core (referred to as
Internal Sources) or can originate from other parts of the 71M653x SoC (referred to as External Sources).
There are seven external interrupt sources, as seen in the leftmost part of Figure 7, and in Table 24 and
Table 25 (i.e. EX0-EX6)
Interrupt Overview
When an interrupt occurs, the MPU will vector to the predetermined address as shown in Table 36. Once
the interrupt service has begun, it can be interrupted only by a higher priority interrupt. The interrupt service
30
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
is terminated by a return from instruction, RETI. When an RETI is performed, the processor will return to
the instruction that would have been next when the interrupt occurred.
When the interrupt condition occurs, the processor will also indicate this by setting a flag bit. This bit is
set regardless of whether the interrupt is enabled or disabled. Each interrupt flag is sampled once per
machine cycle, then samples are polled by the hardware. If the sample indicates a pending interrupt
when the interrupt is enabled, then the interrupt request flag is set. On the next instruction cycle, the interrupt
will be acknowledged by hardware forcing an LCALL to the appropriate vector address, if the following
conditions are met:
•
•
•
No interrupt of equal or higher priority is already in progress.
An instruction is currently being executed and is not completed.
The instruction in progress is not RETI or any write access to the registers IEN0, IEN1, IEN2, IP0 or IP1.
Special Function Registers for Interrupts
The following SFR registers control the interrupt functions:
•
•
•
•
The interrupt enable registers: IEN0, IEN1 and IEN2 (see Table 24, Table 25 and Table 26).
The Timer/Counter control registers, TCON and T2CON (see Table 27 and Table 28).
The interrupt request register, IRCON (see Table 29).
The interrupt priority registers: IP0 and IP1 (see Table 34).
Table 24: The IEN0 Bit Functions (SFR 0xA8)
Bit
IEN0[7]
IEN0[6]
IEN0[5]
IEN0[4]
IEN0[3]
IEN0[2]
IEN0[1]
IEN0[0]
Symbol
EAL
WDT
–
ES0
ET1
EX1
ET0
EX0
Function
EAL = 0 disables all interrupts.
Not used for interrupt control.
Not Used.
ES0 = 0 disables serial channel 0 interrupt.
ET1 = 0 disables timer 1 overflow interrupt.
EX1 = 0 disables external interrupt 1.
ET0 = 0 disables timer 0 overflow interrupt.
EX0 = 0 disables external interrupt 0.
Table 25: The IEN1 Bit Functions (SFR 0xB8)
Bit
IEN1[7]
IEN1[6]
IEN1[5]
IEN1[4]
IEN1[3]
IEN1[2]
IEN1[1]
IEN1[0]
Symbol
–
–
EX6
EX5
EX4
EX3
EX2
–
Function
Not used.
Not used.
EX6 = 0 disables external interrupt 6: XFER_BUSY, RTC_1SEC, WD_NROVF
EX5 = 0 disables external interrupt 5: EEPROM_BUSY
EX4 = 0 disables external interrupt 4: PLL_OK (rise), PLL_OK (fall)
EX3 = 0 disables external interrupt 3: CE_BUSY
EX2 = 0 disables external interrupt 2: FWCOL0, FWCOL1, SPI
Not Used.
Table 26: The IEN2 Bit Functions (SFR 0x9A)
Bit
IEN2[0]
Rev 2
Symbol
ES1
Function
ES1 = 0 disables the serial channel 1 interrupt.
31
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Table 27: TCON Bit Functions (SFR 0x88)
Bit
TCON[7]
TCON[6]
TCON[5]
TCON[4]
TCON[3]
Symbol
TF1
TR1
TF0
TR0
IE1
TCON[2]
IT1
TCON[1]
IE0
TCON[0]
IT0
Function
Timer 1 overflow flag.
Not used for interrupt control.
Timer 0 overflow flag.
Not used for interrupt control.
External interrupt 1 flag.
External interrupt 1 type control bit:
0 = interrupt on low level.
1 = interrupt on falling edge.
External interrupt 0 flag
External interrupt 0 type control bit:
0 = interrupt on low level.
1 = interrupt on falling edge.
Table 28: The T2CON Bit Functions (SFR 0xC8)
Bit
T2CON[7]
Symbol
T2CON[6]
I3FR
T2CON[5]
I2FR
T2CON[4:0]
–
–
Function
Not used.
Polarity control for external interrupt 3: CE_BUSY
0 = falling edge.
1 = rising edge.
Polarity control for external interrupt 2: FWCOL0, FWCOL1, SPI
0 = falling edge.
1 = rising edge.
Not used.
Table 29: The IRCON Bit Functions (SFR 0xC0)
Bit
IRCON[7]
IRCON[6]
IRCON[5]
IRCON[4]
IRCON[3]
IRCON[2]
IRCON[1]
IRCON[0]
Symbol
–
–
IEX6
IEX5
IEX4
IEX3
IEX2
–
Function
Not used
Not used
1 = External interrupt 6 occurred and has not been cleared.
1 = External interrupt 5 occurred and has not been cleared.
1 = External interrupt 4 occurred and has not been cleared.
1 = External interrupt 3 occurred and has not been cleared.
1 = External interrupt 2 occurred and has not been cleared.
Not used.
TF0 and TF1 (Timer 0 and Timer 1 overflow flags) will be automatically cleared by hardware when
the service routine is called (Signals T0ACK and T1ACK – port ISR – active high when the service
routine is called).
32
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
External MPU Interrupts
The seven external interrupts are the interrupts external to the 80515 core, i.e. signals that originate in
other parts of the 71M6533/71M6534, for example the CE, DIO, RTC, EEPROM interface.
The external interrupts are connected as shown in Table 30. The polarity of interrupts 2 and 3 is
programmable in the MPU via the I3FR and I2FR bits in T2CON. Interrupts 2 and 3 should be programmed
for falling sensitivity (I3FR = I2FR = 0). The generic 8051 MPU literature states that interrupts 4 through 6
are defined as rising-edge sensitive. Thus, the hardware signals attached to interrupts 5 and 6 are inverted
to achieve the edge polarity shown in Table 30.
Table 30: External MPU Interrupts
External
Interrupt
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Connection
Digital I/O High Priority
Digital I/O Low Priority
FWCOL0, FWCOL1, SPI
CE_BUSY
PLL_OK (rising), PLL_OK (falling)
EEPROM busy
XFER_BUSY, RTC_1SEC or WD_NROVF
Polarity
see Section 1.5.7
see Section 1.5.7
falling
falling
rising
falling
falling
Flag Reset
automatic
automatic
automatic
automatic
automatic
automatic
manual
External interrupt 0 and 1 can be mapped to pins on the device using DIO resource maps. See Section
1.5.7 Digital I/O for more information.
FWCOLx interrupts occur when the CE collides with a flash write attempt. See the flash write description
in the Flash Memory section for more detail.
SFR enable bits must be set to permit any of these interrupts to occur. Likewise, each interrupt has its own
flag bit, which is set by the interrupt hardware, and reset by the MPU interrupt handler. XFER_BUSY,
RTC_1SEC, WD_NROVF, FWCOL0, FWCOL1, SPI, PLLRISE and PLLFALL have their own enable and
flag bits in addition to the interrupt 6, 4 and enable and flag bits (see Table 31).
IE0 through IEX6 are cleared automatically when the hardware vectors to the interrupt handler. The other
flags, IE_XFER through IE_PB, are cleared by writing a zero to them.
Since these bits are in an SFR bit addressable byte, common practice would be to clear them
with a bit operation, but this must be avoided. The hardware implements bit operations as a
byte wide read-modify-write hardware macro. If an interrupt occurs after the read, but before
the write, its flag will be cleared unintentionally.
The proper way to clear the flag bits is to write a byte mask consisting of all ones except for a
zero in the location of the bit to be cleared. The flag bits are configured in hardware to ignore
ones written to them.
Table 31: Interrupt Enable and Flag Bits
EX0
EX1
EX2
EX3
EX4
EX5
EX6
Rev 2
Interrupt Enable
Name
Location
SFR A8[0]
SFR A8[2]
SFR B8[1]
SFR B8[2]
SFR B8[3]
SFR B8[4]
SFR B8[5]
IE0
IE1
IEX2
IEX3
IEX4
IEX5
IEX6
Interrupt Flag
Name
Location
SFR 88[1]
SFR 88[3]
SFR C0[1]
SFR C0[2]
SFR C0[3]
SFR C0[4]
SFR C0[5]
Interrupt Description
External interrupt 0
External interrupt 1
External interrupt 2
External interrupt 3
External interrupt 4
External interrupt 5
External interrupt 6
33
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Interrupt Enable
Name
Location
EX_XFER
2002[0]
EX_RTC
2002[1]
IEN_WD_NROVF 20B0[0]
IEN_SPI
20B0[4]
EX_FWCOL
2007[4]
EX_PLL
2007[5]
FDS_6533_6534_004
Interrupt Flag
Name
Location
IE_XFER
SFR E8[0]
IE_RTC
SFR E8[1]
WD_NROVF_FLAG 20B1[0]
SPI_FLAG
20B1[4]
IE_FWCOL0
SFR E8[3]
IE_FWCOL1
SFR E8[2]
IE_PLLRISE
SFRE8[6]
IE_PLLFALL
SFRE8[7]
IE_WAKE
SFRE8[5]
IE_PB
SFRE8[4]
Interrupt Description
XFER_BUSY interrupt (INT 6)
RTC_1SEC interrupt (INT 6)
WDT near overflow (INT 6)
SPI Interface (INT2)
FWCOL0 interrupt (INT 2)
FWCOL1 interrupt (INT 2)
PLL_OK rise interrupt (INT 4)
PLL_OK fall interrupt (INT 4)
†
AUTOWAKE flag
PB flag†
†
The AUTOWAKE and PB flag bits are shown in Table 31 because they behave similarly to interrupt flags,
even though they are not actually related to an interrupt. These bits are set by hardware when the MPU
wakes from a push button or wake timeout. The bits are reset by writing a zero. Note that the PB flag is
set whenever the PB is pushed, even if the part is already awake.
WD_NROVF_FLAG is set approximately 1 ms before a WDT reset occurs. The flag can be cleared by
writing a zero to it and is automatically cleared by the falling edge of WAKE.
Interrupt Priority Level Structure
All interrupt sources are combined in groups, as shown in Table 32:
Table 32: Interrupt Priority Level Groups
0
1
2
3
4
5
Group Members
External interrupt 0, Serial
channel 1 interrupt
Timer 0 interrupt, External
interrupt 2
External interrupt 1, External
interrupt 3
Timer 1 interrupt, External
interrupt 4
Serial channel 0 interrupt,
External interrupt 5
External interrupt 6
Each group of interrupt sources can be programmed individually to one of four priority levels (as shown in
Table 33) by setting or clearing one bit in the SFR interrupt priority register IP0 and one in IP1 (Table 34).
If requests of the same priority level are received simultaneously, an internal polling sequence as shown
in Table 35 determines which request is serviced first.
Changing interrupt priorities while interrupts are enabled can easily cause software defects. It is best
to set the interrupt priority registers only once during initialization before interrupts are enabled.
Table 33: Interrupt Priority Levels
IP1[x]
0
0
1
1
34
IP0[x]
0
1
0
1
Priority Level
Level 0 (lowest)
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3 (highest)
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Table 34: Interrupt Priority Registers (IP0 and IP1)
Register
Address
Bit 7
(MSB)
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
IP0
IP1
SFR 0xA9
SFR 0xB9
–
–
–
–
IP0[5]
IP1[5]
IP0[4]
IP1[4]
IP0[3]
IP1[3]
IP0[2]
IP1[2]
IP0[1]
IP1[1]
Bit 0
(LSB)
IP0[0]
IP1[0]
External interrupt 0
Serial channel 1 interrupt
Timer 0 interrupt
External interrupt 2
External interrupt 1
External interrupt 3
Timer 1 interrupt
External interrupt 4
Serial channel 0 interrupt
External interrupt 5
External interrupt 6
Polling sequence
Table 35: Interrupt Polling Sequence
Interrupt Sources and Vectors
Table 36 shows the interrupts with their associated flags and vector addresses.
Table 36: Interrupt Vectors
Interrupt
Request Flag
IE0
TF0
IE1
TF1
RI0/TI0
RI1/TI1
IEX2
IEX3
IEX4
IEX5
IEX6
Rev 2
Description
External interrupt 0
Timer 0 interrupt
External interrupt 1
Timer 1 interrupt
Serial channel 0 interrupt
Serial channel 1 interrupt
External interrupt 2
External interrupt 3
External interrupt 4
External interrupt 5
External interrupt 6
Interrupt Vector
Address
0x0003
0x000B
0x0013
0x001B
0x0023
0x0083
0x004B
0x0053
0x005B
0x0063
0x006B
35
71M6533/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
No.
External
Source
Internal
Source
Individual
Enable Bits
Individual Flags
0
DIO
DIO status
changed
DIO_Rn
TCON.1 (IE0)
byte received
S1CON.0 (RI1)
byte transmitted
S1CON.1 (TI1)
Timer 0
SPI I/F
2
Write attempt, CE
Flash
busy
Write
CE code start,
Collision
TCON.5 (TF0)
IEN_SPI
SPI_FLAG
IE_FWCOL0
flash write busy
1
DIO
3
CE_BUSY
DIO status
changed
PLL OK
PLL status
changed
overflow occurred
EX_PLL
byte received
UART0
5
6
BUSY fell
IP1.0/
IP0.0
I2FR
IRCON.1
(IEX2)
IRCON.2
(IEX3)
IEN1.1
(EX2)
IP1.1/
IP0.1
IEN0.2
(EX1)
IEN1.2
(EX3)
IP1.2/
IP0.2
IEN0.3
(ET1)
TCON.7 (TF1)
IE_PLLRISE
IE_PLLFALL
S0CON.0 (RI0)
byte transmitted
S0CON.0 (TI0)
I2C
EX_SPI
IE_SPI
XFER_BUSY
accumulation
cycle completed
EX_XFER
IE_XFER
every second
EX_RTC
IE_RTC
WDT near
overflow
IEN_NR_
WDOVF
WD_NROVF_FLAG
MPU-external
sources
>=1
I3FR
IE_EEX
NR_OVF
Priority
Assignment
IEN0.1
(ET0)
TCON.3 (IE1)
EX_EEX
RTC_1S
IEN2.0
(ES1)
IE_FWCOL1
command
received
EEPROM
IEN0.0
(EX0)
IT0
CE completed code run and
has new status information
Timer 1
4
DIO_Rn
Interrupt Enable
IEN0.7
(EAL)
>=1
overflow occurred
EX_FWCOL
Interrupt
Flags
Polling Sequence
UART1
(optical)
Logic and Polarity
Selection
>=1
IRCON.3
(IEX4)
IEN1.3
(EX4)
IP1.3/
IP0.3
IEN0.4
(ES0)
>=1
>=1
>=1
IRCON.4
(IEX5)
IRCON.5
(IEX6)
Flag=1 means
that an interrupt has occurred and
has not been
cleared
MPU-internal
sources
IEN1.4
(EX5)
IEN1.5
(EX6)
IP1.4/
IP0.4
IP1.5/
IP0.5
EX0 – EX6 are cleared
automatically when the
hardware vectors to the
interrupt handler
Interrupt
Vector
2/2/2009
Figure 7: Interrupt Structure
36
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
1.5
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
On-Chip Resources
1.5.1
Oscillator
The 71M6533/71M6534 oscillator drives a standard 32.768 kHz watch crystal. These crystals are accurate
and do not require a high-current oscillator circuit. The oscillator has been designed specifically to handle
these crystals and is compatible with their high impedance and limited power handling capability. The
oscillator power dissipation is very low to maximize the lifetime of any battery attached to VBAT.
Oscillator calibration can improve the accuracy of both the RTC and metering. Refer to Section 1.5.3
Real-Time Clock (RTC) for more information.
The oscillator is powered directly and only from VBAT, which therefore must be connected to a DC voltage
source. The oscillator requires approximately 100 nA, which is negligible compared to the internal leakage
of a battery.
The oscillator may appear to work when VBAT is not connected, but this mode of operation is not
recommended.
If VBAT is connected to a drained battery or disconnected, a battery test that sets BME may drain
VBAT’s supply and cause the oscillator to stop. A stopped oscillator may force the device to reset.
Therefore, an unexpected reset during a battery test should be interpreted as a battery failure.
1.5.2
PLL and Internal Clocks
Timing for the device is derived from the 32.768 kHz crystal oscillator output. On-chip timing functions
include:
•
•
•
•
•
The MPU clock (CKMPU)
The emulator clock (2 x CKMPU)
The clock for the CE (CKCE)
The clock driving the delta-sigma ADC along with the FIR (CKADC, CKFIR)
A real time clock (RTC).
The two general-purpose counter/timers contained in the MPU are controlled by CKMPU (see Timers and
Counters). Table 37 provides a summary of the clock functions provided.
Table 37: Clock System Summary
Clock
Derived
From
CKPLL
MCK
Crystal
CKPLL
CKCE
MCK
MCK Divider / [M40MHZ, M26MHZ]
÷ 2 / [1,0]
78.6432 MHz
39.3216 MHz
4.9152 9.8304
MHz † MHz †
4.9152 MHz
9.8304 MHz***
32.768 kHz
**
÷ 3 / [0,1]
78.6432 MHz
26.2144 MHz
÷ 4 / [0,0]
78.6432 MHz
19.6608 MHz
6.5536 MHz
4.9152 MHz
Brownout Mode
32 kHz
Off
112 kHz
Off
CKADC / CKFIR
MCK
6.5536 MHz
4.9152 MHz
28 kHz
***
***
CKMPU maximum
MCK
6.5536 MHz
4.9152 MHz
28 kHz
CK32
MCK
32.768 kHz
32.768 kHz
**
Default state at power-up
***
This is the maximum CKMPU frequency. CKMPU can be reduced from this rate using MPU_DIV[2:0].
†
CKCE = 9.8304 MHz when CE10MHZ is set, 4.9152 MHz otherwise.
The master clock, MCK, is generated by an on-chip PLL that multiplies the crystal oscillator output frequency
(CK32) by 2400 to provide 80 MHz (78.6432 MHz). A divider controlled by the I/O RAM registers
M40MHZ and M26MHZ permits scaling of MCK by ½, ⅓, and ¼. All other clocks are derived from this
scaled MCK output (making them multiples of 32768 Hz), and the clock skew is matched so that the rising
edges of CKADC, CKCE, CK32, and CKMPU are aligned.
Rev 2
37
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
The PLL has a 2x emulator clock which is controlled by the ECK_DIS bit. Since clock noise from this feature
may disturb the ADC, it is recommended that this option be avoided when possible.
The MPU clock frequency CKMPU is determined by another divider controlled by the I/O RAM field
(MPU_DIV+2)
Hz where MPU_DIV[2:0] varies from 0 to 6. The circuit
MPU_DIV[2:0] and can be set to MCK/2
also generates the 2 x CKMPU clock for use by the emulator. The emulator clock is not generated when
ECK_DIS is asserted.
During a power-on reset, [M40MHZ, M26MHZ] defaults to [0,0], and the MCK divider is set to divide by 4.
When [M40MHZ, M26MHZ] = [1,0], the CE clock frequency may be set to ~5 MHz (4.9152 MHz) or ~10
MHz (9.8304 MHz), using the I/O RAM register CE10MHZ. In this mode, the ADC and FIR clock frequencies
remain at ~5 MHz. When [M40MHZ, M26MHZ] = [0,1], the CE, ADC, FIR, and MPU clock frequencies are
shifted to ~6.6 MHz (6.5536 MHz). This increases the ADC sample rate by 33%.
CE codes are tailored to particular clock frequencies. Changing the clock frequency for a
particular CE code may render it unusable.
In SLEEP mode, the M40MHZ and M26MHZ inputs to the clock generator are forced low. In BROWNOUT
mode, the clocks are derived from the crystal oscillator, and the clock frequencies are scaled by 7/8.
1.5.3
Real-Time Clock (RTC)
The RTC is driven directly by the crystal oscillator. It is powered by the net RTC_NV (battery-backed up
supply). The RTC consists of a counter chain and output registers. The counter chain consists of registers
for seconds, minutes, hours, day of week, day of month, month, and year. The RTC is capable of
processing leap years. Each counter has its own output register. The RTC registers will not be affected
by the reset pin, watchdog timer resets, or by transitions between the battery modes and mission mode.
Whenever the MPU reads the seconds register, all other output registers are automatically updated.
Since the RTC clock is not coherent to the MPU clock, the MPU must read the seconds register until two
consecutive reads are the same (this requires either 2 or 3 reads). At this point, all RTC output registers
will have the correct time. Regardless of the MPU clock speed, RTC reads require one wait state.
RTC time is set by writing to the RTC_SEC[5:0] through RTC_YR registers. Each write operation must be
preceded by a write operation to the WE register in I/O RAM. The value written to the WE register is
unimportant.
Time adjustments are written to the RTCA_ADJ[6:0], PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] registers. Updates to
PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] must occur after the one second interrupt, and must be finished before reaching
the next one-second boundary. The new values are loaded into the counters at the next one-second
boundary.
PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] are separate registers in the device hardware, but the bits are 16-bit contiguous
so the MPU firmware can treat them as a single register. A single binary number can be calculated and
then loaded into them at the same time.
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 have two rate adjustment mechanisms. The first is an analog rate adjustment,
using RTCA_ADJ[6:0], which trims the crystal load capacitance. Setting RTCA_ADJ[6:0] to 00 minimizes
the load capacitance, maximizing the oscillator frequency. Setting RTCA_ADJ[6:0] to 0x7F maximizes the
load capacitance, minimizing the oscillator frequency. The adjustable capacitance is approximately:
C ADJ =
RTCA _ ADJ
⋅ 16.5 pF
128
The typical adjustment range is approximately -15 ppm. The precise amount of adjustment will depend
on the crystal and board properties. The adjustment may occur at any time, and the resulting clock frequency
can be measured over a one-second interval.
38
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The second rate adjustment is a digital rate adjust using PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0], which can be used
to adjust the clock rate up to ± 988 ppm, with a resolution of 3.8 ppm. Updates must occur after a one
second interrupt, and must finish before the next one second boundary. The rate adjustment will be
implemented starting at the next one-second boundary. Since the LSB results in an adjustment every
four seconds, the frequency should be measured over an interval that is a multiple of four seconds.
To adjust the clock rate using the digital rate adjust, the appropriate values must be written to PREG[16:0]
and QREG[1:0]. The default frequency is 32,768 RTCLK cycles per second. To shift the clock frequency
by ∆ ppm, calculate PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] using the following equation:

 32768 ⋅ 8
4 ⋅ PREG + QREG = floor
+ 0.5 
−6

 1 + ∆ ⋅ 10
For example, for a shift of -988 ppm, 4⋅PREG + QREG = 262403 = 0x40103. PREG[16:0] = 0x10040, and
QREG[1:0] = 0x03. The default values of PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0], corresponding to zero adjustment,
are 0x10000 and 0x0, respectively.
The RTC timing may be observed on the TMUXOUT pin by setting TMUX[4:0] to 0x10 or 0x11.
Default values for RTCA_ADJ[6:0], PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] should be nominal values, at the
center of the adjustment range. Uncalibrated extreme values (zero, for example) can cause incorrect
operation.
If the crystal temperature coefficient is known, the MPU can integrate temperature and correct the RTC
time as necessary.
Both RTCA_ADJ[6:0] and PREG[16:0]/QREG[1:0] are non-volatile registers, i.e. their values will be
preserved in BROWNOUT, SLEEP and LCD modes. However, the digital correction controlled by the
PREG[16:0]/QREG[1:0] registers is not operational in SLEEP mode.
The digital adjustment using PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] is preferred over the analog adjustment using
RTCA_ADJ: The digital adjustment is more repeatable and has a wider range.
The sub-second register of the RTC, SUBSEC, can be read by the MPU after the one-second interrupt and
before reaching the next one second boundary. SUBSEC contains the count remaining, in 1/256 second
nominal clock periods, until the next one-second boundary. When the RST_SUBSEC bit is written, the
SUBSEC counter is restarted. Reading and resetting the sub-second counter can be used as part of an
algorithm to accurately set the RTC.
When setting the RTC_SEC register, it is important to take into account that the associated write operation
will be performed only in the next second boundary.
1.5.4
Temperature Sensor
The device includes an on-chip temperature sensor for determining the temperature of the bandgap
reference. If automatic temperature measurement is not performed by selecting CHOP_E[1:0] = 00, the
MPU may request an alternate multiplexer frame containing the temperature sensor output by asserting
MUX_ALT. The primary use of the temperature data is to determine the magnitude of compensation
required to offset the thermal drift in the system (see Section 3.5 Temperature Compensation).
1.5.5
Physical Memory
Flash Memory
The device includes 128 KB (71M6533/H, 71M6534) or 256 KB (71M6533G, 71M6534H) of on-chip flash
memory. The flash memory primarily contains MPU and CE program code. It also contains images of
the CE and MPU data in RAM as well as of I/O RAM. On power-up, before enabling the CE, the MPU
copies these images to their respective locations.
Rev 2
39
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
The flash memory is segmented into individually erasable pages that contain 1024 bytes.
Flash space allocated for the CE program is limited to 4096 16-bit words (8 KB). The CE program must
begin on a 1 KB boundary of the flash address space. The CE_LCTN[7:0] word defines which 1 KB
boundary contains the CE code. Thus, the first CE instruction is located at 1024*CE_LCTN[7:0].
Flash Write Procedures
The MPU may write to the flash memory. This is one of the non-volatile storage options available to the
user in addition to external EEPROM.
FLSH_PWE (flash program write enable) differentiates 80515 data store instructions ([email protected],A)
between Flash and XRAM writes. This bit must be cleared by the MPU after each byte write operation.
Write operations to this bit are inhibited when interrupts are enabled.
The MPU cannot write to flash while the CE is executing its code from flash. Two interrupts warn of collisions
between the MPU firmware and the CE timing. If a flash write operation is attempted while the CE is
busy, the flash write will not execute and the FWCOL0 interrupt will be issued. If a flash write is still in
progress when the CE would otherwise begin a code pass, the code pass is skipped, the write operation
is completed, and the FWCOL1 interrupt is issued.
The simplest flash write procedure disables the CE during the write operation and interpolates the metering
measurements. However, this results in the loss of at least one second of data, because the CE has to
resynchronize with the mains voltage.
There is a brief guaranteed interval (typically 1/32768 s) between CE executions which occurs 2520 times
per second. The start of the interval can be detected with the CE_BUSY interrupt which occurs on the
falling edge of CE_BUSY (an internal signal measurable from TMUXOUT). However, this guaranteed idle
time (30.5 µs) is too short to write a byte which takes 42 µs or to erase a page of flash memory which
takes at least 20 ms. Some CE code has substantially longer idle times, but in those cases, firmware
interrupt latencies can easily consume the available write time. If a flash write fails in this scheme, the
failure can be detected with the FWCOL0 or FWCOL1 interrupt and the write can be retried.
It is practical to pre-erase pages, disable interrupts and poll the CE_BUSY interrupt flag, IRCON[2]. This
method avoids problems with interrupt latency, but can still result in a write failure if the CE code takes
too much time. As mentioned above, polling FWCOL0 and FWCOL1 can detect write failures. However,
the speed in a polling write is only 2520 bytes per second and the firmware cannot respond to interrupts.
As an alternative to using flash, a small EEPROM can store data without compromises. EEPROM interfaces
are included in the device.
Updating Individual Bytes in Flash Memory
The original state of a flash byte is 0xFF (all ones). Once a value other than 0xFF is written to a flash
memory cell, overwriting with a different value usually requires that the cell be erased first. Since cells
cannot be erased individually, the page has to be copied to RAM, followed by a page erase. After this,
the page can be updated in RAM and then written back to the flash memory.
Flash Erase Procedures
Flash erasure is initiated by writing a specific data pattern to specific SFR registers in the proper sequence.
These special pattern/sequence requirements prevent inadvertent erasure of the flash memory.
The mass erase sequence is:
1. Write 1 to the FLSH_MEEN bit (SFR 0xB2[1]).
2. Write the pattern 0xAA to FLSH_ERASE (SFR 0x94).
The mass erase cycle can only be initiated when the ICE port is enabled.
40
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The page erase sequence is:
1. Write the page address to FLSH_PGADR[5:0] (SFR 0xB7[7:2]).
2. Write the pattern 0x55 to FLSH_ERASE (SFR 0x94).
Note: Transitions to BROWNOUT mode must be avoided during page erase operations.
Bank-Switching
The program memory of the 71M6533/71M6534 consists of a fixed lower bank of 32 KB, addressable at
0x0000 to 0x7FFF plus an upper banked area of 32 KB, addressable at 0x8000 to 0xFFFF. The upper 32
KB space is banked using the I/O RAM FL_BANK[2:0] register as shown in Table 38.: Note that when
FL_BANK[2:0] = 0, the upper bank is the same as the lower bank.
Table 38: Bank Switching with FL_BANK[2:0]
71M6533/H
71M6534
FL_BANK[1:0]
00
01
10
11
Not applicable
in 71M6533/H
and 71M6534
71M6534H
71M6533G
FL_BANK[2:0]
000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
Address Range for Lower Bank Address Range for Upper Bank
(0x000-0x7FFF)
(0x8000-0xFFFF)
0x0000-0x7FFF
0x0000-0x7FFF
0x8000-0xFFFF
0x10000-0x17FFF
0x18000-0x1FFFF
0x20000-0x27FFF
0x28000-0x2FFFF
0x30000-0x37FFF
0x38000-0x3FFFF
Program Security
When enabled, the security feature limits the ICE to global flash erase operations only. All other ICE
operations are blocked. This guarantees the security of the user’s MPU and CE program code. Security
should be enabled by MPU code that is executed during the pre-boot interval (60 CKMPU cycles before
the primary boot sequence begins). Once security is enabled, the only way to disable it is to perform a
global erase of the flash, followed by a chip reset.
