dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification

dsPIC30F
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
1.0
OVERVIEW AND SCOPE
This document defines the programming specification
for the dsPIC30F family of Digital Signal Controllers
(DSCs). The programming specification is required
only for the developers of third-party tools that are used
to program dsPIC30F devices. Customers using
dsPIC30F devices should use development tools that
already provide support for device programming.
This document includes programming specifications
for the following devices:
•
•
•
•
•
•
dsPIC30F2010/2011/2012
dsPIC30F3010/3011/3012/3013/ 3014
dsPIC30F4011/4012/4013
dsPIC30F5011/5013/5015/5016
dsPIC30F6010/6011/6012/6013/6014/6015
dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A
2.0
PROGRAMMING OVERVIEW
OF THE dsPIC30F
The dsPIC30F family of DSCs contains a region of onchip memory used to simplify device programming.
This region of memory can store a programming
executive, which allows the dsPIC30F to be
programmed faster than the traditional means. Once
the programming executive is stored to memory by an
external programmer (such as Microchip’s MPLAB®
ICD 2, MPLAB PM3, PRO MATE® II, or MPLAB REAL
ICE™), it can then interact with the external
programmer to efficiently program devices.
The programmer and programming executive have a
master-slave relationship, where the programmer is
the master programming device and the programming
executive is the slave, as illustrated in Figure 2-1.
FIGURE 2-1:
OVERVIEW OF dsPIC30F
PROGRAMMING
Two different methods are used to program the chip in
the user’s system. One method uses the Enhanced InCircuit Serial Programming™ (Enhanced ICSP™)
protocol and works with the programming executive.
The other method uses In-Circuit Serial Programming
(ICSP) protocol and does not use the programming
executive.
The Enhanced ICSP protocol uses the faster, highvoltage method that takes advantage of the
programming executive. The programming executive
provides all the necessary functionality to erase,
program and verify the chip through a small command
set. The command set allows the programmer to
program the dsPIC30F without having to deal with the
low-level programming protocols of the chip.
The ICSP programming method does not use the
programming executive. It provides native, low-level
programming capability to erase, program and verify
the chip. This method is significantly slower because it
uses control codes to serially execute instructions on
the dsPIC30F device.
This specification describes the ICSP and Enhanced
ICSP
programming
methods.
Section 3.0
“Programming Executive Application” describes
the
programming
executive
application
and
Section 5.0 “Device Programming” describes its
application programmer’s interface for the host
Section 11.0
“ICSP™
Mode”
programmer.
describes the ICSP programming method.
2.1
Hardware Requirements
In ICSP or Enhanced ICSP mode, the dsPIC30F
requires two programmable power supplies: one for
VDD and one for MCLR. For Bulk Erase programming,
which is required for erasing code protection bits, VDD
must be greater than 4.5 volts. Refer to Section 13.0
“AC/DC Characteristics and Timing Requirements”
for additional hardware parameters.
Programmer
2
Programming
Executive
On-chip Memory
dsPIC30F Device
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 1
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
2.2
Pins Used During Programming
The pins identified in Table 2-1 are used for device
programming. Refer to the appropriate device data
sheet for complete pin descriptions.
TABLE 2-1:
Pin Name
dsPIC30F PIN DESCRIPTIONS
DURING PROGRAMMING
Pin Type
Pin Description
MCLR/VPP
P
Programming Enable
VDD
P
Power Supply
VSS
P
Ground
PGC
I
Serial Clock
PGD
I/O
Serial Data
Legend: I = Input, O = Output, P = Power
2.3
Program Memory Map
The program memory space extends from 0x0 to
0xFFFFFE. Code storage is located at the base of the
memory map and supports up to 144 Kbytes (48K
instruction words). Code is stored in three, 48 Kbyte
memory panels that reside on-chip. Table 2-2 shows
the location and program memory size of each device.
TABLE 2-2:
Locations 0x800000 through 0x8005BE are reserved
for executive code memory. This region stores either
the programming executive or debugging executive.
The programming executive is used for device
programming, while the debug executive is used for incircuit debugging. This region of memory cannot be
used to store user code.
Locations 0xF80000 through 0xF8000E are reserved
for the Configuration registers. The bits in these
registers may be set to select various device options,
and are described in Section 5.7 “Configuration Bits
Programming”.
Locations 0xFF0000 and 0xFF0002 are reserved for
the Device ID registers. These bits can be used by the
programmer to identify what device type is being
programmed and are described in Section 10.0
“Device ID”. The device ID reads out normally, even
after code protection is applied.
Figure 2-2 illustrates the memory map for the
dsPIC30F devices.
2.4
Data EEPROM Memory
The Data EEPROM array supports up to 4 Kbytes of
data and is located in one memory panel. It is mapped
in program memory space, residing at the end of User
Memory Space (see Figure 2-2). Table 2-2 shows the
location and size of data EEPROM in each device.
CODE MEMORY AND DATA EEPROM MAP AND SIZE
Code Memory map
(Size in Instruction Words)
Data EEPROM Memory Map
(Size in Bytes)
dsPIC30F2010
0x000000-0x001FFE (4K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F2011
0x000000-0x001FFE (4K)
None (0K)
dsPIC30F2012
0x000000-0x001FFE (4K)
None (0K)
dsPIC30F3010
0x000000-0x003FFE (8K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F3011
0x000000-0x003FFE (8K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F3012
0x000000-0x003FFE (8K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F3013
0x000000-0x003FFE (8K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F3014
0x000000-0x003FFE (8K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F4011
0x000000-0x007FFE (16K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F4012
0x000000-0x007FFE (16K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F4013
0x000000-0x007FFE (16K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F5011
0x000000-0x00AFFE (22K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F5013
0x000000-0x00AFFE (22K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F5015
0x000000-0x00AFFE (22K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F5016
0x000000-0x00AFFE (22K)
0x7FFC00-0x7FFFFE (1K)
dsPIC30F6010
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFE (4K)
dsPIC30F6010A
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFF (4K)
dsPIC30F6011
0x000000-0x015FFE (44K)
0x7FF800-0x7FFFFE (2K)
dsPIC30F6011A
0x000000-0x015FFE (44K)
0x7FF800-0x7FFFFE (2K)
dsPIC30F6012
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFE (4K)
dsPIC30F6012A
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFE (4K)
dsPIC30F6013
0x000000-0x015FFE (44K)
0x7FF800-0x7FFFFE (2K)
dsPIC30F6013A
0x000000-0x015FFE (44K)
0x7FF800-0x7FFFFE (2K)
dsPIC30F6014
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFE (4K)
dsPIC30F6014A
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFE (4K)
dsPIC30F6015
0x000000-0x017FFE (48K)
0x7FF000-0x7FFFFE (4K)
Device
DS70102K-page 2
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
FIGURE 2-2:
PROGRAM MEMORY MAP
000000
User Flash
Code Memory
(48K x 24-bit)
User Memory
Space
017FFE
018000
Reserved
Data EEPROM
(2K x 16-bit)
7FEFFE
7FF000
7FFFFE
800000
Executive Code Memory
(Reserved)
Unit ID (32 x 24-bit)
8005BE
8005C0
8005FE
800600
Configuration Memory
Space
Reserved
Configuration Registers
(8 x 16-bit)
F7FFFE
F80000
F8000E
F80010
Reserved
Device ID
(2 x 16-bit)
Reserved
Note:
FEFFFE
FF0000
FF0002
FF0004
FFFFFE
The address boundaries for user Flash code memory and data EEPROM are device-dependent.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 3
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
3.0
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
APPLICATION
3.1
Programming Executive Overview
The programming executive resides in executive
memory and is executed when Enhanced ICSP
Programming mode is entered. The programming executive provides the mechanism for the programmer (host
device) to program and verify the dsPIC30F, using a
simple command set and communication protocol.
The following capabilities are provided by the
programming executive:
• Read memory
- Code memory and data EEPROM
- Configuration registers
- Device ID
• Erase memory
- Bulk Erase by segment
- Code memory (by row)
- Data EEPROM (by row)
• Program memory
- Code memory
- Data EEPROM
- Configuration registers
• Query
- Blank Device
- Programming executive software version
The programming executive performs the low-level
tasks required for erasing and programming. This
allows the programmer to program the device by
issuing the appropriate commands and data.
The programming procedure is outlined in Section 5.0
“Device Programming”.
3.2
Programming Executive Code
Memory
The programming executive is stored in executive code
memory and executes from this reserved region of
memory. It requires no resources from user code
memory or data EEPROM.
3.3
4.0
CONFIRMING THE CONTENTS
OF EXECUTIVE MEMORY
Before programming can begin, the programmer must
confirm that the programming executive is stored in executive memory. The procedure for this task is illustrated in
Figure 4-1.
First, ICSP mode is entered. The unique application ID
word stored in executive memory is then read. If the
programming executive is resident, the application ID
word is 0xBB, which means programming can resume
as normal. However, if the application ID word is not
0xBB, the programming executive must be
programmed to Executive Code memory using the
method described in Section 12.0 “Programming the
Programming Executive to Memory”.
Section 11.0 “ICSP™ Mode” describes the process
for the ICSP programming method. Section 11.13
“Reading the Application ID Word” describes the
procedure for reading the application ID word in ICSP
mode.
FIGURE 4-1:
CONFIRMING PRESENCE
OF THE PROGRAMMING
EXECUTIVE
Start
Enter ICSP™ Mode
Read the
Application ID
from Address
0x8005BE
Is
Application ID
0xBB?
No
Yes
Prog. Executive is
Resident in Memory
Prog. Executive must
be Programmed
Programming Executive Data RAM
The programming executive uses the device’s data
RAM for variable storage and program execution. Once
the programming executive has run, no assumptions
should be made about the contents of data RAM.
DS70102K-page 4
Finish
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.0
DEVICE PROGRAMMING
5.1
Overview of the Programming
Process
Once the programming executive has been verified
in memory (or loaded if not present), the dsPIC30F can
be programmed using the command set shown in
Table 5-1. A detailed description for each command is
provided in Section 8.0 “Programming Executive
Commands”.
TABLE 5-1:
COMMAND SET SUMMARY
Command
Description
SCHECK
Sanity check
READD
Read data EEPROM, Configuration
registers and device ID
READP
Read code memory
PROGD
Program one row of data EEPROM
and verify
PROGP
Program one row of code memory and
verify
PROGC
Program Configuration bits and verify
ERASEB
Bulk Erase, or erase by segment
ERASED
Erase data EEPROM
ERASEP
Erase code memory
QBLANK
Query if the code memory and data
EEPROM are blank
QVER
Query the software version
A high-level overview of the programming process is
illustrated in Figure 5-1. The process begins by entering Enhanced ICSP mode. The chip is then bulk
erased, which clears all memory to ‘1’ and allows the
device to be programmed. The Chip Erase is verified
before programming begins. Next, the code memory,
data Flash and Configuration bits are programmed. As
these memories are programmed, they are each
verified to ensure that programming was successful. If
no errors are detected, the programming is complete
and Enhanced ICSP mode is exited. If any of the
verifications fail, the procedure should be repeated,
starting from the Chip Erase.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
If Advanced Security features are enabled, then
individual Segment Erase operations need to be
performed, based on user selections (i.e., based on the
specific needs of the user application). The specific
operations that are used typically depend on the order
in which various segments need to be programmed for
a given application or system.
Section 5.2 “Entering Enhanced ICSP Mode”
through Section 5.8 “Exiting Enhanced ICSP Mode”
describe the programming process in detail.
FIGURE 5-1:
PROGRAMMING FLOW
Start
Enter Enhanced
ICSP™ mode
Perform Chip
Erase
Program
Configuration
registers to
default value
Program and
verify code
Program and
verify data
Program and verify
Configuration bits
Exit Enhanced ICSP
Mode
Finish
DS70102K-page 5
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.2
Entering Enhanced ICSP Mode
5.3
Chip Erase
The Enhanced ICSP mode is entered by holding PGC
and PGD high, and then raising MCLR/VPP to VIHH
(high voltage), as illustrated in Figure 5-2. In this mode,
the code memory, data EEPROM and Configuration
bits can be efficiently programmed using the programming executive commands that are serially transferred
using PGC and PGD.
Before a chip can be programmed, it must be erased.
The Bulk Erase command (ERASEB) is used to perform
this task. Executing this command with the MS
command field set to 0x3 erases all code memory, data
EEPROM and code-protect Configuration bits. The
Chip Erase process sets all bits in these three memory
regions to ‘1’.
FIGURE 5-2:
Since non-code-protect Configuration bits cannot be
erased, they must be manually set to ‘1’ using multiple
PROGC commands. One PROGC command must be
sent for each Configuration register (see Section 5.7
“Configuration Bits Programming”).
ENTERING ENHANCED
ICSP™ MODE
P6
P7
VIHH
If Advanced Security features are enabled, then individual Segment Erase operations would need to be
performed, depending on which segment needs to be
programmed at a given stage of system programming.
The user should have the flexibility to select specific
segments for programming.
MCLR/VPP
VDD
PGD
Note:
PGC
PGD = Input
5.4
Note 1: The sequence that places the device into
Enhanced ICSP mode places all unused
I/Os in the high-impedance state.
2: Before entering Enhanced ICSP mode,
clock switching must be disabled using
ICSP, by programming the FCKSM<1:0>
bits in the FOSC Configuration register to
‘11’ or ‘10’.
