Emulation Extension Pak (EEP) and Emulation Header User Guide

Emulation Extension Pak (EEP)
and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS50002243B
Note the following details of the code protection feature on Microchip devices:
•
Microchip products meet the specification contained in their particular Microchip Data Sheet.
•
Microchip believes that its family of products is one of the most secure families of its kind on the market today, when used in the
intended manner and under normal conditions.
•
There are dishonest and possibly illegal methods used to breach the code protection feature. All of these methods, to our
knowledge, require using the Microchip products in a manner outside the operating specifications contained in Microchip’s Data
Sheets. Most likely, the person doing so is engaged in theft of intellectual property.
•
Microchip is willing to work with the customer who is concerned about the integrity of their code.
•
Neither Microchip nor any other semiconductor manufacturer can guarantee the security of their code. Code protection does not
mean that we are guaranteeing the product as “unbreakable.”
Code protection is constantly evolving. We at Microchip are committed to continuously improving the code protection features of our
products. Attempts to break Microchip’s code protection feature may be a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If such acts
allow unauthorized access to your software or other copyrighted work, you may have a right to sue for relief under that Act.
Information contained in this publication regarding device
applications and the like is provided only for your convenience
and may be superseded by updates. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your application meets with your specifications.
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OTHERWISE, RELATED TO THE INFORMATION,
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Trademarks
The Microchip name and logo, the Microchip logo, dsPIC,
FlashFlex, flexPWR, JukeBlox, KEELOQ, KEELOQ logo, Kleer,
LANCheck, MediaLB, MOST, MOST logo, MPLAB,
OptoLyzer, PIC, PICSTART, PIC32 logo, RightTouch, SpyNIC,
SST, SST Logo, SuperFlash and UNI/O are registered
trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the
U.S.A. and other countries.
The Embedded Control Solutions Company and mTouch are
registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, BodyCom, chipKIT, chipKIT logo,
CodeGuard, dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net, ECAN, In-Circuit
Serial Programming, ICSP, Inter-Chip Connectivity, KleerNet,
KleerNet logo, MiWi, motorBench, MPASM, MPF, MPLAB
Certified logo, MPLIB, MPLINK, MultiTRAK, NetDetach,
Omniscient Code Generation, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit,
PICtail, RightTouch logo, REAL ICE, SQI, Serial Quad I/O,
Total Endurance, TSHARC, USBCheck, VariSense,
ViewSpan, WiperLock, Wireless DNA, and ZENA are
trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the
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SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
Silicon Storage Technology is a registered trademark of
Microchip Technology Inc. in other countries.
GestIC is a registered trademark of Microchip Technology
Germany II GmbH & Co. KG, a subsidiary of Microchip
Technology Inc., in other countries.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their
respective companies.
© 2014-2015, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in
the U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-63277-835-2
QUALITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM
CERTIFIED BY DNV
== ISO/TS 16949 ==
DS50002243B-page 2
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2009 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona; Gresham, Oregon and design centers in California
and India. The Company’s quality system processes and procedures
are for its PIC® MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping
devices, Serial EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and
analog products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design
and manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP AND EMULATION HEADER
USER’S GUIDE
Table of Contents
Chapter 1. EEP and Emulation Header Overview
1.1 What is an Emulation Extension Pak? ........................................................... 5
1.2 What is an Emulation Header? ....................................................................... 5
1.3 Why Would I Want to Use an Emulation Header? ......................................... 6
1.4 Compare Emulation Header, Debug Header and Device Features ............... 6
1.5 Support Information ........................................................................................ 8
1.6 Emulation Header Hardware Setup ................................................................ 9
1.7 Emulation Header Setup for MPLAB X IDE ................................................. 11
1.8 Additional Information ................................................................................... 11
Chapter 2. Emulation Header Features
2.1 Introduction ................................................................................................... 13
2.2 Breakpoint, Runtime Watch, and Trace Resources ..................................... 14
2.3 Runtime Watches ......................................................................................... 14
2.4 Real Time Hardware Instruction Trace ......................................................... 15
2.5 Hardware Address/Data Breakpoints ........................................................... 19
2.6 Enhanced Event Breakpoints ....................................................................... 22
2.7 Event Combiners .......................................................................................... 23
2.8 Stopwatch Cycle Counter ............................................................................. 25
2.9 Trigger In/Out ............................................................................................... 25
2.10 View Hardware Stack On Halt .................................................................... 27
2.11 Previous Program Counter ......................................................................... 28
2.12 Background Debug ..................................................................................... 28
Chapter 3. Emulation Header List
3.1 Introduction ................................................................................................... 29
3.2 AC244055 .................................................................................................... 31
3.3 AC244063 .................................................................................................... 33
3.4 AC244064 .................................................................................................... 35
3.5 AC244065 .................................................................................................... 37
3.6 AC244066 .................................................................................................... 39
Appendix A. -ME2 Silicon Errata
A.1 Introduction .................................................................................................. 41
A.2 CCP3 Capture .............................................................................................. 41
A.3 Hardware Breakpoint Issue .......................................................................... 41
A.4 Trigger In/Halt during Multi-Cycle Instruction Processing ............................ 42
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
Appendix B. Emulation Header Target Footprints
B.1 Introduction .................................................................................................. 43
B.2 DIP Device Footprints .................................................................................. 43
B.3 TQFP/PLCC Device Footprints .................................................................... 43
Appendix C. Emulation Header Connections
C.1 Introduction .................................................................................................. 45
C.2 6-Pin Modular Connector ............................................................................. 45
C.3 6-Pin SIL Connector .................................................................................... 46
C.4 Modular-to-SIL Adapter ............................................................................... 47
C.5 Ordering Information .................................................................................... 47
Index .............................................................................................................................51
Worldwide Sales and Service......................................................................................54
DS50002243A1-page 4
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Chapter 1. EEP and Emulation Header Overview
NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS
All documentation becomes dated, and this manual is no exception. Microchip tools and
documentation are constantly evolving to meet customer needs, so some actual dialogs
and/or tool descriptions may differ from those in this document. Please refer to our web site
(www.microchip.com) to obtain the latest documentation available.
Documents are identified with a “DS” number. This number is located on the bottom of each
page, in front of the page number. The numbering convention for the DS number is
“DSXXXXXA”, where “XXXXX” is the document number and “A” is the revision level of the
document.
For the most up-to-date information on development tools, see the MPLAB X IDE online Help
(Help menu).
This chapter contains the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.1
What is an Emulation Extension Pak?
What is an Emulation Header?
Why Would I Want to Use an Emulation Header?
Compare Emulation Header, Debug Header and Device Features (Future)
Support Information
Emulation Header Hardware Setup
Emulation Header Setup for MPLAB X IDE
Additional Information
WHAT IS AN EMULATION EXTENSION PAK?
An Emulation Extension Pak (EEP) contains an emulation header; gold, single, in-line
pins; a trace cable, and a trace adapter board. An EEP is what you purchase when you
want an emulation header.
1.2
WHAT IS AN EMULATION HEADER?
An emulation header is a circuit board that allows a debug tool to debug code for a specific device. A special version of the device (-ME2) with on-board emulation circuitry is
located on the header. Connectors on the side of the header allow it to connect directly
to, or through, an adapter to the emulator. Connectors on the bottom of the header
allow it to connect directly to, or through, a transition socket to a target board.
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS50002243B-page 5
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
1.3
WHY WOULD I WANT TO USE AN EMULATION HEADER?
Although some devices have on-board debug circuitry to allow you to debug your code,
you often lose device resources to debugging, i.e., debugging requires the use of two
I/O lines, plus VDD, VSS and VPP, to communicate with the device. Using an emulation
header can free up these resources for your application, and give you new and powerful debugging features not found on debug headers.
For details on emulation header features, see Chapter 2. “Emulation Header Features”.
For details on debug header features, see the user’s guide or online help file for supported debug tools (listed in Section 1.5 “Support Information”). Also see the Processor
Extension Pak and Debug Header Specification (DS51292). Find all documentation on
the Microchip website (http://www.microchip.com).
For a comparison of emulation versus debug features, see Section 1.4 “Compare
Emulation Header, Debug Header and Device Features (Future)”.
1.4
COMPARE EMULATION HEADER, DEBUG HEADER AND DEVICE
FEATURES (FUTURE)
Use the Development Tool Selector (DTS) to compare the extra debug features of an
emulation header to a supported device (with on-board debug circuitry) and supported
debug header.
To find features by device:
1. In a web browser, go to: http://www.microchip.com/dtsapp/
2. Select your device from the “Select Product” list. Or type and search for the name
of your device in the "Search" box and it will appear at the top of the “Select Product” list, where you can select it.
3. Click on the tab “Emulators & Debuggers” to see debug features.
DS50002243B-page 6
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP and Emulation Header Overview
FIGURE 1-1:
DTS DEVICE INFORMATION
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS50002243B-page 7
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
1.5
SUPPORT INFORMATION
Emulation headers require specific MPLAB X IDE versions and debug tools to operate.
Acquire these before purchasing an emulation header in an emulation extension pak
(EEP). Available EEPs are listed in Chapter 3. “Emulation Header List”.