The first 60 cycles of the MPU boot code are called the pre-boot phase because during this phase the
ICE is inhibited. A read-only status bit, PREBOOT, identifies these cycles to the MPU. Upon completion
of pre-boot, the ICE can be enabled and is permitted to take control of the MPU.
The security enable bit, SECURE, is reset whenever the chip is reset. Hardware associated with the bit
permits only ones to be written to it. Thus, pre-boot code may set SECURE to enable the security feature
but may not reset it. Once SECURE is set, the pre-boot code is protected and no external read of program
code is possible
Specifically, when SECURE is set, the following applies:
•
•
•
The ICE is limited to bulk flash erase only.
Page zero of flash memory, the preferred location for the user’s pre-boot code, may not be
page-erased by either MPU or ICE. Page zero may only be erased with global flash erase.
Writes to page zero, whether by MPU or ICE are inhibited.
MPU/CE RAM
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 includes 4 KB of static RAM memory on-chip (XRAM) plus 256 bytes of internal
RAM in the MPU core. The 4 KB of static RAM are used for data storage for both MPU and CE operations.
Rev 2
41
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
1.5.6
FDS_6533_6534_004
Optical Interface
The device includes an interface to implement an IR/optical port. The pin OPT_TX is designed to directly
drive an external LED for transmitting data on an optical link. The pin OPT_RX has the same threshold
as the RX pin, but can also be used to sense the input from an external photo detector used as the receiver
for the optical link. OPT_TX and OPT_RX are connected to a dedicated UART port (UART1).
The OPT_TX and OPT_RX pins can be inverted with configuration bits OPT_TXINV and OPT_RXINV,
respectively. Additionally, the OPT_TX output may be modulated at 38 kHz. Modulation is available
when system power is present (i.e. not in BROWNOUT mode). The OPT_TXMOD bit enables modulation.
The duty cycle is controlled by OPT_FDC[1:0], which can select 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.25% duty cycle. A
6.25% duty cycle means OPT_TX is low for 6.25% of the period. Figure 8 illustrates the OPT_TX generator.
from
OPT_TX UART
OPT_TXINV
Internal
VARPULSE
3
WPULSE
2
1
DIO2
MOD
A
B
0
EN DUTY
OPT_TXE[1:0]
OPT_TXMOD
OPT_FDC
2
OPT_TXMOD = 0
A
A
B
B
V3P3
OPT_TX
OPT_TXMOD = 1,
OPT_FDC = 2 (25%)
1/38kHz
Figure 8: Optical Interface
When not needed for the optical UART, the OPT_TX pin can alternatively be configured as DIO2,
WPULSE, or VARPULSE. The configuration bits are OPT_TXE[1:0]. Likewise, OPT_RX can alternately
be configured as DIO_1. Its control is OPT_RXDIS.
In the 71M6534, a multiplexer allows the selection of alternate pins DIO18/MTX and DIO22/RTX for
UART1. This function is controlled with the UMUX_E and UMUX_SEL bits in I/O RAM.
1.5.7
Digital I/O
The device includes up to 40 pins (71M6533) or 53 pins (71M6534) of general purpose digital I/O. These
pins are compatible with 5 V inputs (no current limiting resistors are needed). The Digital I/O pins can be
categorized as follows:
•
•
•
42
Dedicated DIO pins (5 pins): DIO3, DIO56, DIO57, DIO58, PB
DIO/LCD segment pins
o A total of 33 pins for the 71M6533:
DIO4/SEG24 - DIO11/SEG31 (8 pins)
DIO13/SEG33 - DIO21/SEG41 (9 pins)
DIO23/SEG43 – DIO27/SEG47 (5 pins)
DIO29/SEG49 - DIO30/SEG50 (2 pins)
DIO41/SEG61 (1 pin)
DIO43/SEG63 - DIO45/SEG65 (3 pins)
DIO47/SEG67 – DIO51/SEG71 (5 pins)
o A total of 46 pins for the 71M6534:
DIO4/SEG24 – DIO30/SEG50 (27 pins)
DIO36/SEG56 – DIO39/SEG59 (4 pins)
DIO41/SEG61 – DIO55/SEG75 (15 pins)
DIO pins combined with other functions (2 pins): DIO2/OPT_TX, DIO1/OPT_RX
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
On reset or power-up, all DIO pins are inputs until they are configured for the desired direction under
MPU control. The pin function can be configured by the I/O RAM bits LCD_BITMAPn. Setting
LCD_BITMAPn = 1 configures the pin for LCD, setting LCD_BITMAPn = 0 configures it for DIO.
Once a pin is configured as DIO, it can be configured independently as an input or output with the
DIO_DIR bits or the LCD_SEGn registers. Input and output data are written to or read from the pins using
SFR registers P0, P1, and P2.
Table 39 through
Table 42 shows all the DIO pins with their configuration, direction control and data registers. Table
entries marked with an asterisk and grayed are applicable to the 71M6534 only.
Table 39: Data/Direction Registers and Internal Resources for DIO 1-15
DIO
LCD Segment
71M6533 Pin #
71M6534 Pin #
Configuration (DIO
or LCD segment)
Data Register
Direction Register
0 = input, 1 = output
Internal Resources
Configurable
PB 1
–
–
97 91
114 109
6
7
8
9 10 11 12* 13 14 15
26 27 28 29 30 31 32* 33 34 35
62 63 67 68 69 70 – 44 29 30
72 73 77 78 79 80 120 50 35 36
2
3
4
5
6
7
0* 1
2
3
Always DIO
LCD_BITMAP[31:24]
LCD_BITMAP[39:32]
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0
1
2
3
4* 5
6
7
DIO0 = P0 (SFR 0x80)
DIO1 = P1 (SFR 0x90)
–
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
0
1
2
3
4* 5
6
7
DIO_DIR0 (SFR 0xA2)
DIO_DIR1 (SFR 0x91)
Y
Y
2
–
3
3
3
–
17
22
4
24
60
70
0
5
25
61
71
1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
–
–
–
–
Table 40: Data/Direction Registers and Internal Resources for DIO 16-30
Rev 2
LCD_SEG50[3]
LCD_SEG49[3]
LCD_SEG48[3]*
DIO_DIR2 (SFR 0xA1)
LCD_SEG47[3]
Direction Register
0 = input, 1 = output
LCD_SEG46[3]
Data Register
LCD_SEG45[3]
Configuration (DIO
or LCD segment)
16 17 18 19 20 21 22* 23 24 25 26 27 28* 29 30 –
36 37 38 39 40 41 42* 43 44 45 46 47 48* 49 50 –
33 12 13 64 65 66 – 54 46 43 42 41 – 32 35 –
39 17 18 74 75 76 115 64 52 49 48 47 81 38 41
4
5
6
7
0
1
2* 3
4
5
6
7 0*
1
2
–
LCD_BITMAP[39:32]
LCD_BITMAP[47:40]
LCD_BITMAP[55:48]
0
1
2
3
4
5
6* 7
0
1
2
3 4*
5
6
–
DIO2 = P2 (SFR 0xA0)
DIO3 = P3 (SFR 0xB0)
0
1
2
3
4
5
6* 7
LCD_SEG44[3]
DIO
LCD Segment
71M6533 Pin #
71M6534 Pin #
43
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Table 41: Data/Direction Registers and Internal Resources for DIO 36-47
LCD_SEG67[0]
LCD_SEG59[3]*
LCD_SEG67[3]
LCD_SEG58[3]*
LCD_SEG66[0]*
LCD_SEG57[3]*
LCD_SEG66[3]*
–
LCD_SEG65[0]
–
LCD_SEG65[3]
LCD_SEG59[0]*
–
LCD_SEG64[0]
LCD_SEG58[0]*
–
LCD_SEG64[3]
LCD_SEG57[0]*
Direction Register
0 = input, 1 = output
–
LCD_SEG63[0]
–
LCD_SEG63[3]
–
44 45 46* 47
64 65 66* 67
31 38 – 22
37 44 5 27
0
1 2*
3
LCD_BITMAP[71:64]
LCD_SEG62[0]*
–
43
63
40
46
7
LCD_SEG62[3]*
–
42*
62*
–
118
6*
LCD_SEG61[0]
Data Register
LCD_SEG56[0]*
36* 37* 38* 39* – 41
56* 57* 58* 59* – 61
– 99
–
–
–
–
87 88 89 90 – 117
0* 1* 2* 3*
–
5
LCD_BITMAP[63:56]
LCD_SEG56[3]*
Configuration (DIO
or LCD segment)
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
LCD_BITMAP[55:48]
LCD_SEG61[3]
DIO
LCD Segment
71M6533 Pin #
71M6534 Pin #
Table 42: Data/Direction and Internal Resources for DIO 48-58
DIO
LCD Segment
71M6533 Pin #
71M6534 Pin #
Data Register
LCD_SEG68[0]
LCD_SEG69[0]
LCD_SEG70[0]
LCD_SEG71[0]
LCD_SEG72[0]*
LCD_SEG73[0]*
LCD_SEG74[0]*
LCD_SEG75[0]*
DIO_56[4]
DIO_57[4]
DIO_58[4]
Direction Register
0 = input, 1 = output
LCD_SEG69[3]
LCD_SEG70[3]
LCD_SEG71[3]
LCD_SEG72[3]*
LCD_SEG73[3]*
LCD_SEG74[3]*
LCD_SEG75[3]*
DIO_DIR56[7]
DIO_DIR57[7]
DIO_DIR58[7]
52* 53* 54* 55* 56 57 58
72* 73* 74* 75* –
–
–
–
–
–
– 14 15 16
57 58 59 60 19 20 21
0* 1* 2* 3*
Always DIO
LCD_BITMAP[80:72]
LCD_SEG68[3]
Configuration (DIO
or LCD segment)
48 49 50 51
68 69 70 71
23 24 25 50
28 29 30 56
4
5
6
7
LCD_BITMAP[71:64]
See the tables in the I/O RAM Description (Section 5.2) for exact bit locations. For example,
DIO43 is controlled by LCD_SEG63[0] which resolves to I/O RAM location 0x2045[4].
DIO24 and higher do not have SFR registers for direction control. DIO36 and higher do not have SFR
registers for data access. The direction control of these pins is achieved with the LCD_SEGn[3] registers
and data access is controlled with the LCD_SEGn[0] registers in I/O RAM. DIO56 through DIO58 are
dedicated DIO pins. They are controlled with DIO_DIR56[7] through DIO_DIR58[7] (direction) and with
DIO_56[4] through DIO_58[4] (data) in I/O RAM.
44
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Since the control for DIO_24 through DIO_55 is shared with the control for LCD segments, the firmware
must take care not to disturb the DIO pins when accessing the LCD segments and vice versa. Usually,
this requires reading the I/O RAM register, applying a mask and writing back the modified byte.
DIO4 and DIO5 can be configured to implement the EEPROM Interface.
Additionally, if DIO6 and DIO7 are configured as DIO and defined as outputs, they can be used as dedicated
pulse outputs (WPULSE = DIO6, VARPULSE = DIO7) using the DIO_PW and DIO_PV bits. In this case,
DIO6 and DIO7 are under CE control. Similarly, DIO8 and DIO9 can be declared pulse outputs (XPULSE =
DIO8, YPULSE = DIO9).
The PB pin is a dedicated digital input. In addition, if the optical UART is not used, OPT_TX and OPT_RX can
be configured as dedicated DIO pins, DIO1and DIO2, respectively (see Section 1.5.6 Optical Interface).
Tracking DIO pins configured as outputs is useful for pulse counting without external hardware.
Either the interrupts or the counter/timer clocks can be used to count the pulse outputs, or
interrupt on the CE’s power failure output.
A 3-bit configuration word, I/O RAM register DIO_Rn (0x2009[2:0] through 0x200E[6:4]) can be used for
certain pins (when configured as DIO) to individually assign an internal resource such as an interrupt or a
timer control (DIO_RRX configures the RX pin). This way, DIO pins can be tracked even if they are
configured as outputs. See Table 39 for DIO pins available for this option.
Table 43 lists the internal resources which can be assigned using DIO_R0 (also called DIO_RPB) through
DIO_R7. If more than one input is connected to the same resource, the resources are combined using a
logical OR.
Table 43: Selectable Resources using the DIO_Rn Bits
DIO_Rn
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Resource Selected for DIO Pin
None
Reserved
T0 (counter0 clock)
T1 (counter1 clock)
High priority I/O interrupt (INT0 rising)
Low priority I/O interrupt (INT1 rising)
High priority I/O interrupt (INT0 falling)
Low priority I/O interrupt (INT1 falling)
When driving LEDs, relay coils etc., the DIO pins should sink the current into GNDD (as shown in
Figure 9, right), not source it from V3P3D (as shown in Figure 9, left). This is due to the resistance
of the internal switch that connects V3P3D to either V3P3SYS or VBAT.
Sourcing current into or out of DIO pins other than the PB pin, for example with pull-up or pulldown resistors, should be avoided. Violating this rule will lead to increased quiescent current in
SLEEP and LCD modes.
Rev 2
45
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
MISSION
LCD/SLEEP
BROWNOUT
FDS_6533_6534_004
V3P3SYS
MISSION
VBAT
BROWNOUT
LCD/SLEEP
V3P3D
HIGH
HIGH-Z
DIO
LOW
VBAT
V3P3D
HIGH
HIGH-Z
LOW
GNDD
Not recommended
V3P3SYS
DIO
GNDD
Recommended
Figure 9: Connecting an External Load to DIO Pins
1.5.8
LCD Drivers
The device contains a total of 57 (71M6533) or 75 (71M6534) dedicated and multiplexed LCD drivers,
which are grouped as follows:
15 dedicated LCD segment drivers (SEG0 to SEG2, SEG8, SEG12 to SEG18, SEG20 to SEG23)
4 drivers multiplexed with the SPI port (SEG3 to SEG6)
2 drivers multiplexed with MUX_SYNC and CKTEST (SEG7 and SEG19)
3 or 8 drivers multiplexed with the ICE interface
o 71M6533 – 3 drivers (SEG9 to SEG11)
o 71M6534 – 8 drivers (SEG9 to SEG11 and SEG51 to SEG55)
• 33 or 46 multi-use LCD/DIO pins described in Section 1.5.7 Digital I/O
o 71M6533 – 33 pins
o 71M6534 – 46 pins
With a minimum of 15 driver pins always available and a total of 57 (71M6533) or 75 (71M6534) driver
pins in the maximum configuration, the device is capable of driving between 60 to 228 pixels (71M6533)
or 60 to 300 pixels (71M6534) of an LCD display with 25% duty cycle. At eight pixels per digit, this
corresponds to 7.5 to 28 digits for the 71M6533 or 7.5 to 37 digits for the 71M6534. The LCD interface is
flexible and can drive 7-segment digits, 14- segments digits or enunciator symbols.
•
•
•
•
For each multi-use pin, the corresponding LCD_BITMAP[] bit (see Section 1.5.7 Digital I/O) is used to select
the pin for DIO or LCD operation. The mapping of the LCD_BITMAP[] bits is specified in Section 5.1 I/O
RAM and SFR Map –Functional Order. The LCD drivers are supported by the four common pins (COM0
– COM3).
LCD segment data is written to the LCD_SEGn[3:0] I/O RAM registers as described in Section 5.2 I/O
RAM Description – Alphabetical Order. Note that even though the register names call out bit numbers 3
to 0 some registers use physical bits 4 to 7.
The segment driver SEG18 can be configured to blink at either 0.5 Hz or 1 Hz. The blink rate is controlled
by LCD_Y. There can be up to four pixels/segments connected to this driver pin. The I/O RAM field
LCD_BLKMAP18[3:0] identifies which pixels, if any, are to blink.
The LCD bias may be compensated for temperature using the LCD_DAC[2:0] bits in I/O RAM. The bias
may be adjusted from 1.4 V below the 3.3 V supply (V3P3SYS in mission mode and BROWNOUT
46
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
modes, VBAT in LCD mode). When the LCD_DAC[2:0] bits are set to 000, the DAC is bypassed and
powered down. This can be used to reduce current in LCD mode.
1.5.9
Battery Monitor
The battery voltage is measured by the ADC during alternative MUX frames if the BME (Battery Measure
Enable) bit is set. While BME is set, an on-chip 45 kΩ load resistor is applied to the battery and a scaled
fraction of the battery voltage is applied to the ADC input. After each alternative MUX frame, the result of
the ADC conversion is available at XRAM address 0x07. BME is ignored and assumed zero when system
power is not available.
If VBAT is connected to a drained battery or disconnected, a battery test that sets BME may drain
VBAT’s supply and cause the oscillator to stop. A stopped oscillator may force the device to reset.
Therefore, an unexpected reset during a battery test should be interpreted as a battery failure.
Battery measurement is not very linear but is very reproducible. The best way to perform the calibration
is to set the battery input to the desired failure voltage and then have the MPU firmware record that
measurement. After this, the MPU firmware’s battery measurement logic may use the recorded value as
the battery failure limit. The same value can also be a calibration offset for any battery voltage display.
See Section 6.4.5 for details regarding the ADC LSB size and the conversion accuracy.
1.5.10 EEPROM Interface
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 provides hardware support for either a two-pin or a three-wire (µ-wire) type
of EEPROM interface. The interfaces use the EECTRL and EEDATA registers for communication.
Two-pin EEPROM Interface
The dedicated 2-pin serial interface communicates with external EEPROM devices. The interface is
multiplexed onto the DIO4 (SCK) and DIO5 (SDA) pins and is selected by setting DIO_EEX[1:0] = 01.
The MPU communicates with the interface through the SFR registers EEDATA and EECTRL. If the MPU
wishes to write a byte of data to the EEPROM, it places the data in EEDATA and then writes the Transmit
code to EECTRL. This initiates the transmit operation which is finished when the BUSY bit falls. INT5 is also
asserted when BUSY falls. The MPU can then check the RX_ACK bit to see if the EEPROM acknowledged
the transmission.
A byte is read by writing the Receive command to EECTRL and waiting for the BUSY bit to fall. Upon
completion, the received data is in EEDATA. The serial transmit and receive clock is 78 kHz during each
transmission, and then holds in a high state until the next transmission. The EECTRL bits when the two-pin
interface is selected are shown in Table 44.
Table 44: EECTRL Bits for 2-pin Interface
Status
Bit
7
6
5
4
Reset
State
0
0
1
Polarity
Description
ERROR
BUSY
RX_ACK
Read/
Write
R
R
R
Positive
Positive
Negative
TX_ACK
R
1
Negative
1 when an illegal command is received.
1 when serial data bus is busy.
0 indicates that the EEPROM sent an ACK bit.
0 indicates when an ACK bit has been sent to the
EEPROM.
Name
CMD[3:0]
0000
3:0
CMD[3:0]
W
0000
Positive
0010
0011
0101
Rev 2
Operation
No-op command. Stops the I2C clock
(SCK, DIO4). If not issued, SCK
keeps toggling.
Receive a byte from the EEPROM
and send ACK.
Transmit a byte to the EEPROM.
Issue a STOP sequence.
47
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Status
Bit
Name
Read/
Write
Reset
State
Polarity
FDS_6533_6534_004
Description
0110
1001
Others
Receive the last byte from the
EEPROM and do not send ACK.
Issue a START sequence.
No operation, set the ERROR bit.
The EEPROM interface can also be operated by controlling the DIO4 and DIO5 pins directly. In
this case, a resistor has to be used in series with SDA to avoid data collisions due to limits in the
speed at which the SDA pin can be switched from output to input. However, controlling DIO4 and
DIO5 directly is discouraged, because it may tie up the MPU to the point where it may become too
busy to process interrupts.
Three-wire (µ-Wire) EEPROM Interface
A 500 kHz three-wire interface, using SDATA, SCK, and a DIO pin for CS is available. The interface is
selected by setting DIO_EEX[1:0] = 2. The EECTRL bits when the three-wire interface is selected are
shown in Table 45. When EECTRL is written, up to 8 bits from EEDATA are either written to the EEPROM
or read from the EEPROM, depending on the values of the EECTRL bits.
The µ-Wire EEPROM interface is only functional when MPU_DIV[2:0] = 000.
Table 45: EECTRL Bits for the 3-wire Interface
Control
Bit
Name
Read/
Write
Description
Wait for Ready. If this bit is set, the trailing edge of BUSY will be delayed
until a rising edge is seen on the data line. This bit can be used during
WFR
the last byte of a Write command to cause the INT5 interrupt to occur
7
W
when the EEPROM has finished its internal write sequence. This bit is
ignored if HiZ=0.
BUSY
6
R
Asserted while the serial data bus is busy. When the BUSY bit falls, an
INT5 interrupt occurs.
HiZ
5
W
Indicates that the SD signal is to be floated to high impedance immediately
after the last SCK rising edge.
RD
4
W
Indicates that EEDATA is to be filled with data from EEPROM.
Specifies the number of clocks to be issued. Allowed values are 0
through 8. If RD=1, CNT bits of data will be read MSB first, and right
justified into the low order bits of EEDATA. If RD=0, CNT bits will be
CNT[3:0]
3:0
W
sent MSB first to the EEPROM, shifted out of the MSB of EEDATA. If
CNT[3:0] is zero, SDATA will simply obey the HiZ bit.
The timing diagrams in Figure 10 through Figure 14 describe the 3-wire EEPROM interface behavior. All
commands begin when the EECTRL register is written. Transactions start by first raising the DIO pin that
is connected to CS. Multiple 8-bit or less commands such as those shown in Figure 10 through Figure 14
are then sent via EECTRL and EEDATA.
When the transaction is finished, CS must be lowered. At the end of a Read transaction, the EEPROM
will be driving SDATA, but will transition to HiZ (high impedance) when CS falls. The firmware should
then immediately issue a write command with CNT=0 and HiZ=0 to take control of SDATA and force it to
a low-Z state.
48
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
EECTRL Byte Written
INT5
CNT Cycles (6 shown)
Write -- No HiZ
SCLK (output)
SDATA (output)
D7
D6
D5
SDATA output Z
D4
D3
D2
(LoZ)
BUSY (bit)
Figure 10: 3-wire Interface. Write Command, HiZ=0.
EECTRL Byte Written
INT5
CNT Cycles (6 shown)
Write -- With HiZ
SCLK (output)
SDATA (output)
D7
D6
D5
SDATA output Z
D4
D3
D2
(LoZ)
(HiZ)
BUSY (bit)
Figure 11: 3-wire Interface. Write Command, HiZ=1
EECTRL Byte Written
INT5
CNT Cycles (8 shown)
READ
SCLK (output)
SDATA (input)
D7
D6
SDATA output Z
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
(HiZ)
BUSY (bit)
Figure 12: 3-wire Interface. Read Command.
EECTRL Byte Written
Write -- No HiZ
INT5 not issued
CNT Cycles (0 shown)
EECTRL Byte Written
Write -- HiZ
INT5 not issued
CNT Cycles (0 shown)
SCLK (output)
SCLK (output)
SDATA (output)
SDATA (output)
D7
SDATA output Z
SDATA output Z
(LoZ)
(HiZ)
BUSY (bit)
BUSY (bit)
Figure 13: 3-Wire Interface. Write Command when CNT=0
EECTRL Byte Written
INT5
CNT Cycles (6 shown)
Write -- With HiZ and WFR
SCLK (output)
SDATA (out/in)
SDATA output Z
D7
D6
D5
(From 6520)
From
653X
(LoZ)
D4
D3
D2
BUSY
READY
(From EEPROM)
(HiZ)
BUSY (bit)
Figure 14: 3-wire Interface. Write Command when HiZ=1 and WFR=1
Rev 2
49
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
1.5.11 SPI Slave Port
The slave SPI port communicates directly with the MPU data bus and is able to read and write Data RAM
locations. It is also able to send commands to the MPU. The interface to the slave port consists of the
PCSZ, PCLK, PSDI and PSDO pins. These pins are multiplexed with the LCD segment driver pins SEG3
to SEG6. The port pins default to LCD driver pins. The port is enabled by setting the SPE bit.
Possible applications for the SPI interface are:
1) An external host reads data from CE locations to obtain metering information. This can be used in
applications where the 71M6533 or 71M6534 function as a smart front-end with preprocessing
capability. Since the addresses are in 16-bit format, any type of XRAM data can be accessed: CE,
MPU, I/O RAM, but not SFRs or the 80515-internal register bank.
2) A communication link can be established via the SPI interface: By writing into MPU memory
locations, the external host can initiate and control processes in the 71M6533/71M6534 MPU.
Writing to a CE or MPU location normally generates an interrupt, a function that can be used to signal
to the MPU that the byte that had just been written by the external host must be read and processed.
Data can also be inserted by the external host without generating an interrupt.
3) An external DSP can access front-end data generated by the ADC. This mode of operation uses the
71M6533 or 71M6534 as an analog front-end (AFE).
A typical SPI transaction is as follows: While PCSZ is high, the port is held in an initialized/reset state.
During this state, PSDO is held in HiZ state and all transitions on PCLK and PSDI are ignored. When
PCSZ falls, the port will begin the transaction on the first rising edge of PCLK. The transaction ends
when PCSZ is raised. At this point, the SPI interrupt is generated. Some transactions may consist of a
command only. The read transaction consists of the following parts:
1.
2.
3.
4.
8-bit command word generated by the host
16-bit address generated by the host
8-bit datum provided by the slave (71M653x)
Optionally, more 8-bit data bytes (71M653x)
The write transaction consists of the following parts:
1.
2.
3.
4.
8-bit command word generated by the host
16-bit address generated by the host
8-bit datum provided by the host
Optionally, more 8-bit data bytes provided by the host
The optional data bytes are part of an auto-increment mode, where the read or write address is
incremented by 1 after every read or write operation and does not have to be generated by the host. This
operation mode is useful for quickly accessing fields of adjacent data in one long SPI command
sequence.
Table 46 lists I/O RAM registers (bit fields) that are involved in SPI transactions.
Table 46: SPI Registers
Register Name
SP_ADDR[15:8]
SP_ADDR[7:0]
SP_CMD
SPE
SPI_FLAG
Description
SPI Address. 16-bit address from the bus master. This register does not auto-increment and reading this register will not reflect the next available address after an autoincrement command.
SPI command. 8-bit command from the bus master.
SPI port enable. Enables the SPI interface.
SPI interrupt flag. The flag is set by the hardware and is cleared by the firmware writing a 0. Firmware using this interrupt should clear the spurious interrupt indication
during initialization.
In order to allow access from the external host, the SPE bit has to be set. The SP_CMD and
SP_ADDR[15:0] bit fields contain a copy of the command word and address sent by the SPI master.
50
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The SPI_FLAG flag bit will be set upon every SPI transaction regardless of whether the command is 11xx
xxxx or 10xx xxxx. The SP_ADDR[15:0] bit field is for writing purposes by the host only. Data read from
SP_ADDR[15:0] will not contain the next available SPI address after an auto-increment operation.
The last issued SPI command and address (if part of the command) are available to the MPU in registers
SP_CMD and SP_ADDR.
The SPI port supports data transfers at 1 Mb/s in mission mode, and 16 kb/s in BROWNOUT mode. The
SPI port may operate at higher speeds under certain conditions. For SPI speeds higher than 1 Mbit/s, the
following conditions apply:
•
•
Write operations can be issued by the host at up to 2 Mbits/s.
Read operations can be issued at up to 2 Mbit/s, if a minimum gap of 1 µs is inserted by the host
between the last PSCK clock of the SPI address and the first clock of the data read. This gap will
give the hardware of the 71M653x sufficient time to fetch and provide the read data.
A read transaction performed at 2 Mbit/s is shown in Figure 15.
PCSZ
PCLK
1 µs min.
0.5 µs
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 15 14 ……………...….
PSDI
Command
6 5 4 3 1 0
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
Address
PSDO
Data
Figure 15: SPI Slave Port: Read Operation with Gap
Figure 16 illustrates the SPI Interface read and write timing.
Table 47: SPI Command Description
Command
11xx xxxx ADDR Byte0 ... ByteN
10xx xxxx ADDR Byte0 ... ByteN
0xxx xxxx ADDR Byte0 ... ByteN
Description
Read data starting at ADDR. The address value provided in ADDR will
be automatically incremented until PCSZ is raised. Upon completion:
SP__CMD=11xx xxxx
An MPU interrupt is generated.
Write data starting at ADDR. The address value provided in ADDR will
be automatically incremented until PCSZ is raised. Upon completion:
SP_CMD=10xx xxxx
An MPU interrupt is generated.
Commands other than 1xxx xxxx are ignored, but an SPI interrupt is still
generated when PCSZ goes high.
Certain I/O RAM registers can be written and read using the SPI port (see Table 48). However, the MPU
takes priority over the I/O RAM bus, and SPI operation may fail without notice. To avoid this situation, the
SPI host should send a command other than 11xxxxxx or 10xxxxxx (read or write) before the actual read
or write command. The SPI slave interface will load the command register and generate an INT2 interrupt
upon receiving the command. The MPU should service the interrupt and halt any external data memory
operations to effectively grant the bus to the SPI. When the SPI host finishes, it should send another
Rev 2
51
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
command so the MPU can access the bus. There are no issues with Data RAM access; SPI and the
MPU will share the bus with no conflicts for Data RAM access.