3: When in Enhanced ICSP mode, the SPI
output pin (SDO1) will toggle while the
device is being programmed.
The Device ID registers cannot be erased.
These registers remain intact after a Chip
Erase is performed.
Blank Check
The term “Blank Check” means to verify that the device
has been successfully erased and has no programmed
memory cells. A blank or erased memory cell reads as
‘1’. The following memories must be blank checked:
• All implemented code memory
• All implemented data EEPROM
• All Configuration bits (for their default value)
The Device ID registers (0xFF0000:0xFF0002) can be
ignored by the Blank Check since this region stores
device information that cannot be erased. Additionally,
all unimplemented memory space should be ignored
from the Blank Check.
The QBLANK command is used for the Blank Check. It
determines if the code memory and data EEPROM are
erased by testing these memory regions. A ‘BLANK’ or
‘NOT BLANK’ response is returned. The READD
command is used to read the Configuration registers. If
it is determined that the device is not blank, it must be
erased (see Section 5.3 “Chip Erase”) before
attempting to program the chip.
DS70102K-page 6
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.5
5.5.1
Code Memory Programming
OVERVIEW
The Flash code memory array consists of 512 rows of
thirty-two, 24-bit instructions. Each panel stores 16K
instruction words, and each dsPIC30F device has
either 1, 2 or 3 memory panels (see Table 5-2).
TABLE 5-2:
DEVICE CODE MEMORY SIZE
Device
Code Size
(24-bit
Words)
Number
of
Rows
Number
of
Panels
dsPIC30F2010
dsPIC30F2011
dsPIC30F2012
dsPIC30F3010
dsPIC30F3011
dsPIC30F3012
dsPIC30F3013
dsPIC30F3014
dsPIC30F4011
dsPIC30F4012
dsPIC30F4013
dsPIC30F5011
dsPIC30F5013
dsPIC30F5015
dsPIC30F5016
dsPIC30F6010
dsPIC30F6010A
dsPIC30F6011
dsPIC30F6011A
dsPIC30F6012
dsPIC30F6012A
dsPIC30F6013
dsPIC30F6013A
dsPIC30F6014
dsPIC30F6014A
dsPIC30F6015
4K
4K
4K
8K
8K
8K
8K
8K
16K
16K
16K
22K
22K
22K
22K
48K
48K
44K
44K
48K
48K
44K
44K
48K
48K
48K
128
128
128
256
256
256
256
256
512
512
512
704
704
704
704
1536
1536
1408
1408
1536
1536
1408
1408
1536
1536
1536
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5.5.2
Next, one row in the device is programmed with a
PROGP command. Each PROGP command contains
data for one row of code memory of the
dsPIC30F6014A. After the first command is processed
successfully, ‘RemainingCmds’ is decremented by 1
and compared to 0. Since there are more PROGP
commands to send, ‘BaseAddress’ is incremented by
0x40 to point to the next row of memory.
On the second PROGP command, the second row of
each memory panel is programmed. This process is
repeated until the entire device is programmed. No
special handling must be performed when a panel
boundary is crossed.
FIGURE 5-3:
Start
BaseAddress = 0x0
RemainingCmds = 1536
Send PROGP
Command to Program
BaseAddress
Is
A flowchart for programming of code memory is illustrated in Figure 5-3. In this example, all 48K instruction
words of a dsPIC30F6014A device are programmed.
First, the number of commands to send (called
‘RemainingCmds’ in the flowchart) is set to 1536 and
the destination address (called ‘BaseAddress’) is set to
‘0’.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
No
PROGP response
PASS?
Yes
RemainingCmds =
RemainingCmds – 1
PROGRAMMING METHODOLOGY
Code memory is programmed with the PROGP
command. PROGP programs one row of code memory
to the memory address specified in the command. The
number of PROGP commands required to program a
device depends on the number of rows that must be
programmed in the device.
FLOWCHART FOR
PROGRAMMING
dsPIC30F6014A CODE
MEMORY
BaseAddress =
BaseAddress
+ 0x40
No
Is
RemainingCmds
0?
Yes
Finish
Failure
Report Error
DS70102K-page 7
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.5.3
PROGRAMMING VERIFICATION
Once code memory is programmed, the contents of
memory can be verified to ensure that programming
was successful. Verification requires code memory to
be read back and compared against the copy held in
the programmer’s buffer.
The READP command can be used to read back all the
programmed code memory.
Alternatively, you can have the programmer perform
the verification once the entire device is programmed
using a checksum computation, as described in
Section 6.8 “Checksum Computation”.
5.6
5.6.1
Data EEPROM Programming
OVERVIEW
The panel architecture for the data EEPROM memory
array consists of 128 rows of sixteen 16-bit data words.
Each panel stores 2K words. All devices have either
one or no memory panels. Devices with data EEPROM
provide either 512 words, 1024 words or 2048 words of
memory on the one panel (see Table 5-3).
TABLE 5-3:
PROGRAMMING METHODOLOGY
The programming executive uses the PROGD command
to program the data EEPROM. Figure 5-4 illustrates
the flowchart of the process. Firstly, the number of rows
to program (RemainingRows) is based on the device
size, and the destination address (DestAddress) is set
to ‘0’. In this example, 128 rows (2048 words) of data
EEPROM will be programmed.
The first PROGD command programs the first row of
data EEPROM. Once the command completes
successfully, ‘RemainingRows’ is decremented by 1
and compared with 0. Since there are 127 more rows
to program, ‘BaseAddress’ is incremented by 0x20 to
point to the next row of data EEPROM. This process is
then repeated until all 128 rows of data EEPROM are
programmed.
FIGURE 5-4:
FLOWCHART FOR
PROGRAMMING
dsPIC30F6014A DATA
EEPROM
Start
DATA EEPROM SIZE
Device
Data EEPROM
Size (Words)
Number of
Rows
dsPIC30F2010
dsPIC30F2011
dsPIC30F2012
dsPIC30F3010
dsPIC30F3011
dsPIC30F3012
dsPIC30F3013
dsPIC30F3014
dsPIC30F4011
dsPIC30F4012
dsPIC30F4013
dsPIC30F5011
dsPIC30F5013
dsPIC30F5015
dsPIC30F5016
dsPIC30F6010
dsPIC30F6010A
dsPIC30F6011
dsPIC30F6011A
dsPIC30F6012
dsPIC30F6012A
dsPIC30F6013
dsPIC30F6013A
dsPIC30F6014
dsPIC30F6014A
dsPIC30F6015
512
0
0
512
512
512
512
512
512
512
512
512
512
512
512
2048
2048
1024
1024
2048
2048
1024
1024
2048
2048
2048
32
0
0
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
32
128
128
64
64
128
128
64
64
128
128
128
DS70102K-page 8
5.6.2
Remaining Rows = 128
BaseAddress = 0
Send PROGD
Command with
BaseAddress
Is
PROGD response
No
PASS?
Yes
RemainingRows =
RemainingRows – 1
BaseAddress =
BaseAddress
+ 0x20
No
Is
RemainingRows
0?
Yes
Finish
Failure
Report Error
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.6.3
PROGRAMMING VERIFICATION
Once the data EEPROM is programmed, the contents
of memory can be verified to ensure that the
programming was successful. Verification requires the
data EEPROM to be read back and compared against
the copy held in the programmer’s buffer. The READD
command reads back the programmed data EEPROM.
Alternatively, the programmer can perform the
verification once the entire device is programmed using
a checksum computation, as described in Section 6.8
“Checksum Computation”.
TBLRDL instructions executed within a
REPEAT loop must not be used to read
from Data EEPROM. Instead, it is
recommended to use PSV access.
Note:
5.7
Configuration Bits Programming
5.7.1
OVERVIEW
The dsPIC30F has Configuration bits stored in seven
16-bit registers. These bits can be set or cleared to
select various device configurations. There are two
types of Configuration bits: system-operation bits and
code-protect bits. The system-operation bits determine
the power-on settings for system-level components
such as the oscillator and Watchdog Timer. The codeprotect bits prevent program memory from being read
and written.
TABLE 5-4:
Bit Field
The FOSC Configuration register has three different
register descriptions, based on the device. The FOSC
Configuration
register
description
for
the
dsPIC30F2010 and dsPIC30F6010/6011/6012/6013/
6014 devices are shown in Table 5-4.
Note:
If user software performs an erase operation on the configuration fuse, it must be
followed by a write operation to this fuse
with the desired value, even if the desired
value is the same as the state of the
erased fuse.
The FOSC Configuration register description for the
dsPIC30F4011/4012 and dsPIC30F5011/5013 devices
is shown in Table 5-5.
The FOSC Configuration register description for
devices
(dsPIC30F2011/2012,
all remaining
dsPIC30F3010/3011/3012/3013,
dsPIC30F3014/
4013, dsPIC30F5015 and dsPIC30F6011A/6012A/
6013A/ 6014A) is shown in Table 5-6. Always use the
correct register descriptions for your target processor.
The FWDT, FBORPOR, FBS, FSS, FGS and FICD
Configuration registers are not device-dependent. The
register descriptions for these Configuration registers
are shown in Table 5-7.
The Device Configuration register maps are shown in
Table 5-8 through Table 5-11.
FOSC CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION FOR dsPIC30F2010 AND
dsPIC30F6010/6011/6012/6013/6014
Register
Description
FCKSM<1:0>
FOSC
Clock Switching Mode
1x = Clock switching is disabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is disabled
01 = Clock switching is enabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is disabled
00 = Clock switching is enabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is enabled
FOS<1:0>
FOSC
Oscillator Source Selection on POR
11 = Primary Oscillator
10 = Internal Low-Power RC Oscillator
01 = Internal Fast RC Oscillator
00 = Low-Power 32 kHz Oscillator (Timer1 Oscillator)
FPR<3:0>
FOSC
Primary Oscillator Mode
1111 = ECIO w/PLL 16X – External Clock mode with 16X PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1110 = ECIO w/PLL 8X – External Clock mode with 8X PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1101 = ECIO w/PLL 4X – External Clock mode with 4X PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1100 = ECIO – External Clock mode. OSC2 pin is I/O
1011 = EC – External Clock mode. OSC2 pin is system clock output (FOSC/4)
1010 = Reserved (do not use)
1001 = ERC – External RC Oscillator mode. OSC2 pin is system clock output
(FOSC/4)
1000 = ERCIO – External RC Oscillator mode. OSC2 pin is I/O
0111 = XT w/PLL 16X – XT Crystal Oscillator mode with 16X PLL
0110 = XT w/PLL 8X – XT Crystal Oscillator mode with 8X PLL
0101 = XT w/PLL 4X – XT Crystal Oscillator mode with 4X PLL
0100 = XT – XT Crystal Oscillator mode (4 MHz-10 MHz crystal)
001x = HS – HS Crystal Oscillator mode (10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
000x = XTL – XTL Crystal Oscillator mode (200 kHz-4 MHz crystal)
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 9
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 5-5:
FOSC CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION FOR dsPIC30F4011/4012 AND
dsPIC30F5011/5013
Bit Field
Register
Description
FCKSM<1:0>
FOSC
Clock Switching Mode
1x = Clock switching is disabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is disabled
01 = Clock switching is enabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is disabled
00 = Clock switching is enabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is enabled
FOS<1:0>
FOSC
Oscillator Source Selection on POR
11 = Primary Oscillator
10 = Internal Low-Power RC Oscillator
01 = Internal Fast RC Oscillator
00 = Low-Power 32 kHz Oscillator (Timer1 Oscillator)
FPR<3:0>
FOSC
Primary Oscillator Mode
1111 = ECIO w/PLL 16X – External Clock mode with 16X PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1110 = ECIO w/PLL 8X – External Clock mode with 8X PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1101 = ECIO w/PLL 4X – External Clock mode with 4X PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1100 = ECIO – External Clock mode. OSC2 pin is I/O
1011 = EC – External Clock mode. OSC2 pin is system clock output (FOSC/4)
1010 = FRC w/PLL 8x – Internal fast RC oscillator with 8x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
1001 = ERC – External RC Oscillator mode. OSC2 pin is system clock output
(FOSC/4)
1000 = ERCIO – External RC Oscillator mode. OSC2 pin is I/O
0111 = XT w/PLL 16X – XT Crystal Oscillator mode with 16X PLL
0110 = XT w/PLL 8X – XT Crystal Oscillator mode with 8X PLL
0101 = XT w/PLL 4X – XT Crystal Oscillator mode with 4X PLL
0100 = XT – XT Crystal Oscillator mode (4 MHz-10 MHz crystal)
0011 = FRC w/PLL 16x – Internal fast RC oscillator with 16x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
0010 = HS – HS Crystal Oscillator mode (10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
0001 = FRC w/PLL 4x – Internal fast RC oscillator with 4x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
0000 = XTL – XTL Crystal Oscillator mode (200 kHz-4 MHz crystal)
DS70102K-page 10
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 5-6:
Bit Field
FOSC CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION FOR dsPIC30F2011/2012,
dsPIC30F3010/3011/3012/3013/3014, dsPIC30F4013, dsPIC30F5015/5016,
dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A AND dsPIC30F6015
Register
Description
FCKSM<1:0>
FOSC
Clock Switching Mode
1x = Clock switching is disabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is disabled