To proceed with setting up emulation header hardware, see Section 1.6 “Emulation
Header Hardware Setup”.
Contact Customer Support for issues with emulation headers.
1.5.1
Software Support
Emulation headers are supported on MPLAB X IDE v1.90 and greater.
1.5.2
Tool Support
Emulation headers are supported on the following tools:
• PICkit™ 3 in-circuit debugger
• MPLAB® ICD 3 in-circuit debugger
• MPLAB® REAL ICE® in-circuit emulator
Note:
1.5.3
Not all features are supported on all tools.
Customer Support
Users of Microchip products can receive assistance through several channels:
•
•
•
•
Distributor or Representative
Local Sales Office
Field Application Engineer (FAE)
Technical Support
Technical support is available through the web site at: http://support.microchip.com
Documentation errors or comments may be sent to: [email protected]
DS50002243B-page 8
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP and Emulation Header Overview
1.6
EMULATION HEADER HARDWARE SETUP
To set up your header, follow these instructions before doing anything else:
1. Check the header box for any paper inserts that specify special operating instructions and the emulation header for any stickers (Figure 1-2).
FIGURE 1-2:
SPECIAL HEADER INSTRUCTIONS
Emulation Header (Top)
ION
UT
CA
CAUTION
2. Set any jumpers or switches on the header to determine device functionality, or
selection, as specified for that header. See the section “Emulation Header List”
for information on how to set up individual headers.
3. Connect the header to your desired debug tool by consulting the tool
documentation for connection options. Example connections are shown in
Figure 1-3, Figure 1-4, and Figure 1-5.
FIGURE 1-3:
PICkit™ 3 IN-CIRCUIT DEBUGGER CONNECTIONS
FIGURE 1-4:
MPLAB® ICD 3 IN-CIRCUIT DEBUGGER CONNECTIONS
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
FIGURE 1-5:
MPLAB® REAL ICE™ IN-CIRCUIT EMULATOR
CONNECTIONS
4. Connect the header to the target board. On the bottom of the header is a socket
that is used to connect to the target board. The header can be connected to the
target board as follows:
a) PDIP header socket to PDIP target socket with a stand-off (male-to-male)
connector or single in-line pins. An example is shown in Figure 1-6.
b) Header socket to plug on the target board
c) Header socket to target socket with a transition socket (see the Transition
Socket Specification, DS51194)
The header socket will have the same pin count as your selected device. The
-ME2 device on the top of the header usually has a larger pin count because it
has additional pins that are dedicated to debug.
FIGURE 1-6:
CONNECT HEADER TO TARGET
Emulation Header (Bottom)
Header Socket
Stand-off Connector
Power In
Target Board (Top)
Target Socket
5. If using a debug tool that can power the target, power that tool now.
6. Power the target, if needed.
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 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP and Emulation Header Overview
1.7
EMULATION HEADER SETUP FOR MPLAB X IDE
Emulation header functionality is supported on MPLAB X IDE 1.90 or greater, but not
on MPLAB IDE v8. Please use debug headers, if you are still using MPLAB IDE v8.
You need to do the following to use an emulation header on MPLAB X IDE:
1. Set up the emulation header as specified in Section 1.6 “Emulation Header Hardware Setup”.
2. Begin creating a project for a device supported by your emulation header using
the Projects wizard (File>New Project). See MPLAB X IDE documentation for
more on projects.
3. In one step of the wizard you will have an opportunity to specify the emulation
header product number (AC######).
4. In another step you will specify the hardware (debug) tool to which the emulation
header is attached.
5. Once the wizard is complete, write code for your project.
6. Select Debug>Debug Project to run and debug your code.
Note:
1.8
An emulation header can only be used to debug (Debug menu), not to
program (Run menu). See “Section 1.8.1 “Programming Notes””.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
The following additional information is useful when using an emulation header from an
Emulation Extension Pak.
1.8.1
Programming Notes
The emulation header is designed to be used with the in-circuit emulator in debugger
mode, Debug>Debug Project, (not in programmer mode, Run>Run Project), in MPLAB
X IDE. Any programming of the special -ME2 device on the header is for debug
purposes.
To program production (non-special) devices with your debug tool, use the Universal
Programming Module (AC162049) or design a modular interface connector on the
target. See the appropriate specification for connections. For the most up-to-date
device programming specifications, see the Microchip website at 
http://www.microchip.com.
Also, production devices can be programmed with the following tools:
•
•
•
•
MPLAB PM3 device programmer
PICkit 3 development programmer
MPLAB ICD 3 in-circuit debugger (select as a programmer)
MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator (select as a programmer)
1.8.2
Calibration Bits
The calibration bits for the band gap and internal oscillator are always preserved to their
factory settings.
1.8.3
Performance Issues
See the MPLAB X IDE help file regarding your debug tool for information on specific
device limitations that could affect performance.
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
NOTES:
DS50002243B-page 12
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Chapter 2. Emulation Header Features
2.1
INTRODUCTION
Emulation header features depend on the debug tool used. The table below shows a
list of all available emulation header features, and the features that are supported on
each tool.
TABLE 2-1:
EMULATION FEATURE SUPPORT BY HARDWARE TOOL
Features
RI
ICD3
PK3
Section 2.3 “Runtime Watches” - see Note
Section 2.4 “Real Time Hardware Instruction Trace” - see Note
Section 2.5 “Hardware Address/Data Breakpoints” - see Note
Section 2.5.2 “Range Breakpoints”
Section 2.5.3 “Data Value Comparison”
Section 2.5.4 “Data Value Mask”
Section 2.5.6 “Trigger Out Operation”
Section 2.5.7 “Interrupt Context Detection”
Section 2.6 “Enhanced Event Breakpoints” - see Note
Section 2.6.1 “Execution Out-of-Bounds Detection”
Section 2.6.2 “Break on Trigger In/Emit Trigger Out”
Section 2.7 “Event Combiners”
Section 2.8 “Stopwatch Cycle Counter”
Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”
Section 2.10 “View Hardware Stack On Halt”
Section 2.11 “Previous Program Counter”
Section 2.12 “Background Debug”
Legend:
RI = MPLAB® REAL ICE™ In-Circuit Emulation
ICD3 = MPLAB® ICD 3 In-Circuit Debugger
PK3 = PICkit™ 3 In-Circuit Debugger
Note: See also Section 2.2 “Breakpoint, Runtime Watch, and Trace Resources”.
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
2.2
BREAKPOINT, RUNTIME WATCH, AND TRACE RESOURCES
Emulation headers have 32 data capture resources, total, that may be used for breakpoints and runtime watches. For example, if you use a data capture resource for a
breakpoint, you will have one less data capture resource for other breakpoints or
runtime watches.
Runtime watches and trace are mutually exclusive. Data streaming from the emulation
header may be used for either runtime watches or trace. For example, if you want to
use trace, you cannot use runtime watches.
Selecting trace in the Project Properties takes precedence over other selections, such
as in the Watches window or in any plug-ins.
2.3
RUNTIME WATCHES
In the MPLAB X IDE Watches window (Window>Debugging>Watches), you can create
a watch for a symbol where the value changes at runtime.
Before you add a runtime watch to the Watches window, you need to set up the clock.
Perform the following steps to set up the clock:
1. Right click on the project name and select “Properties”.
2. Click on the debug tool name (e.g., Real ICE) and select option category “Clock”.
3. Set the runtime instruction speed.
To add a global symbol or SFR as a runtime watch, do one of the following:
• Right click in the Watches window and select “New Runtime Watch” or select
Debug>New Runtime Watch. Click the selection buttons to see either Global
Symbols or SFRs. Click on a name from the list and then click OK.
• Select the symbol or SFR name in the Editor window and then select “New Runtime Watch” from the right click menu. The name is populated in the Watches window. Click OK.
Debug Run and watch the values change as the program executes. For more information on the Watches window, see MPLAB X IDE documentation.
2.3.1
Symbol/SFR Size
For all devices except PIC32 MCUs, symbols used in a runtime watch must be sized
to match the device memory. That is, you need 8-bit symbols when using an 8-bit
device.
2.3.2
SFR Caveats
Unless an SFR is explicitly read or written by code, no value change will be visible in
the Watches window. As the runtime watch uses the trace mechanism, code must read
or cause a change before a trace packet is output. Therefore any SFR value changes,
without code explicitly reading it or causing the SFR value change, cannot be directly
monitored as a Runtime Watch.
For example, setting up a Runtime Watch on the Analog-to-Digital Converter (ADC)
conversion result SFRs ADRESH and ADRESL will not show any runtime changes, even
when the input voltage to the ADC is changing. A workaround is code that copies the
ADRESH and ADRESL register values to RAM variables (e.g., ADRESH_copy and
ADRESL_copy') after an ADC conversion is complete. These variables, added to the
Watches window as Runtime Watches, will then reflect the changes in ADC values.
Another example would be monitoring an input pin or an entire port that is configured
as inputs. External changes on the input pin(s) will not trigger a trace watch packet;
and, therefore, no runtime updates to the port will be displayed. The Runtime Watch
display will only update when code reads the input pin or input port.