Table 48: I/O RAM Registers Accessible via SPI
Name
Address (hex)
CE0
2000
CE1
2001
CE2
2002
CONFIG0
2004
CONFIG1
2005
VERSION
2006
CONFIG2
2007
DIO0
2008
DIO1 to DIO6
2009 to 200E
−
200F
RTM0H
2060
RTM0L
2061
RTM1H
2062
RTM1L
2063
RTM2H
2064
RTM2L
2065
RTM3H
2066
RTM3L
2067
PLS_W
2080
PLS_I
2081
SLOT0 to SLOT9 2090 to 209A
CE3
209D
CE4
20A7
CE5
20A8
WAKE
20A9
CONFIG3
20AC
CONFIG4
20AD
−
20AF
SPI0
20B0
SPI1
20B1
VERSION
20C8
CHIP_ID
20C9
TRIMSEL
20FD
TRIMX
20FE
TRIM
20FF
52
Bit Range
7:3
7:0
5:3, 1:0
7:6, 1:0
5:2, 0
7:0
7:0
7, 4:0
6:4, 2:0
7:6, 3:2
1:0
7:0
1:0
7:0
1:0
7:0
1:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
7:0
3:0
7:0
7:0
7:5, 3:0
7:0
7:0
2:0
4, 0
4, 0
7:0
7:0
4:0
0
7:0
Read/Write
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
R
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
RW
R
RW
RW
RW
RW
R
R
R
RW
RW
RW
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
SERIAL READ
8 bit CMD
DATA[ADDR]
16 bit Address
DATA[ADDR+1]
Extended Read . . .
PCSZ
0
7
8
C0
A15
23
24
A0
x
31
32
D0
D7
39
PSCK
(From Host) PSDI
x
C7
C6
C5
A14
A1
HI Z
(From 653X) PSDO
SERIAL WRITE
D7
8 bit CMD
D6
D1
DATA[ADDR]
16 bit Address
D1
D0
DATA[ADDR+1]
PCSZ
Extended Write . . .
0
PSCK
(From Host) PSDI
D6
x
C7
C6
C5
7
8
C0
A15
A14
A1
23
24
A0
D7
D6
D1
31
32
D0
D7
39
D6
D1
D0
x
HI Z
(From 653X) PSDO
Figure 16: SPI Slave Port: Typical Read and Write Operations
SFR locations, i.e. the control registers internal to the 71M653x MPU, are not accessible via the SPI port.
In cases where these registers have to be accessed, for example to control DIO pins, a protocol that uses
the MPU has to be used for read and write operations involving the SFRs.
1.5.12 Hardware Watchdog Timer
An independent, robust, fixed-duration, watchdog timer (WDT) is included in the 71M6533/71M6534. It
uses the RTC crystal oscillator as its time base and must be refreshed by the MPU firmware at least every
1.5 seconds. When not refreshed on time, the WDT overflows and the
V1
part is reset as if the RESET pin were pulled high, except that the I/O
RAM bits will be in the same state as after a wake-up from SLEEP or LCD
V3P3
WDT dismodes (see the I/O RAM description in Section 5.2 for a list of I/O RAM bit
V3P3 - 10mV
abled
states after RESET and wake-up). 4100 oscillator cycles (or 125 ms) after
V3P3 the WDT overflow, the MPU will be launched from program address
400mV
0x0000.
Normal
operation,
WDT
enabled
VBIAS
Battery
modes
A status bit, WD_OVF, is set when the WDT overflow occurs. This bit is
preserved in LCD mode (not in SLEEP mode) and can be read by the
MPU when WAKE rises to determine if the part is initializing after a WDT
overflow event or after a power-up. After it is read, the MPU firmware
must clear WD_OVF. The WD_OVF bit is also cleared by the RESET pin.
There is no internal digital state that deactivates the WDT. The WDT can
be disabled by tying the V1 pin to V3P3 (see Figure 17). Of course, this
also deactivates V1 power fault detection. Since there is no method in
firmware to disable the crystal oscillator or the WDT, it is guaranteed that
whatever state the part might find itself in, upon watchdog overflow, the
part will be reset to a known state.
0V
Figure 17: Functions Defined by V1
Asserting ICE_E will also deactivate the WDT. This is the only method that will work in BROWNOUT mode.
In normal operation, the WDT is reset by periodically writing a one to the WDT_RST bit. The watchdog timer
is also reset when the internal signal WAKE=0 (see Section 2.5 Wake Up Behavior).
Rev 2
53
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
If enabled with the IEN_WD_NROVF bit in I/O RAM, an interrupt occurs roughly 1 ms before the WDT resets
the chip. This can be used to determine the cause of a WDT reset since it allows the code to log its state
(e.g. the current PC value, loop counters, flags, etc.) before a WDT reset occurs.
1.5.13 Test Ports (TMUXOUT Pin)
One of the digital or analog signals listed in Table 49 can be selected to be output on the TMUXOUT pin.
The function of the multiplexer is controlled with TMUX[4:0] (I/O RAM 0x20AA[4:0]), as shown in Table 49.
The TMUXOUT pin may be used for diagnosis purposes or in production test. The RTC 1-second output
may be used to calibrate the crystal oscillator. The RTC 4-second output provides even higher precision.
Table 49: TMUX[4:0] Selections
TMUX[4:0]
Mode
Function
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8 - 0x0F
0x10
0x11
0x12
0x13
0x14
0x15
0x16
0x17
0x18
0x19
0x1A
0x1B
0x1C
0X1D
0X1E
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
Analog
–
Digital
Digital
–
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
–
Digital
Digital
Digital
Digital
0X1F
Digital
GNDD
Reserved
GNDD
Reserved
PLL_2P5
Output of the 2.5 V low-power regulator
Internal VBIAS voltage (nominally 1.6V)
Not used
Reserved
RTC 1-second output
RTC 4-second output
Not used
V1 comparator output, synchronized to RTCLK
Real-time output from the CE
WDTR_EN (comparator 1 output AND V1LT3)
V2 comparator output (71M6534 only)
V1 comparator output, unsynchronized
RXD (from Optical interface, w/ optional inversion)
MUX_SYNC
Not used
CKMPU (MPU clock)
Pulse output
RTCLK (output of the oscillator circuit, nominally 32,786Hz)
CE_BUSY (busy interrupt generated by CE, 396µs)
XFER_BUSY (transfer busy interrupt generated by the CE,
nominally every 999.7ms)
1.5.14 V2 Comparator (71M6534/6534H Only)
The 71M6534/6534H offers a pin that is connected to an internal comparator. The voltage applied to this
pin is compared to the internal reference voltage (VBIAS). If the voltage at the V2 pin is above VBIAS,
the comparator output will be high (1). The comparator output is reflected at the TMUXOUT pin, when
0x16 is selected for TMUX[4:0].
54
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
2 Functional Description
2.1
Theory of Operation
The energy delivered by a power source into a load can be expressed as:
t
E = ∫ V (t ) I (t )dt
0
Assuming phase angles are constant, the following formulae apply:


P = Real Energy [Wh] = V * A * cos φ* t

S = Apparent Energy [VAh] =
Q = Reactive Energy [VARh] = V * A * sin φ * t
P2 + Q2
For a practical meter, not only voltage and current amplitudes, but also phase angles and harmonic content
may change constantly. Thus, simple RMS measurements are inherently inaccurate. A modern solid-state
electricity meter IC such as the Teridian 71M6533 and 71M6534 functions by emulating the integral operation
above, i.e. it processes current and voltage samples through an ADC at a constant frequency. As long as
the ADC resolution is high enough and the sample frequency is beyond the harmonic range of interest, the
current and voltage samples, multiplied with the time period of sampling will yield an accurate quantity for
the momentary energy. Summing up the momentary energy quantities over time will result in accumulated
energy.
500
400
300
200
100
0
0
5
10
15
20
-100
-200
-300
Current [A]
Voltage [V]
Energy per Interval [Ws]
-400
Accumulated Energy [Ws]
-500
Figure 18: Voltage, Current, Momentary and Accumulated Energy
Figure 18 shows the shapes of V(t), I(t), the momentary power and the accumulated power, resulting from
50 samples of the voltage and current signals over a period of 20 ms. The application of 240 VAC and 100 A
results in an accumulation of 480 Ws (= 0.133 Wh) over the 20 ms period, as indicated by the accumulated
power curve. The described sampling method works reliably, even in the presence of dynamic phase
shift and harmonic distortion.
Rev 2
55
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
2.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
System Timing Summary
Figure 19 summarizes the timing relationships between the input MUX states, the CE_BUSY signal and
the two serial output streams. In this example, MUX_DIV[3:0] = 6 and FIR_LEN[1:0] = 1. The duration of
each MUX frame is (M40MHZ/M26MHZ = 00, 10, or 11 assumed):
1 + MUX_DIV[3:0] * 1, if FIR_LEN[1:0] = 0 (138 CE cycles), complete MUX frame = 7 CK32 cycles
1 + MUX_DIV[3:0] * 2, if FIR_LEN[1:0] = 1 (288 CE cycles) , complete MUX frame = 13 CK32 cycles
1 + MUX_DIV[3:0] * 3, if FIR_LEN[1:0] = 2 (384 CE cycles) , complete MUX frame = 19 CK32 cycles
•
•
•
An ADC conversion will always consume an integer number of CK32 clocks. Following this is a single
CK32 cycle where the bandgap voltage is allowed to recover from the change in CROSS.
ADC MUX Frame
ADC TIMING
MUX_DIV Conversions (MUX_DIV=6 is shown)
CK32
Settle
150
MUX_SYNC
ADC EXECUTION
CE TIMING
CE_EXECUTION
ADC0
0
ADC1
300
ADC2
600
ADC3
900
ADC4
1200
ADC5
1500
CK COUNT = CE_CYCLES + floor((CE_CYCLES + 2) / 4)
1800
MAX CK COUNT
CE_BUSY
XFER_BUSY
INITIATED BY A CE OPCODE AT END OF SUM INTERVAL
RTM TIMING
140
RTM
NOTES:
1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE 4.9152 MHz CK COUNTS.
2. XFER_BUSY OCCURS ONCE EVERY (PRESAMPS * SUM_CYCLES) CODE PASSES.
Figure 19: Timing Relationship between ADC MUX and Compute Engine
Each CE program pass begins when the ADC0 conversion (slot 0, as defined by SLOT0_SEL) begins.
Depending on the length of the CE program, it may continue running until the end of the last conversion.
CE opcodes are constructed to ensure that all CE code passes consume exactly the same number of
cycles. The result of each ADC conversion is inserted into the XRAM when the conversion is complete.
The CE code is written to tolerate sudden changes in ADC data. The exact clock count when each ADC
value is loaded into RAM is shown in Figure 19.
Figure 20 shows that the serial data stream, RTM, begins transmitting at the beginning of state S. RTM,
consisting of 140 CK cycles, will always finish before the next code pass starts.
CK32
MUX_SYNC
CKTEST
30
0
31
1
30
0
31
1
30
31
FLAG
SIGN
LSB
FLAG
SIGN
1
FLAG
LSB
0
31
SIGN
30
LSB
RTM DATA 0 (32 bits)
RTM DATA 1 (32 bits)
RTM DATA 2 (32 bits)
RTM DATA 3 (32 bits)
1
SIGN
0
FLAG
LSB
TMUXOUT/RTM
Figure 20: RTM Output Format
56
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
2.3
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Battery Modes
Shortly after system power (V3P3SYS) is applied, the part will be in MISSION mode. MISSION mode
means that the part is operating with system power and that the internal PLL is stable. This mode is the
normal operation mode where the part is capable of measuring energy.
When system power is not available (i.e. when V1<VBIAS), the 71M6533 and 71M6534 will be in one of
three battery modes: BROWNOUT, LCD, or SLEEP mode. Figure 21 shows a state diagram of the various
operation modes, with the possible transitions between modes. For information on the timing of mode
transitions refer to Figure 22 through Figure 24.
Figure 21: Operation Modes State Diagram
When V1 falls below VBIAS or the part wakes up under battery power, the part will automatically enter
BROWNOUT mode (see Section 2.5 Wake Up Behavior). From BROWNOUT mode, the part may enter
either LCD mode or SLEEP mode, as controlled by the MPU via the I/O RAM bits LCD_ONLY and SLEEP.
The transition from MISSION mode to BROWNOUT mode is signaled by the IE_PLLFALL interrupt flag
(SFR 0xE8[7]). The transition in the other direction is signaled by the IE_PLLRISE interrupt flag (SFR
0xE8[6]), when the PLL becomes stable.
Meters that do not require functionality in the battery modes, e.g. meters that only use the SLEEP
mode to maintain the RTC, still need to contain code that brings the chip from BROWNOUT
mode to SLEEP mode. Otherwise, the chip remains in BROWNOUT mode once the system
power is missing and consumes more current than intended.
Similarly, meters equipped with batteries need to contain code that transitions the chip to SLEEP
mode as soon as the battery is attached in production. Otherwise, remaining in BROWNOUT
mode would unnecessarily drain the battery.
Rev 2
57
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
To facilitate transition to SLEEP mode, which is useful when an unprogrammed IC is mounted on a PCB
with a battery installed, the Teridian production test programs the following six-byte sequence into the
flash location starting at address 0x00000: 0x74 - 0x40 - 0x90 - 0x20 - 0xA9 - 0xF0. This sequence
decodes to the following assembler code:
0000: 7440
0002: 9020A9
0005: F0
MOV A,#40
MOV DPTR,#20A9
MOVX @DPTR,A
; set bit 6 in accumulator
; point to I/O RAM address 0x20A9
; set bit 6 (sleep) in 0x20A9
Transitions from both LCD and SLEEP mode are initiated by wake-up timer timeout conditions or
pushbutton events. When the PB pin is pulled high (pushbutton is pressed), the IE_PB interrupt flag (SFR
0xE8[4]) is set, and when the wake-up timer times out, the IE_WAKE interrupt flag (SFR 0xE8[5]) is set.
In the absence of system power, if the voltage margin for the LDO regulator providing 2.5 V to the internal
circuitry becomes too low to be safe, the part automatically enters SLEEP mode (BAT_OK false). The
battery voltage must stay above 3 V to ensure that BAT_OK remains true. Under this condition, the
71M6533 and 71M6534 stays in SLEEP mode, even if the voltage margin for the LDO improves (BAT_OK
true). Table 50 shows the circuit functions available in each operating mode.
Table 50: Available Circuit Functions
Circuit Function
CE
CE/MPU Data RAM
FIR
Analog circuits:
MPU clock rate
MPU_DIV
ICE
DIO Pins
Watchdog Timer
LCD
EEPROM Interface (2-wire)
EEPROM Interface (3-wire)
UART
Optical TX modulation
Flash Read
Flash Page Erase
Flash Write
XRAM Read and Write
Wakeup Timer
Oscillator and RTC
XRAM data preservation
V3P3D voltage output pin
GPO – GP7 registers
– indicates not active
58
System Power
MISSION
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
From PLL, as
defined by
MPU_DIV[2:0]
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Battery Power (Nonvolatile Supply)
BROWNOUT
LCD
SLEEP
–
–
–
Yes
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
28.672 kHz
(7/8 of 32768 Hz)
–
–
–
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes (8 kb/s)
Yes (16 kb/s)
300 bd
–
Yes
Yes
–
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
–
–
–
–
Yes
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Yes
Yes
–
–
Yes
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Yes
Yes
–
–
Yes
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
2.3.1
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
BROWNOUT Mode
In BROWNOUT mode, most non-metering digital functions are active (as shown in Table 50) including
ICE, UART, EEPROM, LCD and RTC. In BROWNOUT mode, a low-bias current regulator will provide
2.5 Volts to V2P5 and V2P5NV. The regulator has an output called BAT_OK to indicate that it has sufficient
overhead. When BAT_OK = 0, the part will enter SLEEP mode. From BROWNOUT mode, the processor
can voluntarily enter LCD or SLEEP modes. When system power is restored, the part will automatically
transition from any of the battery modes to MISSION mode, once the PLL has settled.
The MPU will run at 7/8 of the crystal clock rate in BROWNOUT mode. This permits the UARTs to be
operated at 300 bd. In this mode, the MPU clock has substantial short-term jitter.
The value of MPU_DIV[2:0] will be remembered (not changed) as the part enters and exits BROWNOUT.
MPU_DIV[2:0] will be ignored during BROWNOUT.
While PLL_OK = 0, the I/O RAM bits ADC_E and CE_E are held in the zero state disabling both the ADC and
the CE. When PLL_OK falls, the CE program counter is cleared immediately and all FIR processing halts.
Figure 25 shows the functional blocks active in BROWNOUT mode.
2.3.2
LCD Mode
In LCD mode, the data contained in the LCD_SEGn[3:0] fields is displayed. Up to four LCD segments
connected to the pin SEG18 can be made to blink without the involvement of the MPU, which is disabled
in LCD mode. To minimize power, only segments that might be used should be enabled.
LCD mode can be exited only by system power up, a timeout of the wake-up timer, or a push button.
When the IC exits LCD mode, the MPU can discover the event that caused the exit by reading the interrupt
flags and interpret them as follows:
•
•
•
•
IE_WAKE = 1 indicates that the wake timer has expired.
IE_PB =1 indicates that the pushbutton input (PB) was activated.
COMPSTAT = 0 indicates that a reset occurred but that main power is not yet available.
If none of the above conditions applies, system power (V3P3SYS) must have been restored
After the transition from LCD mode to MISSION or BROWNOUT mode, the PC will be at 0x0000, the
XRAM is in an undefined state, and the I/O RAM is only partially preserved (see the description of I/O
RAM states in Section 5.2). GP0[7:0] through GP7[7:0] are preserved unless a hardware reset occurs
(RESET pin is pulled high or power to the part is cycled without a battery being present). Figure 26
shows the functional blocks active in LCD mode.
2.3.3
SLEEP Mode
In SLEEP mode, the battery current is minimized and only the Oscillator and RTC functions are active.
This mode can be exited only by system power-up, a timeout of the wake-up timer, or a push button event.
When the IC exits SLEEP mode, the MPU can discover the event that caused the exit by reading the
interrupt flags and interpret them as follows:
•
•
•
•
IE_WAKE = 1 indicates that the wake timer has expired.
IE_PB =1 indicates that the pushbutton input (PB) was activated.
COMPSTAT = 0 indicates that a reset occurred but that main power is not yet available.
If none of the above conditions applies, system power (V3P3SYS) must have been restored
After the transition from SLEEP mode to MISSION or BROWNOUT mode the PC will be at 0x0000, the
XRAM is in an undefined state, and the I/O RAM is only partially preserved (see the description of I/O
RAM states in Section 5.2). GP0[7:0] through GP7[7:0] are preserved unless the a hardware reset occurs
(RESET pin is pulled high or power to the part is cycled without a battery being present). Figure 27
shows the functional blocks active in SLEEP mode.
Rev 2
59
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
System
(V3P3SYS)
V1_OK
Battery
Current
MPU Mode
300 nA
BROWNOUT
PLL_OK
MISSION
13..14 CK
cycles
WAKE
MPU Clock
Source
Transition
PLL
(4.2 MHz/MUX_DIV)
Xtal
2048...4096
CK32 cycles
Power
Figure 22: Transition from BROWNOUT to MISSION Mode when System Power Returns
V3P3SYS
and VBAT
V1_OK
Battery
Current
MPU Mode
MPU Clock
Source
WAKE
PLL_OK
Internal
RESETZ
300 nA
BROWNOUT
Xtal
MISSION
PLL
(4.2 MHz)
14.5 CK32
cycles
4096 CK32
cycles
1024 CK32
cycles
time
Figure 23: Power-Up Timing with V3P3SYS and VBAT Tied Together
60
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
VBAT
Battery
Current
BROWNOUT
MPU Mode
MPU Clock
Source
WAKE
Xtal
14.5 CK32
cycles
PLL_OK
Internal
RESETZ
1024 CK32
cycles
VBAT_OK
time
Figure 24: Power-Up Timing with VBAT Only
Rev 2
61
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
GNDA GNDD
VREF
∆Σ ADC
CONVERTER
VBIAS
FIR
VADC
MUX
22
VREF
VREF
VBAT
PLS_INV
PLS_INTERVAL
PLS_MAXWIDTH
CE_LCTN
EQU
PRE_SAMPS
SUM_CYCLES
RTM_0...3
RTM_E
CE_E
CE_PROG
16
TEMP
2.5V_NV
OSC
(32 kHz)
XIN
XOUT
RTCLK (32KHz)
MCK
PLL
MPU_DIV
CKOUT_E
V3P3D
CE
VBIAS
CK_CE
FLASH
128 KB/
256 KB
RTM
VBAT
to TMUX
VOLT
REG
RPULSE
WPULSE
LCD_ONLY
SLEEP
XPULSE
YPULSE
YPULSE
XPULSE
WPULSE
RPULSE
IAP
IAN
VA
IBP
IBN
VB
ICP
ICN
VC
IDP
IDN
V3P3SYS
V3P3A
CE_DATA
32
V2P5
2.5V to logic
2.5V_NV
XRAM
4 KB
DIO_PV
DIO_PW
DIO_PX
DIO_PY
CK_MPU
RTCA_ADJ
CKTEST
RTC
2.5V_NV
TEST
MULTIPURPOSE
I/O
RST_SUBSEC
QREG,PREG
RTC_DAY
RTC_DATE
RTC_HR
RTC_MIN RTC_MO
RTC_SEC RTC_YR
TX
LCD DISPLAY
DRIVER
TEST
MODE
LCD_DAC
LCD_MODE
LCD_CLK
LCD_E
LCD_BLKMAP
LCD_SEG
LCD_Y
DIGITAL I/O
UART1
XRAM BUS
8
PB
PB
3
4
5
3
MPU
RX
CKOUT_E
DIO_DIR
DIO_R
DIO
SPI SLAVE
EEPROM I/F
EEDATA
EECTRL
4
4
4
2
Segments
5
9
DIO_1..24
24
PCSZ
PCLK
PSDI
PSDO
PCMD
8
COM0..3
2
DIO_EEX
UART2/OPTICAL
OPT_RXDIS
OPT_RXINV
OPT_TXE
OPT_TXINV
OPT_TXMOD
OPT_FDC
VBIAS*
V3*
+
V3_OK*
V2*
+
NV RAM
GP0-GP7
V2_OK*
-
EMULATOR
IRAM BUS
8
V1
POWER FAULT
ICE_E
OPT_TXE
4
7
2.5V_NV
E_RXTX
E_TCLK
E_RSTZ
ICE_E
IRAM
256B
FAULTZ
OPT_TX
OPT_RX
DIO52/SEG72*...DIO55/SEG75*
DIO47/SEG67...DIO51/SEG71
DIO46/SEG66*
DIO43/SEG63...DIO45/SEG65
DIO42/SEG62*
COM3..0
DIO41/SEG61
DIO36/SEG56*...DIO39/SEG59*
DIO29/SEG49...DIO30/SEG50
DIO28/SEG48*
DIO23/SEG43...DIO27/SEG47
DIO22/SEG42*
DIO13/SEG33...DIO21/SEG41
DIO12/SEG32*
DIO10/SEG30...DIO11/SEG31
DIO9/SEG29/YPULSE
DIO8/SEG28/XPULSE
DIO7/SEG27/RPULSE
DIO6/SEG26/WPULSE
DIO5/SEG25/SDATA
DIO4/SEG24/SDCK
DIO3
DIO2/OPT_TX
DIO1/OPT_RX
SPE
SDATA
SCLK
DIO56...DIO58
3
TEST
MUX
SEG20...SEG23
SEG19/CKTEST
SEG12 ...SEG18
SEG11/E_RST
SEG10/E_TCLK
SEG9/E_RXTX
SEG8
SEG7/MUX_SYNC
SEG6/PSDI
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG4/PSDO
SEG3/PCLK
SEG0...SEG2
TMUXOUT
TMUX[4:0]
* 71M6534 only
RESET
ICE_E
5/24/2010
Figure 25: Functional Blocks in BROWNOUT Mode
(Inactive blocks in the figure are grayed out.)
62
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
GNDA GNDD
VREF
∆Σ ADC
CONVERTER
VBIAS
FIR
VADC
MUX
22
VREF
VREF
VBAT
PLS_INV
PLS_INTERVAL
PLS_MAXWIDTH
CE_LCTN
EQU
PRE_SAMPS
SUM_CYCLES
RTM_0...3
RTM_E
CE_E
CE_PROG
16
TEMP
2.5V_NV
OSC
(32 kHz)
XIN
XOUT
RTCLK (32KHz)
MCK
PLL
MPU_DIV
CKOUT_E
V3P3D
CE
VBIAS
CK_CE
FLASH
128 KB/
256 KB
RTM
VBAT
to TMUX
VOLT
REG
RPULSE
WPULSE
LCD_ONLY
SLEEP
XPULSE
YPULSE
YPULSE
XPULSE
WPULSE
RPULSE
IAP
IAN
VA
IBP
IBN
VB
ICP
ICN
VC
IDP
IDN
V3P3SYS
V3P3A
CE_DATA
32
V2P5
2.5V to logic
2.5V_NV
XRAM
4 KB
DIO_PV
DIO_PW
DIO_PX
DIO_PY
CK_MPU
RTCA_ADJ
CKTEST
RTC
2.5V_NV
TEST
MULTIPURPOSE
I/O
RST_SUBSEC
QREG,PREG
RTC_DAY
RTC_DATE
RTC_HR
RTC_MIN RTC_MO
RTC_SEC RTC_YR
TX
LCD DISPLAY
DRIVER
TEST
MODE
LCD_DAC
LCD_MODE
LCD_CLK
LCD_E
LCD_BLKMAP
LCD_SEG
LCD_Y
DIGITAL I/O
UART1
XRAM BUS
8
PB
PB
3
4
5
3
MPU
RX
CKOUT_E
DIO_DIR
DIO_R
DIO
SPI SLAVE
EEPROM I/F
EEDATA
EECTRL
4
4
4
2
Segments
5
9
DIO_1..24
24
PCSZ
PCLK
PSDI
PSDO
PCMD
8
COM0..3
2
DIO_EEX
UART2/OPTICAL
OPT_RXDIS
OPT_RXINV
OPT_TXE
OPT_TXINV
OPT_TXMOD
OPT_FDC
VBIAS*
V3*
+
V3_OK*
V2*
+
NV RAM
GP0-GP7
V2_OK*
-
EMULATOR
IRAM BUS
8
V1
POWER FAULT
ICE_E
OPT_TXE
4
7
2.5V_NV
E_RXTX
E_TCLK
E_RSTZ
ICE_E
IRAM
256B
FAULTZ
OPT_TX
OPT_RX
DIO52/SEG72*...DIO55/SEG75*
DIO47/SEG67...DIO51/SEG71
DIO46/SEG66*
DIO43/SEG63...DIO45/SEG65
DIO42/SEG62*
COM3..0
DIO41/SEG61
DIO36/SEG56*...DIO39/SEG59*
DIO29/SEG49...DIO30/SEG50
DIO28/SEG48*
DIO23/SEG43...DIO27/SEG47
DIO22/SEG42*
DIO13/SEG33...DIO21/SEG41
DIO12/SEG32*
DIO10/SEG30...DIO11/SEG31
DIO9/SEG29/YPULSE
DIO8/SEG28/XPULSE
DIO7/SEG27/RPULSE
DIO6/SEG26/WPULSE
DIO5/SEG25/SDATA
DIO4/SEG24/SDCK
DIO3
DIO2/OPT_TX
DIO1/OPT_RX
SPE
SDATA
SCLK
DIO56...DIO58
3
TEST
MUX
SEG20...SEG23
SEG19/CKTEST
SEG12 ...SEG18
SEG11/E_RST
SEG10/E_TCLK
SEG9/E_RXTX
SEG8
SEG7/MUX_SYNC
SEG6/PSDI
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG4/PSDO
SEG3/PCLK
SEG0...SEG2
TMUXOUT
TMUX[4:0]
* 71M6534 only
RESET
ICE_E
5/24/2010
Figure 26: Functional Blocks in LCD Mode
(Inactive blocks in the figure are grayed out.)
Rev 2
63
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
VREF
IAP
IAN
VA
IBP
IBN
VB
ICP
ICN
VC
IDP
IDN
GNDA GNDD
V3P3A
V 3P 3SYS
∆Σ ADC
CONVERTER
VBIAS
RTM
PLS_INV
FIR
PLS_INTERVAL
to TMUX
22
PLS_MAXWIDTH
CE_LCTN
VOLT
RPULSE
EQU
REG
PRE_SAMPS
WPULSE
LCD_ONLY
SUM_CYCLES
VREF
SLEEP
RTM_0...3
XPULSE
RTM_E
YPULSE
CE_E
E EEE
S SSS
CE_DATA
CE_PROG
L L L
L
U UUU
2. 5V to logic
16
32
PP
P PW
Y X R 2 .5V _NV
VADC
MUX
VREF
VBAT
TEMP
2 .5V _NV
OSC
( 32 kHz)
XIN
XOUT
RTCLK (32KHz)
V3P3D
CE
VBIAS
MCK
PLL
MPU_DIV
CKOUT_E
CK_CE
FLASH
128 KB/
256 KB
XRAM
4 KB
CKTEST
RTC
TEST
TX
LCD DISPLAY
DRIVER
TEST
MODE
LCD_DAC
LCD_MODE
LCD_CLK
LCD_E
LCD_BLKMAP
LCD_SEG
LCD_Y
UART1
XRAM BUS
8
PB
PB
V 3 _OK *
V2*
+
EMULATOR
IRAM BUS
8
POWER FAULT
EEPROM I / F
EEDATA
EECTRL
NV RAM
GP0-GP7
V2 _ OK*
-
V1
SPI SLAVE
COM0..3
4
4
4
2
Segments
5
9
DIO_1.. 24
24
2
SDATA
SCLK
ICE_E
DIO_EEX
4
7
2 .5V _NV
E_RXTX
E_ TCLK
E_RSTZ
ICE _E
IRAM
256B
FAULTZ
DIO56...DIO58
DIO52/SEG72*...DIO55/SEG75*
DIO47/SEG67...DIO51/SEG71
DIO46/SEG66*
DIO43/SEG63...DIO45/SEG65
DIO42/SEG62*
COM3..0
DIO41/SEG61
DIO36/SEG56*...DIO39/SEG59*
DIO29/SEG49...DIO30/SEG50
DIO28/SEG48*
DIO23/SEG43...DIO27/SEG47
DIO22/SEG42*
DIO13/SEG33...DIO21/SEG41
DIO12/SEG32*
DIO10/SEG30...DIO11/SEG31
DIO9/SEG29/YPULSE
DIO8/SEG28/XPULSE
DIO7/SEG27/RPULSE
DIO6/SEG26/WPULSE
DIO5/SEG25/SDATA
DIO4/SEG24/SDCK
DIO3
DIO2/OPT_TX
DIO1/OPT_RX
PCSZ
PCLK
PSDI SPE
PSDO
UART2/ OPTICAL
OPT _RXDIS
OPT_TX
OPT _RXINV
OPT _TXE
OPT_ RX OPT _TXE
OPT _TXINV
OPT _TXMOD
OPT _FDC
VBIAS *
+
DIGITAL I / O
DIO_DIR
DIO_R
DIO
PCMD
8
V3*
3
3
MPU
RX
CKOUT_E
MULTI4
PURPOSE 5
I /O
RST_SUBSEC
QREG,PREG
RTC_DAY
RTC_DATE
RTC_HR
RTC_MIN RTC_MO
RTC_SEC RTC_YR
V2P5
DIO_PV
DIO_PW
DIO_PX
DIO_PY
CK_MPU
RTCA_ADJ
2.5 V_NV
VBAT
3
TEST
MUX
SEG20...SEG23
SEG19/CKTEST
SEG12 ...SEG18
SEG11/E _RST
SEG10/E _TCLK
SEG9/E_RXTX
SEG8
SEG7/MUX_SYNC
SEG6/PSDI
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG4/PSDO
SEG3/PCLK
SEG0...SEG2
TMUXOUT
TMUX[ 4:0]
* 71M6534 only
RESET
ICE_E
5 /24/2010
Figure 27: Functional Blocks in SLEEP Mode
(Inactive blocks in the figure are grayed out.)