01 = Clock switching is enabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is disabled
00 = Clock switching is enabled, Fail-Safe Clock Monitor is enabled
FOS<2:0>
FOSC
Oscillator Source Selection on POR
111 = Primary Oscillator
110 = Reserved
101 = Reserved
100 = Reserved
011 = Reserved
010 = Internal Low-Power RC Oscillator
001 = Internal Fast RC Oscillator (no PLL)
000 = Low-Power 32 kHz Oscillator (Timer1 Oscillator)
FPR<4:0>
FOSC
Primary Oscillator Mode (when FOS<2:0> = 111b)
11xxx = Reserved (do not use)
10111 = HS/3 w/PLL 16X – HS/3 crystal oscillator with 16X PLL
(10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
10110 = HS/3 w/PLL 8X – HS/3 crystal oscillator with 8X PLL
(10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
10101 = HS/3 w/PLL 4X – HS/3 crystal oscillator with 4X PLL
(10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
10100 = Reserved (do not use)
10011 = HS/2 w/PLL 16X – HS/2 crystal oscillator with 16X PLL
(10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
10010 = HS/2 w/PLL 8X – HS/2 crystal oscillator with 8X PLL
(10 MHz-25 MHz crystal
10001 = HS/2 w/PLL 4X – HS/2 crystal oscillator with 4X PLL
(10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
10000 = Reserved (do not use)
01111 = ECIO w/PLL 16x – External clock with 16x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
01110 = ECIO w/PLL 8x – External clock with 8x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
01101 = ECIO w/PLL 4x – External clock with 4x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
01100 = Reserved (do not use)
01011 = Reserved (do not use)
01010 = FRC w/PLL 8x – Internal fast RC oscillator with 8x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
01001 = Reserved (do not use)
01000 = Reserved (do not use)
00111 = XT w/PLL 16X – XT crystal oscillator with 16X PLL
00110 = XT w/PLL 8X – XT crystal oscillator with 8X PLL
00101 = XT w/PLL 4X – XT crystal oscillator with 4X PLL
00100 = Reserved (do not use)
00011 = FRC w/PLL 16x – Internal fast RC oscillator with 8x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
00010 = Reserved (do not use)
00001 = FRC w/PLL 4x – Internal fast RC oscillator with 4x PLL. OSC2 pin is I/O
00000 = Reserved (do not use)
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 11
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 5-6:
FOSC CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION FOR dsPIC30F2011/2012,
dsPIC30F3010/3011/3012/3013/3014, dsPIC30F4013, dsPIC30F5015/5016,
dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A AND dsPIC30F6015 (CONTINUED)
Bit Field
FPR<4:0>
Register
FOSC
DS70102K-page 12
Description
Alternate Oscillator Mode (when FOS<2:0> = 011b)
1xxxx = Reserved (do not use)
0111x = Reserved (do not use)
01101 = Reserved (do not use)
01100 = ECIO – External clock. OSC2 pin is I/O
01011 = EC – External clock. OSC2 pin is system clock output (FOSc/4)
01010 = Reserved (do not use)
01001 = ERC – External RC oscillator. OSC2 pin is system clock output (FOSC/4)
01000 = ERCIO – External RC oscillator. OSC2 pin is I/O
00111 = Reserved (do not use)
00110 = Reserved (do not use)
00101 = Reserved (do not use)
00100 = XT – XT crystal oscillator (4 MHz-10 MHz crystal)
00010 = HS – HS crystal oscillator (10 MHz-25 MHz crystal)
00001 = Reserved (do not use)
00000 = XTL – XTL crystal oscillator (200 kHz-4 MHz crystal)
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 5-7:
Bit Field
CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION
Register
Description
FWPSA<1:0> FWDT
Watchdog Timer Prescaler A
11 = 1:512
10 = 1:64
01 = 1:8
00 = 1:1
FWPSB<3:0> FWDT
Watchdog Timer Prescaler B
1111 = 1:16
1110 = 1:15
•
•
•
0001 = 1:2
0000 = 1:1
FWDTEN
FWDT
Watchdog Enable
1 = Watchdog enabled (LPRC oscillator cannot be disabled. Clearing the SWDTEN
bit in the RCON register will have no effect)
0 = Watchdog disabled (LPRC oscillator can be disabled by clearing the SWDTEN bit
in the RCON register)
MCLREN
FBORPOR
Master Clear Enable
1 = Master Clear pin (MCLR) is enabled
0 = MCLR pin is disabled
PWMPIN
FBORPOR
Motor Control PWM Module Pin Mode
1 = PWM module pins controlled by PORT register at device Reset (tri-stated)
0 = PWM module pins controlled by PWM module at device Reset (configured as output pins)
HPOL
FBORPOR
Motor Control PWM Module High-Side Polarity
1 = PWM module high-side output pins have active-high output polarity
0 = PWM module high-side output pins have active-low output polarity
LPOL
FBORPOR
Motor Control PWM Module Low-Side Polarity
1 = PWM module low-side output pins have active-high output polarity
0 = PWM module low-side output pins have active-low output polarity
BOREN
FBORPOR
PBOR Enable
1 = PBOR enabled
0 = PBOR disabled
BORV<1:0>
FBORPOR
Brown-out Voltage Select
11 = 2.0V (not a valid operating selection)
10 = 2.7V
01 = 4.2V
00 = 4.5V
FPWRT<1:0> FBORPOR
Power-on Reset Timer Value Select
11 = PWRT = 64 ms
10 = PWRT = 16 ms
01 = PWRT = 4 ms
00 = Power-up Timer disabled
RBS<1:0>
Boot Segment Data RAM Code Protection (only present in dsPIC30F5011/5013/
6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
11 = No Data RAM is reserved for Boot Segment
10 = Small-sized Boot RAM
[128 bytes of RAM are reserved for Boot Segment]
01 = Medium-sized Boot RAM
[256 bytes of RAM are reserved for Boot Segment]
00 = Large-sized Boot RAM
[512 bytes of RAM are reserved for Boot Segment in dsPIC30F5011/5013, and
1024 bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015]
FBS
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 13
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 5-7:
CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION (CONTINUED)
Bit Field
Register
Description
EBS
FBS
Boot Segment Data EEPROM Code Protection (only present in dsPIC30F5011/
5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
1 = No Data EEPROM is reserved for Boot Segment
0 = 128 bytes of Data EEPROM are reserved for Boot Segment in dsPIC30F5011/
5013, and 256 bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015
BSS<2:0>
FBS
Boot Segment Program Memory Code Protection (only present in
dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
111 = No Boot Segment
110 = Standard security; Small-sized Boot Program Flash
[Boot Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x0003FF]
101 = Standard security; Medium-sized Boot Program Flash
[Boot Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x000FFF]
100 = Standard security; Large-sized Boot Program Flash
[Boot Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x001FF]
011 = No Boot Segment
010 = High security; Small-sized Boot Program Flash
[Boot Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x0003FF]
001 = High security; Medium-sized Boot Program Flash
[Boot Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x000FFF]
000 = High security; Large-sized Boot Program Flash
[Boot Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x001FFF]
BWRP
FBS
Boot Segment Program Memory Write Protection (only present in
dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
1 = Boot Segment program memory is not write-protected
0 = Boot Segment program memory is write-protected
RSS<1:0>
FSS
Secure Segment Data RAM Code Protection (only present in dsPIC30F5011/
5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
11 = No Data RAM is reserved for Secure Segment
10 = Small-sized Secure RAM
[(256 – N) bytes of RAM are reserved for Secure Segment]
01 = Medium-sized Secure RAM
[(768 – N) bytes of RAM are reserved for Secure Segment in dsPIC30F5011/
5013, and (2048 – N) bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/
6015]
00 = Large-sized Secure RAM
[(1024 – N) bytes of RAM are reserved for Secure Segment in dsPIC30F5011/
5013, and (4096 – N) bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/
6015]
where N = Number of bytes of RAM reserved for Boot Sector.
ESS<1:0>
FSS
Secure Segment Data EEPROM Code Protection (only present in
dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
11 = No Data EEPROM is reserved for Secure Segment
10 = Small-sized Secure Data EEPROM
[(128 – N) bytes of Data EEPROM are reserved for Secure Segment in
dsPIC30F5011/5013, and (256 – N) bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/
6013A/6014A/6015]
01 = Medium-sized Secure Data EEPROM
[(256 – N) bytes of Data EEPROM are reserved for Secure Segment in
dsPIC30F5011/5013, and (512 – N) bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/
6013A/6014A/6015]
00 = Large-sized Secure Data EEPROM
[(512 – N) bytes of Data EEPROM are reserved for Secure Segment in
dsPIC30F5011/5013, (1024 – N) bytes in dsPIC30F6011A/6013A, and (2048 –
N) bytes in dsPIC30F6010A/6012A/6014A/6015]
where N = Number of bytes of Data EEPROM reserved for Boot Sector.
DS70102K-page 14
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 5-7:
CONFIGURATION BITS DESCRIPTION (CONTINUED)
Bit Field
Register
Description
SSS<2:0>
FSS
Secure Segment Program Memory Code Protection (only present in
dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
111 = No Secure Segment
110 = Standard security; Small-sized Secure Program Flash
[Secure Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x001FFF]
101 = Standard security; Medium-sized Secure Program Flash
[Secure Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x003FFF]
100 = Standard security; Large-sized Secure Program Flash
[Secure Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x007FFF]
011 = No Secure Segment
010 = High security; Small-sized Secure Program Flash
[Secure Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x001FFF]
001 = High security; Medium-sized Secure Program Flash
[Secure Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x003FFF]
000 = High security; Large-sized Secure Program Flash
[Secure Segment starts after BS and ends at 0x007FFF]
SWRP
FSS
Secure Segment Program Memory Write Protection (only present in
dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
1 = Secure Segment program memory is not write-protected
0 = Secure program memory is write-protected
GSS<1:0>
FGS
General Segment Program Memory Code Protection (only present in
dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
11 = Code protection is disabled
10 = Standard security code protection is enabled
0x = High security code protection is enabled
GCP
FGS
General Segment Program Memory Code Protection (present in all devices
except dsPIC30F5011/5013/6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A/6015)
1 = General Segment program memory is not code-protected
0 = General Segment program memory is code-protected
GWRP
FGS
General Segment Program Memory Write Protection
1 = General Segment program memory is not write-protected
0 = General Segment program memory is write-protected
BKBUG
FICD
Debugger/Emulator Enable
1 = Device will reset into Operational mode
0 = Device will reset into Debug/Emulation mode
COE
FICD
Debugger/Emulator Enable
1 = Device will reset into Operational mode
0 = Device will reset into Clip-on Emulation mode
ICS<1:0>
FICD
ICD Communication Channel Select
11 = Communicate on PGC/EMUC and PGD/EMUD
10 = Communicate on EMUC1 and EMUD1
01 = Communicate on EMUC2 and EMUD2
00 = Communicate on EMUC3 and EMUD3
RESERVED
FBS, FSS, FGS Reserved (read as ‘1’, write as ‘1’)
—
All
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
Unimplemented (read as ‘0’, write as ‘0’)
DS70102K-page 15
Address
0xF80000
dsPIC30F CONFIGURATION REGISTERS (FOR dsPIC30F2010, dsPIC30F4011/4012 AND dsPIC30F6010/ 6011/6012/6013/
6014)
Name
Bit 15
Bit 14
FCKSM<1:0>
FOSC
Bit 13
Bit 12
Bit 11
Bit 10
—
—
—
—
Bit 9
Bit 8
FOS<1:0>
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
—
—
—
—
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
0xF80002
FWDT
FWDTEN
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FWPSA<1:0>
0xF80004
FBORPOR
MCLREN
—
—
—
—
PWMPIN(1)
HPOL(1)
LPOL(1)
BOREN
—
BORV<1:0>
0xF80006
FBS
—
—
Reserved(2)
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
—
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
0xF80008
FSS
—
—
Reserved(2)
—
—
—
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
0xF8000A
FGS
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
0xF8000C
FICD
BKBUG
COE
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
—
—
—
—
Note
1:
2:
Name
Bit 15
Bit 14
Bit 13
Bit 12
Bit 11
Bit 10
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FCKSM<1:0>
Bit 9
0xF80002
FWDT
FWDTEN
0xF80004
FBORPOR
MCLREN
0xF80006
FBS
—
—
RBS<1:0>
—
—
0xF80008
FSS
—
—
RSS<1:0>
—
—
0xF8000A
FGS
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FICD
BKBUG
COE
—
—
—
—
—
1:
Reserved bits read as ‘1’ and must be programmed as ‘1’.
Bit 8
FOS<1:0>
FOSC
0xF8000C
—
FPWRT<1:0>
GCP
GWRP
ICS<1:0>
dsPIC30F CONFIGURATION REGISTERS (FOR dsPIC30F5011/5013)
0xF80000
Note
FWPSB<3:0>
—
On the 6011, 6012, 6013 and 6014, these bits are reserved (read as ‘1’ and must be programmed as ‘1’).
Reserved bits read as ‘1’ and must be programmed as ‘1’.