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 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Emulation Header Features
2.4
REAL TIME HARDWARE INSTRUCTION TRACE
Note:
This feature is only supported on the MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator.
Real Time Hardware Instruction Trace is a real-time dump of the program execution
stream that can be captured and analyzed. The functionality that is provided includes
the following:
• full instruction execution information, up to 32 MHz
• trace through Reset conditions
• trace buffer with optional stall
Emulation header trace is similar to PIC32 instruction trace, which is a non-intrusive
hardware instruction trace. You can use trace to capture every instruction executed by
the device. The trace data is output from the device (using the pins TRCLK,
TRDAT[6:0], and TRSTALL) to the emulator. The emulator streams this data to a trace
buffer, that acts like a rolling first-in/first-out (FIFO) buffer, on the PC.
The amount of trace data is limited only by the size of the trace buffer. This buffer can
fill quickly even when set to the maximum size, so it is wise to determine exactly what
you need to capture.
Note:
Execution will NOT HALT when this external buffer is full. However,
MPLAB X IDE will announce when the trace buffer has overflowed.
Trace requires hardware and software setup before trace data can be viewed in a window.
2.4.1
Set Up Trace Hardware
To use trace, you will need the ribbon cable and emulator interface board that comes
with the emulation header. Connect one end to the emulation header (Figure 2-1). Connect the other end to the emulator. For more information on complete hardware setup
and connections, refer to Section 1.6 “Emulation Header Hardware Setup”. For details
on trace connectors, see Section 2.4.4 “Trace Hardware”.
FIGURE 2-1:
EMULATION TRACE CABLE CONNECTED TO HEADER
Emulation Header
Trace
Connector
Interface
Board
4
2
J2
1
2
C 2013
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Emulation
Header
1 3
J1
6
8
10 12 14 16 18 20
5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19
02-10038
Assembly No.:
Trace Adapter
Modular
Connector
To the
Emulator
Logic Probe
Connector
To the
Emulator
Modular
Connector
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
2.4.2
Set Up Trace for MPLAB X IDE
To set up MPLAB X IDE to use trace for the MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator,
perform the following steps:
1. Right click on the project name and select “Properties” to open the Project
Properties window.
2. Click on “Real ICE” under “Categories”.
3. Under “Option categories”, select “Clock”. Specify the target run-time instruction
speed and speed units.
FIGURE 2-2:
CLOCK OPTION CATEGORY
4. Under “Option categories”, select “Trace and Profiling”.
5. Under “Data Collection Selection”, choose “Instruction Trace/Profiling”.
6. Set up any other trace-related options.
FIGURE 2-3:
TRACE AND PROFILING OPTION CATEGORY
7. Click OK.
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Emulation Header Features
2.4.3
Using Trace
Once trace hardware and MPLAB X IDE are set up, you can begin using trace. On a
Debug Run, trace will continue to fill the trace buffer with data, rolling over when the
buffer is full, until a program Halt. For more on the trace buffer, see Section 2.4 “Real
Time Hardware Instruction Trace”.
2.4.3.1
VIEWING TRACE DATA
When trace is enabled and code is run, trace data will be collected by the emulator.
Once the device is halted, trace data will be decoded and displayed in the Trace
window (Window>Debugging>Trace).
FIGURE 2-4:
2.4.3.2
TRACE WINDOW
BANK SELECT AND TRACE
For PIC12F/16F1xxx devices and related headers, Trace can decode instructions
resulting in a bank set. Once established, decoding with that bank continues until the
next bank switch. Therefore, scrolling up in the window will cause the bank to be indeterminate, where as scrolling down sets the bank.
2.4.3.3
IMPROVING THE TRACE EXPERIENCE
Remove as many USB devices from your PC USB ports as you can. This should
improve trace throughput.
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
2.4.4
Trace Hardware
Hardware details are shown in the following figures.
FIGURE 2-5:
TRACE CONNECTOR ON EMULATION HEADER
Trace Cable Header (To RI)
J4
GND
1
2
TRCLK
R9
56
56
GND
3
4
TRD0
R10
GND
5
6
TRD1
56
GND
7
8
TRD2
R11
R12
GND
9
10
TDR3
R13
56
GND
11
12
TRD4
R14
56
GND
13
14
TRD5
R15
56
GND
15
16
TRD6
R16
56
GND
17
18
TRSTALL
GND
19
20
TRGIN
GND
21
22
TRGOUT
GND
23
24
NC (KEY)
HDR_2X12_OE
56
TRCLK
TRD0
TRD1
TRD2
TRD3
TRD4
TRD5
TRD6
TRSTALL
TRGIN
TRGOUT
R2
R17
R3
20k
20k
20k
GND
FIGURE 2-6:
INTERFACE BOARD
Top
2
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18 20
2
1
19
5
02-10038
3
Assembly No.:
To the
Emulator
Logic Probe
Connector
1
J1
Emulation
Header
J2
C 2013
Pin 20 Removed
Trace Adapter
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Emulation Header Features
2.5
HARDWARE ADDRESS/DATA BREAKPOINTS
Up to 32 hardware address/data breakpoints are available to use on the emulation
header (for details see Section 2.2 “Breakpoint, Runtime Watch, and Trace
Resources”.). Software breakpoints are useful, but real hardware breakpoints are
incomparable when you need unfettered control of qualifying the breakpoint/event conditions beyond the simple address matching. Consider the addition of a special interrupt contextual qualifier and these hardware breakpoints offer a high degree of
configurability.
Emulation header hardware breakpoints can trigger without halting execution and
could be used as trigger events to other features.
2.5.1
Breakpoint Setup
Address/Data Breakpoints may be found and set up on the New Breakpoint dialog
(Debug>New Breakpoint) by choosing either “Address” or “Data” as the “Breakpoint
Type”. After the breakpoint is created, it can be edited by right clicking and selecting
“Customize”. For details, see the MPLAB X IDE documentation.
2.5.2
Range Breakpoints
A breakpoint may be specified to occur with a range of program or data memory. A start
address, and then an end address, are specified for the breakpoint. Then the break
condition is selected.
The dialog items used to set up range breakpoints are described below.
TABLE 2-2:
ADDRESS/DATA BREAKPOINTS - SETTINGS
Item
Description
Enable Range Address
check to set a range breakpoint
Address (Start)
enter a starting hexadecimal memory address
Address (End)
enter an ending hexadecimal memory address
Breaks on
specifies the conditions of the break
Conditions differ for address memory and data memory.
2.5.3
Data Value Comparison
Data memory breakpoints may be set up to compare a “Break on” value to another
value before breaking.
The dialog items used to set up data value comparison are described below.
TABLE 2-3:
DATA BREAKPOINTS - SETTINGS
Item
Description
Breaks on
specifies the conditions of the break
Value
for the “Breaks on” selection of:
• Read Specific Value
• Write Specific Value
• Read or Write Specific Value
Enter a hexadecimal value here.
Value Comparison
compare to “Value” as specified:
= Value: Equal-to value
!= Value: Not-equal-to value
> Value: Greater-than value
< Value: Less-than value
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2.5.4
Data Value Mask
Data memory breakpoints may be set up to compare a masked “Break on” value to
another value before breaking.
To set up a value comparison, see Section 2.5.3 “Data Value Comparison”.
The dialog items used to set up a data value mask are described below.
TABLE 2-4:
DATA BREAKPOINTS - SETTINGS
Item
Data Value Mask
2.5.5
Description
use mask when comparing to “Value”
Enter a value in the range 0x00 to 0xhh, where:
0x00: no bits compared
0xhh: all bits compared
Pass Count Operation
Using a pass count allows you to delay breaking until after a specified count.
Event must occur Count times
Count is the number of times you will pass the breakpoint before stopping.
• 0 means execution will stop immediately
• 1 means execution will pass once then stop the next time (stop on second time)
• 10 means execution will pass 10 times and stop the next time (stop on eleventh
time)
The dialog items used to set up a pass count operation are found in the “Pass count”
section of the dialog and are described below.
TABLE 2-5:
ADDRESS/DATA BREAKPOINTS - PASS COUNT
Item
Description
Condition determines when the break specified under “Breaks on” occurs:
Always Break: Always break when the “Breaks on” 
condition is met.
Event must occur Count times: An event (“Breaks on”
condition) must occur Count times before actually breaking.
Count*
2.5.6
according to the condition specified, enters the number of events
Trigger Out Operation
A trigger out pulse can be generated when an address or data breakpoint is reached.
For more on triggers, see Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”.
The dialog item used to set up trigger out operation is described below
TABLE 2-6:
ADDRESS/DATA BREAKPOINTS - TRIGGER OUT OPTIONS
Item
Trigger Options
DS50002243B-page 20
Description
selects when to trigger, either:
• do not emit a trigger out pulse when breakpoint is hit
• emits a trigger out pulse when breakpoint is hit
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Emulation Header Features
2.5.7
Interrupt Context Detection
An address or data breakpoint can be set based on the context of an interrupt. You can
set up the breakpoint so it only breaks when it is in the interrupt section of code (ISR),
only when it is in main line code, or when it is in either ISR or main code. This can assist
when attempting to narrow down issues in code regions.