64
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
2.4
2.4.1
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Fault and Reset Behavior
Reset Mode
When the RESET pin is pulled high, all digital activity stops. The oscillator and RTC module continue to
run. Additionally, all I/O RAM bits are set to their default states. As long as V1, the input voltage at the
power fault block, is greater than VBIAS, the internal 2.5 V regulator will continue to provide power to the
digital section.
Once initiated, the reset mode will persist until the reset timer times out, signified by WAKE rising. This
will occur in 4100 cycles of the real time clock after RESET goes low, at which time the MPU will begin
executing its pre-boot and boot sequences from address 00. See the description of Program Security
in Section 1.5.5 for additional descriptions of pre-boot and boot.
If system power is not present, the reset timer duration will be 2 cycles of the crystal clock at which time
the MPU will begin executing in BROWNOUT mode, starting at address 00.
2.4.2
Power Fault Circuit
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 include a comparator to monitor system power fault conditions. When the
output of the comparator falls (V1<VBIAS), the I/O RAM PLL_OK bit is zeroed and the part switches to
BROWNOUT mode, if a battery is present (and the MPU keeps executing code). If a battery is not
present, as indicated by BAT_OK=0, WAKE will fall and the part will enter SLEEP mode. Once system
power returns the MPU remains in reset and does not transition to MISSION mode until 2048 to 4096
CK32 clock cycles later, when PLL_OK rises. .
There are several conditions the device could be in as system power returns. If the part is in BROWNOUT
mode, it will automatically switch to MISSION mode when PLL_OK rises. It will receive an interrupt indicating
this. No configuration bits will be reset or reconfigured during this transition.
If the part is in LCD or SLEEP mode when system power returns, it will also switch to MISSION mode
when PLL_OK rises. In this case, all configuration bits will be in the reset state due to WAKE having
been zero. The RTC clock will not be disturbed, but the MPU RAM must be re-initialized. The hardware
watchdog timer will become active when the part enters MISSION mode.
If there is no battery when system power returns, the part will switch to MISSION mode when PLL_OK
rises. All configuration bits will be in reset state, and RTC and MPU RAM data will be unknown and must
be initialized by the MPU.
2.5
Wake Up Behavior
As described above, the part will always wake up in MISSION mode when system power is restored.
Additionally, the part will wake up in BROWNOUT mode when PB rises (push button is pressed) or when
a timeout of the wake-up timer occurs.
2.5.1
Wake on PB
If the part is in SLEEP or LCD mode, it can be awakened by a rising edge on the PB pin. This pin is normally
pulled to GND and can be pulled high by a push button depression. Before the PB signal rises, the MPU
is in reset due to WAKE being low. When PB rises, WAKE rises and within three crystal cycles, the MPU
begins to execute. The MPU can determine whether the PB signal woke it up by checking the IE_PB flag.
Figure 28 shows the Wake Up timing.
For debouncing, the PB pin is monitored by a state machine operating from a 32 Hz clock. This circuit will
reject between 31 ms and 62 ms of noise. Detection hardware will ignore all transitions after the initial
rising edge. This will continue until the MPU clears the IE_PB bit.
Rev 2
65
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
System
Power
(V3P3SYS)
PB or wakeup timer
15 CK32
cycles
WAKE
MPU Mode
LCD
BROWNOUT
PLL_OK
time
Figure 28: Wake Up Timing
2.5.2
Wake on Timer
If the part is in SLEEP or LCD mode, it can be awakened by the wake-up timer. Until this timer times out,
the MPU is in reset due to WAKE being low. When the wake-up timer times out, the WAKE signal rises
and within three CK32 cycles, the MPU begins to execute. The MPU can determine whether the timer
woke it by checking the AUTOWAKE interrupt flag (IE_WAKE).
The wake-up timer begins timing when the part enters LCD or SLEEP mode. Its duration is controlled by
WAKE_PRD[2:0] and WAKE_RES. WAKE_RES selects a timer LSB of either 1 minute (WAKE_RES = 1) or
2.5 seconds (WAKE_RES = 0). WAKE_PRD[2:0] selects a duration of from 1 to 7 LSBs.
The timer is armed by WAKE_ARM = 1. It must be armed at least three RTC cycles before SLEEP or
LCD_ONLY is initiated. Setting WAKE_ARM presets the timer with the values in WAKE_RES and WAKE_PRD
and readies the timer to start when the processor writes to the SLEEP or LCD_ONLY bits. The timer is
reset and disarmed whenever the processor is awake. Thus, if it is desired to wake the MPU periodically
(every 5 seconds, for example) the timer must be rearmed every time the MPU is awakened.
2.6
Data Flow
The data flow between the Compute Engine (CE) and the MPU is shown in Figure 29. In a typical application,
the 32-bit CE sequentially processes the samples from the voltage inputs on pins IA, VA, IB, and VB,
2
2
performing calculations to measure active power (Wh), reactive power (VARh), A h, and V h for four-quadrant
metering. These measurements are then accessed by the MPU, processed further and output using the
peripheral devices available to the MPU. Figure 29 illustrates the CE/MPU data flow.
Pulses
IRQ
Samples
CE
PreProcessor
Data
MPU
Post Processor
Processed
Metering
Data
I/O RAM (Configuration RAM)
Figure 29: MPU/CE Data Flow
66
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
2.7
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
CE/MPU Communication
Figure 30 shows the functional relationships between the CE and the MPU. The CE is controlled by the
MPU via shared registers in the I/O RAM and in RAM.
The CE outputs two interrupt signals to the MPU: CE_BUSY and XFER_BUSY, which are connected to
the MPU interrupt service inputs as external interrupts. CE_BUSY indicates that the CE is actively
processing data. This signal will occur once every multiplexer cycle. XFER_BUSY indicates that the CE
is updating data to the output region of the RAM. This will occur whenever the CE has finished generating a
sum by completing an accumulation interval determined by SUM_CYCLES[5:0] * PRE_SAMPS[1:0] samples.
Interrupts to the MPU occur on the falling edges of the XFER_BUSY and CE_BUSY signals.
Refer to Section 5.3 CE Interface Description for additional information on setting up the device using the
MPU firmware.
PULSES
W (DIO6)
ADC
WSUM
VARSUM
VAR
(DIO7)
MPU
DATA
CE
Mux Control
APULSEW
APULSER
EXT PULSE
SAG CONTROL
SAMPLES
DISPLAY (Memory
mapped LCD
segments)
CE BUSY
XFER BUSY
SERIAL
(UART0/1)
EEPROM
(I2C)
DIO
INTERRUPTS
I/O RAM (Configuration RAM)
Figure 30: MPU/CE Communication
Rev 2
67
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
3 Application Information
3.1
Connection of Sensors (CT, Resistive Shunt)
Figure 31 through Figure 33 show how resistive dividers, current transformers, Rogowski coils and resistive
shunts are connected to the voltage and current inputs of the 71M6533/71M6534.
The analog input pins of the 71M65XX are designed for sensors with low source impedance. RC
filters with components differing from the components used in the Teridian Demo Boards should be
avoided. See Application Note AN5292 for details on filter implementation.
VA = Vin * Rout/(Rout + Rin)
VA
Rin
Vin
Rout
Figure 31: Resistive Voltage Divider
Iout
Iin
IA
IIN
IOUT
Vout
R
InP
VDIFF
VOUT
R
V3P3A
V3P3
1/N
InN
1/N
Filter
Figure 32: CT with Single Ended (Left) and Differential Input (Right) Connection
Iin
IA
R
Vout
Iin
1/N
Vout = dIin /dt
Vout
R
V3P3
IA
VC
V3P3
Figure 33: Resistive Shunt (Left), Rogowski Sensor (Right)
Note: Ferrites or other inductive components must not be connected directly to the sensor input pins (InP,
InN Vn).
3.2
Distinction between 71M6533/71M6534 and 71M6533G/H/71M6534H Parts
The 71M6533G, 71M6533H, and 71M6534H (high-accuracy) parts go through an additional process of
characterization during production which makes them suitable to high-accuracy performance over
temperature.
The first process, applied to all parts is the trimming of the reference voltage to the target value of 1.195
V.
The second process, which is applied only to the high-accuracy parts, is the characterization of the reference voltage over temperature. The coefficients for the reference voltage are stored in trim fuses (I/O
RAM registers TRIMBGA, TRIMBGB, TRIMM[2:0]. The MPU can read these trim fuses and calculate the
68
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
correction coefficients PPM1 and PPMC2 per the formulae given in Section 6.4.15 VREF. See Section 3.5
Temperature Compensation for additional details.
The fuse TRIMBGB is non-zero for the high-accuracy parts and zero for the regular parts. Only partial trim
fuse information is available for the regular parts. The values for PPMC and PPMC2 that are used by the
CE to implement temperature compensation are calculated as follows:
•
•
PPMC = TC1 * 22.46 = (52.46 - TRIMT) * 3.18 * 22.46 = (52.46 - TRIMT) * 71.423
PPMC2 = TC2 * 1150.1 = –0.444 * 1150.1 = -510.6
The factor TRIMT used to calculate PPMC is derived from the trim fuse TRIMT[7:0].
3.3
Connecting 5 V Devices
All digital input pins of the 71M6533/71M6534 are compatible with external 5 V devices. I/O pins configured
as inputs do not require current-limiting resistors when they are connected to external 5 V devices.
3.4
Temperature Measurement
Measurement of absolute temperature uses the on-chip temperature sensor and applying the following
formula:
T=
( N (T ) − N n )
+ Tn
Sn
In the above formula T is the temperature in °C, N(T) is the ADC count at temperature T, Nn is the ADC
count at 25°C, Sn is the sensitivity in LSB/°C as stated in the Electrical Specifications, and Tn is +25 °C.
It is recommended that temperature measurements be based on TEMP_RAW_X which is the sum of two
consecutive temperature readings, thus being higher by a factor of two than the raw sensor readings.
Example: At 25°C a temperature sensor value of 483,203,000 (Nn) is read by the ADC. At an unknown
temperature T the value 449.648.000 is read at (N(T)). We determine the absolute temperature by dividing
the difference of Nn and N(T) by 512 times the slope factor (-1180). After this, we add the 25 °C from the
reference measurement:
T=
449.648.000 - 483,203,000
+ 25C = 80.5C
512 ⋅ (−1180)
The divisor 512 accounts for the 8-bit shift of the ADC value and for the factor of 2 introduced into the
measurement by the CE which adds two consecutive temperature readings.
3.5
Temperature Compensation
In a typical application, the CE compensates for the temperature dependency of the reference voltage
(see Section 4.1.1). System-wide temperature correction over the entire meter is possible by involving
the MPU. The thermal coefficients processed by the MPU may include the current sensors, the voltage
sensors, and other influences.
3.5.1
Temperature Coefficients
For the 71M6533 and 71M6534 (regular accuracy parts), the temperature coefficient TC2 is given as a
constant that represent typical component behavior (in µV/°C2). TC1 can be calculated for the individual
chip from the contents of the TRIMT[7:0] I/O RAM register. TC1 and TC2 allow compensation for variations
of the reference voltage to within ±40 PPM/°C.
For the high-accuracy parts, individualized coefficients TC1 and TC2 can be retrieved from the on-chip
fuses via TRIMBGA, TRIMBGB, TRIMM[2:0] (see Section 3.2 Distinction between 71M6533/71M6534 and
71M6533G/H/71M6534H Parts). For this part, TC1 and TC2 allow compensation for variations of the
reference voltage to within ±15 PPM/°C
Rev 2
69
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Since TC1 and TC2 are given in µV/°C and µV/°C2, respectively, the value of the VREF voltage
(1.195V) has to be taken into account when transitioning to PPM/°C and PPM/°C2. This means
that PPMC = 26.84*TC1/1.195 and PPMC2 = 1374*TC2/1.195).
Close examination of the electrical specification (see Table 51) for the parts with regular accuracy reveals
that the achievable deviation is not strictly ±40 PPM/°C over the whole temperature range: Only for
temperatures for which T-22 > 40 (i.e. T > 62°C) or for which T-22 < -40 (i.e. T < -18°C), the data sheet
states ±40 PPM/°C. For temperatures between -18°C and +62°C, the error should be considered
constant at ±1,600 PPM, or ±0.16%.
Similar considerations apply to the high-accuracy parts (see Table 52), where the error around the
calibration temperature should be considered constant at ±600 PPM, or ±0.06%.
Parameter
VREF(T) deviation from VNOM(T)
VREF (T ) − VNOM (T )
10 6
VNOM (T )
max( T − 22 ,40)
Condition
Min
-40
Typ
+40
PPM/ºC
Table 51: VREF Definition for the Regular Accuracy Parts
Parameter
4
VREF(T) deviation from
VNOM(T)
VREF (T ) − VNOM (T )
10 6
max( T − 22 ,40)
VNOM (T )
Condition
Min
-15
Typ
+15
PPM/ºC
Table 52: VREF Definition for the High-Accuracy Parts
Figure 34 and Figure 35 show this concept graphically. The “box” from -18°C to +62°C reflects the fact
that it is impractical to measure the temperature coefficient of high-quality references at small temperature
excursions. For example, at +25°C, the expected error would be ±3°C * 40 PPM/°C, or just 0.012% for the
regular-accuracy parts..
The maximum deviation of ±2520 PPM (or 0.252%) for the regular-accuracy parts is reached at the
temperature extremes. If the reference voltage is used to measure both voltage and current, the identical
errors of ±0.252% add up to a maximum Wh registration error of ±0.504%.
The maximum deviation of ±945 PPM (or 0.0945%) for the high-accuracy parts is reached at the
temperature extremes. If the reference voltage is used to measure both voltage and current, the identical
errors of ±0.0945% add up to a maximum Wh registration error of ±0.189%.
70
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Error Band (PPM) over Temperature (°C)
2800
2400
2000
1600
1200
800
400
0
-400
-800
-1200
-1600
-2000
-2400
-2800
±40 PPM/°C
±40 PPM/°C
-40
-20
0
20
40
60
80
Figure 34: Error Band for VREF over Temperature (Regular-Accuracy Parts)
Error Band (PPM) over Temperature (°C)
1200
±15 PPM/°C
800
400
0
-400
-800
±15 PPM/°C
-1200
-40
-20
0
20
40
60
80
Figure 35: Error Band for VREF over Temperature (High-Accuracy Parts)
4.1.1
Temperature Compensation for VREF
The bandgap temperature is used to digitally compensate the power outputs for the temperature dependence
of VREF, using the CE register GAIN_ADJ (internal temperature compensation). Since the band gap amplifier
is chopper-stabilized via the CHOP_E[1:0] field, the most significant long-term drift mechanism in the voltage
reference is removed.
In internal temperature compensation mode, the CE applies the following formula to determine the GAIN_ADJ
value. In this formula TEMP_X is the deviation from nominal or calibration temperature expressed in multiples
of 0.1 °C:
TEMP _ X ⋅ PPMC TEMP _ X 2 ⋅ PPMC 2
GAIN _ ADJ = 16385 +
+
214
2 23
Rev 2
71
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
4.1.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
System Temperature Compensation
In a production electricity meter, the 71M6533 and 71M6534 is not the only component contributing to
temperature dependency. A whole range of components (e.g. current transformers, resistor dividers,
power sources, filter capacitors) will contribute temperature effects.
Since the output of the on-chip temperature sensor is accessible to the MPU, temperature compensation
mechanisms with great flexibility are possible. MPU access to GAIN_ADJ permits a system-wide temperature
correction over the entire meter rather than local to the chip.
4.1.3
Temperature Compensation for the RTC
In order to obtain accurate readings from the RTC, the following calibration procedures are recommended:
1. At the time of meter calibration, the crystal oscillator may be calibrated using the RTCA_ADJ register in
I/O RAM to be as close to 32768 Hz as possible. The recommended procedure is to connect a highprecision frequency counter to the TMUXOUT pin and select 0x11 for TMUX[4:0]. This will generate a
4-second pulse at TMUXOUT that can be used to trim RTCA_ADJ to the best value.
A wider trim range is achieved with the I/O RAM registers PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0].
2. When the meter is in service, the MPU takes frequent temperature readings. If the temperature
characteristics of the crystal are known, the temperature readings can be used to modify the settings
for the I/O RAM registers PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] in order to keep the crystal frequency close to
32768 Hz.
3. After periods of operation under battery power, the temperature for the time the meter was not powered
can be estimated by averaging the temperatures before and after battery operation. Based on this,
the overall correction for the RTC time can be calculated and applied to the RTC after main power returns
to the meter.
4.2
Connecting LCDs
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 have an on-chip LCD controller capable of controlling static or multiplexed
LCDs. Figure 36 shows the basic connection for an LCD.
The following dedicated and multi-use pins can be assigned as LCD segments:
•
•
•
•
72
15 dedicated LCD segment pins: SEG0 to SEG2, SEG8, SEG12 to SEG18, SEG20 to SEG23.
9 dual-function pins: MUX_SYNC/SEG7, CKTEST/SEG19, E_RXTX/SEG9, E_TCLK/SEG10,
E_RST/SEG11, SEG3/PCLK, SEG4/PSDO, SEG5/PCSZ, SEG6/PSDI.
5 additional dual-function pins in the 71M6534: SEG51/E_TBUS0, SEG52/E_TBUS1,
SEG53/E_TBUS2, SEG54/E_TBUS3, SEG55/E_ISYNC
33 (71M6533) or 46 (71M6534) combined DIO and segment pins
o 71M6533: SEG24/DIO4 to SEG31/DIO11, SEG33/DIO13 to SEG41/DIO21, SEG43/DIO23 to
SEG47/DIO27, SEG49/DIO29, SEG50/DIO30, SEG61/DIO41, SEG63/DIO43 to
SEG65/DIO45, and SEG67/DIO47 to SEG71/DIO51.
o 71M6534: SEG24/DIO4 to SEG50/DIO30, SEG56/DIO36 to SEG59/DIO39, SEG61/DIO41 to
SEG75/DIO55.
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
71M6533/71M6534
LCD
segments
commons
Figure 36: Connecting LCDs
Connecting I2C EEPROMs
4.3
I2C EEPROMs or other I2C compatible devices should be connected to the DIO pins DIO4 and DIO5, as
shown in Figure 37.
Pull-up resistors of roughly 10 kΩ to V3P3D (to ensure operation in BROWNOUT mode) should be used
for both SCL and SDA signals. The DIO_EEX[1:0] register in I/O RAM must be set to 1 in order to convert
2
the DIO pins DIO4 and DIO5 to I C pins SCL and SDA.
10 kΩ
V3P3D
10 kΩ
EEPROM
DIO4
SCL
DIO5
SDA
71M6533/71M6534
2
Figure 37: I C EEPROM Connection
4.4
Connecting Three-Wire EEPROMs
µWire EEPROMs and other compatible devices should be connected to the DIO pins DIO4 and DIO5, as
shown in Figure 38 and described below:
•
•
•
•
•
DIO5 connects to both the DI and DO pins of the three-wire device.
The CS pin must be connected to a vacant DIO pin of the 71M6533/71M6534.
In order to prevent bus contention, a 10 kΩ to resistor is used to separate the DI and DO signals.
The CS and CLK pins should be pulled down with a resistor to prevent operation of the three-wire
device on power-up, before the 71M6533/71M6534 can establish a stable signal for CS and CLK.
The DIO_EEX[1:0] field in I/O RAM must be set to 2 in order to convert the DIO pins DIO4 and DIO5
to µWire pins.
The µ-Wire EEPROM interface is only functional when MPU_DIV[2:0] = 000.
Rev 2
73
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/71M6534
EEPROM
V3P3D
VCC
DIO4
CLK
DI
10 kΩ
DIO5
DIOn
DO
CS
100 kΩ
100 kΩ
Figure 38: Three-Wire EEPROM Connection
4.5
UART0 (TX/RX)
The UART0 RX pin should be pulled down by a 10 kΩ resistor and additionally protected by a 100 pF ceramic
capacitor, as shown in Figure 39.
71M6533/71M6534
RX
TX
100 pF 10 k Ω
RX
TX
Figure 39: Connections for UART0
4.6
Optical Interface (UART1)
The OPT_TX and OPT_RX pins can be used for a regular serial interface (by connecting a RS_232
transceiver for example), or they can be used to directly operate optical components (for example, an
infrared diode and phototransistor implementing a FLAG interface). Figure 40 shows the basic connections
for UART1. The OPT_TX pin becomes active when the OPT_TXE[1:0] I/O RAM field is set to 00.
The polarity of the OPT_TX and OPT_RX pins can be inverted with the configuration bits, OPT_TXINV
and OPT_RXINV, respectively.
The OPT_TX output may be modulated at 38 kHz when system power is present. Modulation is not
available in BROWNOUT mode. The OPT_TXMOD bit enables modulation. The duty cycle is controlled
by OPT_FDC[1:0], which can select 50%, 25%, 12.5%, and 6.25% duty cycle. A 6.25% duty cycle means
OPT_TX is low for 6.25% of the period. The OPT_RX pin uses digital signal thresholds and may need an
analog filter when receiving modulated optical signals.
With modulation, an optical emitter can be operated at higher current than nominal, enabling it to
increase the distance along the optical path.
If operation in BROWNOUT mode is desired, the external components should be connected to V3P3D.
74
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
V3P3SYS
R1
71M6533/71M6534
100 pF
OPT_RX
10 kΩ
Phototransistor
V3P3SYS
LED
R2
OPT_TX
Figure 40: Connection for Optical Components
4.7
Connecting the V1 Pin
A voltage divider should be used to establish that V1 is in a safe range when the meter is in MISSION
mode (see Figure 41). V1 must be lower than 2.9 V in all cases in order to keep the hardware watchdog
timer enabled. The resistor divider ratio must be chosen so that V1 crosses the VBIAS threshold when
V3P3 is near the minimum supply voltage (3.0 VDC). A series resistor (R3) provides additional hysteresis,
and a capacitor to ground (C1) is added for enhanced EMC immunity.
The amount of hysteresis depends on the choice of R1 and R3: If V1 < VBIAS, approximately 1 µA will
flow into the on-chip V1 comparator causing a voltage drop. If V1 ≥ VBIAS, almost no current will flow
into the comparator. The voltage drop will require V3P3 to be slightly higher for V1 to cross the VBIAS
threshold when V3P3 is rising as compared to when V3P3 is falling. Maintaining sufficient hysteresis
helps to eliminate rapid mode changes which may occur in cases where the power supply is unstable with
V1 close to the VBIAS threshold point.
R3
R1
V3P3
16.9kΩ
R2
GND
20kΩ
C1
100pF
V1
Figure 41: Voltage Divider for V1
4.8
Connecting the Reset Pin
Even though a functional meter will not necessarily need a reset switch, it is useful to have a reset pushbutton for prototyping as shown in Figure 42, left side. The RESET signal may be sourced from V3P3SYS
(functional in MISSION mode only), V3P3D (MISSION and BROWNOUT modes), or VBAT (all modes, if
a battery is present), or from a combination of these sources, depending on the application.
For a production meter, the RESET pin should be protected by the by the external components shown in
Figure 42, right side. R1 should be in the range of 100 Ω and mounted as closely as possible to the IC.
Since the 71M6533 and 71M6534 generates its own power-on reset, a reset button or circuitry, as
shown in Figure 42, is only required for test units and prototypes.
Rev 2
75
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
VBAT/
V3P3D
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/
71M6534
71M6533/
71M6534
V3P3D
R2
1k ?
Reset
Switch
RESET
10k ?
R1
0.1µF
GNDD
Figure 42: External Components for the RESET Pin: Push-Button (Left), Production Circuit (Right)
4.9
Connecting the Emulator Port Pins
Even when the emulator is not used, small shunt capacitors to ground (22 pF) should be used for protection
from EMI as illustrated in Figure 43. Production boards should have the ICE_E pin connected to ground
via a resistor of around 200 Ω.
The 71M6534 is capable of supporting a trace emulator. To connect this non-standard emulator, the pins
E_TBUS0 (SEG51) – E_TBUS3 (SEG54) and E_ISYNC (SEG55) have to be brought out to the emulator
interface.
LCD Segments
(optional)
V3P3D
71M6533/71M6534
ICE_E
62 Ω
E_RST
62 Ω
E_RXT
E_TCLK
62 Ω
22 pF 22 pF 22 pF
Figure 43: External Components for the Emulator Interface
4.10 Connecting a Battery
It is important that a valid voltage is connected to the VBAT pin at all times. For meters without a battery,
VBAT should be connected directly to V3P3SYS. Designs for meters with batteries need to ensure that
the meter functions even when the battery voltage decreases below the specified voltage for VBAT. This
can be achieved by connecting a diode from V3P3SYS to VBAT. However, the battery test will yield
inaccurate results if that technique is used, since the voltage at V3P3SYS will feed current to the VBAT pin.
A better solution is shown in Figure 44. During the battery test, a DIO pin is activated as an output and
applies a low voltage to the anode of the diode. This prevents the voltage at the power supply to influence
the voltage at the VBAT pin.
76
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Power
Supply
V3P3SYS
V3P3A
DIO
Battery or +
Super -Cap
-
VBAT
71M6533/6534
Figure 44: Connecting a Battery
Meters equipped with batteries need to contain code that transitions the chip to SLEEP mode as
soon as the battery is attached in production. Otherwise, remaining in BROWNOUT mode would
add unnecessary drain to the battery.
4.11 Flash Programming
Operational or test code can be programmed into the flash memory using either an in-circuit emulator or
the Flash Programmer Module (TFP-2). The flash programming procedure uses the E_RST, E_RXTX,
and E_TCLK pins. The FL_BANK[2:0] field must be set to the value corresponding to the bank that is
being programmed.
4.12 MPU Firmware Library
All application-specific MPU functions mentioned in Section 3 Application Information are featured in the
Teridian demonstration source code. The code is available as part of the Demonstration Kit for the
71M6533/71M6534. The Demonstration Kits come with the 71M6533/71M6534 preprogrammed with demo
firmware and mounted on a functional sample meter Demo Board. The Demo Boards allow for quick and
efficient evaluation of the IC without having to write firmware or having to supply an in-circuit emulator
(ICE).
4.13 Crystal Oscillator
The oscillator drives a standard 32.768 kHz watch crystal. The oscillator has been designed specifically
to handle these crystals and is compatible with their high impedance and limited power handling capability.
The oscillator power dissipation is very low to maximize the lifetime of any battery backup device attached
to VBAT.
Board layouts with minimum capacitance from XIN to XOUT will require less battery current. Good
layouts will have XIN and XOUT shielded from each other.
For best rejection of electromagnetic interference, connect the crystal body and the ground
terminals of the two crystal capacitors to GNDD through a ferrite bead. No external resistor
should be connected across the crystal, since the oscillator is self-biasing.
Rev 2
77
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
4.14 Meter Calibration
Once the Teridian 71M6533 and 71M6534 energy meter device has been installed in a meter system, it
must be calibrated. A complete calibration includes the following:
•
•
•
•
Calibration of the metrology section, i.e. calibration for tolerances of the current sensors, voltage dividers
and signal conditioning components as well as of the internal reference voltage (VREF).
Establishment of the reference temperature (Section 3.2) for temperature measurement and temperature
compensation (Section 3.5).
Calibration of the battery voltage measurement (Section 1.5.9).
Calibration of the oscillator frequency (Section 1.5.3) and temperature compensation for the RTC
(Section 4.1.3).
The metrology section can be calibrated using the gain and phase adjustment factors accessible to the
CE. The gain adjustment is used to compensate for tolerances of components used for signal conditioning,
especially the resistive components. Phase adjustment is provided to compensate for phase shifts
introduced by the current sensors or by the effects of reactive power supplies.
Due to the flexibility of the MPU firmware, any calibration method, such as calibration based on energy, or
current and voltage can be implemented. It is also possible to implement segment-wise calibration (depending
on current range).
The 71M6533 and 71M6534 supports common industry standard calibration techniques, such as singlepoint (energy-only), multi-point (energy, Vrms, Irms), and auto-calibration.
78
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
5 Firmware Interface
5.1
I/O RAM and SFR Map –Functional Order
In Table 53, unimplemented (U) and reserved (R) bits are shaded in light gray. Unimplemented bits have no memory storage, writing them has no
effect, and reading them always returns zero. Reserved bits may be in use and should not be changed from the values given in parentheses.