TABLE 5-9:
Address
Reserved(2)
Bit 0
FPR<3:0>
—
—
—
—
FWPSA<1:0>
BOREN
—
BORV<1:0>
—
—
—
—
BSS<2:0>
—
—
—
—
SSS<2:0>
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Reserved(1)
—
EBS
ESS<1:0>
Bit 1
Bit 0
FPR<3:0>
FWPSB<3:0>
—
—
FPWRT<1:0>
GSS<1:0>
—
BWRP
SWRP
GWRP
ICS<1:0>
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
DS70102K-page 16
TABLE 5-8:
Address
dsPIC30F CONFIGURATION REGISTERS (FOR dsPIC30F2011/2012, dsPIC30F3010/3011/3012/3013/3014, dsPIC30F4013 AND
dsPIC30F5015/5016)
Name
Bit 15
Bit 14
Bit 12
Bit 11
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
FOSC
—
—
—
—
—
—
0xF80002
FWDT
FWDTEN
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FWPSA<1:0>
0xF80004
FBORPOR
MCLREN
—
—
—
—
PWMPIN(1)
HPOL(1)
LPOL(1)
BOREN
—
BORV<1:0>
0xF80006
FBS
—
—
Reserved(2)
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
—
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
0xF80008
FSS
—
—
Reserved(2)
—
—
—
—
—
—
Reserved(2)
0xF8000A
FGS
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Reserved(3)
0xF8000C
FICD
BKBUG
COE
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1:
2:
3:
Address
Reserved(2)
FPR<4:0>
FWPSB<3:0>
—
—
Name
FOSC
Bit 15
Bit 14
FCKSM<1:0>
Bit 13
Bit 12
Bit 11
—
—
—
Bit 10
Bit 9
Bit 8
FOS<2:0>
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
—
—
—
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
FWDT
FWDTEN
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FWPSA<1:0>
FBORPOR
MCLREN
—
—
—
—
PWMPIN(1)
HPOL(1)
LPOL(1)
BOREN
—
BORV<1:0>
0xF80006
FBS
—
—
RBS<1:0>
—
—
—
EBS
—
—
—
—
BSS<2:0>
0xF80008
FSS
—
—
RSS<1:0>
—
—
—
—
—
—
SSS<2:0>
0xF8000A
FGS
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
FICD
BKBUG
COE
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
1:
GCP
GWRP
ICS<1:0>
ESS<1:0>
On the 6011A, 6012A, 6013A and 6014A, these bits are reserved (read as ‘1’ and must be programmed as ‘1’).
Bit 1
Bit 0
FPR<4:0>
0xF80002
Note
FPWRT<1:0>
dsPIC30F CONFIGURATION REGISTERS (FOR dsPIC30F6010A/6011A/6012A/6013A/6014A AND dsPIC30F6015)
0xF80004
0xF8000C
Bit 0
On the 2011, 2012, 3012, 3013, 3014 and 4013, these bits are reserved (read as ‘1’ and must be programmed as ‘1’).
Reserved bits read as ‘1’ and must be programmed as ‘1’.
The FGS<2> bit is a read-only copy of the GCP bit (FGS<1>).
TABLE 5-11:
0xF80000
FOS<2:0>
Bit 7
0xF80000
Note
FCKSM<1:0>
Bit 13
FWPSB<3:0>
—
—
FPWRT<1:0>
GSS<1:0>
—
BWRP
SWRP
GWRP
ICS<1:0>
DS70102K-page 17
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
TABLE 5-10:
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.7.2
PROGRAMMING METHODOLOGY
System operation Configuration bits are inherently
different than all other memory cells. Unlike code
memory,
data
EEPROM
and
code-protect
Configuration bits, the system operation bits cannot be
erased. If the chip is erased with the ERASEB
command, the system-operation bits retain their
previous value. Consequently, you should make no
assumption about the value of the system operation
bits. They should always be programmed to their
desired setting.
Configuration bits are programmed as a single word at
a time using the PROGC command. The PROGC
command specifies the configuration data and
Configuration register address. When Configuration
bits are programmed, any unimplemented bits must be
programmed with a ‘0’, and any reserved bits must be
programmed with a ‘1’.
Four PROGC commands are required to program all the
Configuration bits. Figure 5-5 illustrates the flowchart of
Configuration bit programming.
Note:
5.7.3
If the General Code Segment Code
Protect (GCP) bit is programmed to ‘0’,
code memory is code-protected and cannot be read. Code memory must
be verified before enabling read protection. See Section 5.7.4 “Code-Protect
Configuration Bits” for more information
about code-protect Configuration bits.
PROGRAMMING VERIFICATION
Once the Configuration bits are programmed, the
contents of memory should be verified to ensure that
the programming was successful. Verification requires
the Configuration bits to be read back and compared
against the copy held in the programmer’s buffer. The
READD command reads back the programmed
Configuration bits and verifies whether the
programming was successful.
Any unimplemented Configuration bits are read-only
and read as ‘0’.
DS70102K-page 18
5.7.4
CODE-PROTECT CONFIGURATION
BITS
The FBS, FSS and FGS Configuration registers are
special Configuration registers that control the size and
level of code protection for the Boot Segment, Secure
Segment and General Segment, respectively. For each
segment, two main forms of code protection are
provided. One form prevents code memory from being
written (write protection), while the other prevents code
memory from being read (read protection).
The BWRP, SWRP and GWRP bits control write
protection; and BSS<2:0>, SSS<2:0> and GSS<1:0>
bits control read protection. The Chip Erase ERASEB
command sets all the code protection bits to ‘1’, which
allows the device to be programmed.
When write protection is enabled, any programming
operation to code memory will fail. When read
protection is enabled, any read from code memory will
cause a ‘0x0’ to be read, regardless of the actual
contents of code memory. Since the programming
executive always verifies what it programs, attempting
to program code memory with read protection enabled
will also result in failure.
It is imperative that all code protection bits are ‘1’ while
the device is being programmed and verified. Only after
the device is programmed and verified should any of
the above bits be programmed to ‘0’ (see Section 5.7
“Configuration Bits Programming”).
In addition to code memory protection, parts of data
EEPROM and/or data RAM can be configured to be
accessible only by code resident in the Boot Segment
and/or Secure Segment. The sizes of these “reserved”
sections are user-configurable, using the EBS,
RBS<1:0>, ESS<1:0> and RSS<1:0> bits.
Note 1: All bits in the FBS, FSS and FGS
Configuration registers can only be
programmed to a value of ‘0’. ERASEB is
the only way to reprogram code-protect
bits from ON (‘0’) to OFF (‘1’).
2: If any of the code-protect bits in FBS,
FSS, or FGS are clear, the entire device
must be erased before it can be
reprogrammed.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
5.8
Exiting Enhanced ICSP Mode
The Enhanced ICSP mode is exited by removing power
from the device or bringing MCLR to VIL. When normal
user mode is next entered, the program that was stored
using Enhanced ICSP will execute.
FIGURE 5-5:
CONFIGURATION BIT PROGRAMMING FLOW
Start
ConfigAddress = 0xF80000
Send PROGC
Command
Is
PROGC Response
PASS?
No
Yes
ConfigAddress =
ConfigAddress + 2
No
Is
ConfigAddress
0xF8000C?
Yes
Finish
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
Failure
Report Error
DS70102K-page 19
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
6.0
OTHER PROGRAMMING
FEATURES
6.1
Erasing Memory
field in the ERASEB command. The code-protect
Configuration bits can then be reprogrammed using the
PROGC command.
Note:
Memory is erased by using an ERASEB, ERASED or
ERASEP command, as detailed in Section 8.5
“Command Descriptions”. Code memory can be
erased by row using ERASEP. Data EEPROM can be
erased by row using ERASED. When memory is erased,
the affected memory locations are set to ‘1’s.
If read or write code protection is enabled
for a segment, no modifications can be
made to that segment until code
protection is disabled. Code protection
can only be disabled by performing a Chip
Erase or by performing a Segment Erase
operation for the required segment.
ERASEB provides several Bulk Erase options.
Performing a Chip Erase with the ERASEB command
clears all code memory, data EEPROM and code
protection registers. Alternatively, ERASEB can be used
to selectively erase either all code memory or data
EEPROM. Erase options are summarized in Table 6-1.
6.3
TABLE 6-1:
The READP command reads the code memory of the
device. This command only returns 24-bit data packed
as described in Section 8.3 “Packed Data Format”.
READP can be used to read up to 32K instruction words
of code memory.
ERASE OPTIONS
Command
Affected Region
Entire chip(1) or all code memory or all
data EEPROM, or erase by segment
ERASEB
ERASED
Specified rows of data EEPROM
ERASEP(2)
Specified rows of code memory
Note 1:
2:
6.2
The system operation Configuration
registers and device ID registers are not
erasable.
ERASEP cannot be used to erase codeprotect Configuration bits. These bits must
be erased using ERASEB.
Modifying Memory
Instead of bulk-erasing the device before
programming, it is possible that you may want to modify
only a section of an already programmed device. In this
situation, Chip Erase is not a realistic option.
Instead, you can erase selective rows of code memory
and data EEPROM using ERASEP and ERASED,
respectively. You can then reprogram the modified
rows with the PROGP and PROGD command pairs. In
these cases, when code memory is programmed,
single-panel programming must be specified in the
PROGP command.
For modification of Advanced Code Protection bits for
a particular segment, the entire chip must first be
erased with the ERASEB command. Alternatively, on
devices that support Advanced Security, individual
segments (code and/or data EEPROM) may be
erased, by suitably changing the MS (Memory Select)
DS70102K-page 20
Reading Memory
The READD command reads the data EEPROM,
Configuration bits and device ID of the device. This
command only returns 16-bit data and operates on
16-bit registers. READD can be used to return the
entire contents of data EEPROM.
Note:
6.4
Reading an unimplemented memory
location causes the programming
executive to reset. All READD and READP
commands must specify only valid
memory locations.
Programming Executive Software
Version
At times, it may be necessary to determine the version
of programming executive stored in executive memory.
The QVER command performs this function. See
Section 8.5.11 “QVER Command” for more details
about this command.
6.5
Data EEPROM Information in the
Hexadecimal File
To allow portability of code, the programmer must read
the data EEPROM information from the hexadecimal
file. If data EEPROM information is not present, a
simple warning message should be issued by the
programmer. Similarly, when saving a hexadecimal file,
all data EEPROM information must be included. An
option to not include the data EEPROM information can
be provided.
Microchip Technology Inc. believes that this feature is
important for the benefit of the end customer.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
6.6
Configuration Information in the
Hexadecimal File
To allow portability of code, the programmer must read
the Configuration register locations from the
hexadecimal file. If configuration information is not
present in the hexadecimal file, a simple warning
message should be issued by the programmer.
Similarly, while saving a hexadecimal file, all
configuration information must be included. An option
to not include the configuration information can be
provided.
Microchip Technology Inc. feels strongly that this
feature is important for the benefit of the end customer.
6.7
Unit ID
The dsPIC30F devices contain 32 instructions of Unit
ID. These are located at addresses 0x8005C0 through
0x8005FF. The Unit ID can be used for storing product
information such as serial numbers, system
manufacturing dates, manufacturing lot numbers and
other such application-specific information.
A Bulk Erase does not erase the Unit ID locations.
Instead, erase all executive memory using steps 1-4 as
shown in Table 12-1, and program the Unit ID along
with the programming executive. Alternately, use a
Row Erase to erase the row containing the Unit ID
locations.
6.8
Checksum Computation
Checksums for the dsPIC30F are 16 bits in size. The
checksum is to total sum of the following:
• Contents of code memory locations
• Contents of Configuration registers
Table A-1 describes how to calculate the checksum for
each device. All memory locations are summed one
byte at a time, using only their native data size. More
specifically, Configuration and device ID registers are
summed by adding the lower two bytes of these
locations (the upper byte is ignored), while code
memory is summed by adding all three bytes of code
memory.
Note:
The
checksum
calculation
differs
depending on the code-protect setting.
Table A-1 describes how to compute the
checksum for an unprotected device and
a read-protected device. Regardless of
the code-protect setting, the Configuration
registers can always be read.
7.0
PROGRAMMER –
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
COMMUNICATION
7.1
Communication Overview
The programmer and programming executive have a
master-slave relationship, where the programmer is
the master programming device and the programming
executive is the slave.
All communication is initiated by the programmer in the
form of a command. Only one command at a time can
be sent to the programming executive. In turn, the
programming executive only sends one response to
the programmer after receiving and processing a
command. The programming executive command set
is described in Section 8.0 “Programming Executive
Commands”. The response set is described in
Section 9.0 “Programming Executive Responses”.
7.2
Communication Interface and
Protocol
The Enhanced ICSP interface is a 2-wire SPI interface
implemented using the PGC and PGD pins. The PGC
pin is used as a clock input pin, and the clock source
must be provided by the programmer. The PGD pin is
used for sending command data to, and receiving
response data from, the programming executive. All
serial data is transmitted on the falling edge of PGC
and latched on the rising edge of PGC. All data
transmissions are sent Most Significant bit (MSb) first,
using 16-bit mode (see Figure 7-1).
FIGURE 7-1:
PROGRAMMING
EXECUTIVE SERIAL
TIMING
P1
1
2
3
4
5
6
11
12
13 14
15 16
PGC
P1b
P3
P1a
P2
PGD
MSb 14 13 12
11
...
5
4
3
2
1 LSb
Since a 2-wire SPI interface is used, and data transmissions are bidirectional, a simple protocol is used to
control the direction of PGD. When the programmer
completes a command transmission, it releases the
PGD line and allows the programming executive to
drive this line high. The programming executive keeps
the PGD line high to indicate that it is processing the
command.