Address/Data Breakpoints may be found and set up on the New Breakpoint Dialog
(Debug>New Breakpoint) by choosing either “Address” or “Data” as the “Breakpoint
Type”. After the breakpoint is created, it may be edited by right clicking and selecting
“Customize”.
The dialog item used to set up interrupt context is described below.
TABLE 2-7:
Item
ADDRESS/DATA BREAKPOINTS - INTERRUPT CONTEXT
Description
Interrupt Context Interrupt Context qualifier for address/data breakpoints
select from:
• Always break (break in both ISR and main code)
• Break in main line (non-interrupt) context only - break in main code
only
• Break in interrupt context only - break in ISR code only
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2.6
ENHANCED EVENT BREAKPOINTS
For a definition of event breakpoints, see the MPLAB X IDE Help, “New Breakpoint
Dialog”. Additional events for emulation headers are:
• Break on MCLR reset
• Break on execution out of bounds
• Break on trigger in signal
When creating a new breakpoint or customizing an existing breakpoint using an emulation header, additional actions are available for each event breakpoint:
Action
Break
Trigger out
Break and trigger out
Description
breaks (halts) execution per option specified
emits a trigger out pulse per option specified
breaks (halts) execution AND emits a trigger out
pulse per option specified
Event breakpoints may be found and set up on the New Breakpoint Dialog
(Debug>New Breakpoint) by choosing “Event” as the “Breakpoint Type”. After the
breakpoint is created, it may be edited by right clicking and selecting “Customize”.
2.6.1
Execution Out-of-Bounds Detection
An emulation header can be used to detect out-of-bounds execution of code.
Out-of-bounds code execution is detected by an event breakpoint that watches for Program Counter (PC) values that exceed the available program memory of the emulated
MCU. The out-of-bounds code execution condition is typically caused by a computed
GOTO or CALL that erroneously computes the index, or by loading PCLATH with an
incorrect value. Once code is halted due to the execution out-of-bounds event
breakpoint the ‘Previous PC’ functionality can be used to identify the offending
instruction.
The Out-of-bounds break option may be found and set up on the New Breakpoint
Dialog (Debug>New Breakpoint) by choosing “Event” as the “Breakpoint Type” and
checking “Break on execution out of bounds”. After the breakpoint is created, it may be
edited by right clicking and selecting “Customize”.
2.6.2
Break on Trigger In/Emit Trigger Out
An emulation header can be set up to break on a trigger in. For details on this type of
trigger, see Section 2.9.2 “Trigger In Operation”.
Also, the emulation header may be set to trigger out, or break and trigger out, when an
enhanced even breakpoint is hit. For details on this type of trigger, see Section 2.9.3
“Trigger Out Operation”.
See also: Section 2.9.1 “Trigger In/Out Hardware”.
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Emulation Header Features
2.7
EVENT COMBINERS
An event combiner monitors multiple event inputs (currently breakpoints only) and can
generate a halt or a trigger out that is based on combinations and sequences of those
inputs.
Emulation headers have four (4) Event Combiners, and each combines eight (8) combinational or sequential events into a single event trigger. Individual breakpoints may
be grouped into sequences, logical ‘AND’ lists, or a nested combination of these for
more complex control. The Event Combiners were modeled after the legacy MPLAB®
ICE 2000 complex triggers.
Set up the following complex breakpoints through selections in the Breakpoint window
(Window>Debugging>Breakpoints).
2.7.1
Complex Breakpoint Sequence
A breakpoint sequence is a list of breakpoints that execute but do not halt until the last
breakpoint is executed. Sequenced breakpoints can be useful when there are more
than one execution path leading to a certain instruction, and you only want to exercise
one specific path.
To create a Breakpoint Sequence:
1. Right click on an existing breakpoint or shift click to select a group of existing
breakpoints and right click on the group.
2. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Add to New
Sequence”.
3. Enter a name for your sequence in the dialog box, and click OK.
4. The breakpoint(s) will appear under the new sequence.
To add Existing Breakpoints to a Sequence:
1. Right click on an existing breakpoint or shift click to select a group of existing
breakpoints and right click on the group.
2. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Move to Name”,
where Name is the name of the sequence.
To add a New Breakpoint to a Sequence:
Right click on the sequence and select “New Breakpoint”.
For more on setting up a new breakpoint, see Section 2.5 “Hardware Address/Data
Breakpoints” and Section 2.6 “Enhanced Event Breakpoints”.
To select the Sequence Order:
1. Expand on a sequence to see all items.
2. Right click on an item and select Complex Breakpoints>Move Up or Complex
Breakpoints>Move Down. Sequence execution of breakpoints is bottom-up; the
last breakpoint in the sequence occurs first.
To remove Breakpoints from a Sequence:
1. Right click on an existing breakpoint or shift click to select a group of existing
breakpoints and right click on the group.
2. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Remove from
Name”, where Name is the name of the sequence.
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2.7.2
Complex Breakpoint Latched-And
In addition to breakpoint sequences, a Latched-And (hardware AND) is available to
AND a list of breakpoints. ANDed breakpoints can be useful when a variable is modified
in more than one location and you need to break only when that variable is modified in
one particular location.
To create a Breakpoint Latch-And:
1. Right click on an existing breakpoint or shift click to select a group of existing
breakpoints and right click on the group.
2. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Add a New
Latched-And”.
3. Enter a name for your Latched-And in the dialog box and click OK.
4. The breakpoint(s) will appear under the new Latched-And.
To add Existing Breakpoints to a Latch-And:
1. Right click on an existing breakpoint or shift click to select a group of existing
breakpoints and right click on the group.
2. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Move to Name”,
where Name is the name of the Latched-And.
To add a New Breakpoint to a Latch-And:
Right click on the Latched-And and select “New Breakpoint”.
To remove Breakpoints from a Latch-And:
1. Right click on an existing breakpoint or shift click to select a group of existing
breakpoints and right click on the group.
2. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Remove from
Name”, where Name is the name of the Latched-And.
2.7.3
Complex Breakpoint Nesting
Complex breakpoints may be nested to create even more complex breaking schemes.
To nest one group of complex breakpoints into another:
1. Create two groups of complex breakpoints (Sequenced, Latched-And or one of
each).
2. Right click on the complex breakpoint group you wish to nest.
3. From the pop-up menu, go to “Complex Breakpoint” and select “Move to Name”,
where Name is the name of the other complex breakpoint group.
4. The first group will appear under the second group, thus creating a scheme.
FIGURE 2-7:
DS50002243B-page 24
NESTED COMPLEX BREAKPOINTS
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Emulation Header Features
2.8
STOPWATCH CYCLE COUNTER
The Stopwatch Cycle Counter (32-bit-wide instruction cycle counter) has the ability to
perform the existing basic instruction cycle counting (all instruction cycles counted) that
exists on standard Enhanced Midrange parts..
Note:
The count units are in instruction cycles, not in instructions (as not all
instructions execute in a single cycle).
The stopwatch is available under Window>Debugging>Stopwatch.
The stopwatch uses two (2) breakpoint resources.
2.9
TRIGGER IN/OUT
The emulation header is capable of producing an output pulse for external triggering
and detecting an input pulse for internal triggering.
• Trigger In/Out Hardware
• Trigger In Operation
• Trigger Out Operation
2.9.1
Trigger In/Out Hardware
Pins on the emulation header may be used for Trigger In/Out. Pin functions are labeled
on the board silkscreen, namely:
• GND – ground
• TRIG IN – used for Trigger In
• TRIG OUT – used for Trigger Out
2.9.2
Trigger In Operation
A pulse on the Trigger In (TRIG IN) pin can be used to generate a trigger condition, halt
and/or trigger out signal. Set up Trigger In by selecting Window>Debugging>Triggers.
Selection
Polarity
Noise Reduction Filter
Trigger Trace
Description
Trigger-in pin pulse polarity:
Positive: a positive-going pulse
Negative: a negative-going pulse
reduces the noise on the trigger-in pin using a filter, which helps mitigate spurious triggers from halting code
Enables or disables this feature
Trigger trace when a pulse is received on the trigger-in pin
Enables or disables this feature
An Event Breakpoint can be set up to break when a Trigger In pulse is detected. See
Section 2.6 “Enhanced Event Breakpoints”.
2.9.3
Trigger Out Operation
A pulse can be output on the Trigger Out (TRIG OUT) pin based on the setting of
breakpoint types:
• Line
• Data or Address (see Section 2.5 “Hardware Address/Data Breakpoints”)
• Event (see Section 2.6 “Enhanced Event Breakpoints”).
The breakpoint can be set up so that the pulse is emitted without halting device
execution.
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Set up Trigger Out by selecting Window>Debugging>Triggers.
Selection
Description
Polarity
Trigger-out pin pulse polarity:
Positive: a positive-going pulse
Negative: a negative-going pulse
Slew Rate Limiting Limit the slew rate on the Trigger Out pulse.