Writing values other than those shown in parenthesis to reserved bits may have undesirable side effects and must be avoided.
Non-volatile bits are shaded in dark gray. Non-volatile bits are backed-up during power failures if the system includes a battery connected to the
VBAT pin.
This table lists only the SFR registers that are not generic 8051 SFR registers. Bits marked with † (e.g. UMUX_E†) apply to the 71M6534 only.
Table 53: I/O RAM Map – Functional Order
Name
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Configuration:
CE0
EQU[2:0]
CE_E
CE10MHZ
2000
U
CE1
PRE_SAMPS[1:0]
SUM_CYCLES[5:0]
2001
CE2
CHOP_E[1:0]
RTM_E
WD_OVF
EX_RTC
EX_XFR
2002
U
COMP0
PLL_OK
COMPSTAT
2003
U
U
U
U
U
U
CONFIG0 2004
VREF_CAL
PLS_INV
CKOUT_E
VREF_DIS
MPU_DIV[2:0]
U
CONFIG1 2005
ECK_DIS
M26MHZ
ADC_E
MUX_ALT
M40MHZ
R (0)
R(0)
U
VERSION 2006
VERSION[7:0]
CONFIG2 2007
OPT_TXE[1:0]
EX_PLL
EX_FWCOL
FIR_LEN[1:0]
OPT_FDC[1:0]
CE3
MUX_DIV[3:0]
209D
U
U
U
U
CE4
BOOT_SIZE[7:0]
20A7
CE5
CE_LCTN[7:0]
20A8
WAKE
WAKE_ARM
SLEEP
LCD_ONLY
WAKE_RES
WAKE_PRD[2:0]
20A9
U
TMUX
TMUX[4:0]
20AA
U
U
U
ANACTRL 20AB
R (0000)
LCD_DAC[2:0]
CHOP_I_EN
CONFIG3 20AC
SEL_IBN
CHOP_IB
SEL_IAN
CHOP_IA
U
U
U
U
CONFIG4 20AD
SEL_IDN
CHOP_ID
SEL_ICN
CHOP_IC
U
U
U
U
Interrupts and WD Timer:
INTBITS
WD_RST
INT6
INT5
INT4
INT3
INT2
INT1
INT0
SFR F8
IFLAGS
IE_WAKE
IE_PB
IE_FWCOL1
IE_FWCOL0
IE_RTC
IE_XFER
SFR E8 IE_PLLFALL IE_PLLRISE
Rev 2
79
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Name
Address
Digital I/O:
20AF
DIO0
2008
DIO1
2009
DIO2
200A
DIO3
200B
DIO4
200C
DIO5
200D
DIO6
200E
200F
Bit 7
FDS_6533_6534_004
Bit 6
U
U
DIO_EEX[1:0]
U
U
U
U
U
U
R (00)
†
UMUX_E
UMUX_SEL†
DIO7/ P0
DIO8
DIO9 / P1
(Port 1)
SFR 80
SFR A2
SFR 90
DIO_1[7:5]
DIO10
SFR 91
DIO_DIR1[7:5]
DIO11/ P2
SFR A0
(Port 2)
DIO_2[7]
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
U
OPT_RXDIS
DIO_R1[2:0]
DIO_R3[2:0]
DIO_R5[2:0]
DIO_R7[2:0]
DIO_R9[2:0]
DIO_R11[2:0]
U
OPT_RXINV
U
DIO_PW
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
DIO_PX
U
DIO_2[6]†
U
DIO_DIR2[6]†
DIO_DIR2[7]
P3
SFR B0
U
DIO3[6]
DIO3[5]
Flash:
ERASE
FLSHCTL
SFR 94
SFR B2
PREBOOT
SECURE
WRPROT_BT
FL_BANK
SFR B6
U
U
U
U
DIO_RRX[2:0]
OPT_TXMOD
DI_RPB[2:0]
DIO_R2[2:0]
DIO_R4[2:0]
DIO_R6[2:0]
DIO_R8[2:0]
DIO_R10[2:0]
DIO_PY
U
Bit 0
OPT_TXINV
U
U
DIO_1[3:0]
DIO_DIR1[3:0]
DIO_DIR2[5:0]
U
DIO3[4]†
DIO3[3]
FLSH_ERASE[7:0]
WRPROT_CE
U
U
U
DIO3[2]
U
U
FLSH_PGADR[5:0]
U
U
Bit 1
DIO_2[5:0]
SFR A1
80
DIO_PV
DIO_0[7:0](Port 0)
DIO_DIR0[7:1]
U
DIO_1[4]†
U
DIO_DIR[4] †
DIO12
PGADR
SFR B7
Real Time Clock:
RTCCTRL 2010
RTCA_ADJ 2011
SUBSEC1 2014
Bit 2
U
U
U
RTCA_ADJ[6:0]
SUBSEC[7:0]
U
DIO3[1]
DIO3[0]
FLSH_MEEN
FLSH_PWE
FL_BANK[1:0]
FL_BANK[2:0]†
U
U
U
RST_SUBSEC
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Name
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
RTC0
RTC_SEC[5:0]
2015
U
U
RTC1
RTC_MIN[5:0]
2016
U
U
RTC2
RTC_HR[4:0]
2017
U
U
U
RTC3
RTC_DAY[2:0]
2018
U
U
U
U
U
RTC4
RTC_DATE[2:0]
2019
U
U
U
RTC5
RTC_MO[3:0]
201A
U
U
U
U
RTC6
RTC_YR[7:0]
201B
RTCADJ_H 201C
PREG[16:14]
U
U
U
U
U
RTCADJ_M 201D
PREG[13:6]
RTCADJ_L 201E
PREG[5:0]
QREG[1:0]
WE
201F
RTC write protect register (write data is discarded)
LCD Display Interface:
LCDX
MUX_SYNC_E
BME
2020
R (0)
R (0)
U
U
U
U
LCDY
LCD_Y
LCD_E
LCD_MODE[2:0]
LCD_CLK[1:0]
2021
U
LCD_MAP0 2023
…
…
See the detailed description for LCD_BITMAP[ ] in Table 54: I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical
LCD_MAP5 2028
LCD_MAP6† 2029
LCD0
2030
…
See the detailed description for LCD_SEG[ ] in Table 54: I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical
…
LCD41
2059
LCD_BLNK 205A
LCD_BLKMAP19[3:0]
LCD_BLKMAP18[3:0]
Area Reserved for Factory Test:
RTM0H
RTM0[9:8]
2060
U
RTM0L
RTM0[7:0]
2061
RTM1H
RTM1[9:8]
2062
U
RTM1L
RTM1[7:0]
2063
RTM2H
RTM2[9:8]
2064
U
RTM2L
RTM2[7:0]
2065
RTM3H
RTM3[9:8]
2066
U
RTM3L
RTM3[7:0]
2067
Rev 2
81
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Name
Address
SPI Interface:
SPI…
2070
SP_CMD
2071
SP_ADH
2072
SP_ADL
2073
Pulse Generator:
PLS_W
2080
PLS_I
2081
ADC Mux:
SLOT0
2090
SLOT1
2091
SLOT2
2092
SLOT3
2093
SLOT4
2094
SLOT5
2096
SLOT6
2097
SLOT7
2098
SLOT8
2099
SLOT9
209A
SPI Interrupt:
FDS_6533_6534_004
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
SPE
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
SP_CMD[7:0]
SP_ADDR[15:8]
SP_ADDR[7:0]
PLS_MAXWIDTH[7:0]
PLS_INTERVAL[7:0]
SLOT1_SEL[3:0]
SLOT3_SEL[3:0]
SLOT5_SEL[3:0]
SLOT7_SEL[3:0]
SLOT9_SEL[3:0]
SLOT1_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT3_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT5_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT7_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT9_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT0_SEL[3:0]
SLOT2_SEL[3:0]
SLOT4_SEL[3:0]
SLOT6_SEL[3:0]
SLOT8_SEL[3:0]
SLOT0_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT2_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT4_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT6_ALTSEL[3:0]
SLOT8_ALTSEL[3:0]
SPI0
20B0
U
U
U
IEN_SPI
U
U
U
SPI1
20B1
U
U
U
SPI_FLAG
U
U
U
General-Purpose and Non Volatile Registers:
GP0
20C0
…
…
GP7
20C7
VERSION 20C8
Serial EEPROM:
EEDATA
SFR 9E
EECTRL
SFR 9F
† 71M6534 only
82
IEN_WD_
NROVF
WD_NROVF_
FLAG
GP0[7:0]
…
GP7[7:0]
VERSION[7:0]
EEDATA[7:0]
EECTRL[7:0]
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
5.2
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical Order
The following conventions apply to the descriptions in this table:
•
•
•
•
•
Bits with a W (write) direction are written by the MPU into configuration RAM. Typically, they are initially stored in flash memory and copied to
the configuration RAM by the MPU. Some of the more frequently programmed bits are mapped to the MPU SFR memory space. The remaining
bits are mapped to 2xxx.
Bits with an R (read) direction can be read by the MPU.
Columns labeled Reset and Wake describe the bit values upon reset and wake, respectively. “NV” in the Wake column means the bit is powered
by the nonvolatile supply and is not initialized. LCD-related registers labeled “L” retain data upon transition from LCD mode to BROWNOUT
mode and vice versa, but do not retain data in SLEEP mode. “–“ means that the value is undefined.
Write-only bits will return zero when they are read.
†
Bits marked with an asterisk (e.g. DIO_DIR1[4] ) are applicable to the 71M6534 only.
Table 54: I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical (by Bit Name)
Name
Location
Reset
Wake
Dir
Description
ADC_E
2005[3]
0
0
R/W
2020[6]
0
–
R/W
BOOT_SIZE[7:0] 20A7[7:0]
01
01
R/W
CE10MHZ
2000[3]
0
0
R/W
CE_E
CE_LCTN[7:0]
2000[4]
20A8[7:0]
0
0x31
0
0x31
R/W
R/W
CHOP_E[1:0]
2002[5:4]
00
00
R/W
CHOP_I_EN
20AB[0]
0
0
R/W
CHOP_IA
CHOP_IB
CHOP_IC
CHOP_ID
Enables ADC and VREF. When disabled, removes bias current.
Battery Measure Enable. When set, a load current is immediately applied to the battery
and it is connected to the ADC to be measured on Alternative Mux Cycles. See the
MUX_ALT bit.
End of space reserved for boot program. The ending address of the boot region is
1024*BOOT_SIZE.
CE clock select. When set, the CE is clocked at 10 MHz. Otherwise, the CE clock
frequency is 5 MHz.
CE enable.
CE program location. The starting address for the CE program is 1024*CE_LCTN.
Chop enable for the reference bandgap circuit. The value of CHOP will change on the
rising edge of MUXSYNC according to the value in CHOP_E:
00 = toggle, except at the mux sync edge at the end of SUMCYCLE, an alternative
MUX frame is automatically inserted at the end of each accumulation interval.
01 = positive.
10 = reversed.
11 = toggle, no alternative MUX frame is inserted
When CHOP_I_EN is set, chop mode for the analog current inputs can be enabled
with the CHOP_IA, CHOP_IB, CHOP_IC, and CHOP_ID bits.
BME
20AC[0]
20AC[4]
20AD[0]
20AD[4]
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R/W
Rev 2
When CHOP_I_EN is set, these bits enable chop mode for the respective channel.
83
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
CKOUT_E
2004[4]
0
0
R/W
COMPSTAT
2003[0]
--
--
R
DI_RPB[2:0]
DIO_R1[2:0]
DIO_R2[2:0]
DIO_R3[6:4]
DIO_R4[2:0]
DIO_R5[2:0]
DIO_R6[2:0]
DIO_R7[2:0]
DIO_R8[2:0]
DIO_R9[2:0]
DIO_R10[2:0]
DIO_R11[2:0]
DIO_RRX[2:0]*
2009[2:0]
2009[6:4]
200A[2:0]
200A[6:4]
200B[2:0]
200B[6:4]
200C[2:0]
200C[6:4]
200D[2:0]
200D[6:4]
200E[2:0]
200E[6:4]
20AF[2:0]
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R/W
Control bit for the SEG19/CKOUT pin:
0: The pin is the SEG19 LCD driver
1: The pin is the CK_FIR output (5 MHz in mission mode, 32 kHz in BROWNOUT
mode)
Status bit for the V1 comparator (same as V1_OK, see TMUXOUT).
Connects dedicated I/O pins DIO1 through DIO11 as well as input pins PB to internal
resources. If more than one input is connected to the same resource, the Multiple
column in the table below specifies how they are combined.
Resource
DIO_Rx[2:0]
000
NONE
001
Reserved
010
T0 (Counter /Timer 0 clock or gate)
011
T1 (Counter /Timer 1 clock or gate)
100
High priority IO interrupt (int0 rising)
101
Low priority IO interrupt (int1 rising)
110
High priority IO interrupt (int0 falling)
111
Low priority IO interrupt (int1 falling)
*DIO_RRX applies to the RX pin.
Multiple
-OR
OR
OR
OR
OR
OR
OR
Programs the direction of pins DIO7 through DIO1. Writing a 1 indicates an output. A bit
is ignored if the corresponding pin is not configured as DIO. See DIO_PV and DIO_PW
for special options for DIO6 and DIO7. See DIO_EEX[1:0] for special options for DIO4
and DIO5.
Programs the direction of pins DIO15 through DIO8. Writing a 1 indicates an output.
A bit is ignored if the corresponding pin is not configured as DIO. See DIO_PX and
DIO_PY for special options for the DIO8 and DIO9 outputs.
†
DIO_DIR1[4] controlling DIO12 is only applicable to the 71M6534.
Programs the direction of pins DIO23 through DIO16. Writing a 1 indicates an output.
A bit is ignored if the corresponding pin is not configured as a DIO.
†
DIO_DIR2[6] controlling DIO22 is only applicable to the 71M6534.
DIO_DIR0[7:1]
SFR A2[7:1]
0
–
R/W
DIO_DIR1[7:5,
3:0],
†
DIO_DIR1[4]
SFR 91
0
–
R/W
DIO_DIR2[7,5:0]
†
DIO_DIR2[6]
SFR A1
0
–
R/W
DIO_56
DIO_57
DIO_58
DIO_DIR56
DIO_DIR57
DIO_DIR58
2052[4]
2053[4]
2054[4]
2052[7]
2053[7]
2054[7]
0
0
0
0
0
0
–
–
–
R/W
The value on DIO pins 56 through 58. The MPU writes data to these registers to change
the data on these pins.
–
–
–
R/W
Programs the direction of DIO pins 56 through 58. Writing a 1 indicates an output.
84
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
DIO_0[7:0]
DIO_1[7:0]
DIO_2[7:0]
DIO_3[6:0]
SFR 80
SFR 90
SFR A0
SFR B0
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
0
0
0
0
–
–
–
–
R/W
DIO_EEX[1:0]
2008[7:6]
0
0
R/W
DIO_PV
DIO_PW
DIO_PX
DIO_PY
EEDATA[7:0]
EECTRL[7:0]
2008[2]
2008[3]
200F[3]
200F[2]
SFR 9E
SFR 9F
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
ECK_DIS
2005[5]
0
0
R/W
EQU[2:0]
EX_XFR
EX_RTC
EX_FWCOL
EX_PLL
2000[7:5]
2002[0]
2002[1]
2007[4]
2007[5]
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R/W
Rev 2
R/W
The value on the DIO pins. Pins configured as LCD will read zero. When written, changes
data on pins configured as outputs. Pins configured as LCD or input will ignore writes.
DIO_0[7:0] corresponds to DIO7 through DIO1 and PB (PB is read on DIO_0[0]).
DIO_1[7:0] corresponds to DIO15 through DIO8. (DIO_1[4] corresponding to
DIO12 is only applicable to the 71M6534)
DIO_2[7:0] corresponds to DIO23 through DIO16. (DIO_2[4] corresponding to
DIO22 is only applicable to the 71M6534)
DIO_3[6:0] corresponds to DIO30 through DIO24. (DIO_3[4] corresponding to
DIO28 is only applicable to the 71M6534)
When set, converts DIO4 and DIO5 to interface with external EEPROM. DIO4 becomes
SDCK and DIO5 becomes bi-directional SDATA.
Function
DIO_EEX[1:0]
00
Disable EEPROM interface
01
2-Wire EEPROM interface
10
3-Wire EEPROM interface
11
--not used-Causes VARPULSE to be output on DIO7.
Causes WPULSE to be output on DIO6.
Causes XPULSE to be output on DIO8.
Causes YPULSE to be output on DIO9.
Serial EEPROM interface data.
Serial EEPROM interface control.
Emulator clock disable. When ECK_DIS = 1, the emulator clock is disabled.
If ECK_DIS is set, the emulator and programming devices will be unable to
erase or program the device.
Specifies the power equation to be used by the CE.
Interrupt enable bits. These bits enable the XFER_BUSY, the RTC_1SEC, the
FirmWareCollision (FWCOL), and PLL interrupts. Note that if one of these interrupts is
to be enabled, its corresponding MPU EX enable must also be set. See Section 1.4.9
Interrupts for details.
85
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
FIR_LEN[1:0]
2007[3:2]
1
1
R/W
FL_BANK[1:0]
FL_BANK[2:0]†
SFR B6[1:0]
SFR B6[2:0]
1
1
R/W
FLSH_ERASE
[7:0]
SFR 94[7:0]
0
0
W
FLSH_MEEN
SFR B2[1]
0
0
W
FLSH_PGADR
[5:0]
SFR B7 [7:2]
0
0
W
FLSH_PWE
SFR B2[0]
0
0
R/W
FOVRIDE
20FD[4]
0
0
R/W
86
FIR_LEN[1:0] controls the length of the ADC decimation FIR filter.
Resulting FIR Resulting
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ]
FIR_LEN[1:0]
Filter Cycles
ADC Gain
[00], [10], or [11]
00
138
0.110017
01
288
1.000
10
384
2.37037
[01]
00
186
0.113644
01
384
1.000
10
588
3.590363
Flash bank selection. Flash memory above 32 k is mapped to the MPU address space
from 0x8000 to 0xFFFF in 32 KB banks. When MPU address[15] = 1, the address in
flash is mapped to FL_BANK[1:0] or FL_BANK[2:0] (71M6534 only), MPU Address[14:0].
FL_BANK[] is reset by the erase cycle.
Flash Erase Initiate. (Default = 0x00). FLSH_ERASE is used to initiate either the Flash
Mass Erase cycle or the Flash Page Erase cycle. Specific patterns are expected for
FLSH_ERASE in order to initiate the appropriate Erase cycle.
0x55 = Initiate Flash Page Erase cycle. Must be proceeded by a write to
FLSH_PGADR @ SFR 0xB7.
0xAA = Initiate Flash Mass Erase cycle. Must be proceeded by a write to
FLSH_MEEN @ SFR 0xB2 and the debug (CC) port must be enabled.
Any other pattern written to FLSH_ERASE will have no effect. The erase cycle is not
completed until 0x00 is written to FLSH_ERASE.
Mass Erase Enable.
0 = Mass Erase disabled (default).
1 = Mass Erase enabled.
Must be re-written for each new Mass Erase cycle.
Flash Page Erase Address. (Default = 0x00)
FLSH_PGADR[5:0] with FL_BANK[2:0], sets the Flash Page Address (page 0 through
127) that will be erased during the Page Erase cycle.
Must be re-written for each new Page Erase cycle.
Program Write Enable. This bit must be cleared by the MPU after each byte write
operation. Writes to this bit are inhibited when interrupts are enabled.
0 = MOVX commands refer to XRAM Space, normal operation (default).
1 = MOVX @DPTR,A moves A to Program Space (Flash) @ DPTR.
Permits the values written by the MPU to temporarily override the values in the fuse
register (reserved for production test).
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
GP0
…
GP7
IE_FWCOL0
IE_FWCOL1
20C0
…
20C7
SFR E8[2]
SFR E8[3]
0
…
0
0
0
NV
…
NV
0
0
IE_PB
SFR E8[4]
0
–
R/W
IE_PLLRISE
SFR E8[6]
0
0
R/W
IE_PLLFALL
SFR E8[7]
0
0
R/W
IEN_SPI
IEN_WD_NROVF
IE_XFER
IE_RTC
20B0[4]
20B0[0]
SFR E8[0]
SFR E8[1]
0
0
0
0
0
0
IE_WAKE
SFR E8[5]
0
–
R/W
INTBITS
SFR F8[6:0]
–
–
R/W
LCD_BITMAP
[31:24]
2023[7:0]
0
L
R/W
LCD_BITMAP
[39:32]
2024[7:0]
0
L
R/W
2025[7:0]
0
L
R/W
2026[2:0]
0
L
R/W
LCD_BITMAP
[47:40]
LCD_BITMAP
[50:48]
Rev 2
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Non-volatile general-purpose registers powered by the RTC supply. These registers
maintain their value in all power modes, but will be cleared on reset. The values of
GP0…GP7 will be undefined if VBAT drops below the minimum value.
Interrupt flags for the Firmware Collision Interrupt. See the Flash Memory section for
details.
PB flag. Indicates that a rising edge occurred on PB. Firmware must write a zero to
this bit to clear it. The bit is also cleared when the MPU requests SLEEP or LCD
mode. On bootup, the MPU can read this bit to determine if the part was woken with
the PB DIO0[0].
Indicates that the MPU was woken or interrupted (INT4) by system power becoming
available, or more precisely, by PLL_OK rising. The firmware must write a zero to this
bit to clear it.
Indicates that the MPU has entered BROWNOUT mode because system power has
become unavailable (INT4), or more precisely, because PLL_OK fell. This bit will not
be set if the part wakes into BROWNOUT mode because of PB or the WAKE timer.
The firmware must write a zero to this bit to clear it.
SPI interrupt enable.
Active high watchdog near overflow interrupt enable.
Interrupt flags. These flags monitor the XFER_BUSY interrupt and the RTC_1SEC
interrupt. The flags are set by hardware.
Indicates that the MPU was awakened by the autowake timer. This bit is typically read
by the MPU on bootup. The firmware must write a zero to this bit to clear it.
Interrupt inputs. The MPU may read these bits to see the status of external interrupts
INT0, INT1 up to INT6. These bits do not have any memory and are primarily intended
for debug use.
Configuration for DIO11/SEG31 through DIO4/SEG24. Unused bits should be set to zero.
1 = LCD pin, 0 = DIO pin.
Configuration for DIO19/SEG39 through DIO12/SEG32. LCD_BITMAP[32] ,
corresponding to DIO12/SEG32, is only applicable to the 71M6534. Unused bits
should be set to zero.
1 = LCD pin, 0 = DIO pin.
Configuration for DIO27/SEG47 through DIO20/SEG40. LCD_BITMAP[42],
corresponding to DIO22/SEG42, is only applicable to the 71M6534. Unused bits should
be set to zero.
1 = LCD pin, 0 = DIO pin.
Configuration for DIO30/SEG50 through DIO28/SEG48. LCD_BITMAP[48],
corresponding to DIO28/SEG48, is only applicable to the 71M6534. Unused bits should
be set to zero.
1 = LCD pin, 0 = DIO pin.
87
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
LCD_BITMAP
[63:61],
[59:56]†
2027[7:5,3:0]
0
L
R/W
LCD_BITMAP
[71:64]
2028[7:0]
0
L
R/W
LCD_BLKMAP18
205A[3:0]
[3:0]
0
L
R/W
LCD_CLK[1:0]
0
L
R/W
2021[1:0]
LCD_DAC[2:0]
20AB[3:1]
0
L
R/W
LCD_E
2021[5]
0
L
R/W
LCD_MODE[2:0] 2021[4:2]
88
0
L
R/W
Configuration for DIO43/SEG63 through DIO41/SEG61 and DIO39/SEG59 through
DIO36/SEG56. LCD_BITMAP[62], corresponding to DIO42/SEG62, and
LCD_BITMAP[59:56] ,corresponding to DIO39/SEG59 through DIO36/SEG56, are only
applicable to the 71M6534. Unused bits should be set to zero.
1 = LCD pin, 0 = DIO pin.
Configuration for DIO51/SEG71 through DIO44/SEG64. LCD_BITMAP[66],
corresponding to DIO46/SEG66, is only applicable to the 71M6534. Unused bits should
be set to zero.
1 = LCD pin, 0 = DIO pin.
Identifies which segments connected to SEG18 should blink. 1 means blink. The
most significant bit corresponds to COM3, the least significant bit to COM0.
Sets the LCD clock frequency for the COM/SEG pins (not the frame rate) according to
the following (f w = 32768 Hz):
00 = f w/512, 01 = f w/256, 10 = f w/128, 11 = f w/64
LCD contrast control DAC. Adjusts the LCD voltage in steps of 0.2 V from V3P3SYS
(mission mode) or VBAT (BROWNOUT/LCD modes).
LCD_DAC[2:0]
000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
Resulting LCD Voltage
V3P3 or VBAT
V3P3 or VBAT – 0.2 V
V3P3 or VBAT – 0.4 V
V3P3 or VBAT – 0.6 V
V3P3 or VBAT – 0.8 V
V3P3 or VBAT – 1.0 V
V3P3 or VBAT – 1.2 V
V3P3 or VBAT – 1.4 V
Enables the LCD display. When disabled, VLC2, VLC1 and VLC0 are ground as are
the COM and SEG outputs.
The LCD bias mode. Use the LCD DAC to reduce saturation. The number of states is
the number of commons which are driven to multiplex the LCD.
LCD_MODE[2:0]
000
001
010
011
100
Function
4 states, ⅓ bias
3 states, ⅓ bias
2 states, ½ bias
3 states, ½ bias
static display
Notes
⅓ bias modes can drive 3.3 V LCDs.
½ bias and static modes can drive
both 3.3 V and 5 V LCDs.
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
LCD_ONLY
20A9[5]
LCD_SEG0[3:0] 2030[3:0]
…
…
LCD_SEG18[3:0] 2042[3:0]
LCD_SEG19[3:0]
2043[3:0]
…
…
LCD_SEG31[3:0] 204F[3:0]
†
LCD_SEG32[3:0] 2050[3:0]
LCD_SEG33[3:0] 2051[3:0]
…
…
LCD_SEG41[3:0] 2059[3:0]
†
LCD_SEG42[3:0] 2030[7:4]
LCD_SEG43[3:0] 2031[7:4]
…
…
LCD_SEG47[3:0] 2035[7:4]
LCD_SEG48[3:0]† 2036[7:4]
LCD_SEG49[3:0] 2037[7:4]
LCD_SEG50[3:0] 2038[7:4]
LCD_SEG51[3:0]† 2039[7:4]
…
…
LCD_SEG59[3:0]† 2041[7:4]
LCD_SEG61[3:0] 2043[7:4]
†
LCD_SEG62[3:0] 2044[7:4]
LCD_SEG63[3:0] 2045[7:4]
…
…
LCD_SEG65[3:0] 2047[7:4]
LCD_SEG66[3:0]† 2048[7:4]
LCD_SEG67[3:0] 2049[7:4]
…
…
LCD_SEG71[3:0] 204D[7:4]
LCD_SEG72[3:0]† 204E[7:4]
…
…
†
LCD_SEG75[3:0] 2051[7:4]
Rev 2
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
0
0
0
…
0
0
…
0
0
0
…
0
0
0
…
0
0
0
0
0
…
0
0
0
0
…
0
0
0
…
0
0
…
0
L
…
L
L
…
L
L
L
…
L
L
L
…
L
L
L
L
L
…
L
L
L
L
…
L
L
L
…
L
L
…
L
W
Puts the 71M6533/71M6534 to sleep, but with the LCD display still active. LCD_ONLY
is ignored if system power is present. While in SLEEP mode, the device will wake up
on reset, when the autowake timer times out, when the push button is pushed, or when
system power returns.
R/W
LCD Segment Data. Each word contains information for 1 to 4 time divisions of each
segment.
R/W
In each word, bit 0 corresponds to COM0, bit 1 to COM1, bit 2 to COM2 and bit 3 to
COM3 of the first segment. Bits 4 through 7 correspond to COM0 to COM3, respectively,
of the second segment.
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Care should be taken when writing to LCD_SEG locations since some of them control
DIO pins.
LCD_SEG32, LCD_SEG42, LCD_SEG48, LCD_SEG51 through LCD_SEG59, LCD_SEG62,
LCD_SEG66, and LCD_SEG72 through LCD_SEG75 are only applicable to the 71M6534.
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
89
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
LCD_Y
2021[6]
0
L
R/W
M26MHZ
M40MHZ
2005[4]
2005[0]
0
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
LCD Blink Frequency (ignored if blink is disabled or if the segment is off).
0 = 1 Hz (500 ms ON, 500 ms OFF)
1 = 0.5 Hz (1 s ON, 1 s OFF)
M26MHZ and M40MHZ set the master clock (MCK) frequency. These bits are reset on
chip reset and may only be set. Attempts to write zeroes to M40MHZ and M26MHZ are
ignored.
M40MHZ M26MHZ MCK Frequency
0
0
20 MHz
0
1
26.7 MHz
1
0
40 MHz
1
1
40 MHz
The MPU clock divider (from MCK). These bits may be programmed by MPU without
risk of losing control.
MPU_DIV[2:0]
2004[2:0]
0
0
R/W
MUX_ALT
2005[2]
0
0
R/W
MUX_DIV[3:0]
MUX_SYNC_E
209D[3:0]
2020[7]
0
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
OPT_FDC[1:0]
90
2007[1:0]
0
0
R/W
MPU_DIV[2:0]
Resulting Clock Frequency
000
MCK/4
001
MCK/8
010
MCK/16
011
MCK/32
100
MCK/64
101
MCK/128
110
MCK/265
111
MCK/265
The MPU asserts this bit when it wishes the MUX to perform ADC conversions on an
alternate set of inputs.
If CHOP_E is 00, MUX_ALT is automatically asserted once per sum cycle, when
XFER_BUSY falls.