After the programming executive has processed the
command, it brings PGD low for 15 μsec to indicate to
the programmer that the response is available to be
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 21
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
clocked out. The programmer can begin to clock out
the response 20 μsec after PGD is brought low, and it
must provide the necessary amount of clock pulses to
receive the entire response from the programming
executive.
Once the entire response is clocked out, the
programmer should terminate the clock on PGC until it
is time to send another command to the programming
executive. This protocol is illustrated in Figure 7-2.
7.3
SPI Rate
In Enhanced ICSP mode, the dsPIC30F operates from
the fast internal RC oscillator, which has a nominal
frequency of 7.37 MHz. This oscillator frequency yields
an effective system clock frequency of 1.84 MHz. Since
the SPI module operates in Slave mode, the
programmer must limit the SPI clock rate to a
frequency no greater than 1 MHz.
Note:
7.4
Time Outs
The programming executive uses no Watchdog Timer
or time out for transmitting responses to the
programmer. If the programmer does not follow the flow
control mechanism using PGC, as described in
Section 7.2 “Communication Interface and Protocol”, it is possible that the programming executive will
behave unexpectedly while trying to send a response
to the programmer. Since the programming executive
has no time out, it is imperative that the programmer
correctly follow the described communication protocol.
As a safety measure, the programmer should use the
command time outs identified in Table 8-1. If the
command time out expires, the programmer should
reset the programming executive and start
programming the device again.
If the programmer provides the SPI with a
clock faster than 1 MHz, the behavior of
the programming executive will be
unpredictable.
FIGURE 7-2:
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE – PROGRAMMER COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL
Host Transmits
Last Command Word
1
2
Programming Executive
Processes Command
Host Clocks Out Response
1
15 16
2
1
15 16
2
15 16
PGC
PGD
MSB X X X LSB
1
P8
PGC = Input
PGD = Input
DS70102K-page 22
P9a
PGC = Input (Idle)
PGD = Output
MSB X X X LSB
MSB X X X LSB
0
P9b
P10
P11
PGC = Input
PGD = Output
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.0
8.1
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
COMMANDS
8.3
Command Set
The programming executive command set is shown in
Table 8-1. This table contains the opcode, mnemonic,
length, time out and description for each command.
Functional details on each command are provided in
the command descriptions (see Section 8.5
“Command Descriptions”).
8.2
Length
Command Data First Word (if required)
•
•
Command Data Last Word (if required)
The command opcode must match one of those in the
command set. Any command that is received which
does not match the list in Table 8-1 will return a “NACK”
response (see Section 9.2.1 “Opcode Field”).
The command length is represented in 16-bit words
since the SPI operates in 16-bit mode. The
programming executive uses the Command Length
field to determine the number of words to read from the
SPI port. If the value of this field is incorrect, the
command will not be properly received by the
programming executive.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
8 7
0
MSB1
lsw2
lswx: Least significant 16 bits of instruction word
MSBx: Most Significant Byte of instruction word
0
Opcode
PACKED INSTRUCTION
WORD FORMAT
MSB2
Note:
COMMAND FORMAT
12 11
FIGURE 8-2:
lsw1
All programming executive commands have a general
format consisting of a 16-bit header and any required
data for the command (see Figure 8-1). The 16-bit
header consists of a 4-bit opcode field, which is used to
identify the command, followed by a 12-bit command
length field.
15
When 24-bit instruction words are transferred across
the 16-bit SPI interface, they are packed to conserve
space using the format shown in Figure 8-2. This
format minimizes traffic over the SPI and provides the
programming executive with data that is properly
aligned for performing table write operations.
15
Command Format
FIGURE 8-1:
Packed Data Format
8.4
When the number of instruction words
transferred is odd, MSB2 is zero and lsw2
cannot be transmitted.
Programming Executive Error
Handling
The programming executive will “NACK” all
unsupported commands. Additionally, due to the
memory constraints of the programming executive, no
checking is performed on the data contained in the
Programmer command. It is the responsibility of the
programmer to command the programming executive
with valid command arguments, or the programming
operation may fail. Additional information on error
handling is provided in Section 9.2.3 “QE_Code
Field”.
DS70102K-page 23
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 8-1:
Opcode
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE COMMAND SET
Mnemonic
Length
(16-bit
words)
Time Out
Description
0x0
SCHECK
1
1 ms
0x1
READD
4
1 ms/row
Read N 16-bit words of data EEPROM, Configuration registers or
device ID starting from specified address.
0x2
READP
4
1 ms/row
Read N 24-bit instruction words of code memory starting from
specified address.
0x3
Reserved
N/A
N/A
This command is reserved. It will return a NACK.
0x4
PROGD(2)
19
5 ms
Program one row of data EEPROM at the specified address, then
verify.
0x5
PROGP(1)
51
5 ms
Program one row of code memory at the specified address, then
verify.
0x6
PROGC
4
5 ms
Write byte or 16-bit word to specified Configuration register.
0x7
ERASEB
2
5 ms
Bulk Erase (entire code memory or data EEPROM), or erase by
segment.
0x8
ERASED(2)
3
5 ms/row
Erase rows of data EEPROM from specified address.
0x9
ERASEP
(1)
3
5 ms/row
Erase rows of code memory from specified address.
0xA
QBLANK
3
300 ms
QVER
1
1 ms
0xB
Note 1:
2:
Sanity check.
Query if the code memory and data EEPROM are blank.
Query the programming executive software version.
One row of code memory consists of (32) 24-bit words. Refer to Table 5-2 for device-specific information.
One row of data EEPROM consists of (16) 16-bit words. Refer to Table 5-3 for device-specific information.
DS70102K-page 24
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.5
Command Descriptions
8.5.2
All commands that are supported by the programming
executive are described in Section 8.5.1 “SCHECK
Command”
through
Section 8.5.11
“QVER
Command”.
8.5.1
READD COMMAND
15
12 11
12 11
Reserved0
N
Reserved1
Addr_MSB
Addr_LS
0
Opcode
Length
Field
0
Length
SCHECK COMMAND
15
8 7
Opcode
Description
Field
Description
Opcode
0x1
Length
0x4
0x0
Opcode
0x0
Reserved0
Length
0x1
N
Number of 16-bit words to read
(max of 2048)
Reserved1
0x0
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit source address
Addr_LS
LS 16 bits of 24-bit source address
The SCHECK command instructs the programming
executive to do nothing, but generate a response. This
command is used as a “sanity check” to verify that the
programming executive is operational.
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1000
0x0002
Note:
This instruction is not required for
programming, but is provided for
development purposes only.
The READD command instructs the programming
executive to read N 16-bit words of memory starting
from the 24-bit address specified by Addr_MSB and
Addr_LS. This command can only be used to read
16-bit data. It can be used to read data EEPROM,
Configuration registers and the device ID.
Expected Response (2+N words):
0x1100
N+2
Data word 1
...
Data word N
Note:
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
Reading unimplemented memory will
cause the programming executive to
reset.
DS70102K-page 25
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.5.3
READP COMMAND
15
12 11
8.5.4
8 7
Opcode
0
PROGD COMMAND
15
Length
12 11
8 7
Opcode
N
0
Length
Reserved
Reserved
Addr_MSB
Addr_MSB
Addr_LS
Addr_LS
D_1
D_2
Field
...
Description
D_16
Opcode
0x2
Length
0x4
N
Number of 24-bit instructions to read
(max of 32768)
Opcode
0x4
Reserved
0x0
Length
0x13
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit source address
Reserved
0x0
Addr_LS
LS 16 bits of 24-bit source address
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit destination address
Addr_LS
LS 16 bits of 24-bit destination
address
D_1
16-bit data word 1
D_2
16-bit data word 2
...
16-bit data words 3 through 15
D_16
16-bit data word 16
The READP command instructs the programming
executive to read N 24-bit words of code memory
starting from the 24-bit address specified by
Addr_MSB and Addr_LS. This command can only be
used to read 24-bit data. All data returned in response
to this command uses the packed data format
described in Section 8.3 “Packed Data Format”.
Field
Description
Expected Response (2 + 3 * N/2 words for N even):
0x1200
2 + 3 * N/2
Least significant program memory word 1
...
Least significant data word N
The PROGD command instructs the programming
executive to program one row of data EEPROM. The
data to be programmed is specified by the 16 data
words (D_1, D_2,..., D_16) and is programmed to the
destination address specified by Addr_MSB and
Addr_LSB. The destination address should be a
multiple of 0x20.
Expected Response (4 + 3 * (N – 1)/2 words for N
odd):
0x1200
4 + 3 * (N – 1)/2
Least significant program memory word 1
...
MSB of program memory word N (zero padded)
Once the row of data EEPROM has been programmed,
the programming executive verifies the programmed
data against the data in the command.
Note:
Reading unimplemented memory will
cause the programming executive to
reset.
DS70102K-page 26
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1400
0x0002
Note:
Refer to Table 5-3 for data EEPROM size
information.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.5.5
PROGP COMMAND
15
12 11
8.5.6
8 7
Opcode
0
Length
Reserved
PROGC COMMAND
15
12 11
8 7
Opcode
Addr_MSB
0
Length
Reserved
Addr_MSB
Addr_LS
Addr_LS
D_1
Data
D_2
...
D_N
Field
Description
Field
Description
Opcode
0x6
Length
0x4
Reserved
0x0
Opcode
0x5
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit destination address
Length
0x33
Addr_LS
Reserved
0x0
LS 16 bits of 24-bit destination
address
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit destination address
Data
Data to program
Addr_LS
LS 16 bits of 24-bit destination address
D_1
16-bit data word 1
D_2
16-bit data word 2
...
16-bit data word 3 through 47
D_48
16-bit data word 48
The PROGP command instructs the programming
executive to program one row of code memory
(32 instruction words) to the specified memory
address. Programming begins with the row address
specified in the command. The destination address
should be a multiple of 0x40.
The PROGC command programs data to the specified
Configuration register and verifies the programming.
Configuration registers are 16 bits wide, and this
command allows one Configuration register to be
programmed.
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1600
0x0002
Note:
This command can only be used for
programming Configuration registers.
The data to program to memory, located in command
words D_1 through D_48, must be arranged using the
packed instruction word format shown in Figure 8-2.
After all data has been programmed to code memory,
the programming executive verifies the programmed
data against the data in the command.
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1500
0x0002
Note:
Refer to Table 5-2 for code memory size
information.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 27
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.5.7
15
ERASEB COMMAND
12 11
8.5.8
2
Opcode
0
Length
Reserved
ERASED COMMAND
15
12 11
Opcode
MS
8 7
0
Length
Num_Rows
Addr_MSB
Addr_LS
Field
Description
Opcode
0x7
Length
0x2
Field
Description
Opcode
0x8
Reserved 0x0
Length
0x3
MS
Num_Rows
Number of rows to erase (max of 128)
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit base address
Addr_LS
LS 16 bits of 24-bit base address
Select memory to erase:
0x0 = All Code in General Segment
0x1 = All Data EEPROM in General
Segment
0x2 = All Code and Data EEPROM in
General Segment, interrupt vectors and
FGS Configuration register
0x3 = Full Chip Erase
0x4 = All Code and Data EEPROM in
Boot, Secure and General Segments,
and FBS, FSS and FGS Configuration
registers
0x5 = All Code and Data EEPROM in
Secure and General Segments, and
FSS and FGS Configuration registers
0x6 = All Data EEPROM in Boot
Segment
0x7 = All Data EEPROM in Secure
Segment
The ERASEB command performs a Bulk Erase. The MS
field selects the memory to be bulk erased, with options
for erasing Code and/or Data EEPROM in individual
memory segments.
The ERASED command erases the specified number of
rows of data EEPROM from the specified base
address. The specified base address must be a
multiple of 0x20. Since the data EEPROM is mapped
to program space, a 24-bit base address must be
specified.
After the erase is performed, all targeted bytes of data
EEPROM will contain 0xFF.
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1800
0x0002
Note:
The ERASED command cannot be used to
erase the Configuration registers or
device ID. Code-protect Configuration
registers can only be erased with the
ERASEB command, while the device ID is
read-only.
When Full Chip Erase is selected, the following
memory regions are erased:
• All code memory (even if code-protected)
• All data EEPROM
• All code-protect Configuration registers
Only the executive code memory, Unit ID, device ID
and Configuration registers that are not code-protected
remain intact after a Chip Erase.
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1700
0x0002
Note:
A Full Chip Erase cannot be performed in
low-voltage programming systems (VDD
less than 4.5 volts). ERASED and ERASEP
must be used to erase code memory,
executive memory and data memory.
Alternatively, individual Segment Erase
operations may be performed.
DS70102K-page 28
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.5.9
ERASEP COMMAND
15
12 11
8.5.10
8 7
Opcode
0
Length
Num_Rows
12 11
Description
0
Opcode
Length
Addr_MSB
Addr_LS
Field
15
QBLANK COMMAND
PSize
Reserved
DSize
Field
Description
Opcode
0x9
Opcode
0xA
Length
0x3
Length
0x3
Num_Rows
Number of rows to erase
PSize
Addr_MSB
MSB of 24-bit base address
Length of program memory to check
(in 24-bit words), max of 49152
Addr_LS
LS 16 bits of 24-bit base address
Reserved
0x0
DSize
Length of data memory to check
(in 16-bit words), max of 2048
The ERASEP command erases the specified number of
rows of code memory from the specified base address.