One Shot
Force Trigger Out
Enable: slew rate is slow and limited
Disable: Slew rate is as fast as possible
The trigger out pulse duration is:
Enable: a fixed width, regardless of MCU operating frequency
Disable: the length of the event itself, which is MCU frequency
dependent
Click this button to force a Trigger Out pulse.
A handy feature of the trigger out signal is that its duration can last as long as the occurring event. For example, if the customer needs to time the duration of the watchdog
timer (whose timeout period is user-programmable); the following code, in conjunction
with the trigger out and SLEEP event breakpoint features, can make timing an event
very simple without employing the old-school technique of writing a single line of
(special, non-production) code to wiggle an I/O pin.
The following code is an example:
; ----------------------------------------------------;
T R I G G E R
O U T
T E S T :
;
T I M I N G
T H E
W A T C H D O G
T I M E R
; ----------------------------------------------------;
;
:
;
;
;
1) Ensure the watchdog timer configuration bit is enabled.
2) Set an Event Breakpoint (Break on SLEEP) to initiate a
'Trigger out' action only.
3) Connect your oscilloscope probe to the TRIGGER OUT pin and
set up your oscilloscope to trigger on the rising edge.
4) Run the following code:
CLRWDT
NOP
NOP
SLEEP
; The expiration of the watchdog timer will wake up the MCU from
: sleep after ~2 seconds. The trigger out pulse high-time
; duration is the duration of the watchdog timer: ___---___
; Since the default watchdog timer period value is 2 seconds
: typical, the trigger out pulse measured on the oscilloscope
; should be approximately 2 seconds.
NOP
NOP
NOP
Loop_101:
BRA
Loop_101
; -----------------------------------------------------
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Emulation Header Features
2.10
VIEW HARDWARE STACK ON HALT
View the contents of the hardware stack on halt.
To open the hardware stack window, do the following:
1. Select Window>PIC Memory Views and choose any memory window type (e.g.,
Program Memory).
2. In the memory window, under the “Memory” drop-down list, select “Hardware
Stack”.
The first stack level is denoted by “0”.
FIGURE 2-8:
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HARDWARE STACK VIEW
DS50002243B-page 27
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
2.11
PREVIOUS PROGRAM COUNTER
MPLAB X IDE has a Previous Program Counter (PrevPC) display, whose value can be
used as discussed below.
The caller of a subroutine or branch can be identified from the PrevPC value if a breakpoint is set on the first instruction of the destination routine (or subroutine). When the
part is halted in the debug session, the PrevPC display in MPLAB X IDE will indicate
the address of the calling or branch instruction.
Similarly, if a breakpoint is set on the instruction that follows a BTFSC-pair (not the
skipped instruction, but the next one), PrevPC will identify whether or not the skip
occurred.
Additionally if an 'execution out-of-bounds' halt exception occurs, the PrevPC feature
can be used to identify the wild-branch instruction that caused the 'execution
out-of-bounds' halt exception.
FIGURE 2-9:
2.12
PREVIOUS PC VIEW
BACKGROUND DEBUG
The emulation header’s on-board -ME2 device contains a Background Debug control
interface that allows you read/write access to RAM memory, SFRs, and emulation registers while your program is running or even sleeping.
Note:
Write access to RAM memory and SFRs while your program is running/sleeping is currently not supported in MPLAB X IDE but is planned in
a future release.
Background Debug capability includes the following advantages:
• Allows runtime changes of breakpoints (i.e., runtime address/data/complex/event
breakpoints).
• Compared to debug headers (with -ICE or -ICD devices), yields noticeably faster
single-stepping speeds at lower MCU operating frequencies.
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EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Chapter 3. Emulation Header List
3.1
INTRODUCTION
Currently available emulation headers and their associated -ME2 devices are shown
below, organized by supported device.
TABLE 1: OPTIONAL EMULATION HEADERS - PIC12/16 DEVICES
Device Supported by
Emulation Header
Pin
Count
EEP* Part
Number
PIC12F1612
PIC16F1613
PIC16F1614
PIC16F1615
PIC16F1618
PIC16F1619
8
14
14
14
20
20
AC244066
PIC12LF1612
PIC16LF1613
PIC16LF1614
PIC16LF1615
PIC16LF1618
PIC16LF1619
8
14
14
14
20
20
PIC16F1703
PIC16F1704
PIC16F1705
PIC16F1707
PIC16F1708
PIC16F1709
PIC16F1713
PIC16F1716
PIC16F1717
PIC16F1718
PIC16F1719
14
14
14
20
20
20
28
28
40/44
28
40/44
PIC16LF1703
PIC16LF1704
PIC16LF1705
PIC16LF1707
PIC16LF1708
PIC16LF1709
PIC16LF1713
PIC16LF1716
PIC16LF1717
PIC16LF1718
PIC16LF1719
14
14
14
20
20
20
28
28
40/44
28
40/44
-ME2 Device on
Emulation Header
PIC16F1619-ME2
VDD Max
5.5V
3.6V
AC244065
PIC16F1719-ME2
5.5V
3.6V
* See Section 1.1 “What is an Emulation Extension Pak?”.
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TABLE 1: OPTIONAL EMULATION HEADERS - PIC12/16 DEVICES (CON’T)
Device Supported by
Emulation Header
Pin
Count
EEP* Part
Number
PIC16F1782
PIC16F1783
PIC16F1784
PIC16F1786
PIC16F1787
PIC16F1788
PIC16F1789
28
28
40/44
28
40/44
28
40/44
AC244064
PIC16LF1782
PIC16LF1783
PIC16LF1784
PIC16LF1786
PIC16LF1787
PIC16LF1788
PIC16LF1789
28
28
40/44
28
40/44
28
40/44
PIC12F1822
PIC12F1840
PIC16F1823
PIC16F1824
PIC16F1825
PIC16F1826
PIC16F1827
PIC16F1828
PIC16F1829
PIC16F1847
8
8
14
14
14
18
18
20
20
18
PIC12LF1822
PIC12LF1840
PIC16LF1823
PIC16LF1824
PIC16LF1825
PIC16LF1826
PIC16LF1827
PIC16LF1828
PIC16LF1829
PIC16LF1847
8
8
14
14
14
18
18
20
20
18
PIC16F1933
PIC16F1934
PIC16F1936
PIC16F1937
PIC16F1938
PIC16F1939
28
40/44
28
40/44
28
40/44
PIC16LF1933
PIC16LF1934
PIC16LF1936
PIC16LF1937
PIC16LF1938
PIC16LF1939
28
40/44
28
40/44
28
40/44
-ME2 Device on
Emulation Header
PIC16F1789-ME2
VDD Max
5.5V
3.6V
AC244063
PIC16F1829-ME2
5.5V
3.6V
AC244055
PIC16F1939-ME2
5.5V
3.6V
* See Section 1.1 “What is an Emulation Extension Pak?”.
DS50002243B-page 30
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Emulation Header List
3.2
AC244055
3.2.1
Header Identification
The AC number is used for ordering the Emulation Extension Pak, which contains the
emulation header. However, this number is not on the header, as the board may be
used for multiple headers by inserting different -ME2 devices. To identify this header,
use the following information.
AC Number
-ME2 Device
Board Assembly Number
AC244055
PIC16F1939-ME2
02-10039
3.2.2
Header Setup and Operation
For this header, select your device type using J5.
CAUTION
Header Damage.
Selecting the wrong type of device may cause device damage,
especially when VDD is greater than 3.6 V (with respect to VSS).
You can also enable the Power LED by using J3. J6 is not a jumper but a group of pins
that you can use for trigger in and/or trigger out signals.
Jumper
Name
Setting
J3
LED Enable
Open
Short
J5
Emulation
Select
pins 1-2
pins 2-3
pin 1
pin 2
J6
Note 1:
Note 2:
3.2.3
Function
Notes
disable power LED indicator
enable power LED indicator
emulate 'F' variants (5.5 V MAX)
Note 1
emulate 'LF' variants (3.6 V MAX!)
Trigger I/O
Ground
Note 2
used for Trigger In
used for Trigger Out
Do not change this setting when the header is powered. Power down first.
See Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”.
Header Limitations and Errata
See the “Limitations” section in your debug tool online Help file for details.
For silicon errata, see:
Section A.3 “Hardware Breakpoint Issue”
Section A.4 “Trigger In/Halt during Multi-Cycle Instruction Processing”
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3.2.4
Header Dimensions
The figure below lists the dimensions for the emulation header. Dimensions are design
values in inches.
If the length and/or width of the emulation header is too large a footprint for the target
board, consider using stand-offs, single in-line pins, transition sockets or other
extenders in the header connection socket to raise the header above the target.
FIGURE 3-1:
DIMENSIONS - AC244055
40-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
44-Pin TQFP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
28-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
0.801
0.710
0.650
0.255
Optional 6-pin SIL
Connector (0.100 pin
1.280
spacing)
0.970
1.270
See Appendix C.
“Emulation Header
Connections”.
6-pin Modular 
Connector
3.400
See Appendix C.
“Emulation Header
Connections”.