The number of states in the input multiplexer.
When set, SEG7 outputs MUX_SYNC. Otherwise, SEG7 is an LCD pin.
Selects the modulation duty cycle for OPT_TX.
OPT_FDC[1:0]
00
01
10
11
Function
50% Low
25% Low
12.5% Low
6.25% Low
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
OPT_RXDIS
2008[5]
0
0
R/W
OPT_RXINV
2008[4]
0
0
R/W
OPT_TXE[1:0]
2007[7:6]
00
00
R/W
OPT_TXINV
2008[0]
0
0
R/W
OPT_TXMOD
2008[1]
0
0
R/W
PLL_OK
2003[6]
0
0
R
FF
FF
R/W
PLS_MAXWIDTH
2080[7:0]
[7:0]
PLS_INTERVAL
[7:0]
2081[7:0]
0
0
R/W
PLS_INV
2004[6]
0
0
R/W
PREBOOT
SFRB2[7]
–
–
R
PREG[16:0]
201C[2:0]
201D[7:0]
201E[7:2]
4
0
0
NV
NV
NV
R/W
R/W
R/W
PRE_SAMPS[1:0] 2001[7:6]
Rev 2
0
0
R/W
Configures OPT_RX to an analog input to the optical UART comparator or as a digital
input/output, DIO1.
0 = OPT_RX, 1 = DIO1.
Inverts the result from the OPT_RX comparator when 1. Affects only the UART input.
Has no effect when OPT_RX is used as a DIO input.
Configures the OPT_TX output pin.
OPT_TXE[1:0]
Function
00
OPT_TX
01
DIO2
10
WPULSE
11
RPULSE
Inverts OPT_TX when 1. This inversion occurs before modulation.
Enables modulation of OPT_TX. When OPT_TXMOD is set, OPT_TX is modulated
when it would otherwise have been zero. The modulation is applied after any inversion
caused by OPT_TXINV.
Indicates that system power is present and the clock generation PLL is settled.
Determines the maximum width of the pulse (low going pulse).
The maximum pulse width is (2*PLS_MAXWIDTH + 1)*TI. Where TI is PLS_INTERVAL.
If PLS_INTERVAL = 0, TI is the sample time (397 µs). If set to 255, pulse width control
is disabled and pulses are output with a 50% duty cycle.
For PULSE_W and PULSE_V only, if the FIFO is used, PLS_INTERVAL must be set to
81. If PLS_INTERVAL = 0, the FIFO is not used and pulses are output as soon as the
CE issues them.
Inverts the polarity of the pulse outputs Normally, these pulses are active low. When
inverted, they become active high.
Indicates that the preboot sequence is active.
RTC adjust. See Section 1.5.3 Real-Time Clock (RTC) for additional details.
0x0FFBF ≤ PREG ≤ 0x10040
PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] are separate in hardware but can be programmed with a
single number calculated by the MPU. . PREG[16:0] and QREG[1:0] are non-volatile,
but have no correcting function in SLEEP mode.
The duration of the pre-summer, in samples.
PRE_SAMPS[1:0]
00
01
10
11
Pre-Summer Duration
42
50
84
100
91
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
QREG[1:0]
RST_SUBSEC
RTCA_ADJ[6:0]
201E[1:0]
2010[0]
2011[6:0]
RTC_SEC[5:0
RTC_MIN[5:0]
RTC_HR[4:0]
RTC_DAY[2:0]
RTC_DATE[4:0]
RTC_MO[3:0]
RTC_YR[7:0]
RTM_E
RTM0[7:0]
RTM1[7:0]
RTM2[7:0]
RTM3[7:0]
FDS_6533_6534_004
0
0
40
NV
NV
–
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
201A
201B
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
NV
NV
NV
NV
NV
NV
NV
2002[3]
2060[9:8]
2061[7:0]
2062[9:8]
2063[7:0]
2064[9:8]
2064[7:0]
2065[9:8]
2066[7:0]
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
SECURE
SFRB2[6]
0
–
R/W
SLEEP
20A9[6]
0
0
W
SEL_IAN
SEL_IBN
SEL_ICN
SEL_IDN
SLOT0_SEL[3:0]
SLOT1_SEL[3:0]
…
SLOT8_SEL[3:0]
SLOT9_SEL[3:0]
20AC[1]
20AC[5]
20AD[1]
20AD[5]
2090[3:0]
2090[7:4]
0
0
0
0
0
1
…
8
9
0
0
0
0
0
1
…
8
9
92
2094[3:0]
2094[7:4]
RTC adjust. See Section 1.5.3 Real-Time Clock (RTC) for additional details.
The sub-second counter is restarted when a 1 is written to this bit.
Analog RTC adjust. See Section 1.5.3 Real-Time Clock (RTC) for additional details.
These are the year, month, day, hour, minute and second parameters of the RTC.
Writing to these registers sets the time. Each write to one of these registers must be
preceded by a write to 0x201F (WE). Valid values for each parameter are:
SEC: 00 to 59, MIN: 00 to 59, HR: 00 to 23 (00 = Midnight)
DAY: 01 to 07 (01 = Sunday), DATE: 01 to 31, MO: 01 to 12
YR: 00 to 99 (00 and all others divisible by 4 are leap years)
Values in the RTC registers are undefined when the IC powers up without a battery but
are maintained through mission and battery modes when a sufficient voltage is maintained
at the VBAT pin. Write operations to these registers are delayed by one second.
There is no change of value at reset if the voltage at VBAT is within specification.
Real Time Monitor enable (RTM). When 0, the RTM output is low.
The four RTM probes. Before each CE code pass, the values of these registers are
serially output on the RTM pin. The RTM registers are ignored when RTM_E = 0.
When set, enables security provisions that prevent external reading of flash memory
and CE program RAM (zeros will be returned if the memory is read). It should be set
while PREBOOT is set. SECURE is cleared when the flash is mass-erased and on chip
reset. The bit may only be set, attempts to write zero are ignored.
Puts the 71M6533/71M6534 into SLEEP mode. This bit is ignored if system power is
present. The 71M6533 and 71M6534 will wake when the autowake timer times out,
when the push button is pushed, when system power returns or when RESET goes high.
R/W
When set to 1, selects differential mode for the corresponding current input (IA, IB, IC,
or ID). When 0, the input remains single-ended.
R/W
Primary multiplexer frame analog input selection. These bits map the selected input,
0-9 to the multiplexer state. The ADC output is always written to the memory location
corresponding to the input, regardless of which multiplexer state an input is mapped to
(see Section 1.1 Error! Not a valid result for table.).
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
SLOT0_ALTSEL
[3:0]
SLOT1_ALTSEL
[3:0]
SLOT2_ALTSEL
[3:0]
…
SLOT8_ALTSEL
[3:0]
SLOT9_ALTSEL
[3:0]
SP_ADDR[15:8]
SP_ADDR[7:0]
SP_CMD
SPE
2096[3:0]
10
10
2096[7:4]
1
1
2097[3:0]
11
11
…
209A[3:0]
…
8
…
8
209A[7:4]
9
9
2072[7:0]
2073[7:0]
2071
2070[7]
–
–
–
0
–
0
SPI_FLAG
20B1[4]
SUBSEC[7:0]
2014[7:0]
–
–
R
SUM_CYCLES[5:0] 2001[5:0]
0
0
R/W
TMUX[4:0]
20AA[4:0]
2
–
R/W
TRIM[7:0]
20FF
0
0
R/W
TRIMSEL[3:0]
20FD[3:0]
0
0
R/W
UMUX_E†
200F[7]
0
0
R/W
UMUX_SEL†
S00F[6]
0
0
R/W
Rev 2
R/W
R
R
R
R/W
R/W
Alternate multiplexer frame analog input selection. Maps the selected input, 0-11, to
the multiplexer state.
The additional inputs, 10 and 11 in the alternate frame are:
10 = TEMP
11 = VBAT
SPI Address. 16-bit address from the bus master.
SPI command. 8-bit command from the bus master.
SPI port enable. Enables the SPI interface on pins SEG3 through SEG6.
SPI interrupt flag. The flag is set by the hardware and is cleared by the firmware
writing a 0. Firmware using this interrupt should clear the spurious interrupt indication
during initialization.
The remaining count, in terms of 1/256 RTC cycles, to the next one second boundary.
SUBSEC may be read by the MPU after the one second interrupt and before reaching
the next one second boundary. Setting RST_SUBSEC will clear SUBSEC.
The number of pre-summer outputs summed in the final summer.
Selects one of 32 signals for TMUXOUT. For details, see Section 1.5.13 Test Ports
(TMUXOUT Pin).
Contains TRIMT[7:0], TRIMBGA,TRIMBGB or TRIMM[2:0] depending on the value
written to TRIMSEL[3:0]. If TRIMBGB = 0, the device is a 71M6533/71M6534, else it is
a 71M6533H/71M6534H.
Selects the temperature trim fuse to be read with the TRIM register:
Trim Fuse
Purpose
TRIMSEL[3:0]
TRIMT[7:0]
1
Trim for the magnitude of VREF
TRIMM[2:0]
4
Trim values related to temperature
compensation
TRIMBGA
5
TRIMBGB
6
Enables the optical UART multiplexer, selects the alternate function (MTX, MRX) for
DIO18, DIO22.
When UMUX_E = 1, selects between OPT_TX, OPT_RX and MTX, MRX as the optical
UART I/O pins. 0 = OPT_TX, OPT_RX, 1 = MTX, MRX
93
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
–
–
–
–
VERSION[7:0]
2006
20C8
VREF_CAL
VREF_DIS
2004[7]
2004[3]
0
0
0
0
R/W
R/W
WAKE_ARM
20A9[7]
0
–
W
WAKE_PRD
20A9[2:0]
001
–
R/W
WAKE_RES
WD_NROVF_
FLAG
20A9[3]
0
–
R/W
20B1[0]
–
0
R/W
WD_RST
SFR F8[7]
0
0
W
WD_OVF
2002[2]
0
NV*
R/W
WE
WRPROT_BT
201F[7:0]
SFR B2[5]
0
0
WRPROT_CE
SFR B2[4]
0
0
†
R
R
W
The device version index. This word may be read by the firmware to determine the
silicon version.
VERSION[7:0]
0000 0101
Silicon Version
A05
Brings VREF to the VREF pad. This feature is disabled when VREF_DIS =1.
Disables the internal voltage reference.
Writing a 1 to this bit arms the autowake timer and presets it with the values presently
in WAKE_PRD and WAKE_RES. The autowake timer is reset and disarmed whenever
the processor is in MISSION mode or BROWNOUT mode. The timer must be armed
at least three RTC cycles before the SLEEP or LCD-ONLY mode is commanded.
Sleep time. Time = WAKE_PRD[2:0]*WAKE_RES. The default = 001. The maximum
value is 7.
Resolution of WAKE timer: 1 = 1 minute, 0 = 2.5 seconds.
This flag is set approximately 1 ms before the watchdog timer overflows. It is cleared
by writing a 0 or on the falling edge of WAKE.
WD timer bit. This bit must be accessed with byte operations. Operations possible for
this bit are:
Write 0: Clears the flag.
Write 1: Resets the WDT.
The WDT overflow status bit, set when the WDT overflows. It is preserved in LCD
mode and will indicate at bootup if the part is recovering from a WDT overflow or a
power fault. This bit should be cleared by the MPU on bootup. It is also automatically
cleared when RESET is high.
*Not preserved in SLEEP mode
An 8-bit value has to be written to this address prior to accessing the RTC registers.
When set, this bit protects flash addresses from 0 to BOOT_SIZE*1024 from flash page erase.
When set, this bit protects flash addresses from CE_LCTN*1024 to the end of memory
from flash page erase.
Applicable to the 71M6534 only.
94
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
5.3
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
CE Interface Description
5.3.1
CE Program
The CE performs the precision computations necessary to accurately measure power. These computations
include offset cancellation, phase compensation, product smoothing, product summation, frequency
detection, VAR calculation, sag detection and voltage phase measurement. All data computed by the CE
is dependent on the selected meter equation as given by EQU[2:0] (in I/O RAM). As a function of
EQU[2:0], the element components V0 through I2 take on different meanings.
The Teridian CE program is supplied as a data image that can be merged with the MPU operational code
for meter applications. Typically, the CE program covers most applications and does not need to be
modified. Other variations of the CE code may be available. The description in this section applies to CE
code revision CE34A02D, which functions for both the 71M6533 and the 71M6534. This version of the
CE code does not process the ID current channel. Also available are CE codes capable of calculating
and measuring the ID channel.
5.3.2
CE Data Format
All CE words are 4 bytes. Unless specified otherwise, they are in 32-bit two’s complement format
(-1 = 0xFFFFFFFF). Calibration parameters are defined in flash memory (or external EEPROM) and
must be copied to CE data memory by the MPU before enabling the CE. Internal variables are used in
internal CE calculations. Input variables allow the MPU to control the behavior of the CE code. Output
variables are outputs of the CE calculations. The corresponding MPU address for the most significant
byte is given by 0x0000 + 4 x CE_address and by 0x0003 + 4 x CE_address for the least significant byte.
5.3.3
Constants
Constants used in the CE Data Memory tables are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Sampling Frequency: FS = 32768 Hz/13 = 2520.62 Hz.
F0 is the fundamental frequency of the mains phases.
IMAX is the external rms current corresponding to 250 mV pk at the inputs IA, IB and IC.
VMAX is the external rms voltage corresponding to 250 mV pk at the VA, VB and VC inputs.
NACC, the accumulation count for energy measurements is PRE_SAMPS[1:0]*SUM_CYCLES[5:0]. This
value also resides in SUM_PRE (CE address 0x23) where it is used for phase angle measurement.
The duration of the accumulation interval for energy measurements is
PRE_SAMPS[1:0]*SUM_CYCLES[5:0]/FS.
ln_8 is a gain constant of the current channel, n. Its value is 8 or 1 and is controlled by In_SHUNT.
X is a gain constant of the pulse generators. Its value is determined by PULSE_FAST and PULSE_SLOW.
-9
Voltage LSB for sag detection = VMAX * 7.879810 V.
The system constants IMAX and VMAX are used by the MPU to convert internal digital quantities (as
used by the CE) to external, i.e. metering quantities. Their values are determined by the scaling of the
voltage and current sensors used in an actual meter. The LSB values used in this document relate digital
quantities at the CE or MPU interface to external meter input quantities. For example, if a SAG threshold
of 80 V peak is desired at the meter input, the digital value that should be programmed into SAG_THR
would be 80 V/SAG_THRLSB, where SAG_THRLSB is the LSB value in the description of SAG_THR.
The parameters EQU[2:0], CE_E, PRE_SAMPS[1:0], and SUM_CYCLES[5:0], essential to the function of
the CE, are stored in I/O RAM (see Section 5.2 I/O RAM Description – Alphabetical Order).
Rev 2
95
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
5.3.4
FDS_6533_6534_004
Environment
Before starting the CE using the CE_E bit, the MPU has to establish the proper environment for the CE by
implementing the following steps:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Load the CE data into RAM.
Establish the equation to be applied in EQU[2:0].
Establish the accumulation period and number of samples in PRE_SAMPS[1:0] and SUM_CYCLES[5:0].
Establish the number of cycles per ADC multiplexer frame (MUX_DIV[3:0]).
Apply proper values to SLOTn_SEL[3:0] and SLOTn_ALTSEL[3:0].
Set PLS_INTERVAL[7:0] to 81.
Select the proper values for FIR_LEN[1:0] (1) and MUX_DIV[3:0] (6).
Set CHOP_E[1:0] = 00.
Initialize any MPU interrupts, such as CE_BUSY, XFER_BUSY, or a power failure detection interrupt.
When different CE codes are used, a different set of environment parameters needs to be established.
The exact values for these parameters are stated in the Application Notes and other documentation
accompanying the CE codes.
Operating CE codes with environment parameters deviating from the values specified will lead to
unpredictable results.
Typically, there are thirteen 32768 Hz cycles per ADC multiplexer frame (see Figure 19 in the System
Timing Summary section). This means that the product of the number of cycles per frame and the number
of conversions per frame must be 12 (allowing for one settling cycle). The default configuration is FIR_LEN
= 1 (two cycles per conversion) and MUX_DIV[3:0] = 6 (6 conversions per mux cycle).
During operation, CHOP_E[1:0] = 00 enables the automatic chopping mode and forces an alternate
multiplexer sequence at regular intervals. This enables accurate temperature measurement.
96
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
5.3.5
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
CE Calculations
Table 55: CE EQU[2:0] Equations and Element Input Mapping
Watt & VAR
Formula
EQU[
2:0] (WSUM/VARS
UM)
VA IA
0* (1 element, 2W
1φ)
VA*(IA-IB)/2
1* (1 element, 3W
1φ)
VA*IA + VB*IB
2* (2 element, 3W
3φ Delta)
VA*(IA-IB)/2 +
VC*IC
3* (2 element, 4W
3φ Delta)
VA*(IA-IB)/2 +
VB*(IC-IB)/2
4* (2 element, 4W
3φ Wye)
VA*IA + VB*IB
+ VC*IC
5
(3 element, 4W
3φ Wye)
Element Input Mapping
W0SUM/ VAR0SUM
W1SUM/
VAR1SUM
W2SUM/
VAR2SUM
I0SQ
SUM
I1SQ
SUM
I2SQ
SUM
VA*IA
–
–
IA
–
–
VA*(IA-IB)/2
–
–
IA-IB
IB
–
VA*IA
VB*IB
–
IA
IB
–
VA*(IA-IB)/2
–
VC*IC
IA-IB
IB
IC
VA*(IA-IB)/2
VB*(IC-IB)/2
–
IA-IB
IC-IB
IC
VA*IA
VB*IB
VC*IC
IA
IB
IC
* Only EQU = 5 is supported by CE code version CE34A02D.
5.3.6
CE Front End Data (Raw Data)
Access to the raw data provided by the AFE is possible by reading addresses 0 through B as shown in
Table 56.
Table 56: CE Raw Data Access Locations
Name
IA FIR data
VA FIR data
IB FIR data
VB FIR data
IC FIR data
VC FIR data
ID FIR data
TEMP FIR data
VBAT FIR data
…
Chip ID, Version bytes
Last Address
Rev 2
CE
0x00
0x01
0x02
0x03
0x04
0x05
0x06
0x0A
0x0B
Address
MPU
0x00
0x04
0x08
0x0C
0x10
0x14
0x18
0x28
0x2C
…
0x0F
003C
0x3FF
…
0xFFC
Type
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Input
Internal
Description
ADC Input data, valid at the end of the MUX
frame. The address mapping of analog
inputs to memory is hard-wired in the ADC
converter circuit.
…
Upper 16 bits are zero. Lower 16 bits are
Read
CHIP_ID[15:8], VERSION[7:0]. This word is
Only
read only.
Internal …
Internal Last Memory Location
97
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
5.3.7
FDS_6533_6534_004
CE Status and Control
CESTATUS provides information about the status of voltage and input AC signal frequency, which are useful
for generating early power fail warnings, e.g. to initiate necessary data storage. It contains sag warning
flags for phase A, B, and C, as well as F0, the derived clock operating at the fundamental input frequency.
CESTATUS represents the status flags for the preceding CE code pass (CE_BUSY interrupt). Sag alarms
are not remembered from one code pass to the next. The CE Status word is refreshed at every
CE_BUSY interrupt. The significance of the bits in CESTATUS is shown in Table 57.
CE Address
0x80
Name
CESTATUS
Description
See description of CESTATUS bits in Table 57.
Since the CE_BUSY interrupt typically occurs at 2520.6 Hz, it is desirable to minimize the computation
required in the interrupt handler of the MPU. Rather than reading the CE status word at every CE_BUSY
interrupt and interpret the sag bits, it is recommended that the MPU activate the YPULSE output to generate
interrupts when a sag occurs (see the description of the CECONFIG register)
Table 57: CESTATUS (CE RAM 0x80) Bit Definitions
CESTATUS [bit]
31:29
Name
Description
Not Used
These unused bits will always be zero.
F0 is a square wave at the exact fundamental frequency for the phase
F0
28
selected with the FREQSELn bits in CECONFIG.
Normally zero. Becomes one when |VC| remains below SAG_THR for
SAG_C
27
SAG_CNT samples. Will not return to zero until |VC| rises above SAG_THR.
Normally zero. Becomes one when VB remains below SAG_THR for
SAG_B
26
SAG_CNT samples. Will not return to zero until VB rises above SAG_THR.
Normally zero. Becomes one when VA remains below SAG_THR for
SAG_A
25
SAG_CNT samples. Will not return to zero until VA rises above SAG_THR.
24:0
Not Used These unused bits will always be zero.
The CE is initialized by the MPU using CECONFIG. This register contains in packed form SAG_CNT,
FREQSEL0, FREQSEL1, EXT_PULSE, I0_SHUNT, I1_SHUNT, PULSE_SLOW, and PULSE_FAST. The
CECONFIG bit definitions are given in Table 58.
CE
Address
Name
Data
0x20
CECONFIG
0x5020
Description
See description of the CECONFIG bits in Table 58.
The SAG_MASKn bits enable sag detection for the respective phase when set to 1. When SAG_INT is set
to 1, a sag event will generate a transition on the YPULSE output.
IA_SHUNT, IB_SHUNT and IC_SHUNT can configure their respective current inputs to accept shunt resistor
sensors. In this case the CE provides an additional gain of 8 to the selected current input. WRATE may
need to be adjusted based on the values Ix_SHUNT.
The CE pulse generator can be controlled by either the MPU (external) or CE (internal) variables. Control is by
the MPU if EXT_PULSE = 1. In this case, the MPU controls the pulse rate by placing values into APULSEW
and APULSER. By setting EXT_PULSE = 0, the CE controls the pulse rate based on WSUM_X and VARSUM_X.
98
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The EXT_TEMP bit enables temperature compensation mode:
•
•
When EXT_TEMP = 0 (internal compensation), the CE will control the gain using GAIN_ADJ (see
Table 59) based on PPMC, PPMC2 and TEMP_X, the difference between die temperature and the
reference / calibration temperature TEMP_NOM. Since PPMC and PPMC2 reflect the typical behavior
of the reference voltage over temperature, the internal temperature compensation eliminates the effects
of temperature-related errors of VREF only.
When EXT_TEMP = 1 (external compensation), the MPU is allowed to control the CE gain using
GAIN_ADJ, based on any algorithm implemented in MPU code.
The 71M6533 Demo Code creep function halts both internal and external pulse generation.
The FREQSEL1 and FREQSEL0 bits select the phase used to control the CE-internal PLL. CE accuracy
depends on the channel selected by the FREQSEL1 and FREQSEL0 bits receiving a clean voltage signal.
Table 58: CECONFIG Bit Definitions
CECONFIG
[bit]
Name
Default
[20]
[19]
[18]
SAG_MASK2
SAG_MASK1
SAG_MASK0
0
0
0
[17]
SAG_INT
0
[16]
EXT_TEMP
0
[15:8]
SAG_CNT
80
(0x50)
[7]
FREQSEL1
0
[6]
FREQSEL0
0
[5]
EXT_PULSE
1
[4]
IC_SHUNT
0
[3]
[2]
IB_SHUNT
IA_SHUNT
0
0
Rev 2
Description
When 1, enables sag interrupt based on phase C.
When 1, enables sag interrupt based on phase B.
When 1, enables sag interrupt based on phase A.
If more than one sag mask is set, a sag interrupt will only be
generated when all phases enabled for the interrupt sag.
When 1, enables the sag interrupt to be output on the
YPULSE/DIO9 pin (see Section 1.5.7).
When set, enables the control of GAIN_ADJ by the MPU.
When 0, enables the control of GAIN_ADJ by the CE.
The number of consecutive voltage samples below SAG_THR
before a sag alarm is declared. The maximum value is 255.
SAG_THR is at address 0x24.
The combination of FREQSEL1 and FEQSEL0 selects the phase
to be used for the frequency monitor, the phase-to-phase lag
calculation,the zero crossing counter (MAINEDGE_X), and the
F0 bit (CESTATUS[28]).
Phases Used for Voltage
Phase
FREQ FREQ
Phase Lag Calculation
Selected
SEL1
SEL0
PH_A to B_X PH_A to C_X
0
0
A
A-B
A-C
0
1
B
B-C
B-A
1
0
C
C-A
C-B
1
1
Not allowed
When zero, causes the pulse generators to respond to internal
data (WPULSE = WSUM_X, RPULSE = VARSUM_X).
Otherwise, the generators respond to values the MPU places
in APULSEW and APULSER.
When 1, the current gain of channel C is increased by 8. The
gain factor controlled by In_SHUNT is referred to as In_8
throughout this document.
When 1, the current gain of channel B is increased by 8.
When 1, the current gain of channel A is increased by 8.
99
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
[1]
PULSE_FAST
0
[0]
PULSE_SLOW
0
FDS_6533_6534_004
When PULSE_FAST = 1, the pulse generator input is increased
16x. When PULSE_SLOW = 1, the pulse generator input is
reduced by a factor of 64. These two bits control the pulse
gain factor X (see table below). Default is 0 for both (X = 6).
PULSE_SLOW PULSE_FAST
X
0
0
1.5 * 22 = 6
0
1
1.5 * 26 = 96
-4
1
0
1.5 * 2 = 0.09375
1
1
Do not use
Table 59: Sag Threshold and Gain Adjust Control
CE
Address
0x24
Name
SAG_THR
Default
Description
2.39*107
The voltage threshold for sag warnings. The default value is
equivalent to 80 V RMS if VMAX = 600 V. The LSB value is
VMAX * 7.8798*10-9 V. For example, if a sag threshold of 80
V RMS is required:
SAG _ THR =
0x40
5.3.8
GAIN_ADJ
16384
80 ⋅ 2
= 2.39 ⋅10 7
−9
VMAX ⋅ 7.8798 ⋅10
This register scales all voltage and current channels. The
default value is equivalent to unity gain (1.000).
CE Transfer Variables
When the MPU receives the XFER_BUSY interrupt, it knows that fresh data is available in the transfer
variables. CE transfer variables are modified during the CE code pass that ends with an XFER_BUSY
interrupt. They remain constant throughout each accumulation interval. In this data sheet, the names of
CE transfer variables always end with _X. The transfer variables can be categorized as:
1. Fundamental energy measurement variables
2. Instantaneous (RMS) values
3. Other measurement parameters
Fundamental Energy Measurement Variables
Table 60 describes each transfer variable for fundamental energy measurement. All variables are signed
32-bit integers. Accumulated variables such as WSUM are internally scaled so they have at least 2x
margin before overflow when the integration time is one second. Additionally, the hardware will not
permit output values to fold back upon overflow.
Table 60: CE Transfer Variables
CE
Address
0x85
0x86
0x87
0x88
0x8A
0x8B
0x8C
0x8D
100
Name
WSUM_X
W0SUM_X
W1SUM_X
W2SUM_X
VARSUM_X
VAR0SUM_X
VAR1SUM_X
VAR2SUM_X
Description
The signed sum: W0SUM_X+W1SUM_X+W2SUM_X.
The sum of Wh samples from each wattmeter element. In_8 is the
gain 1 or 8 as configured by In_SHUNT.
LSB = 9.4045*10-13 VMAX IMAX / In_8 Wh.
The signed sum: VAR0SUM_X+VAR1SUM_X+VAR2SUM_X.
The sum of VARh samples from each wattmeter element. In_8 is the
gain 1 or 8 as configured by In_SHUNT.
LSB = 9.4045*10-13 VMAX IMAX / In_8 VARh.
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
WSUM_X and VARSUM_X are the signed sum of Phase-A, Phase-B and Phase-C Wh or VARh values
according to the metering equation specified in the I/O RAM register EQU[2:0]. WxSUM_X is the Wh value
accumulated for phase x in the last accumulation interval and can be computed based on the specified
LSB value.
For example, with VMAX = 600 V and IMAX = 208 A, the LSB for WxSUM_X is 0.1173 µWh.
Instantaneous Energy Measurement Variables
Table 61 contains various measurement variables. IxSQSUM_X and VxSQSUM are the squared current and
voltage samples acquired during the last accumulation interval. They can be used to calculate RMS voltages
and currents. INSQSUM_X can be used for computing the neutral current.
Table 61: CE Energy Measurement Variables
CE
Address
0x8F
0x90
0x91
Name
I0SQSUM_X
I1SQSUM_X
I2SQSUM_X
Description
The sum of squared current samples from each element.
-13
2
2 2
LSBI = 9.4045*10 IMAX / In_8 A h
The sum of squared current samples from the calculated neutral:
0x92
INSQSUM_X
∑ (I
0
+ I1 + I 2 ) 2
LSB=9.4045*10-13 IMAX2 / In_82 A2h
0x99
0x9A
0x9B
0x9C
0x93
0x94
0x95
I0SQRES_X
I1SQRES_X
I2SQRES_X
INSQRES_X
V0SQSUM_X
V1SQSUM_X
V2SQSUM_X
Residual current measurements with double-precision accuracy. The
exact current is:
ISQn = InSQSUM_X + InSQRES_X
The sum of squared voltage samples from each element.
-13
2 2
LSBV= 9.4045*10 VMAX V h
The RMS values can be computed by the MPU from the squared current and voltage samples as follows:
Ix RMS =
IxSQSUM ⋅ LSBI ⋅ 3600 ⋅ FS
N ACC
Vx RMS =
VxSQSUM ⋅ LSBV ⋅ 3600 ⋅ FS
N ACC
Other Transfer variables include those available for frequency and phase measurement, and those reflecting
the count of the zero-crossings of the mains voltage and the battery voltage. These transfer variables are
listed in Table 62.
MAINEDGE_X reflects the number of half-cycles accounted for in the last accumulated interval for the AC
signal of the phase specified in the FREQSEL1 and FREQSEL0 registers. MAINEDGE_X is useful for
implementing a real-time clock based on the input AC signal.