The specified base address must be a multiple of 0x40.
Once the erase is performed, all targeted words of
code memory contain 0xFFFFFF.
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1900
0x0002
Note:
The ERASEP command cannot be used to
erase the Configuration registers or
device ID. Code-protect Configuration
registers can only be erased with the
ERASEB command, while the device ID is
read-only.
The QBLANK command queries the programming executive to determine if the contents of code memory and
data EEPROM are blank (contains all ‘1’s). The size of
code memory and data EEPROM to check must be
specified in the command.
The Blank Check for code memory begins at 0x0 and
advances toward larger addresses for the specified
number of instruction words. The Blank Check for data
EEPROM begins at 0x7FFFFE and advances toward
smaller addresses for the specified number of data
words.
QBLANK returns a QE_Code of 0xF0 if the specified
code memory and data EEPROM are blank.
Otherwise, QBLANK returns a QE_Code of 0x0F.
Expected Response (2 words for blank device):
0x1AF0
0x0002
Expected Response (2 words for non-blank device):
0x1A0F
0x0002
Note:
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
The QBLANK command does not check
the system Configuration registers. The
READD command must be used to determine the state of the Configuration
registers.
DS70102K-page 29
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
8.5.11
9.2
QVER COMMAND
15
12 11
0
Opcode
Length
Field
Description
Opcode
0xB
Length
0x1
Expected Response (2 words):
0x1BMN (where “MN” stands for version M.N)
0x0002
9.1
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
RESPONSES
Overview
The programming executive sends a response to the
programmer for each command that it receives. The
response indicates if the command was processed
correctly, and includes any required response or error
data.
The programming executive response set is shown in
Table 9-1. This table contains the opcode, mnemonic
and description for each response. The response
format is described in Section 9.2 “Response
Format”.
TABLE 9-1:
Opcode
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
RESPONSE SET
Mnemonic
Description
0x1
PASS
Command successfully
processed.
0x2
FAIL
Command unsuccessfully
processed.
0x3
NACK
Command not known.
DS70102K-page 30
As shown in Example 9-1, all programming executive
responses have a general format consisting of a two
word header and any required data for the command.
Table 9-2 lists the fields and their descriptions.
EXAMPLE 9-1:
15
The QVER command queries the version of the
programming executive software stored in test
memory. The “version.revision” information is returned
in the response’s QE_Code using a single byte with the
following format: main version in upper nibble and
revision in the lower nibble (i.e., 0x23 is version 2.3 of
programming executive software).
9.0
Response Format
12 11
Opcode
FORMAT
8 7
Last_Cmd
0
QE_Code
Length
D_1 (if applicable)
...
D_N (if applicable)
TABLE 9-2:
FIELDS AND DESCRIPTIONS
Field
Description
Opcode
Response opcode.
Last_Cmd
Programmer command that
generated the response.
QE_Code
Query code or Error code.
Length
Response length in 16-bit words
(includes 2 header words.)
D_1
First 16-bit data word (if applicable).
D_N
Last 16-bit data word (if applicable).
9.2.1
Opcode FIELD
The Opcode is a 4-bit field in the first word of the
response. The Opcode indicates how the command
was processed (see Table 9-1). If the command is
processed successfully, the response opcode is PASS.
If there is an error in processing the command, the
response opcode is FAIL, and the QE_Code indicates
the reason for the failure. If the command sent to
the programming executive is not identified, the
programming executive returns a NACK response.
9.2.2
Last_Cmd FIELD
The Last_Cmd is a 4-bit field in the first word of
the response and indicates the command that the
programming executive processed. Since the
programming executive can only process one
command at a time, this field is technically not required.
However, it can be used to verify whether the
programming executive correctly received the
command that the programmer transmitted.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
9.2.3
QE_Code FIELD
The QE_Code is a byte in the first word of the
response. This byte is used to return data for query
commands, and error codes for all other commands.
When the programming executive processes one of the
two query commands (QBLANK or QVER), the returned
opcode is always PASS and the QE_Code holds the
query response data. The format of the QE_Code for
both queries is shown in Table 9-3.
TABLE 9-3:
QE_Code FOR QUERIES
Query
QE_Code
QBLANK
0x0F = Code memory and data EEPROM
are NOT blank
0xF0 = Code memory and data EEPROM
are blank
QVER
0xMN, where programming executive
software version = M.N
(i.e., 0x32 means software version 3.2)
When the programming executive processes any
command other than a Query, the QE_Code
represents an error code. Supported error codes are
shown in Table 9-4. If a command is successfully
processed, the returned QE_Code is set to 0x0, which
indicates that there was no error in the command
processing. If the verify of the programming for the
PROGD, PROGP or PROGC command fails, the QE_Code
is set to 0x1. For all other programming executive
errors, the QE_Code is 0x2.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
TABLE 9-4:
QE_Code FOR NON-QUERY
COMMANDS
QE_Code
Description
0x0
No error
0x1
Verify failed
0x2
Other error
9.2.4
RESPONSE LENGTH
The response length indicates the length of the
programming executive’s response in 16-bit words.
This field includes the 2 words of the response header.
With the exception of the response for the READD and
READP commands, the length of each response is only
2 words.
The response to the READD command is N + 2 words,
where N is the number of words specified in the READD
command.
The response to the READP command uses the packed
instruction word format described in Section 8.3
“Packed Data Format”. When reading an odd number
of program memory words (N odd), the response to the
READP command is (3 • (N + 1)/2 + 2) words. When
reading an even number of program memory words
(N even), the response to the READP command is
(3 • N/2 + 2) words.
DS70102K-page 31
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
10.0
DEVICE ID
The device ID region is 2 x 16 bits and can be read
using the READD command. This region of memory is
read-only and can also be read when code protection
is enabled.
Table 10-1 shows the device ID for each device,
Table 10-2 shows the device ID registers and Table 103 describes the bit field of each register.
TABLE 10-1:
Device
DEVICE IDS
Silicon Revision
DEVID
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
B0
B1
B2
dsPIC30F2010
0x0040
0x1000
0x1001
0x1002
0x1003
0x1004
—
—
—
dsPIC30F2011
0x0240
—
0x1001
—
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F2012
0x0241
—
0x1001
—
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F3010
0x01C0
0x1000
0x1001
0x1002
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F3011
0x01C1
0x1000
0x1001
0x1002
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F3012
0x00C1
—
—
—
—
—
0x1040
0x1041
—
dsPIC30F3013
0x00C3
—
—
—
—
—
0x1040
0x1041
—
dsPIC30F3014
0x0160
—
0x1001
0x1002
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F4011
0x0101
—
0x1001
0x1002
0x1003
0x1003
—
—
—
dsPIC30F4012
0x0100
—
0x1001
0x1002
0x1003
0x1003
—
—
—
dsPIC30F4013
0x0141
—
0x1001
0x1002
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F5011
0x0080
—
0x1001
0x1002
0x1003
0x1003
—
—
—
dsPIC30F5013
0x0081
—
0x1001
0x1002
0x1003
0x1003
—
—
—
dsPIC30F5015
0x0200
0x1000
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F5016
0x0201
0x1000
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
dsPIC30F6010
0x0188
—
—
—
—
—
—
0x1040
0x1042
dsPIC30F6010A
0x0281
—
—
0x1002
0x1003
0x1004
—
—
—
dsPIC30F6011
0x0192
—
—
—
0x1003
—
—
0x1040
0x1042
dsPIC30F6011A
0x02C0
—
—
0x1002
—
—
0x1040
0x1041
—
dsPIC30F6012
0x0193
—
—
—
0x1003
—
—
0x1040
0x1042
dsPIC30F6012A
0x02C2
—
—
0x1002
—
—
0x1040
0x1041
—
dsPIC30F6013
0x0197
—
—
—
0x1003
—
—
0x1040
0x1042
dsPIC30F6013A
0x02C1
—
—
0x1002
—
—
0x1040
0x1041
—
dsPIC30F6014
0x0198
—
—
—
0x1003
—
—
0x1040
0x1042
dsPIC30F6014A
0x02C3
—
—
0x1002
—
—
0x1040
0x1041
—
dsPIC30F6015
0x0280
—
—
0x1002
0x1003
0x1004
—
—
—
TABLE 10-2:
Address
dsPIC30F DEVICE ID REGISTERS
Name
0xFF0000
DEVID
0xFF0002
DEVREV
DS70102K-page 32
Bit
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
DEVID<15:0>
PROC<3:0>
REV<5:0>
DOT<5:0>
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 10-3:
Bit Field
DEVID<15:0>
DEVICE ID BITS DESCRIPTION
Register
DEVID
Description
Encodes the device ID.
PROC<3:0>
DEVREV
Encodes the process of the device (always read as 0x001).
REV<5:0>
DEVREV
Encodes the major revision number of the device.
000000 = A
000001 = B
000010 = C
DOT<5:0>
DEVREV
Encodes the minor revision number of the device.
000000 = 0
000001 = 1
000010 = 2
000011 = 3
Examples:
Rev A.1 = 0000 0000 0000 0001
Rev A.2 = 0000 0000 0000 0010
Rev B.0 = 0000 0000 0100 0000
This formula applies to all dsPIC30F devices, with the exception of the following:
•
•
•
•
•
dsPIC30F6010
dsPIC30F6011
dsPIC30F6012
dsPIC30F6013
dsPIC30F6014
Refer to Table 10-1 for the actual revision IDs.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 33
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.0
ICSP™ MODE
11.1
ICSP Mode
ICSP mode is a special programming protocol that
allows you to read and write to the dsPIC30F programming executive. The ICSP mode is the second (and
slower) method used to program the device. This mode
also has the ability to read the contents of executive
memory to determine whether the programming executive is present. This capability is accomplished by
applying control codes and instructions serially to the
device using pins PGC and PGD.
In ICSP mode, the system clock is taken from the PGC
pin, regardless of the device’s oscillator Configuration
bits. All instructions are first shifted serially into an
internal buffer, then loaded into the Instruction register
and executed. No program fetching occurs from
internal memory. Instructions are fed in 24 bits at a
time. PGD is used to shift data in and PGC is used as
both the serial shift clock and the CPU execution clock.
Data is transmitted on the rising edge and latched on
the falling edge of PGC. For all data transmissions, the
Least Significant bit (LSb) is transmitted first.
Note 1: During ICSP operation, the operating
frequency of PGC must not exceed
5 MHz.
2: Because ICSP is slower, it is recommended that only Enhanced ICSP (EICSP) mode be used for device programming, as described in Section 5.1
“Overview of the Programming
Process”.
11.2
ICSP Operation
Upon entry into ICSP mode, the CPU is idle. Execution
of the CPU is governed by an internal state machine. A
4-bit control code is clocked in using PGC and PGD,
and this control code is used to command the CPU
(see Table 11-1).
TABLE 11-1:
4-bit
Control
Code
CPU CONTROL CODES IN
ICSP™ MODE
Mnemonic
Description
0000b
SIX
Shift in 24-bit instruction
and execute.
0001b
REGOUT
Shift out the VISI
register.
0010b-1111b N/A
11.2.1
Reserved.
SIX SERIAL INSTRUCTION
EXECUTION
The SIX control code allows execution of dsPIC30F
assembly instructions. When the SIX code is received,
the CPU is suspended for 24 clock cycles as the
instruction is then clocked into the internal buffer. Once
the instruction is shifted in, the state machine allows it
to be executed over the next four clock cycles. While
the received instruction is executed, the state machine
simultaneously shifts in the next 4-bit command (see
Figure 11-2).
Note 1: Coming out of the ICSP entry sequence,
the first 4-bit control code is always
forced to SIX and a forced NOP instruction is executed by the CPU. Five additional PGC clocks are needed on startup, thereby resulting in a 9-bit SIX command instead of the normal 4-bit SIX
command. After the forced SIX is clocked
in, ICSP operation resumes as normal
(the next 24 clock cycles load the first
instruction word to the CPU). See
Figure 11-1 for details.
2: TBLRDH, TBLRDL, TBLWTH and TBLWTL
instructions must be followed by a NOP
instruction.
The SIX control code is used to send instructions to the
CPU for execution, while the REGOUT control code is
used to read data out of the device via the VISI register.
The operation details of ICSP mode are provided in
Section 11.2.1 “SIX Serial Instruction Execution”
and Section 11.2.2 “REGOUT Serial Instruction
Execution”.
DS70102K-page 34
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.2.2
REGOUT SERIAL INSTRUCTION
EXECUTION
The REGOUT instruction is unique because the PGD
pin is an input when the control code is transmitted to
the device. However, once the control code is
processed, the PGD pin becomes an output as the VISI
register is shifted out. After the contents of the VISI are
shifted out, PGD becomes an input again as the state
machine holds the CPU idle until the next 4-bit control
code is shifted in.
The REGOUT control code allows for data to be
extracted from the device in ICSP mode. It is used to
clock the contents of the VISI register out of the device
over the PGD pin. Once the REGOUT control code is
received, eight clock cycles are required to process the
command. During this time, the CPU is held idle. After
these eight cycles, an additional 16 cycles are required
to clock the data out (see Figure 11-3).
FIGURE 11-1:
Once the contents of VISI are shifted out,
the dsPIC® DSC device maintains PGD
as an output until the first rising edge of
the next clock is received.