-ME2
Device
Trace
Cable
Header
0.310
0.710
2.575
44-Pin QFP Target Pin 1 located
on Bottom side of Header
0.560 Typical
Top
0.062 Typical
Side
0.335 Typical
Dimensions are in inches
DS50002243B-page 32
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Emulation Header List
3.3
AC244063
3.3.1
Header Identification
The AC number is used for ordering the Emulation Extension Pak, which contains the
emulation header. However, this number is not on the header, as the board may be
used for multiple headers by inserting different -ME2 devices. To identify this header,
use the following information.
AC Number
-ME2 Device
Board Assembly Number
AC244063
PIC16F1829-ME2
02-10212
3.3.2
Header Setup and Operation
For this header, select your device type using J5.
CAUTION
Header Damage.
Selecting the wrong type of device may cause device damage,
especially when Vdd is greater than 3.6 V (with respect to Vss).
You can also enable the Power LED by using J3.
J7, J8, and J9 are a group of pins that you can use for trigger in/trigger out signals.
Jumper
Name
Setting
J3
LED Enable
Open
Short
J5
Emulation
Select
pins 1-2
pins 2-3
J6
J7
J8
J9
Note 1:
Note 2:
3.3.3
Function
Notes
disable power LED indicator
enable power LED indicator
emulate 'F' variants (5.5 V MAX)
Note 1
emulate 'LF' variants (3.6 V MAX!)
18-pin devices
pins 1-2
Note 1
pins 2-3 8/14/20-pin devices
pin 1
Ground
pin 2
used for Trigger In
Trigger I/O
Note 2
pin 3
used for Trigger Out
Do not change this setting when the header is powered. Power down first.
See Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”.
Device
Package
Header Limitations
See the “Limitations” section in your debug tool online Help file for details.
For silicon errata, see:
Section A.4 “Trigger In/Halt during Multi-Cycle Instruction Processing”
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3.3.4
Header Dimensions
The figure below lists the dimensions for the emulation header. Dimensions are design
values in inches.
If the length and/or width of the emulation header is too large a footprint for the target
board, consider using stand-offs, single in-line pins, transition sockets or other
extenders in the header connection socket to raise the header above the target.
FIGURE 3-2:
DIMENSIONS - AC244063
20-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
Optional 6-pin SIL Connector
(0.100 pin spacing)
18-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
See Appendix C. “Emulation
Header Connections”.
0.975
0.475
0.140
0.800
6-pin Modular 
Connector
See Appendix C.
“Emulation Header
Connections”.
2.300
-ME2
Device
Trace
Cable
Header
2.575
Top
0.560 Typical
0.062 Typical Board Thickness
0.165 Typical
Side
Dimensions are in inches
DS50002243B-page 34
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Emulation Header List
3.4
AC244064
3.4.1
Header Identification
The AC number is used for ordering the Emulation Extension Pak, which contains the
emulation header. However, this number is not on the header, as the board may be
used for multiple headers by inserting different -ME2 devices. To identify this header,
use the following information.
AC Number
-ME2 Device
Board Assembly Number
AC244064
PIC16F1789-ME2
02-10039
3.4.2
Header Setup and Operation
For this header, select your device type using J5.
CAUTION
Header Damage.
Selecting the wrong type of device may cause device damage,
especially when VDD is greater than 3.6 V (with respect to VSS).
You can also enable the Power LED by using J3.
J6 is not a jumper but a group of pins that you can use for trigger in/trigger out signals.
Jumper
Name
Setting
J3
LED Enable
Open
Short
J5
Note 1
pins 1-2
pins 2-3 emulate 'LF' variants (3.6 V MAX!)
Trigger I/O
pin 1
Ground
Note 2
pin 2
used for Trigger In
pin 3
used for Trigger Out
Do not change this setting when the header is powered. Power down first.
See Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”.
J6
Note 1:
Note 2:
3.4.3
Emulation
Select
Function
Notes
disable power LED indicator
enable power LED indicator
emulate 'F' variants (5.5 V MAX)
Header Limitations and Errata
See the “Limitations” section in your debug tool online Help file for details.
For silicon errata, see:
Section A.2 “CCP3 Capture”.
Section A.4 “Trigger In/Halt during Multi-Cycle Instruction Processing”
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3.4.4
Header Dimensions
The figure below lists the dimensions for the emulation header. Dimensions are design
values in inches.
If the length and/or width of the emulation header is too large a footprint for the target
board, consider using stand-offs, single in-line pins, transition sockets or other
extenders in the header connection socket to raise the header above the target.
FIGURE 3-3:
DIMENSIONS - AC244064
Dimensions are in inches
40-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 located
on Bottom side of Header
44-Pin TQFP Target Pin 1 located
on Bottom side of Header
28-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 located
on Bottom side of Header
0.801
0.710
0.650
0.255
Optional 6-pin SIL
Connector (0.100 pin
spacing)
1.280
0.970
1.270
See Appendix C.
“Emulation Header
Connections”.
6-pin Modular 
Connector
3.400
See Appendix C.
“Emulation Header
Connections”.
-ME2
Device
Trace
Cable
Header
0.310
0.710
2.575
44-Pin QFP Target Pin 1 located
on Bottom side of Header
0.560 Typical
0.062 Typical
Side
DS50002243B-page 36
Top
0.335 Typical
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Emulation Header List
3.5
AC244065
3.5.1
Header Identification
The AC number is used for ordering the Emulation Extension Pak, which contains the
emulation header. However, this number is not on the header, as the board may be
used for multiple headers by inserting different -ME2 devices. To identify this header,
use the following information.
AC Number
-ME2 Device
Board Assembly Number
AC244065
PIC16F1719-ME2
02-10315
3.5.2
Header Setup and Operation
For this header, select your device type using JP2.
CAUTION
Header Damage.
Selecting the wrong type of device may cause device damage,
especially when VDD is greater than 3.6 V (with respect to VSS).
You can also enable the Power LED by using JP1. TP1-3 are not jumpers but a group
of test points that you can use for trigger in/trigger out signals.
Jumper
Name
Setting
JP1
LED Enable
Open
Short
JP2
Emulation
Select
pins 1-2
pins 2-3
Device
Package
pins 1-2
pins 2-3
JP3
TP1
TP2
TP3
Note 1:
Note 2:
3.5.3
Function
Notes
disable power LED indicator
enable power LED indicator
emulate 'F' variants (5.5 V MAX)
Note 1
emulate 'LF' variants (3.6 V MAX!)
28/40/44-pin devices
Note 1
14/20-pin devices
Trigger I/O
Ground
Note 2
used for Trigger In
used for Trigger Out
Do not change this setting when the header is powered. Power down first.
See Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”.
Header Limitations and Errata
See the “Limitations” section in your debug tool online Help file for details.
For silicon errata, see:
Section A.2 “CCP3 Capture”
Section A.4 “Trigger In/Halt during Multi-Cycle Instruction Processing”
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DS50002243B-page 37
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
3.5.4
Header Dimensions
The figure below lists the dimensions for the emulation header. Dimensions are design
values in inches.
If the length and/or width of the emulation header is too large a footprint for the target
board, consider using stand-offs, single in-line pins, transition sockets or other
extenders in the header connection socket to raise the header above the target.
FIGURE 3-4:
DIMENSIONS - AC244065
0.800
44-Pin TQFP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
0.700
0.600
0.860
40-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
14/20-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
28-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
Top
0.905
0.970
1.275
1.475
1
1.930
3.400
2
-ME2
Device
3
0.325
0.860
2.575
44-Pin QFP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
1.
2.
3.
0.560 Typical
Optional 6-pin SIL Connector (0.100 pin spacing). See 
Appendix C. “Emulation Header Connections”.
6-pin Modular Connector. See Appendix C. “Emulation Header
Connections”.
Trace Cable Header
0.062 Typical
0.335 Typical
Side
Dimensions are in inches
DS50002243B-page 38
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Emulation Header List
3.6
AC244066
3.6.1
Header Identification
The AC number is used for ordering the Emulation Extension Pak, which contains the
emulation header. However, this number is not on the header, as the board may be
used for multiple headers by inserting different -ME2 devices. To identify this header,
use the following information.
AC Number
-ME2 Device
Board Assembly Number
AC244066
PIC16F1619-ME2
02-10384
3.6.2
Header Setup and Operation
For this header, select your device type using JP2.
CAUTION
Header Damage.
Selecting the wrong type of device may cause device damage,
especially when VDD is greater than 3.6 V (with respect to VSS).
You can also enable the Power LED by using JP1.
J7-J9 are not jumpers but a group of test points that you can use for trigger in/trigger
out signals.
Jumper
Name
Setting
JP1
LED Enable
Open
Short
JP2
Emulation
Select
pins 1-2
pins 2-3
J7
J8
J9
Note 1:
Note 2:
3.6.3
Function
disable power LED indicator
enable power LED indicator
emulate 'F' variants (5.5 V MAX)
Notes
Note 1
emulate 'LF' variants (3.6 V MAX!)
Ground
Note 2
used for Trigger In
used for Trigger Out
Do not change this setting when the header is powered. Power down first.
See Section 2.9 “Trigger In/Out”.
Trigger I/O
Header Limitations and Errata
See the “Limitations” section in your debug tool online Help file for details.