Rev 2
101
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Table 62: Other Transfer Variables
CE
Address
Name
0x82
FREQ_X
Description
Fundamental frequency: LSB ≡
0x97
PH_AtoB_X
0x98
PH_AtoC_X
0x83
MAINEDGE_X
0x84
VBAT_SUM_X
5.3.9
FS
≈ 0.587 ⋅ 10 −6 Hz
32
2
Voltage phase lag. The selection of the reference phase is based
on FREQSEL1 and FREQSEL0 in the CECONFIG register:
If FREQSEL1/FREQSEL0 select phase A: Phase lag from A to B.
If FREQSEL1/FREQSEL0 select phase B: Phase lag from B to C.
If FREQSEL1/FREQSEL0 select phase C: Phase lag from C to A.
The angle in degrees is (0 to 360): PH_AtoB_X * 360/NACC + 2.4
If FREQSEL1/FREQSEL0 select phase A: Phase lag from A to C.
If FREQSEL1/FREQSEL0 select phase B: Phase lag from B to A.
If FREQSEL1/FREQSEL0 select phase C: Phase lag from C to B.
Angle in degrees is (0 to 360): PH_AtoC_X * 360/NACC + 4.8
The number of edge crossings of the selected voltage in the
previous accumulation interval. Edge crossings are either
direction and are debounced.
The output of the battery measurement. This value is
equivalent to twice the measured ADC value.
Temperature Measurement and Temperature Compensation
Table 63 describes the CE registers supporting temperature measurement and temperature compensation.
Table 63: CE Temperature Registers
CE
Address
0x81
Name
Default
TEMP_RAW
N/A
0x9D
TEMP_X
N/A
0x39
DEGSCALE
21755
0x1F
TEMP_NOM
0
0x3A
0x3B
PPMC
PPMC2
0
0
Description
The filtered, unscaled reading from the temperature sensor.
This register contains the difference between the die temperature
and the reference/calibration temperature as established in the
TEMP_NOM register, measured in 0.1°C.
Scale factor for the temperature calculation. It is not necessary
to use values other than the default value.
This register holds the reference or calibration temperature
vale. At calibration time, the value read in TEMP_RAW must be
written to TEMP_NOM.
Linear temperature correction factor.
Quadratic temperature correction factor.
5.3.10 Pulse Generation
Table 64 describes the CE pulse generation parameters.
The combination of the PULSE_SLOW and PULSE_FAST parameters (see Table 58) controls the speed of
the pulse rate. The default values of 0 and 0 will maintain the original pulse rate given by the Kh equation.
WRATE controls the number of pulses that are generated per measured Wh and VARh quantities. The
lower WRATE is, the slower the pulse rate for measured energy quantity. The metering constant Kh is
derived from WRATE as the amount of energy measured for each pulse. That is, if Kh = 1Wh/pulse, a
power applied to the meter of 120 V and 30 A results in one pulse per second. If the load is 240 V at
150 A, ten pulses per second will be generated.
102
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
The maximum pulse rate is 3*FS = 7.5 kHz.
Control is transferred to the MPU for pulse generation if EXT_PULSE = 1. In this case, the pulse rate is
determined by APULSEW and APULSER. The MPU loads the source for pulse generation in APULSEW
and APULSER to generate pulses. Irrespective of the EXT_PULSE status, the output pulse rate controlled
by APULSEW and APULSER is implemented by the CE only. By setting EXT_PULSE = 1, the MPU is providing
the source for pulse generation. If EXT_PULSE is 1, W0SUM_X and VAR0SUM_X are the default pulse
generation sources. In this case, creep cannot be controlled since it is an MPU function.
PULSE_WIDTH allows adjustment of the pulse width for compatibility with calibration and other external
equipment. The minimum pulse width possible is 66.16µs.
The maximum time jitter is1/6 of the MUX cycle period (nominally 67 µs) and is independent of the number
of pulses measured. Thus, if the pulse generator is monitored for one second, the peak jitter is 67 ppm.
After 10 seconds, the peak jitter is 6.7 ppm. The average jitter is always zero. If it is attempted to drive
either pulse generator faster than its maximum rate, it will simply output at its maximum rate without
exhibiting any rollover characteristics. The actual pulse rate, using WSUM as an example, is:
WRATE ⋅ WSUM ⋅ FS ⋅ X
Hz ,
2 46
where FS = sampling frequency (2520.6 Hz), X = Pulse speed factor (as defined in the CECONFIG register
with the PULSE_FAST and PULSE_SLOW bits).
Table 64: CE Pulse Generation Parameters
RATE =
CE
Address
0x21
0x22
0x23
Name
Default
WRATE
KVAR
SUM_PRE
171
6448
2520
0x41
APULSEW
0
0x38
PULSEWIDTH
12
0x42
0x43
0x44
0x45
APULSER
APULSEX
APULSEY
WSUM_ACCUM
0
0
0
0
0x46
VSUM_ACCUM
0
0x47
0x48
SUM2_ACCUM
SUM3_ACCUM
0
0
Rev 2
Description
Kh = VMAX*IMAX*66.1782 / (In_8*WRATE*NACC*X) Wh/pulse.
Scale factor for VAR measurement.
PRE_SAMPS * SUM_CYCLES (NACC)
Wh pulse (WPULSE) generator input to be updated by the MPU
when using external pulse generation. The output pulse rate is:
APULSEW * FS * 2-32 * WRATE * X * 2-14.
This input is buffered and can be updated by the MPU during a
conversion interval. The change will take effect at the beginning
of the next interval.
Register for pulse width control of XPULSE and YPULSE. The
maximum pulse width is (2*PULSEWIDTH+1)*(1/FS). The default
value will generate pulses of 10 ms width at FS = 2520.62 Hz.
VARh (RPULSE) pulse generator input.
Pulse generator input for XPULSE output.
Pulse generator input for YPULSE output.
Roll-over accumulator for WPULSE. A pulse is generated when
this register reaches 231.
Roll-over accumulator for RPULSE. A pulse is generated when
31
this register reaches 2 .
Roll-over accumulator for the XPULSE pulse output.
Roll-over accumulator for the YPULSE pulse output.
103
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
5.3.11 Noise Suppression and Version Parameters
Table 65 shows the CE parameters used for suppression of noise due to scaling and truncation effects.
Table 65: CE Parameters for Noise Suppression and Code Version
CE
Address
0x26
0x27
0x28
0x2A
0x2B
0x2C
Name
Default
QUANTA
QUANTB
QUANTC
QUANT_VARA
QUANT_VARB
QUANT_VARC
0
0
0
0
0
0
These parameters are added in channel A to the Watt calculation
to compensate for input noise and truncation.
LSB = (VMAX*IMAX / In_8) *1.04173*10-9 W
0x2E
QUANT_IA
0
0x2F
QUANT_IB
0
0x30
QUANT_IC
0
These parameters are added to compensate for input noise and
truncation in their respective channels in the squaring calculations
for I2 and V2.
2
-13 2
LSB=VMAX *5.08656*10 V and
2
2
LSB= (IMAX /In_8 )* 5.08656*10-13 A2
Text strings holding the CE version information as supplied by
the CE data associated with the CE code. For example, the
words 0x63653333 and 0x61303463 form the text string
“ce33a04c”.
These locations are overwritten in operation.
0x35
0x63653333
0x36
0x61303463
0x37
0x00000000
Description
These parameters are added to the VAR calculation for element
A and B to compensate for input noise and truncation.
LSB = (VMAX*IMAX / In_8) * 1.04173*10-9 W
5.3.12 CE Calibration Parameters
Table 66 lists the parameters that are typically entered to effect calibration of meter accuracy.
Table 66: CE Calibration Parameters
CE
Address
0x10
0x11
0x12
0x13
0x14
0x15
0x16
Name
Default
CAL_IA
CAL_VA
CAL_IB
CAL_VB
CAL_IC
CAL_VC
CAL_ID
16384
16384
16384
16384
16384
16384
16384
0x18
PHADJ_A
0
0x19
PHADJ_B
0
0x1A
PHADJ_C
0
104
Description
These constants control the gain of their respective channels. The
nominal value for each parameter is 214 = 16384. The gain of each
channel is directly proportional to its CAL parameter. Thus, if the
gain of a channel is 1% slow, CAL should be increased by 1%.
CAL_ID is used to calibrate the neutral current input.
These constants control the CT phase compensation. No compensation occurs when PHADJ_X = 0. As PHADJ_X is increased,
more compensation (lag) is introduced. The range is ± 215 – 1. If it
is desired to delay the current by the angle Φ, the equations are:
0.02229 ⋅ TANΦ
at 60Hz
PHADJ _ X = 2 20
0.1487 − 0.0131 ⋅ TANΦ
PHADJ _ X = 2 20
0.0155 ⋅ TANΦ
at 50Hz
0.1241 − 0.009695 ⋅ TANΦ
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
5.3.13 CE Flow Diagrams
Figure 45 through Figure 47 show the data flow through the CE in simplified form. Functions not shown
include delay compensation, sample interpolation, scaling and the processing of meter equations.
multiplexer
IA
VA
IB
VB
IC
VC
ID
VREF
ΔΣ
mod
FS= 2184 Hz
Per channel
de-multiplexer
IA_RAW
VA_RAW
IB_RAW
VB_RAW
IC_RAW
VC_RAW
ID_RAW
FIR
FCLK= 4.9152MHz
FS= 2184 Hz
Per channel
Figure 45: CE Data Flow: Multiplexer and ADC
IA
IA_RAW
OFFSET
NULL
F0
x
x
PHADJ_A
CAL_IA
VA_RAW
OFFSET
NULL
F0
x
F0
Generator
x
LPF
LPF
W0
VAR0
V0
x
90°
CAL_VA
...other phases
x
PHASE
COMP
x
GAIN_ADJ
F0
Figure 46: CE Data Flow: Scaling, Gain Control, Intermediate Variables
Rev 2
105
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
SUM
WA
WB
WC
VARA
VARB
VARC
PRE_SAMPS
IA
IB
IC
VA
VB
VC
F0
FDS_6533_6534_004
Σ
Σ
SQUARE
I2
V2
IASQ
IBSQ
ICSQ
VASQ
VBSQ
VCSQ
SUM
Σ
Σ
WASUM_X
WBSUM_X
WCSUM_X
VARASUM_X
VARBSUM_X
VARCSUM_X
MPU
SUM_CYCLES=60 &
PRE_SAMPS = 42
IASQSUM_X
IBSQSUM_X
ICSQSUM_X
VASQSUM_X
VBSQSUM_X
VCSQSUM_X
F0
Figure 47: CE Data Flow: Squaring and Summation Stages
106
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6 Electrical Specifications
6.1
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Table 67 shows the absolute maximum ranges for the device. Stresses beyond Absolute Maximum Ratings
may cause permanent damage to the device. These are stress ratings only and functional operation at these
or any other conditions beyond those indicated under recommended operating conditions (Section 6.3) is
not implied. Exposure to absolute-maximum-rated conditions for extended periods may affect device
reliability. All voltages are with respect to GNDA.
Table 67: Absolute Maximum Ratings
Voltage and Current
Supplies and Ground Pins
V3P3SYS, V3P3A
VBAT
GNDD
Analog Output Pins
V3P3D
VREF
V2P5
−0.5 V to 4.6 V
-0.5 V to 4.6 V
-0.5 V to +0.5 V
-10 mA to 10 mA,
-0.5 V to 4.6 V
-10 mA to +10 mA,
-0.5 V to V3P3A+0.5 V
-10 mA to +10 mA,
-0.5 V to 3.0 V
Analog Input Pins
IA, VA, IB, VB, IC, VC, V1
XIN, XOUT
-10 mA to +10 mA
-0.5 V to V3P3A+0.5 V
-10 mA to +10 mA
-0.5 V to 3.0 V
All Other Pins
Configured as SEG or COM drivers
Configured as Digital Inputs
Configured as Digital Outputs
-1 mA to +1 mA,
-0.5 to V3P3D+0.5
-10 mA to +10 mA,
-0.5 to 6 V
-15 mA to +15 mA,
-0.5 V to V3P3D+0.5 V
All other pins
−0.5 V to V3P3D+0.5 V
Temperature and ESD Stress
Operating junction temperature (peak, 100ms)
Operating junction temperature (continuous)
Storage temperature
140 °C
125 °C
Solder temperature – 10 second duration
ESD stress on all pins
Rev 2
−45 °C to +165 °C
250 °C
4 kV
107
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
Recommended External Components
Table 68: Recommended External Components
Name
C1
C2
CSYS
C2P5
From
V3P3A
V3P3D
V3P3SYS
V2P5
To
AGND
GNDD
GNDD
GNDD
XTAL
XIN
XOUT
CXS
XIN
AGND
CXL
XOUT
AGND
Function
Bypass capacitor for 3.3 V supply
Bypass capacitor for 3.3 V output
Bypass capacitor for V3P3SYS
Bypass capacitor for V2P5
32.768 kHz crystal – electrically similar to
ECS .327-12.5-17X or Vishay XT26T,
load capacitance 12.5 pF
Load capacitor for crystal (depends on
crystal specs and board parasitics).
Load capacitor for crystal (depends on
crystal specs and board parasitics).
Value
Unit
†
≥0.1 ±20%
†
0.1 ±20%
≥1.0 ±30%
0.1 ±20%
µF
µF
µF
µF
32.768
kHz
33 ±10%
pF
7 ±10% ††
pF
Notes:
1. AGND and GNDD should be connected together.
2. V3P3SYS and V3P3A should be connected together.
†
For accuracy and EMI rejection, C1 + C2 should be 470 µF or higher.
††
10, 12, or 15 pF may be used if 7 pF is not available, with limited range for RTCA_ADJ.
6.3
Recommended Operating Conditions
Table 69: Recommended Operating Conditions
Parameter
V3P3SYS, V3P3A: 3.3 V Supply Voltage
V3P3A and V3P3SYS must be at the
same voltage
Condition
Normal Operation
Battery Backup
Min
3.0
0
Externally Connect to V3P3SYS
VBAT
No Battery
Battery Backup:
BRN and LCD modes
SLEEP mode
Operating Temperature
108
Typ
3.3
Max
3.6
3.6
Unit
V
V
3.0
2.0
3.8
3.8
V
V
-40
+85
ºC
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.4
6.4.1
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Performance Specifications
Input Logic Levels
Table 70: Input Logic Levels
Parameter
†
Digital high-level input voltage , VIH
†
Digital low-level input voltage , VIL
Input pull-up current, IIL
E_RXTX, E_ISYNC
E_RST, CKTEST
Other digital inputs
Input pull down current, IIH
ICE_E
RESET
PB
Other digital inputs
†
Condition
Min
2
VIN=0 V, ICE_E=1
Typ
10
10
-1
VIN = V3P3D
10
10
-1
-1
Max
0.8
Unit
V
V
0
100
100
1
µA
µA
µA
0
0
100
100
1
1
µA
µA
µA
µA
In battery powered modes, digital inputs should be below 0.3 V or above 2.5 V to minimize battery current.
6.4.2
Output Logic Levels
Table 71: Output Logic Levels
Parameter
Digital high-level output voltage VOH
Digital low-level output voltage VOL
OPT_TX VOH (V3P3D-OPT_TX)
OPT_TX VOL
6.4.3
Condition
ILOAD = 1 mA
ILOAD = 15 mA
ILOAD = 1 mA
ILOAD = 15 mA
ISOURCE=1 mA
ISINK=20 mA
Min
V3P3D–0.4
V3P3D-0.6
0
Typ
Max
0.4
0.8
0.4
0.7
Unit
V
V
V
V
V
V
Power-Fault Comparator
Table 72: Power-fault Comparator Performance Specifications
Parameter
Offset Voltage: V1-VBIAS
Hysteresis Current: V1
Response Time: V1
WDT Disable Threshold: V1-V3P3A
6.4.4
Condition
Vin = VBIAS – 100 mV
+100 mV overdrive
Min
-20
0.8
10
-400
Typ
37
Max
+15
1.2
100
-10
Unit
mV
μA
μs
mV
Max
+15
1.2
1
Unit
mV
μA
μs
V2 Comparator (71M6534 only)
Table 73: V2 Comparator Performance Specifications
Parameter
Offset Voltage: V2-VBIAS
Hysteresis Current
Response Time
Rev 2
Condition
Vin = VBIAS – 100 mV
+100 mV overdrive
Min
-20
0.8
Typ
109
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.4.5
FDS_6533_6534_004
Battery Monitor
The LSB values do not include the 8-bit left shift at CE input.
Table 74: Battery Monitor Performance Specifications (BME = 1)
Parameter
Load Resistor
LSB Value
Condition
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ]
= [00], [10], or [11]
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ]
= [01]
FIR_LEN=0
FIR_LEN=1
FIR_LEN=2
FIR_LEN=0
FIR_LEN=1
FIR_LEN=2
(L=138)
(L=288)
(L=384)
(L=186)
(L=384)
(L=588)
Offset Error
6.4.6
Min
27
(-10%)
(-10%)
-200
Typ
45
-48.7
-5.35
-2.26
-19.8
-2.26
-0.63
0
Max
63
(+10%)
+100
Unit
kΩ
μV
μV
μV
μV
μV
μV
mV
Typ
4.2
Max
5.3
Unit
mA
8.4
9.6
mA
3.5
3.8
mA
+400
nA
10
12
mA
82
112
250
250
µA
µA
11
21
0.7
40
46
1.5
µA
µA
µA
Max
15
45
Unit
Ω
Ω
(+10%)
Supply Current
Table 75: Supply Current Performance Specifications
Parameter
V3P3SYS current (CE off)
V3P3SYS current (CE on)
V3P3A current
VBAT current
V3P3SYS current,
Write Flash
VBAT current
6.4.7
Condition
Normal Operation,
V3P3A = V3P3SYS = 3.3 V
CKMPU = 614 kHz
No Flash Memory write
RTM_E=0, ECK_DIS=1,
ADC_E=1, ICE_E=0
Min
-400
Normal Operation as above,
except write Flash at maximum
rate, CE_E = 0, ADC_ E = 0
VBAT=3.6V
BROWNOUT mode
71M6533/6533H
71M6534H
LCD Mode
LCD DAC off
LCD DAC on
SLEEP Mode
V3P3D Switch
Table 76: V3P3D Switch Performance Specifications
Parameter
On resistance – V3P3SYS to V3P3D
On resistance – VBAT to V3P3D
110
Condition
| IV3P3D | ≤ 1 mA
| IV3P3D | ≤ 1 mA
Min
Typ
9
32
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.4.8
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
2.5 V Voltage Regulator
Unless otherwise specified, the load = 5 mA.
Table 77: 2.5 V Voltage Regulator Performance Specifications
Parameter
V2P5
V2P5 load regulation
Condition
Iload = 0
Iload = 0 mA to 5 mA
Iload = 5 mA, reduce V3P3
until V2P5 drops 200 mV
RESET=0, iload=0
Voltage overhead V3P3SYS-V2P5
PSSR ∆V2P5/∆V3P3
6.4.9
Min
2.3
Typ
2.5
Max
2.7
40
460
Unit
V
mV
mV
-2
+2
mV/V
Low-Power Voltage Regulator
Unless otherwise specified, V3P3SYS = V3P3A = 0, PB=GND (BROWNOUT).
Table 78: Low-Power Voltage Regulator Performance Specifications
Parameter
V2P5
V2P5 load regulation
VBAT voltage requirement
PSRR ΔV2P5/ΔVBAT
Condition
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
ILOAD = 0
ILOAD = 0 mA to 1 mA
ILOAD = 1 mA, reduce VBAT
until REG_LP_OK = 0
ILOAD = 0
2.3
2.5
2.7
30
V
mV
3.0
V
50
mV/V
Max
Unit
Crystal connected
1
3
μW
pF
RTCA_ADJ = 0
5
5
pF
pF
-50
6.4.10 Crystal Oscillator
Table 79: Crystal Oscillator Performance Specifications
Parameter
Maximum Output Power to Crystal
2
XIN to XOUT Capacitance
2
Capacitance to GNDD
XIN
XOUT
Condition
1
Min
Typ
1
This specification defines a nominal relationship rather than a measured parameter. Correct circuit
operation will be verified with other specs that use this nominal relationship as a reference.
2
This specification will be guaranteed and verified in production samples, but will not be measured in
production.
6.4.11 Optical Interface
Table 80: Optical Interface Performance Specifications
Parameter
OPT_TX VOH (V3P3D-OPT_TX)
OPT_TX VOL
Rev 2
Condition
ISOURCE =1 mA
ISINK = 20 mA
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
0.4
0.7
V
V
111
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.4.12 LCD DAC
Table 81: LCD DAC Performance Specifications
Parameter
VLCD Voltage
VLCD = V 3P3 ⋅ (1 − 0.059 ⋅ LCD _ DAC ) − 0.019V
Condition
Min
1 ≤ LCD_DAC ≤ 7
-10
Typ
Max
Unit
+10
%
6.4.13 LCD Drivers
The information in Table 82 applies to all COM and SEG pins with LCD_DAC[2:0] = 000.
Table 82: LCD Driver Performance Specifications
Parameter
VLC2 Voltage
††
VLC1 Voltage ,
⅓ bias
½ bias
½ bias, minimum output level
VLC0 Voltage††,
⅓ bias
VLC1 Impedance
VLC0 Impedance
†
Condition
Max
Unit
-0.1
+0.1
V
With respect to 2*VLC2/3
With respect to VLC2/2
-3
-3
+2
+2
1.0
% VLC2
% VLC2
V
With respect to VLC2/3
∆ILOAD = 100 µA (Isink)
∆ILOAD = -100 µA (Isource)
∆ILOAD = 100 µA (Isink)
∆ILOAD = -100 µA (Isource)
-4
+1
15
15
15
15
%
With respect to VLCD
Min
†
Typ
9
9
9
9
kΩ
kΩ
VLCD is V3P3SYS in MISSION mode and VBAT in BROWNOUT and LCD modes.
Specified as percentage of VLC2, the maximum LCD voltage.
††
112
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.4.14 Temperature Sensor
Table 83 shows the performance for the temperature sensor. The LSB values do not include the 8-bit left
shift at CE input.
Table 83: Temperature Sensor Performance Specifications
Parameter
Condition
Nominal relationship: N(T) = Sn*(T-Tn) + Nn, Tn = 25ºC
FIR_LEN=0 (L=138)
[M40MHZ, M26MH] =
FIR_LEN=1 (L=288)
Nominal
[00], [10], or [11]
2
FIR_LEN=2 (L=384)
Sensitivity (Sn)
3
FIR_LEN=0 (L=186)
L
 
S n = −0.00109 ⋅  
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ] =
3
FIR_LEN=1 (L=384)
[01]
FIR_LEN=2 (L=588)
FIR_LEN=0 (L=138)
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ] =
Nominal Offset
FIR_LEN=1 (L=288)
2
[00], [10], or [11]
(Nn)
FIR_LEN=2 (L=384)
3
FIR_LEN=0 (L=186)
L
N n = 0.508 ⋅  
[M40MHZ, M26MHZ] =
FIR_LEN=1 (L=384)
3
[01]
FIR_LEN=2 (L=588)
†
Temperature Error
Tn = 25°C,
 ( N (T ) − N n ) 
ERR = T − 
T = -40ºC to +85ºC

Sn


Min
Typ
Max
-106
-964
-2286
-260
-2286
-8207
Unit
LSB/ºC
49447
449446
1065353
LSB
121071
1065353
3825004
-101
+101
ºC
† Temperature error is calculated with the value Nn, which is measured at Tn during meter calibration and
stored in MPU or CE for use in temperature calculations.
1
Guaranteed by design; not production tested.
2
This specification defines a nominal relationship rather than a measured parameter. Correct circuit
operation will be verified with other specs that use this nominal relationship as a reference.
Rev 2
113
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.4.15 VREF and VBIAS
Table 84 shows the performance specifications for VREF and VBIAS. Unless otherwise specified,
VREF_DIS = 0.
Table 84: VREF Performance Specifications
Parameter
Condition
VREF output voltage, VREF(22)
VREF chop step
VREF power supply sensitivity
ΔVREF / ΔV3P3A
V3P3A = 3.0 to 3.6 V
VREF_DIS = 1,
VREF = 1.3 to 1.7 V
CAL =1,
ILOAD = 10 µA, -10 µA
VREF input impedance
VREF output impedance
VNOM definition
Ta = 22ºC
3
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
1.193
1.195
1.197
40
V
mV
1.5
mV/V
-1.5
100
kΩ
2.5
kΩ
VNOM (T ) = VREF (22) + (T − 22)TC1 ⋅ 10 −6 + (T − 22) 2 TC 2 ⋅ 10 −6
V
If TRIMBGA and TRIMBGB are available (71M6533G/H, 71M6534H)
Definitions
4
γ = 0.1·TRIMBGB - 0.143·(TRIMM+0.5),
ξ=
TEMP22 − 500 ⋅ TRIMBGA − 370000
900
,
η = (56.2 – TRIMT)·0.55
3
VNOM temperature coefficients
TC1
TC2
VREF(T) deviation from
VNOM(T)
VREF (T ) − VNOM (T )
10 6
VNOM (T )
max( T − 22 ,40)
η+ 19γ - 0.065γξ +0.34ξ + 8.0
0.015γ - 0.0013ξ – 0.35
-15 1
µV/ºC
2
µV/ºC
+15 1
If TRIMBGA and TRIMBGB are not available (71M6533, 71M6534)
VNOM temperature coefficients:
3.18·(52.46-TRIMT)
TC1
TC2
-0.444
VREF(T) deviation from VNOM(T)
1
1
VREF (T ) − VNOM (T )
10 6
-40
+40
VNOM (T )
max( T − 22 ,40)
VREF aging
VBIAS Voltage
1
±25
Ta = 25 °C
Ta = -40 °C to 85 °C
(-1%)
(-4%)
1.6
1.6
(+1%)
(+4%)
PPM/ºC
µV/ºC
µV/°C 2
PPM/ºC
PPM/
year
V
V
Guaranteed by design; not production tested.
2
This specification will be guaranteed and verified in production samples, but will be measured in
production only at DC.
3
This relationship describes the nominal behavior of VREF at different temperatures.
4
TEMP22 is the value read from the temperature sensor at 22°C.
114
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.4.16 ADC Converter, V3P3A Referenced
Table 85 shows the performance specifications for the ADC converter, V3P3A referenced. For this data,
FIR_LEN=2, [M40MHZ, M26MHZ]=[00], unless stated otherwise, VREF_DIS=0. LSB values do not include
the 8-bit left shift at the CE input.
Table 85: ADC Converter Performance Specifications
Parameter
Condition
Recommended Input Range
(Vin-V3P3A)
Voltage to Current Crosstalk
10 6 *Vcrosstalk
cos(∠Vin − ∠Vcrosstalk )
Vin
1
THD (First 10 harmonics):
250 mV-pk
20 mV-pk
Input Impedance
Temperature coefficient of Input
Impedance
[M40MHZ,
LSB size
3
1.25  3  M26MHZ] =
VLSB = VREF ⋅
⋅ 
4.75  L  [00], [10], or [11]
L = FIR length
[M40MHZ,
M26MHZ] =
[01]
Digital Full Scale [M40MHZ,
3
M26MHZ] =
 L
 
[00], [10], or [11]
 3
L = FIR length
[M40MHZ,
M26MHZ] =
[01]
Vin = 200 mV peak,
65 Hz, on VA.
Vcrosstalk = largest
measurement on IA or IB
Vin=65 Hz,
64 kpts FFT, BlackmanHarris window
At 65 Hz
Min
Max
Unit
-250
250
mV
peak
-10 1
10 1
μV/V
40
-75
-90
90
dB
dB
kΩ
At 65 Hz
FIR_LEN=0
FIR_LEN=1
FIR_LEN=2
FIR_LEN=0
FIR_LEN=1
FIR_LEN=2
FIR_LEN=0
FIR_LEN=1
FIR_LEN=2
FIR_LEN=0
FIR_LEN=1
FIR_LEN=2
Typ
1.7
Ω/°C
3231
355
150
1319
150
42
± 97336
± 884736
± 2097152
± 238328
± 2097152
± 7529536
nV/LSB
nV/LSB
LSB
LSB
ADC Gain Error vs
%Power Supply Variation
10 6 ∆Nout PK 357nV / VIN
100 ∆V 3P3 A / 3.3
Vin=200 mV pk, 65 Hz
V3P3A=3.0 V, 3.6 V
Input Offset (Vin-V3P3A)
1
-10
50
PPM /
%
10
mV
Guaranteed by design; not production tested.
Rev 2
115
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.5
6.5.1
FDS_6533_6534_004
Timing Specifications
Flash Memory
Table 86: Flash Memory Timing Specifications
Parameter
Flash Read Pulse Width
Flash write cycles
Flash data retention
Flash data retention
Flash byte writes between page or
mass erase operations
Write Time per Byte
Page Erase (1024 bytes)
Mass Erase
6.5.2
Condition
Min
V3P3A = V3P3SYS = 0
(BROWNOUT Mode)
-40°C to +85°C
25°C
85°C
30
Typ
Max
Unit
100
ns
20,000
100
10
Cycles
Years
Years
2
Cycles
42
20
200
µs
ms
ms
Max
Unit
EEPROM Interface
Table 87: EEPROM Interface Timing
Parameter
2
Write Clock frequency (I C)
Write Clock frequency (3-wire)
6.5.3
Condition
Min
CKMPU = 4.9 MHz,
Using interrupts
CKMPU = 4.9 MHz,
bit-banging DIO4/5
CKMPU=4.9 MHz
Typ
78
kHz
150
kHz
500
kHz
RESET
Table 88: RESET Timing
Parameter
Condition
Reset pulse width
Reset pulse fall time
1
Min
Typ
5
Max
Unit
11
µs
µs
Guaranteed by design; not production tested.