Note:
PROGRAM ENTRY AFTER RESET
P1
1
2
3
4
5
6
8
7
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
17 18 19 20
8
21
22 23 24
1
2
3
4
PGC
P4
P3
P4a
P1A
P1B
P2
PGD
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
LSB X
0
X
X
X
X
X
Execute PC – 1,
Fetch SIX Control Code
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X MSB
0
24-bit Instruction Fetch
0
0
0
Execute 24-bit Instruction,
Fetch Next Control Code
PGD = Input
FIGURE 11-2:
SIX SERIAL EXECUTION
P1
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
17 18 19 20
21
22 23 24
1
2
3
4
PGC
P4
P1a
P2
PGD
0
P4a
P1b
P3
0
0
LSB X
0
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X MSB
0
24-bit Instruction Fetch
Execute PC – 1,
Fetch SIX Control Code
0
0
0
Execute 24-bit Instruction,
Fetch Next Control Code
PGD = Input
FIGURE 11-3:
1
REGOUT SERIAL EXECUTION
2
3
4
1
2
7
8
1
2
3
4
6
5
11
12
13 14 15 16
1
2
3
4
PGC
P4
PGD
1
0
0
LSb 1
0
Execute Previous Instruction,
Fetch REGOUT Control Code
PGD = Input
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
P4a
P5
CPU Held In Idle
2
3
4
...
10 11
12 13 14 MSb
Shift Out VISI Register <15:0>
PGD = Output
0
0
0
0
No Execution Takes Place,
Fetch Next Control Code
PGD = Input
DS70102K-page 35
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.3
Entering ICSP Mode
The ICSP mode is entered by holding PGC and PGD
low, raising MCLR/VPP to VIHH (high voltage), and then
performing additional steps as illustrated in Figure 114.
Note 1: The sequence that places the device into
ICSP mode places all unused I/O pins to
the high-impedance state.
2: Once ICSP mode is entered, the PC is
set to 0x0 (the Reset vector).
3: Before leaving the Reset vector, execute
two GOTO instructions, followed by a
single NOP instruction must be executed.
FIGURE 11-4:
ENTERING ICSP™ MODE
P6
4 ms
10 μs
4 ms
VIHH
MCLR/VPP
VDD
PGD
Execute 2 NOP instructions
0
0 0 0
PGC
DS70102K-page 36
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.4
Flash Memory Programming in
ICSP Mode
Programming in ICSP mode is described in
Section 11.4.1 “Programming Operations” through
Section 11.4.3 “Starting and Stopping a Programming Cycle”. Step-by-step procedures are described
in Section 11.5 “Erasing Program Memory in
Normal-Voltage Systems” through Section 11.13
“Reading the Application ID Word”. All programming
operations must use serial execution, as described in
Section 11.2 “ICSP Operation”.
11.4.1
PROGRAMMING OPERATIONS
Flash memory write and erase operations are
controlled by the NVMCON register. Programming is
performed by setting NVMCON to select the type of
erase operation (Table 11-2) or write operation
(Table 11-3), writing a key sequence to enable the
programming and initiating the programming by setting
the WR control bit, NVMCON<15>.
In ICSP mode, all programming operations are
externally timed. An external 2 ms delay must be used
between setting the WR control bit and clearing the WR
control bit to complete the programming operation.
TABLE 11-2:
NVMCON
Value
NVMCON ERASE
OPERATIONS
TABLE 11-3:
NVMCON
Value
Erase all code memory, data memory
(does not erase UNIT ID).
0x4075
Erase 1 row (16 words) of data
EEPROM.
0x4074
Erase 1 word of data EEPROM.
0x4072
Erase all executive memory.
0x4071
Erase 1 row (32 instruction words)
from 1 panel of code memory.
0x406E
Erase Boot Secure and General
Segments, then erase FBS, FSS and
FGS configuration registers.
0x4066
Erase all Data EEPROM allocated to
Boot Segment.
0x405E
Erase Secure and General Segments,
then erase FSS and FGS configuration
registers.
0x4056
Erase all Data EEPROM allocated to
Secure Segment.
0x404E
Erase General Segment, then erase
FGS configuration register.
0x4046
Erase all Data EEPROM allocated to
General Segment.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
Write Operation
0x4008
Write 1 word to configuration
memory.
0x4005
Write 1 row (16 words) to data memory.
0x4004
Write 1 word to data memory.
0x4001
Write 1 row (32 instruction words) into
1 panel of program memory.
11.4.2
UNLOCKING NVMCON FOR
PROGRAMMING
Writes to the WR bit (NVMCON<15>) are locked to
prevent accidental programming from taking place.
Writing a key sequence to the NVMKEY register
unlocks the WR bit and allows it to be written to. The
unlock sequence is performed as follows:
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
Note:
11.4.3
Erase Operation
0x407F
NVMCON WRITE
OPERATIONS
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Any working register, or working register
pair, can be used to write the unlock
sequence.
STARTING AND STOPPING A
PROGRAMMING CYCLE
Once the unlock key sequence has been written to the
NVMKEY register, the WR bit (NVMCON<15>) is used
to start and stop an erase or write cycle. Setting the WR
bit initiates the programming cycle. Clearing the WR bit
terminates the programming cycle.
All erase and write cycles must be externally timed. An
external delay must be used between setting and
clearing the WR bit. Starting and stopping a
programming cycle is performed as follows:
BSET
NVMCON, #WR
<Wait 2 ms>
BCLR
NVMCON, #WR
11.5
Erasing Program Memory in
Normal-Voltage Systems
The procedure for erasing program memory (all code
memory, data memory, executive memory and codeprotect bits) consists of setting NVMCON to 0x407F,
unlocking NVMCON for erasing and then executing the
programming cycle. This method of bulk erasing program memory only works for systems where VDD is
between 4.5 volts and 5.5 volts. The method for erasing
program memory for systems with a lower VDD (3.0
volts-4.5 volts) is described in Section 6.1 “Erasing
Memory”.
DS70102K-page 37
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
Table 11-4 shows the ICSP programming process for
bulk-erasing program memory. This process includes
the ICSP command code, which must be transmitted
(for each instruction) to the Least Significant bit first
using the PGC and PGD pins (see Figure 11-2).
If an individual Segment Erase operation is required,
the NVMCON value must be replaced by the value for
the corresponding Segment Erase operation.
Note:
Program memory must be erased before
writing any data to program memory.
TABLE 11-4:
Command
(Binary)
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR BULK ERASING PROGRAM MEMORY
(ONLY IN NORMAL-VOLTAGE SYSTEMS)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Set NVMCON to program the FBS Configuration register.(1)
0000
0000
24008A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4008, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 3: Initialize the TBLPAG and write pointer (W7) for TBLWT instruction for Configuration register.(1)
0000
0000
0000
200F80
880190
200067
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0xF8, W0
W0, TBLPAG
#0x6, W7
Step 4: Load the Configuration Register data to W6.(1)
0000
0000
EB0300
000000
CLR
NOP
W6
Step 5: Load the Configuration Register write latch. Advance W7 to point to next Configuration register.(1)
0000
BB1B86
TBLWTL W6, [W7++]
Step 6: Unlock the NVMCON for programming the Configuration register.(1)
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
200AA9
883B38
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
#0xAA, W9
W8, NVMKEY
W9, NVMKEY
Step 7: Initiate the programming cycle.(1)
0000
0000
0000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
A8E761
000000
000000
—
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time 2 ms
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Step 8: Repeat steps 5-7 one time to program 0x0000 to RESERVED2 Configuration register.(1)
Step 9: Set the NVMCON to erase all Program Memory.
00000
0000
2407FA
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x407F, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 10: Unlock the NVMCON for programming.
Note 1:
Steps 2-8 are only required for the dsPIC30F5011/5013 devices. These steps may be skipped for all other
devices in the dsPIC30F family.
DS70102K-page 38
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-4:
Command
(Binary)
0000
0000
0000
0000
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR BULK ERASING PROGRAM MEMORY
(ONLY IN NORMAL-VOLTAGE SYSTEMS) (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
Description
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 11: Initiate the erase cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
Note 1:
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P13a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Steps 2-8 are only required for the dsPIC30F5011/5013 devices. These steps may be skipped for all other
devices in the dsPIC30F family.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 39
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.6
Erasing Program Memory in
Low-Voltage Systems
The procedure for erasing program memory (all code
memory and data memory) in low-voltage systems
(with VDD between 2.5 volts and 4.5 volts) is quite
different than the procedure for erasing program
memory in normal-voltage systems. Instead of using a
Bulk Erase operation, each region of memory must be
individually erased by row. Namely, all of the code
memory, executive memory and data memory must be
erased one row at a time. This procedure is detailed in
Table 11-5.
TABLE 11-5:
Command
(Binary)
Due to security restrictions, the FBS, FSS and FGS
register cannot be erased in low-voltage systems.
Once any bits in the FGS register are programmed to
‘0’, they can only be set back to ‘1’ by performing a Bulk
Erase in a normal-voltage system. Alternatively, a Segment Erase operation can be performed instead of a
Bulk Erase.
Normal-voltage systems can also be used to erase
program memory as shown in Table 11-5. However,
since this method is more time-consuming and does
not clear the code-protect bits, it is not recommended.
Note:
Program memory must be erased before
writing any data to program memory.
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR ERASING PROGRAM MEMORY
(EITHER IN LOW-VOLTAGE OR NORMAL-VOLTAGE SYSTEMS)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize NVMADR and NVMADRU to erase code memory and initialize W7 for row address updates.
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0300
883B16
883B26
200407
CLR
MOV
MOV
MOV
W6
W6, NVMADR
W6, NVMADRU
#0x40, W7
Step 3: Set NVMCON to erase 1 row of code memory.
0000
0000
24071A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4071, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 4: Unlock the NVMCON to erase 1 row of code memory.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 5: Initiate the erase cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
DS70102K-page 40
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P13a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-5:
Command
(Binary)
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR ERASING PROGRAM MEMORY
(EITHER IN LOW-VOLTAGE OR NORMAL-VOLTAGE SYSTEMS) (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 6: Update the row address stored in NVMADRU:NVMADR. When W6 rolls over to 0x0, NVMADRU must be
incremented.
0000
0000
0000
0000
430307
AF0042
EC2764
883B16
ADD
BTSC
INC
MOV
W6, W7, W6
SR, #C
NVMADRU
W6, NVMADR
Step 7: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 8: Repeat Steps 3-7 until all rows of code memory are erased.
Step 9: Initialize NVMADR and NVMADRU to erase executive memory and initialize W7 for row address updates.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0300
883B16
200807
883B27
200407
CLR
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
W6
W6, NVMADR
#0x80, W7
W7, NVMADRU
#0x40, W7
Step 10: Set NVMCON to erase 1 row of executive memory.
0000
0000
24071A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4071, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 11: Unlock the NVMCON to erase 1 row of executive memory.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 12: Initiate the erase cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P13a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Step 13: Update the row address stored in NVMADR.
0000
0000
430307
883B16
ADD
MOV
W6, W7, W6
W6, NVMADR
Step 14: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 15: Repeat Steps 10-14 until all 24 rows of executive memory are erased.
Step 16: Initialize NVMADR and NVMADRU to erase data memory and initialize W7 for row address updates.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
2XXXX6
883B16
2007F6
883B16
200207
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#<lower 16-bits of starting Data EEPROM address>, W6
W6, NVMADR
#0x7F, W6
W6, NVMADRU
#0x20, W7
Step 17: Set NVMCON to erase 1 row of data memory.
0000
0000
24075A
883B0A
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
MOV
MOV
#0x4075, W10
W10, NVMCON
DS70102K-page 41
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-5:
Command
(Binary)
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR ERASING PROGRAM MEMORY
(EITHER IN LOW-VOLTAGE OR NORMAL-VOLTAGE SYSTEMS) (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 18: Unlock the NVMCON to erase 1 row of data memory.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 19: Initiate the erase cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P13a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Step 20: Update the row address stored in NVMADR.
0000
0000
430307
883B16
ADD
MOV
W6, W7, W6
W6, NVMADR
Step 21: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 22: Repeat Steps 17-21 until all rows of data memory are erased.
DS70102K-page 42
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.7
Writing Configuration Memory
The FOSC, FWDT, FBORPOR and FICD registers are
not erasable. It is recommended that all Configuration
registers be set to a default value after erasing program
memory. The FWDT, FBORPOR and FICD registers
can be set to a default all ‘1’s value by programming
0xFFFF to each register. Since these registers contain
unimplemented bits that read as ‘0’ the default values
shown in Table 11-6 will be read instead of 0xFFFF.
The recommended default FOSC value is 0xC100,
which selects the FRC clock oscillator setting.
The FGS, FBS and FSS Configuration registers are
special since they enable code protection for the
device. For security purposes, once any bit in these
registers is programmed to ‘0’ (to enable some code
protection feature), it can only be set back to ‘1’ by
performing a Bulk Erase or Segment Erase as
described in Section 11.5 “Erasing Program
Memory in Normal-Voltage Systems”. Programming
these bits from a ‘0’ to ‘1’ is not possible, but they may
be programmed from a ‘1’ to a ‘0’ to enable code
protection.