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EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
3.6.4
Header Dimensions
The figure below lists the dimensions for the emulation header. Dimensions are design
values in inches.
If the length and/or width of the emulation header is too large a footprint for the target
board, consider using stand-offs, single in-line pins, transition sockets or other
extenders in the header connection socket to raise the header above the target.
FIGURE 3-5:
DIMENSIONS - AC244066
20-Pin DIP Target Pin 1 is located
on bottom side of header.
1
Top
0.475
0.140
POWER
0.800
2
LED EN
TRACE
8
-ME2
Device
3
2.300
14
20
TRIGGER I/O
GND
DEVICE SELECT
‘F’ Part
TRIG IN
TRIG OUT
‘LF’ Part:
(3.6V MAX)
2.075
1.
2.
3.
Optional 6-pin SIL Connector (0.100 pin spacing). See 
Appendix C. “Emulation Header Connections”.
6-pin Modular Connector. See Appendix C. “Emulation Header
Connections”.
Trace Cable Header
0.560 Typical
0.062 Typical Board Thickness
0.165 Typical
Side
Dimensions are in inches
DS50002243B-page 40
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Appendix A. -ME2 Silicon Errata
A.1
INTRODUCTION
All emulation header boards have a special -ME2 device mounted on them. In some
cases the -ME2 silicon has errata, i.e., the device does not operate as expected due to
silicon issues.
Known errata are:
• CCP3 Capture
• Hardware Breakpoint Issue
• Trigger In/Halt during Multi-Cycle Instruction Processing
A.2
CCP3 CAPTURE
When the input threshold control for RE0 is configured for TTL, the CCP3 capture input
is ignored. This applies to silicon revision C0 of the devices listed below.
PIC16F1789-ME2 (AC244064):
• PIC16(L)F1784
• PIC16(L)F1787
Work-around: use ST Threshold.
A.3
HARDWARE BREAKPOINT ISSUE
When using this emulation header with C language or Assembly language code,
hardware breakpoints will not function past memory locations 0x3FF for the emulated
devices listed below.
PIC16F1939-ME2 (AC244055):
• PIC16(L)F1936
• PIC16(L)F1937
Workarounds:
1. Software breakpoints for these four parts could be used (with the caveat that
software breakpoints do not offer the advanced capability of hardware
breakpoints).
2. Any function(s) that need to be debugged with hardware breakpoints could be
explicitly (and temporarily) located in the program memory area below 0x400
until the function is properly debugged.
In C language for the MPLAB XC8 C compiler, this can be done with the 
@ address construct as follows, which will locate function_1 at program
memory base address 0x200.
void function_1(void) @ 0x200
{
asm("NOP");
asm("NOP");
asm("NOP");
}
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In assembly language for the MPASM assembler, this can be done with the CODE
directive as follows, which will locate function_1 at program memory base
address 0x200.
HW_BRKPT CODE 0x0200
function_1:
NOP
NOP
NOP
RETURN
A.4
TRIGGER IN/HALT DURING MULTI-CYCLE INSTRUCTION PROCESSING
For some -ME2 devices, the arrival of a trigger-in/HALT event during processing of a
multi-cycle instruction may cause the emulator to fail to properly execute/complete the
instruction before coming to a HALT. This applies to the following -ME2 products:
PIC16(L)F1939-ME2 (AC244055)
PIC16(L)F1829-ME2 (AC244063)
PIC16(L)F1789-ME2 (AC244064)
PIC16(L)F1719-ME2 (AC244065)
DS50002243B-page 42
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EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Appendix B. Emulation Header Target Footprints
B.1
INTRODUCTION
To connect an emulation header directly to a target board (without the use of a
transition socket) the following information will be helpful.
• DIP Device Footprints
• TQFP/PLCC Device Footprints
B.2
DIP DEVICE FOOTPRINTS
The DIP device adapter footprint shown will accept adapter plugs like Samtec series
APA plugs. These plugs can be soldered into place during development/emulation and
eliminate the need for other sockets.
FIGURE B-1:
DIP FOOTPRINT
0.100
0.028 DIA
PLATED-THRU
HOLES
C
UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED,
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES.
DIP
C
8-Pin
14-Pin
18-Pin
20-Pin
28-Pin
40-Pin
0.300
0.300
0.300
0.300
0.300
0.600
Drawing of DIP is 40-pin.
B.3
TQFP/PLCC DEVICE FOOTPRINTS
TQFP/PLCC device adapter footprints shown will accept board stackers like Samtec
series DWM 0.050 Pitch Stackers. These stackers can be soldered into place during
development/emulation and eliminate the need for other sockets.
FIGURE B-2:
SINGLE-ROW TQFP/PLCC FOOTPRINT
0.028 DIA
PLATED-THRU
HOLES
0.800
0.050
UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED,
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES.
Drawing of device is 44-pin TQFP/PLCC.
0.800
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FIGURE B-3:
DOUBLE AND TRIPLE-ROW TQFP/PLCC FOOTPRINT
0.028 DIA
PLATED-THRU
HOLES
0.960 1.160 1.360
0.050
0.960
1.160
UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED,
DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES.
1.360
Drawing of device is 64/68-pin,
80/84-pin and 100-pin
Header pin-out matches the PLCC package. PLCC will map to TQFP as follows:
Header to 44-pin TQFP – one-to-one mapping.
DS50002243B-page 44
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EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Appendix C. Emulation Header Connections
C.1
INTRODUCTION
The following types of emulation header connectors are described here. Information on
connecting development tools to the header is presented, as well.
The topics discussed here are:
•
•
•
•
C.2
6-Pin Modular Connector
6-Pin SIL Connector
Modular-to-SIL Adapter
Ordering Information
6-PIN MODULAR CONNECTOR
Emulation headers with 6-pin modular (RJ-11/ICSP) connectors can connect directly to
the following tools:
• MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator (Standard Driver Board)
• MPLAB ICD 2 or 3
FIGURE 1:
MODULAR CONNECTION
TOP
TOP
From
Tool
Header
Connector
J1
SIDE
From
Tool
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
SIDE
Header
Connector
DS50002243B-page 45
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
C.3
6-PIN SIL CONNECTOR
Emulation headers with 6-pin SIL (Single In-Line) connectors are compatible with the
PICkit 3 but can also be used with the MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator.
The 6-pin modular cable attached to the Standard Driver Board may be connected to
the 6 header pins through the Modular-to-SIL Adapter.
The 8-pin socket of the High Speed Driver Board or optional Isolation Unit may be connected directly to the 6 header pins. Be sure to line up pin 1 on the board with pin 1 on
the header.
FIGURE C-1:
6-PIN SIL CONNECTION TO AN EMULATOR
TOP
J3
TOP
J1
1
1
Header
Connector
DAT
CLK
J2
MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator
High-Speed Receiver Board or
optional Isolation Unit
DS50002243B-page 46
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Emulation Header Connections
C.4
MODULAR-TO-SIL ADAPTER
You can use this adapter for a 6-pin modular connector to an 6-pin SIL connector.
Ensure that you line up pin 1 of J1 with pin 1 of the 6-pin header connector.
FIGURE C-2:
MODULAR-TO-SIL ADAPTER CONNECTION
TOP
TOP
TOP
J2 1
From
Tool
6-Pin
Header
Connector
J1
Modular Connector
SIL Connector
J1
J2
1
2
3
4
5
6
C.5
1
ICRST
VDD
ICDT
ICCK
NC
1
2
3
4
5
6
ICRST
VDD
ICDT
ICCK
NC
ORDERING INFORMATION
To order the development tools and other hardware shown here, please refer to the
table below.
TABLE C-1:
MICROCHIP HARDWARE ORDERING NUMBERS
Hardware
Order #
MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator (Standard Communication)
DV244005
MPLAB REAL ICE in-circuit emulator (High-Speed Communication) – 
Performance Pak
AC244002
MPLAB REAL ICE Isolation Unit (works with High-Speed Communication)
AC244005
Modular-to-SIL Adapter
AC164110
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NOTES:
DS50002243B-page 48
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EEP and Emulation Header
User’s Guide
Appendix D. Revision History
D.1
Revision A (2014)
Release of original document.
D.2
Revision B (October 2015)
• Chapter 1. “EEP and Emulation Header
Overview” - reorganized for better
information flow.
• Chapter 2. “Emulation Header Features” reorganized for better information flow.
Added new content for tool support table,
“Breakpoint, Runtime Watch, and Trace
Resources”, “Runtime Watches”, “View
Hardware Stack on Halt”, and “Previous Program Counter”. Added content to “Hardware
Address/Data Breakpoints” and “Enhanced
Event Breakpoints.”
• Chapter 3. “Emulation Header List” - Added
AC244065 and AC244066.
• Appendix A. “-ME2 Silicon Errata” - Added
this chapter. Some content has been taken
from a previous chapter.