6.5.4
RTC
Table 89: RTC Range for Date
Parameter
Range for date
116
Condition
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
2000
-
2255
year
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.5.5
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
SPI Slave Port (MISSION Mode)
Table 90: SPI Slave Port (MISSION Mode) Timing
Parameter
tSPIcyc PCLK cycle time
tSPILead Enable lead time
tSPILag Enable lag time
tSPIW PCLK pulse width:
High
Low
Condition
Ignore if PCLK is low
when PCSZ falls.
tSPISCK PCSZ to first PCLK fall
tSPIDIS
tSPIEV
tSPISU
tSPIH
Min
1
15
0
Disable time
PCLK to Data Out
Data input setup time
Data input hold time
Typ
Max
Unit
µs
ns
ns
40
40
ns
ns
2
ns
0
15
10
5
ns
ns
ns
ns
PCSZ
tSPIcyc
tSPILead
tSPILag
PCLK
PSDO
tSPISCK
tSPIW
MSB OUT
tSPIEV
tSPIW
LSB OUT
tSPIDIS
tSPIH
PSDI
MSB IN
LSB IN
Figure 48: SPI Slave Port (MISSION Mode) Timing
Rev 2
117
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.6
FDS_6533_6534_004
Typical Performance Data
6.6.1
Accuracy over Current
Figure 49 shows meter accuracy over current for various line frequencies. Figure 50 shows meter accuracy
over current at various load angles.
6533/34 Wh Performance, Equation 5, 45 Hz, 55 Hz, 65 Hz - 240 V - 0° Phase
Angle
0.5
0.4
0.3
45 Hz
55 Hz
0.2
65 Hz
% Error
0.1
0
-0.1
-0.2
-0.3
-0.4
-0.5
0.1
1
10
100
1000
Current (A rms)
Figure 49: Wh Accuracy (0.1 A - 200 A, 240 V, Room Temperature) at Various Frequencies
(Differential Mode, CTs)
71M6533/6534 Wh Accuracy at Various Phase Angles
Equation 5, 240 V
1
0.8
0°
60°
300°
0.6
Error (%)
0.4
0.2
0
-0.2
-0.4
-0.6
-0.8
I [A]
-1
0.01
0.1
1
10
100
Figure 50: Typical Wh Accuracy (0.02 A - 200 A, 240 V, Room Temperature), Various Load Angles
(Differential Mode, CTs)
118
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.6.2
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Accuracy over Temperature
With digital temperature compensation enabled, the temperature characteristics of the reference voltage
(VREF) are compensated to within ±40 PPM/°C for the 71M6533/71M6534 and within ±15 PPM/°C for the
71M6533H/71M6534H.
6.7
6.7.1
Package Outline Drawings
71M6533 (100-Pin LQFP)
Controlling dimensions are in mm.
15.7(0.618)
16.3(0.641)
1
15.7(0.618)
16.3(0.641)
Top View
14.000 +/- 0.200
MAX. 1.600
1.50 +/- 0.10
0.225 +/- 0.045
0.50 TYP.
Side View
0.10 +/- 0.10
0.60 TYP>
Figure 51: 71M6533/71M6533G/71M6533H 100-Pin LQFP Package Outline
Rev 2
119
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.7.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6534/6534H (120-Pin LQFP)
Controlling dimensions are in mm.
16.000 +/- 0.200
14.000 +/- 0.100
7.000
8.000
120
16.000 +/- 0.200
8.000
14.000 +/- 0.100
7.000
1
13.950 +/- 0.100
MAX. 1.600
1.400 +/- 0.050
0.180 +/- 0.050
0.400
0.100 +/- 0.050
0.600 +/- 0.150
Figure 52: 71M6534/6534H 120-Pin LQFP Package Outline
120
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.8
Pinout
71M6533/71M6533G/71M6533H Pinout (100-Pin LQFP)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
TERIDIAN
71M6533
71M6533G
71M6533H
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
GNDD
RESET
V2P5
VBAT
RX
SEG31/DIO11
SEG30/DIO10
SEG29/DIO9/YPULSE
SEG28/DIO8/XPULSE
SEG41/DIO21
SEG40/DIO20
SEG39/DIO19
SEG27/DIO7/RPULSE
SEG26/DIO6/WPULSE
SEG25/DIO5/SDATA
SEG24/DIO4/SDCK
SEG23
SEG22
SEG21
SEG20
ICE_E
SEG43/DIO23
SEG18
SEG17
SEG16
SEG0/TEST0
SEG1/TEST1
SEG2/TEST2
SEG34/DIO14
SEG35/DIO15
SEG64/DIO44
SEG49/DIO29
SEG36/DIO16
SEG6/PSDI
SEG50/DIO30
SEG7/MUX_SYNC
SEG8
SEG65/DIO45
GNDD
SEG63/DIO43
SEG47/DIO27
SEG46/DIO26
SEG45/DIO25
SEG33/DIO13
SEG12
SEG44/DIO24
SEG13
SEG14
SEG15
SEG71/DIO51
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
GNDD
SEG9/E_RXTX
DIO2/OPT_TX
TMUXOUT
TX
SEG3/PCLK
V3P3D
SEG19/CKTEST
V3P3SYS
SEG4/PSDO
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG37/DIO17
SEG38/DIO18/MTX
DIO56
DIO57
DIO58
DIO3
COM0
COM1
COM2
COM3
SEG67/DIO47
SEG68/DIO48
SEG69/DIO49
SEG70/DIO50
100
99
98
97
96
95
94
93
92
91
90
89
88
87
86
85
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
SEG10/E_TCLK
SEG61/DIO41
SEG11/E_RST
PB
NC
XOUT
TEST
XIN
GNDD
DIO1/OPT_RX
V1
VREF
IAP
IAN
IBP
IBN
ICP
ICN
IDP
IDN
VA
VB
VC
V3P3A
GNDA
6.8.1
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Figure 53: Pinout for 71M6533/71M6533G/71M6533H LQFP-100 Package
Rev 2
121
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
71M6534/71M6534H Pinout (120-Pin LQFP)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Teridian
71M6534/
71M6534H
90
89
88
87
86
85
84
83
82
81
80
79
78
77
76
75
74
73
72
71
70
69
68
67
66
65
64
63
62
61
SEG59/DIO39
SEG58/DIO38
SEG57/DIO37
SEG56/DIO36
GNDD
RESET
V2P5
VBAT
RX
SEG48/DIO28
SEG31/DIO11
SEG30/DIO10
SEG29/DIO9/YPULSE
SEG28/DIO8/XPULSE
SEG41/DIO21
SEG40/DIO20
SEG39/DIO19
SEG27/DIO7/RPULSE
SEG26/DIO6/WPULSE
SEG25/DIO5/SDATA
SEG24/DIO4/SDCK
SEG23
SEG22
SEG21
SEG20
ICE_E
SEG43/DIO23
SEG18
SEG17
SEG16
SEG0/TEST0
SEG1/TEST1
SEG2/TEST2
SEG55/E_ISYNC
SEG34/DIO14
SEG35/DIO15
SEG64/DIO44
SEG49/DIO29
SEG36/DIO16
SEG6/PSDI
SEG50/DIO30
SEG7/MUX_SYNC
SEG8
SEG65/DIO45
GNDD
SEG63/DIO43
SEG47/DIO27
SEG46/DIO26
SEG45/DIO25
SEG33/DIO13
SEG12
SEG44/DIO24
SEG13
SEG14
SEG15
SEG71/DIO51
SEG72/DIO52
SEG73/DIO53
SEG74/DIO54
SEG75/DIO55
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
GNDD
SEG9/E_RXTX
DIO2/OPT_TX
TMUXOUT
SEG66/DIO46
TX
SEG3/PCLK
V3P3D
SEG19/CKTEST
V3P3SYS
SEG4/PSDO
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG54/E_TBUS3
SEG53/E_TBUS2
SEG52/E_TBUS1
SEG51/E_TBUS0
SEG37/DIO17
SEG38/DIO18/MTX
DIO56
DIO57
DIO58
DIO3
COM0
COM1
COM2
COM3
SEG67/DIO47
SEG68/DIO48
SEG69/DIO49
SEG70/DIO50
120
119
118
117
116
115
114
113
112
111
110
109
108
107
106
105
104
103
102
101
100
99
98
97
96
95
94
93
92
91
SEG32/DIO12
SEG10/E_TCLK
SEG62/DIO42
SEG61/DIO41
SEG11/E_RST
SEG42/DIO22/MRX
PB
XOUT
TEST
XIN
GNDD
DIO1/OPT_RX
V1
V2
NC
VREF
IAP
IAN
IBP
IBN
ICP
ICN
IDP
IDN
VBIAS
VA
VB
VC
V3P3A
GNDA
6.8.2
FDS_6533_6534_004
Figure 54: Pinout for 71M6534/71M6534H LQFP-120 Package
122
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
6.9
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Pin Descriptions
Pins marked with an asterisk (e.g. V2*) are only available on the 71M6534.
6.9.1
Power and Ground Pins
Table 91: Power and Ground Pins
Name
GNDA
GNDD
Type
P
P
Circuit
–
–
V3P3A
P
–
V3P3SYS
P
–
V3P3D
O
13
VBAT
P
12
V2P5
O
10
6.9.2
Description
Analog ground: This pin should be connected directly to the ground plane.
Digital ground: This pin should be connected directly to the ground plane.
Analog power supply: A 3.3 V power supply should be connected to this
pin, must be the same voltage as V3P3SYS.
System 3.3 V supply. This pin should be connected to a 3.3 V power supply.
Auxiliary voltage output of the chip. In mission mode, this pin is connected to V3P3SYS by the internal selection switch. In BROWNOUT
mode, it is internally connected to VBAT. V3P3D is floating in LCD and
SLEEP mode. A bypass capacitor to ground should not exceed 0.1 µF.
Battery backup and oscillator power supply. A battery or super-capacitor
is to be connected between VBAT and GNDD. If no battery is used,
connect VBAT to V3P3SYS.
Output of the internal 2.5 V regulator. A 0.1 µF capacitor to GNDA
should be connected to this pin.
Analog Pins
Table 92: Analog Pins
Name
IAP/IAN,
IBP/IBN,
ICP/ICN
IDP/IDN
Type
Circuit
I
6
VA, VB,
VC
I
6
V1
I
7
V2*
I
7
VBIAS*
O
9
VREF
O
9
XIN
XOUT
I
8
Description
Differential or single-ended Line Current Sense Inputs: These pins are voltage
inputs to the internal A/D converter. Typically, they are connected to the
outputs of current sensors. Unused pins must be tied to V3P3A.
Line Voltage Sense Inputs: These pins are voltage inputs to the internal
A/D converter. Typically, they are connected to the outputs of resistor
dividers. Unused pins must be tied to V3P3A.
Comparator Input: This pin is a voltage input to the internal comparator.
The voltage applied to the pin is compared to the internal BIAS voltage
(1.6 V). If the input voltage is above VBIAS, the comparator output will be
high (1). If the comparator output is low, a voltage fault will occur. A series
5 kΩ resistor should be connected from V1 to the resistor divider.
Comparator Input (71M6534 only): This pin is a voltage input to an internal
comparator. The voltage applied to this pin is compared to an internal
reference voltage (VBIAS). If the input voltage is above VBIAS, the
comparator output will be high (1).
Low-impedance output for use in biasing current sensors and voltage dividers.
Voltage Reference for the ADC. This pin should be left unconnected
(floating).
Crystal Inputs: A 32 kHz crystal should be connected across these pins.
Typically, a 33 pF capacitor is also connected from XIN to GNDA and a
7 pF capacitor (alternatively, 10 pF to 15 pF) is connected from XOUT
to GNDA. It is important to minimize the capacitance between these pins.
See the crystal manufacturer datasheet for details.
If an external clock is used, a 150 mV (p-p) clock signal should be applied
to XIN, and XOUT should be left unconnected.
Pin types: P = Power, O = Output, I = Input, I/O = Input/Output
The circuit number denotes the equivalent circuit, as specified under Section 6.9.4 I/O Equivalent Circuits.
Rev 2
123
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.9.3
FDS_6533_6534_004
Digital Pins
Table 93: Digital Pins
Name
Type Circuit
COM3,COM2,
O
5
COM1,COM0
SEG0…SEG2,
SEG8,
O
5
SEG12…SEG18,
SEG20…SEG23
SEG24/DIO4
…
SEG31/DIO11,
SEG32/DIO12*
SEG33/DIO13
…
SEG41/DIO21,
SEG42/DIO22*
SEG43/DIO23
…
SEG47/DIO27,
SEG48/DIO28*
SEG49/DIO29,
SEG50/DIO30,
SEG56/DIO36*
I/O 3, 4, 5
…
SEG59/DIO39*
SEG61/DIO41,
SEG62/DIO42*
SEG63/DIO43
…
SEG65/DIO45,
SEG66/DIO45*
SEG67/DIO47
…
SEG71/DIO51
SEG72/DIO52*
…
SEG75/DIO55*
SEG51/E_TBUS0*
SEG52/E_TBUS1*
SEG53/E_TBUS2*
I/O
5
SEG54/E_TBUS3*
SEG55/E_ISYNC_
BRKRQ*
SEG3/PCLK
SEG4/PSDO
I/O 3, 4, 5
SEG5/PCSZ
SEG6/PSDI
DIO3, DIO56,
I/O
3
DIO57, DIO58
124
Description
LCD Common Outputs: These 4 pins provide the select signals for
the LCD display.
Dedicated LCD Segment Output pins.
Multi-use pins, configurable as either LCD SEG driver or DIO.
(DIO4 = SCK, DIO5 = SDA when configured as EEPROM interface;
WPULSE = DIO6, VARPULSE = DIO7, DIO8 = XPULSE,
DIO9 = YPULSE when configured as pulse outputs).
Unused pins must be configured as outputs or terminated to
V3P3/GNDD.
SEG32/DIO12, SEG42/DIO22, SEG48/DIO28, SEG56/DIO36
through SEG59/DIO39, SEG62/DIO42, SEG66/DIO45,
SEG72/DIO52 through SEG75/DIO55 are only available in the
71M6534.
SEG38/DIO18 and SEG42/DIO22 can be assigned to the multiplexed
UART outputs/inputs MTX and MRX (71M6534 only). This function
is controlled by the I/O RAM bits UMUX_E and UMUX_SEL.
Multiuse pins, configurable as either LCD SEG driver or emulator
trace bus or handshake (71M6534 only).
Multi-use pins, configurable as either LCD SEG driver or SPI
PORT.
Dedicated DIO Pins.
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
E_RXTX/SEG9
E_RST/SEG11
E_TCLK/SEG10
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
I/O
I/O
O
1, 4, 5
1, 4, 5
4, 5
ICE_E
I
2
CKTEST/SEG19,
MUXSYNC/SEG7
O
4, 5
TMUXOUT
O
4
OPT_RX/DIO1
I/O
3, 4
OPT_TX/DIO2
I/O
3, 4
RESET
I
2
RX
I
3
TX
O
4
TEST
I
7
PB
I
3
Multi-use pins, configurable as either emulator port pins (when
ICE_E pulled high) or LCD SEG drivers (when ICE_E tied to GND).
ICE enable. When zero, E_RST, E_TCLK, and E_RXTX become
SEG9, SEG10, and SEG11 respectively. For production units, this
pin should be pulled to GND to disable the emulator port.
Multi-use pins, configurable as either multiplexer/clock output or
LCD segment driver using the I/O RAM bits CKOUT_E or
MUX_SYNC_E.
Pin connected to the output test multiplexer. Controlled by
TMUX[3:0].
Multi-use pin, configurable as Optical Receive Input or general DIO.
When configured as OPT_RX, this pin is a regular UART RX pin.
If this pin is unused it must be configured as an output or
terminated to V3P3D or GNDD.
Multi-use pin, configurable as either Optical LED Transmit Output
or general DIO. When configured as OPT_TX, this pin is capable
of directly driving an LED for transmitting data in an IR serial interface.
Chip reset: This input pin is used to reset the chip into a known
state. For normal operation, this pin is pulled low. To reset the
chip, this pin should be pulled high. This pin has an internal 30 μA
(nominal) current source pull-down. No external reset circuitry is
necessary.
UART input. If this pin is unused it must be terminated to
V3P3D or GNDD.
UART output.
Enables Production Test.
This pin must be grounded in normal operation.
Push button input. This pin must be at GNDD when not active or
unused. A rising edge sets the IE_PB flag. It also causes the part to
wake up if it is in SLEEP or LCD mode. PB does not have an internal
pull-up or pull-down resistor.
Pin types: P = Power, O = Output, I = Input, I/O = Input/Output.
The circuit number denotes the equivalent circuit, as specified in Section 6.9.4.
Rev 2
125
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
6.9.4
FDS_6533_6534_004
I/O Equivalent Circuits
V3P3D
V3P3A
V3P3D
110K
Digital
Input
Pin
CMOS
Input
from
internal
reference
LCD SEG
Output
Pin
LCD
Driver
VREF
Pin
GNDD
GNDD
GNDA
LCD Output Equivalent Circuit
Type 5:
LCD SEG or
pin configured as LCD SEG
Digital Input Equivalent Circuit
Type 1:
Standard Digital Input or
pin configured as DIO Input
with Internal Pull-Up
VREF Equivalent Circuit
Type 9:
VREF
V3P3A
V3P3D
V3P3D
Digital
Input
Pin
CMOS
Input
Analog
Input
Pin
GNDD
GNDD
Analog Input Equivalent Circuit
Type 6:
ADC Input
Digital Input
Type 2:
Pin configured as DIO Input
with Internal Pull-Down
V2P5 Equivalent Circuit
Type 10:
V2P5
V3P3A
V3P3D
Comparator
Input
Pin
To
Comparator
VLCD
Pin
CMOS
Input
GNDD
GNDD
Comparator Input Equivalent
Circuit Type 7:
Comparator Input
VLCD Equivalent Circuit
Type 11:
VLCD Power
To
Oscillator
Oscillator
Pin
Digital Input Type 3:
Standard Digital Input or
pin configured as DIO Input
Power
Down
Circuits
VBAT
Pin
GNDD
V3P3D
Digital
Output
Pin
CMOS
Output
GNDD
Oscillator Equivalent Circuit
Type 8:
Oscillator I/O
V3P3D
GNDD
GNDD
Digital Output Equivalent Circuit
Type 4:
Standard Digital Output or
pin configured as DIO Output
126
LCD
Drivers
GNDA
Digital
Input
Pin
V2P5
Pin
GNDA
110K
GNDD
from
internal
reference
To
MUX
from
V3P3SYS
10
VBAT Equivalent Circuit
Type 12:
VBAT Power
V3P3D
Pin
from
VBAT
40
V3P3D Equivalent Circuit
Type 13:
V3P3D
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
7 Ordering Information
PART
71M6533
71M6533H
71M6533G*
71M6533
71M6533H
71M6533G*
PINPACKAGE
VREF TRIM
DEVIATION**
100 LQFP
(Lead(Pb)free)
±40
±15
±40
±40
±15
±40
FLASH
ORDERING
SIZE PACKAGE
NUMBER
(KB)
128
71M6533-IGT/F
128
Bulk
71M6533H-IGT/F
256
71M6533G-IGT/F
128
71M6533-IGTR/F
Tape and
128
71M6533H-IGTR/F
reel
256
71M6533G-IGTR/F
71M6534
±40
128
120 LQFP
71M6534H
±15
256
(Lead(Pb)71M6534
±40
128
free)
71M6534H
±15
256
*Future product—contact factory for availability.
Bulk
Tape and
reel
71M6534-IGT/F
71M6534H-IGT/F
71M6534-IGTR/F
71M6534H-IGTR/F
PACKAGE
MARKING
71M6533-IGT
71M6533H-IGT
71M6533G-IGT
71M6533-IGT
71M6533H-IGT
71M6533G-IGT
71M6534-IGT
71M6534H-IGT
71M6534-IGT
71M6534H-IGT
**VREF trim deviation is the difference between the physical reference voltage and the nominal
reference voltage (VNOM, as calculated from the trim fuses) in ppm/°C. See Section 3.5.1 for details.
8 Related Information
Users must also refer to the following documents related to the 71M6533 and 71M6534:
•
•
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet (this document)
71M653X Software User’s Guide (SUG)
9 Contact Information
For more information about Maxim products or to check the availability of the 71M6533/G/H and
71M6534/H, contact technical support at www.maxim-ic.com/support.
Rev 2
127
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
FDS_6533_6534_004
Appendix A: Acronyms
AFE
AMR
ANSI
CE
DIO
DSP
FIR
I2C
ICE
IEC
MPU
PLL
RMS
SFR
SOC
SPI
TOU
UART
128
Analog Front End
Automatic Meter Reading
American National Standards Institute
Compute Engine
Digital I /O
Digital Signal Processor
Finite Impulse Response
Inter-IC Bus
In-Circuit Emulator
International Electrotechnical Commission
Microprocessor Unit (CPU)
Phase-locked loop
Root Mean Square
Special Function Register
System on Chip
Serial Peripheral Interface
Time of Use
Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
Appendix B: Revision History
REVISION
NUMBER
2
REVISION
DATE
2/12
1.2
August 3, 2010
Rev 2
DESCRIPTION
1) Added Guaranteed By Design notes to the Electrical Specifications.
2) Added explanation on NV properties of RTCA_ADJ[ ] and
PREG/QREG[ ] and corrected entries in Table 54.
3) Added note that transitions to BROWNOUT mode must be avoided
during page erase operations.
4) Added note in Application Section (3.1) stating that filter components other that those shown on the Demo Boards should not be
connected to the sensor input pins. Added reference to AN5292.
5) Consolidated spelling of low-power modes (SLEEP, LCD,
BROWNOUT) and of COMPSTAT register.
6) Corrected value for C2 capacitor in Table 68.
7) Extended explanation of WD_OVF (not preserved in SLEEP mode)
and corrected entries in Table 54.
8) Added explanation of WD_NROVF_FLAG.
9) Added explanation on MPU activity on transition to BROWNOUT
mode in section 2.4.2.
1) Throughout document: Added bit ranges to all register fields where
missing (e.g. MPU_DIV[2:0]).
2) Figure 1: Corrected name for PSDI and PSDO signals.
3) Section 1.2.3 (page 11): Added note concerning tailoring CE code
for ADC resolution.
4) Section 1.1.1, Table 5 (page 15): Corrected equations for EQU=3.
Added note – not all CE codes support all equations.
5) Clarified Section 1.3.2 (page 16).
6) Section 1.4 80515 MPU Core:
 (page 19) Table 6: Change approximate frequencies to exact
frequencies.
 (page 19): Changed providing Library to providing demonstration
source code.
 (page 20) Added note about MUX_DIV=0 disables ADC output.
 (page 21) See restrictions on INTBITS register.
 (page 22) Added P1-P3 to Table 10.
 (page 24) Updated Data Pointer description.
 (page 25) Table 14: Added note about clearing the WRPROT_CE
and WRPROT_BT bits. Updated description for FWCOL0,
FWCOL1.
 (page 26) Section 1.4.6: Clarified SOBUF, S1BUF as Tx and Rx
buffers.
 (page 27): Added caution on proper way to clear flag bits.
 (page 31) Table 25: Added Interrupt sources for Ext. Interrupts 2-6.
7) Section 1.5.2 PLL and Internal Clocks
 (page 37) Table 37: Changed frequencies to exact frequencies.
 (page 38): Added caution concerning frequency relationship to
specific CE code.
8) (page 39) Section 1.5.3 Real-Time Clock (RTC): Added description
for observing RTC timing on TMUXOUT pin.
9) (page 46) Section 1.5.7 Digital I/O: Added caution about not sourcing
current in or out of DIO pins. Updated Figure 9.
10) Section 1.5.11 SPI Slave Port, (page 52): Clarified description of
I/O RAM access via the SPI interface. Added Table 48.
11) Section 2.3 Battery Modes (page 57): Added details on software
129
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
REVISION
NUMBER
REVISION
DATE
FDS_6533_6534_004
DESCRIPTION
12)
13)
14)
15)
16)
17)
18)
19)
precautions for switching between modes and factory programming
of the first 6 flash addresses..
Figure 25, Figure 26 and Figure 27: Corrected name for PSDI and
PSDO signals.
Section 2.5.2 Wake on Timer (page 66): Updated description.
Section 3.1 Connection of Sensors (CT, Resistive Shunt) (page
68): Added note concerning analog input pins requiring sensors
with low source impedance.
Section 4.12 MPU Firmware Library (page 77): Modified to indicate
demonstration source code provided.
Section 4.13 Crystal Oscillator (page 77): Updated caution about
rejecting electromagnetic interference.
Table 53 I/O RAM Map – Functional Order (page 79): Updated format
for Unused and NVRAM locations.
Section 5.3.4 Environment (page 96): Added comment concerning
importance of parameter dependence on CE code environment.
Section 5.3.7 CE Status and Control: (page 99) Updated description
of EXT_TEMP. Updated Table 58.
20) Section 5.3.8 CE Transfer Variables:
 (page 100) Updated Table 60.
 (page 102) Added VBAT_SUM_X to Table 62.
21) Section 5.3.12: Added CAL_ID location.
22) Section 1.1.1: Updated flow diagrams.
23) Added 71M6533G (256 KB).
24) Updated value for capacitor at XOUT (7 pF).
25) Added description of delay compensation in CE (1.3.6).
26) Added description of error bands for VREF in 3.5.1.
27) Replaced Accuracy with Trim Deviation in Ordering Information.
28) Added explanation on pulse generation to description of registers
WSUM_ACCUM and VSUM_ACCUM.
29) Corrected comment in I/O RAM Table for entry DIO_DIR1[7:5, 3:0] to
state “see DIO_PX and DIO_PY for special options for the DIO8 and
DIO9 outputs”.
30) Added comment in electrical specifications for Battery Monitor
stating that the LSB values do not include the 8-bit left shift at CE
input”.
31) In Section on Real-Time Clock (RTC), corrected maximum value for
RTCA_ADJ to 0x7F and corrected adjustment rage to ±15 ppm.
Added note: “The digital adjustment using PREG[16:0] and
QREG[1:0] is preferred over the analog adjustment using
RTCA_ADJ: The digital adjustment is more repeatable and has a
wider range”
32) Corrected entry for SPE in I/O RAM Table to state “Enables the SPI
Interface on pins SEG3 through SEG6”
33) In I/O RAM Table for entry TRIM[7:0]: Added TRIMT[7:0] to list of
fuses accessible with TRIM[7:0].
34) Corrected entry in I/O RAM Table on IE_XFER and IE_RTC:
Removed text stating that flags are cleared automatically.
35) Added entry in I/O RAM Table for WE: Write data is discarded.
36) Corrected formula for sag threshold in CE section.
37) Completely reworked the description of the SPI port.
130
Rev 2
FDS_6533_6534_004
REVISION
NUMBER
1.1
REVISION
DATE
November 9,
2009
1.0
March 6, 2009
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
DESCRIPTION
Changes and corrections:
1) Stated < 0.1% for accuracy for both H and non-H parts over
2000:1 range on title page.
2) Added STOP and IDLE bits in description of PCOM SFR.
3) Consolidated spelling of RTCA_ADJ.
4) Added explanation for Figure 18.
5) Completely revised section 2.5.2 (Wake on Timer).
6) Improved description of hysteresis in Application Section (3.11).
7) Corrected bit range for CE_LCTN to CE_LCTN[7:0].
8) Corrected bit assignment for control of DIO56 – DIO58 (DIO_56[4]
and DIO_DIR56[7].
9) Added LCD_SEG19[ ] to Table 47.
10) Added text in Table 47 stating that registers RTC_SEC to
RTC_YR do not change at reset.
11) Specified Voltage LSB in CE Interface Description (for sag
detection).
12) Corrected formulae for RMS calculation below Table 56.
13) Updated package outline drawing.
14) Added text describing connection of a trace emulator to the
71M6534 in Section 3.13.
15) Clarified write delay that applies to the RTC_SEC and other RTC
registers in Section 1.4.3 and Table 47.
16) Added note describing firmware measures to be applied when
using UART1 in full-duplex mode.
First publication with changes with respect to the preliminary data
sheet (PDS) as follows:
1) Corrected reversed labels for Timer/Counter 1 and 2 in Table 22.
2) Updated Figure 7 (Interrupt structure).
3) Updated range for RTC_A from 1.9 PPM to 3.8 PPM.
4) Changed SLEEP mode current at 25°C to 0.7 µV and deleted
entry for typical SLEEP mode current over temperature.
5) Corrected bit enumeration for FLSH_PGADR[7:2].
6) Corrected various typographical errors (TRIMMT etc.).
7) Corrected entries under “Wk.” Column for GP0-GP7 in alphabetical
I/O RAM table.
8) Added explanation for hysteresis at the V1 pin in Applications
section.
9) Replaced graph showing system performance specification over
temperature with specification on accuracy of VREF
compensation.
10) Changed accuracy of VREF compensation over temperature to
±15 PPM/°C
11) Changed LSB values provided for temperature sensor.
12) Added minimum output level for VLC1 LCD voltage.
13) Removed access to I/O RAM from SPI Port description.
14) Updated numerous parameters in Electrical Specification
(temperature sensor, supply current for mission and battery
modes).
15) Corrected number of pre-boot cycles in Flash Memory Section.
16) Updated entries in I/O RAM table under “Wake” column.
17) Updated CE register tables.
Maxim cannot assume responsibility for use of any circuitry other than circuitry entirely embodied in a Maxim product. No circuit
patent licenses are implied. Maxim reserves the right to change the circuitry and specifications without notice at any time.
M a x i m I n t e g r a t e d P r o d u c t s , 1 2 0 S a n G a b r i e l D r iv e , S u n n y v a le , C A 9 4 0 8 6 4 0 8- 7 3 7 - 7 6 0 0
 2012 Maxim Integrated Products
Maxim is a registered trademark of Maxim Integrated Products.
71M6533/G/H and 71M6534/H Data Sheet
132
Rev 2