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NOTES:
DS50002243B-page 50
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EEP AND EMULATION HEADER
USER’S GUIDE
Index
Numerics
Additional Information ................................................ 7
6-Pin Modular Connector ......................................... 73
6-Pin SIL Connector................................................. 75
8-Pin SIL Connector................................................. 74
C
A
AC162050 ................................................................ 10
AC162052 ................................................................ 12
AC162053 ................................................................ 14
AC162054 ................................................................ 14
AC162055 ................................................................ 12
AC162056 ................................................................ 12
AC162057 ................................................................ 12
AC162058 ................................................................ 10
AC162059 ................................................................ 16
AC162060 ................................................................ 18
AC162061 ................................................................ 20
AC162062 ................................................................ 39
AC162064 ................................................................ 42
AC162065 ................................................................ 44
AC162066 ................................................................ 22
AC162067 ................................................................ 47
AC162070 ................................................................ 16
AC162074 ................................................................ 47
AC162078 ................................................................ 50
AC162079 ................................................................ 39
AC162083 ................................................................ 24
AC162087 ................................................................ 39
AC162088 ................................................................ 53
AC162091 ................................................................ 39
AC162094 ................................................................ 53
AC162096 ................................................................ 16
AC244022 ................................................................ 44
AC244023 ................................................................ 26
AC244024 ................................................................ 26
AC244026 ................................................................ 56
AC244027 ................................................................ 56
AC244028 ................................................................ 28
AC244033 ................................................................ 59
AC244034 ................................................................ 59
AC244035 ................................................................ 61
AC244036 ................................................................ 61
AC244043 ................................................................ 63
AC244044 ................................................................ 63
AC244045 ................................................................ 30
AC244046 ................................................................ 65
AC244047 ................................................................ 65
AC244051 ................................................................ 32
AC244052 ................................................................ 32
AC244053 ................................................................ 67
AC244054 ................................................................ 67
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Calibration Bits ........................................................... 7
I
ICE vs. ICD ................................................................ 3
J
Jumper Settings10, 12, 18, 22, 28, 39, 47, 50, 53, 56, 57,
.............................................................................. 61
M
Modular Connector................................................... 73
Modular-to-SIL Adapter............................................ 76
MPLAB ICE 2000 ..................................................... 22
O
Ordering Hardware................................................... 77
P
PCM16YM0.............................................................. 22
Performance............................................................... 7
PIC10F200 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F202 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F204 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F206 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F220 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F222 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F320 ................................................................. 9
PIC10F322 ................................................................. 9
PIC10LF320 ............................................................... 9
PIC10LF322 ............................................................... 9
PIC12F1501 ............................................................... 9
PIC12F1822 ....................................................... 35, 36
PIC12F1840 ....................................................... 35, 36
PIC12F508 ................................................................. 9
PIC12F509 ................................................................. 9
PIC12F510 ................................................................. 9
PIC12F519 ................................................................. 9
PIC12F609 ........................................................... 9, 24
PIC12F615 ........................................................... 9, 24
PIC12F617 ........................................................... 9, 24
PIC12F629 ........................................................... 9, 10
PIC12F635 ........................................................... 9, 12
PIC12F675 ........................................................... 9, 10
PIC12F683 ........................................................... 9, 10
PIC12HV609 ........................................................ 9, 24
PIC12HV615 ........................................................ 9, 24
PIC12LF1501 ............................................................. 9
PIC16F1454 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1455 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1458 ............................................................. 35
DS50002243B-page 51
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
PIC16F1459 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1503 ............................................................. 10
PIC16F1507 ............................................................. 10
PIC16F1508 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1509 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1823 ....................................................... 35, 36
PIC16F1824 ....................................................... 35, 36
PIC16F1825 ....................................................... 35, 36
PIC16F1826 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1827 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1829 ....................................................... 35, 36
PIC16F1847 ............................................................. 35
PIC16F1933 ............................................................. 36
PIC16F1934 ............................................................. 36
PIC16F1936 ............................................................. 36
PIC16F1937 ............................................................. 36
PIC16F1938 ............................................................. 36
PIC16F1939 ............................................................. 36
PIC16F505 ................................................................. 9
PIC16F506 ................................................................. 9
PIC16F526 ................................................................. 9
PIC16F610 ........................................................... 9, 24
PIC16F616 ........................................................... 9, 24
PIC16F627A......................................................... 9, 14
PIC16F628A......................................................... 9, 14
PIC16F630 ........................................................... 9, 12
PIC16F631 ........................................................... 9, 20
PIC16F636 ........................................................... 9, 12
PIC16F639 ........................................................... 9, 22
PIC16F648A....................................................... 10, 14
PIC16F676 ......................................................... 10, 12
PIC16F677 ......................................................... 10, 20
PIC16F684 ......................................................... 10, 12
PIC16F685 ......................................................... 10, 20
PIC16F687 ......................................................... 10, 20
PIC16F688 ......................................................... 10, 12
PIC16F689 ......................................................... 10, 20
PIC16F690 ......................................................... 10, 20
PIC16F716 ......................................................... 10, 14
PIC16F722 ............................................................... 35
PIC16F723 ............................................................... 35
PIC16F724 ............................................................... 35
PIC16F726 ............................................................... 35
PIC16F727 ............................................................... 35
PIC16F785 ......................................................... 10, 18
PIC16HV610 ........................................................ 9, 24
PIC16HV616 ........................................................ 9, 24
PIC16HV785 ...................................................... 10, 18
PIC16LF1454 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1455 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1458 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1459 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1503 ........................................................... 10
PIC16LF1507 ........................................................... 10
PIC16LF1508 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1509 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1826 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1827 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1847 ........................................................... 35
PIC16LF1933 ........................................................... 36
DS50002243B-page 52
PIC16LF1934 ........................................................... 36
PIC16LF1936 ........................................................... 36
PIC16LF1937 ........................................................... 36
PIC16LF1938 ........................................................... 36
PIC16LF1939 ........................................................... 36
PIC16LF722 ............................................................. 35
PIC16LF723 ............................................................. 35
PIC16LF724 ............................................................. 35
PIC16LF726 ............................................................. 35
PIC16LF727 ............................................................. 35
PIC18F1230 ....................................................... 36, 50
PIC18F1330 ....................................................... 36, 50
PIC18F13K22........................................................... 36
PIC18F13K50........................................................... 10
PIC18F14K22........................................................... 36
PIC18F14K50........................................................... 10
PIC18F24J10 ........................................................... 36
PIC18F25J10 ..................................................... 36, 47
PIC18F44J10 ........................................................... 36
PIC18F45J10 ..................................................... 36, 47
PIC18F63J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F63J90 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F64J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F64J16 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F64J90 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F64J95 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J10 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J15 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J16 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J50 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J55 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F65J90 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J10 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J15 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J16 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J50 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J55 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F66J60 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F66J65 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F67J10 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F67J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F67J50 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F67J60 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F83J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F83J90 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F84J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F84J16 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F84J90 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F84J95 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J10 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J15 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J16 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J50 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J55 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F85J90 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F86J10 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F86J11 ........................................................... 37
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Index
PIC18F86J15 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F86J16 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F86J50 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F86J55 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F86J60 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F86J65 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F87J10 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F87J11 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F87J50 ........................................................... 37
PIC18F87J60 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F96J60 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F96J65 ........................................................... 38
PIC18F97J60 ........................................................... 38
PIC18LF13K22 ........................................................ 36
PIC18LF13K50 ........................................................ 10
PIC18LF14K22 ........................................................ 36
PIC18LF14K50 ........................................................ 10
PIC18LF24J10 ......................................................... 36
PIC18LF25J10 ....................................................36, 47
PIC18LF44J10 ......................................................... 36
PIC18LF45J10 ....................................................36, 47
PIC24F04KA200 ...................................................... 10
PIC24F04KA201 ...................................................... 10
PIC24F08KA101 ...................................................... 38
PIC24F08KA102 ...................................................... 38
PIC24F16KA101 ...................................................... 38
PIC24F16KA102 ...................................................... 38
PIC24FJ128GA006.................................................. 38
PIC24FJ128GA008.................................................. 38
PIC24FJ128GA010.................................................. 38
PIC24FJ16GA002 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ16GA004 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ32GA002 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ32GA004 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ48GA002 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ48GA004 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ64GA002 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ64GA004 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ64GA006 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ64GA008 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ64GA010 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ96GA006 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ96GA008 .................................................... 38
PIC24FJ96GA010 .................................................... 38
PICDEM HPC Explorer Board.................................. 39
Pin Count ..............................................................9, 35
Programming Non-ICD Devices................................. 4
S
SIL Connector, 6 Pin ................................................ 75
SIL Connector, 8 Pin ................................................ 74
Switch Settings ........................................................ 20
Switch Settings, Rotary ............................................ 24
T
Transition Socket ....................................................... 5
V
Vdd Max ................................................................9, 35
Vddcore Max .........................................................9, 35
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS50002243B-page 53
EEP and Emulation Header User’s Guide
DS50002243B-page 54
 2014-2015 Microchip Technology Inc.
Worldwide Sales and Service
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China - Shenzhen
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Fax: 86-755-8203-1760
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Fax: 886-3-5770-955
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Taiwan - Kaohsiung
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Fax: 86-29-8833-7256
Poland - Warsaw
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Spain - Madrid
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07/14/15
DS50002243B-page 54
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