Table 11-7 shows the ICSP programming details for
clearing the Configuration registers. In Step 1, the
Reset vector is exited. In Step 2, the write pointer (W7)
is loaded with 0x0000, which is the original destination
address (in TBLPAG 0xF8 of program memory). In
Step 3, the NVMCON is set to program one Configura-
TABLE 11-7:
Command
(Binary)
tion register. In Step 4, the TBLPAG register is
initialized, to 0xF8, for writing to the Configuration
registers. In Step 5, the value to write to the each
Configuration register (0xFFFF) is loaded to W6. In
Step 6, the Configuration register data is written to the
write latch using the TBLWTL instruction. In Steps 7 and
8, the NVMCON is unlocked for programming and the
programming cycle is initiated, as described in
Section 11.4 “Flash Memory Programming in ICSP
Mode”. In Step 9, the internal PC is set to 0x100 as a
safety measure to prevent the PC from incrementing
into unimplemented memory. Lastly, Steps 3-9 are
repeated six times until all seven Configuration
registers are cleared.
TABLE 11-6:
DEFAULT CONFIGURATION
REGISTER VALUES
Address
Register
Default Value
0xF80000
FOSC
0xC100
0xF80002
FWDT
0x803F
0xF80004
FBORPOR
0x87B3
0xF80006
FBS
0x310F
0xF80008
FSS
0x330F
0xF8000A
FGS
0x0007
0xF8000C
FICD
0xC003
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR WRITING CONFIGURATION
REGISTERS
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize the write pointer (W7) for the TBLWT instruction.
0000
200007
MOV
#0x0000, W7
Step 3: Set the NVMCON to program 1 Configuration register.
0000
0000
24008A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4008, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 4: Initialize the TBLPAG register.
0000
0000
200F80
880190
MOV
MOV
#0xF8, W0
W0, TBLPAG
Step 5: Load the Configuration register data to W6.
0000
0000
2xxxx0
000000
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
MOV
NOP
#<CONFIG_VALUE>, W0
DS70102K-page 43
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-7:
Command
(Binary)
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR WRITING CONFIGURATION
REGISTERS (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 6: Write the Configuration register data to the write latch and increment the write pointer.
0000
0000
0000
BB1B96
000000
000000
TBLWTL W6, [W7++]
NOP
NOP
Step 7: Unlock the NVMCON for programming.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 8: Initiate the write cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P12a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Step 9: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 10: Repeat steps 3-9 until all 7 Configuration registers are cleared.
DS70102K-page 44
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.8
Writing Code Memory
The procedure for writing code memory is similar to the
procedure for clearing the Configuration registers,
except that 32 instruction words are programmed at a
time. To facilitate this operation, working registers
W0:W5 are used as temporary holding registers for the
data to be programmed.
Table 11-8 shows the ICSP programming details,
including the serial pattern with the ICSP command
code, which must be transmitted Least Significant bit
first using the PGC and PGD pins (see Figure 11-2). In
Step 1, the Reset vector is exited. In Step 2, the
NVMCON register is initialized for single-panel
programming of code memory. In Step 3, the 24-bit
starting destination address for programming is loaded
into the TBLPAG register and W7 register. The upper
byte of the starting destination address is stored to
TBLPAG, while the lower 16 bits of the destination
address are stored to W7.
To minimize the programming time, the same packed
instruction format that the programming executive uses
is utilized (Figure 8-2). In Step 4, four packed
instruction words are stored to working registers
W0:W5 using the MOV instruction and the read pointer
W6 is initialized. The contents of W0:W5 holding the
packed instruction word data is shown in Figure 11-4.
TABLE 11-8:
Command
(Binary)
In Step 5, eight TBLWT instructions are used to copy the
data from W0:W5 to the write latches of code memory.
Since code memory is programmed 32 instruction
words at a time, Steps 4 and 5 are repeated eight times
to load all the write latches (Step 6).
After the write latches are loaded, programming is
initiated by writing to the NVMKEY and NVMCON
registers in Steps 7 and 8. In Step 9, the internal PC is
reset to 0x100. This is a precautionary measure to
prevent the PC from incrementing into unimplemented
memory when large devices are being programmed.
Lastly, in Step 10, Steps 2-9 are repeated until all of
code memory is programmed.
FIGURE 11-5:
15
8
MSB1
0
MSB0
lsw1
W2
lsw2
W3
W4
7
lsw0
W0
W1
PACKED INSTRUCTION
WORDS IN W0:W5
MSB3
MSB2
lsw3
W5
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR WRITING CODE MEMORY
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Set the NVMCON to program 32 instruction words.
0000
0000
24001A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4001, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 3: Initialize the write pointer (W7) for TBLWT instruction.
0000
0000
0000
200xx0
880190
2xxxx7
MOV
MOV
MOV
#<DestinationAddress23:16>, W0
W0, TBLPAG
#<DestinationAddress15:0>, W7
Step 4: Initialize the read pointer (W6) and load W0:W5 with the next 4 instruction words to program.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
2xxxx0
2xxxx1
2xxxx2
2xxxx3
2xxxx4
2xxxx5
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#<LSW0>, W0
#<MSB1:MSB0>, W1
#<LSW1>, W2
#<LSW2>, W3
#<MSB3:MSB2>, W4
#<LSW3>, W5
DS70102K-page 45
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-8:
Command
(Binary)
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR WRITING CODE MEMORY (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 5: Set the read pointer (W6) and load the (next set of) write latches.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0300
000000
BB0BB6
000000
000000
BBDBB6
000000
000000
BBEBB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
BB0BB6
000000
000000
BBDBB6
000000
000000
BBEBB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
CLR
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
W6
[W6++], [W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [++W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [++W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
Step 6: Repeat steps 4-5 eight times to load the write latches for 32 instructions.
Step 7: Unlock the NVMCON for writing.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 8: Initiate the write cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET
NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P12a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR
NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Step 9: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 10: Repeat steps 2-9 until all code memory is programmed.
DS70102K-page 46
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.9
Writing Data EEPROM
during each operation, only working registers W0:W3
are used as temporary holding registers for the data to
be programmed.
The procedure for writing data EEPROM is very similar
to the procedure for writing code memory, except that
fewer words are programmed in each operation. When
writing data EEPROM, one row of data EEPROM is
programmed at a time. Each row consists of sixteen
16-bit data words. Since fewer words are programmed
TABLE 11-9:
Command
(Binary)
Table 11-9 shows the ICSP programming details for
writing data EEPROM. Note that a different NVMCON
value is required to write to data EEPROM, and that the
TBLPAG register is hard-coded to 0x7F (the upper byte
address of all locations of data EEPROM).
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR WRITING DATA EEPROM
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Set the NVMCON to write 16 data words.
0000
0000
24005A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4005, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 3: Initialize the write pointer (W7) for TBLWT instruction.
0000
0000
0000
2007F0
880190
2xxxx7
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x7F, W0
W0, TBLPAG
#<DestinationAddress15:0>, W7
Step 4: Load W0:W3 with the next 4 data words to program.
0000
0000
0000
0000
2xxxx0
2xxxx1
2xxxx2
2xxxx3
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#<WORD0>,
#<WORD1>,
#<WORD2>,
#<WORD3>,
W0
W1
W2
W3
Step 5: Set the read pointer (W6) and load the (next set of) write latches.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0300
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
CLR
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
W6
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
Step 6: Repeat steps 4-5 four times to load the write latches for 16 data words.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 47
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-9:
Command
(Binary)
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR WRITING DATA EEPROM (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 7: Unlock the NVMCON for writing.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 8: Initiate the write cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P12a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #WR
NOP
NOP
Step 9: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 10: Repeat steps 2-9 until all data memory is programmed.
DS70102K-page 48
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.10 Reading Code Memory
Reading from code memory is performed by executing
a series of TBLRD instructions and clocking out the data
using the REGOUT command. To ensure efficient
execution and facilitate verification on the programmer,
four instruction words are read from the device at a
time.
Table 11-10 shows the ICSP programming details for
reading code memory. In Step 1, the Reset vector is
exited. In Step 2, the 24-bit starting source address for
reading is loaded into the TBLPAG and W6 registers.
The upper byte of the starting source address is stored
to TBLPAG, while the lower 16 bits of the source
address are stored to W6.
To minimize the reading time, the packed instruction
word format that was utilized for writing is also used for
reading (see Figure 11-5). In Step 3, the write pointer
W7 is initialized, and four instruction words are read
from code memory and stored to working registers
W0:W5. In Step 4, the four instruction words are
clocked out of the device from the VISI register using
the REGOUT command. In Step 5, the internal PC is
reset to 0x100, as a precautionary measure, to prevent
the PC from incrementing into unimplemented memory
when large devices are being read. Lastly, in Step 6,
Steps 3-5 are repeated until the desired amount of
code memory is read.
TABLE 11-10: SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR READING CODE MEMORY
Command
(Binary)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize TBLPAG and the read pointer (W6) for TBLRD instruction.
0000
0000
0000
200xx0
880190
2xxxx6
MOV
MOV
MOV
#<SourceAddress23:16>, W0
W0, TBLPAG
#<SourceAddress15:0>, W6
Step 3: Initialize the write pointer (W7) and store the next four locations of code memory to W0:W5.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0380
000000
BA1B96
000000
000000
BADBB6
000000
000000
BADBD6
000000
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
BA1B96
000000
000000
BADBB6
000000
000000
BADBD6
000000
000000
BA0BB6
000000
000000
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
CLR
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
W7
[W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[++W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[++W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7]
DS70102K-page 49
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 11-10: SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR READING CODE MEMORY (CONTINUED)
Command
(Binary)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 4: Output W0:W5 using the VISI register and REGOUT command.
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
883C20
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C21
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C22
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C23
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C24
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C25
000000
<VISI>
000000
MOV W0, VISI
NOP
Clock out contents
NOP
MOV W1, VISI
NOP
Clock out contents
NOP
MOV W2, VISI
NOP
Clock out contents
NOP
MOV W3, VISI
NOP
Clock out contents
NOP
MOV W4, VISI
NOP
Clock out contents
NOP
MOV W5, VISI
NOP
Clock out contents
NOP
of VISI register
of VISI register
of VISI register
of VISI register
of VISI register
of VISI register
Step 5: Reset the device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 6: Repeat steps 3-5 until all desired code memory is read.
DS70102K-page 50
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.11 Reading Configuration Memory
The procedure for reading configuration memory is
similar to the procedure for reading code memory,
except that 16-bit data words are read instead of 24-bit
words. Since there are seven Configuration registers,
they are read one register at a time.
TABLE 11-11:
Command
(Binary)
Table 11-11 shows the ICSP programming details for
reading all of the configuration memory. Note that the
TBLPAG register is hard-coded to 0xF8 (the upper byte
address of configuration memory), and the read pointer
W6 is initialized to 0x0000.
SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR READING ALL CONFIGURATION MEMORY
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize TBLPAG, and the read pointer (W6) and the write pointer (W7) for TBLRD instruction.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
200F80
880190
EB0300
EB0380
000000
MOV
MOV
CLR
CLR
NOP
#0xF8, W0
W0, TBLPAG
W6
W7
Step 3: Read the Configuration register and write it to the VISI register (located at 0x784).
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
BA0BB6
000000
000000
883C20
000000
TBLRDL [W6++], [W7]
NOP
NOP
MOV
W0, VISI
NOP
Step 4: Output the VISI register using the REGOUT command.
0001
0000
<VISI>
000000
Clock out contents of VISI register
NOP
Step 5: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 6: Repeat steps 3-5 six times to read all of configuration memory.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 51
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.12 Reading Data Memory
The procedure for reading data memory is similar to
that of reading code memory, except that 16-bit data
words are read instead of 24-bit words. Since less data
is read in each operation, only working registers
W0:W3 are used as temporary holding registers for the
data to be read.
Table 11-12 shows the ICSP programming details for
reading data memory. Note that the TBLPAG register is
hard-coded to 0x7F (the upper byte address of all
locations of data memory).
TABLE 11-12: SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR READING DATA MEMORY
Command
(Binary)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize TBLPAG and the read pointer (W6) for TBLRD instruction.
0000
0000
0000
2007F0
880190
2xxxx6
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x7F, W0
W0, TBLPAG
#<SourceAddress15:0>, W6
Step 3: Initialize the write pointer (W7) and store the next four locations of code memory to W0:W5.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0380
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
CLR
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
W7
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
Step 4: Output W0:W5 using the VISI register and REGOUT command.
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0000
0001
0000
883C20
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C21
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C22
000000
<VISI>
000000
883C23
000000
<VISI>
000000
MOV
NOP
Clock
NOP
MOV
NOP
Clock
NOP
MOV
NOP
Clock
NOP
MOV
NOP
Clock
NOP
W0, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W1, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W2, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W3, VISI
out contents of VISI register
Step 5: Reset device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 6: Repeat steps 3-5 until all desired data memory is read.
DS70102K-page 52
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
11.13 Reading the Application ID Word
11.14 Exiting ICSP Mode
The application ID word is stored at address 0x8005BE
in executive code memory. To read this memory
location, you must use the SIX control code to move
this program memory location to the VISI register. The
REGOUT control code must then be used to clock the
contents of the VISI register out of the device. The
corresponding control and instruction codes that must
be serially transmitted to the device to perform this
operation are shown in Table 11-13.
After confirming that the programming executive is
resident in memory, or loading the programming
executive, ICSP mode is exited by removing power to
the device or bringing MCLR to VIL. Programming can
then take place by following the procedure outlined in
Section 5.0 “Device Programming”.
Once the programmer has clocked-out the application
ID word, it must be inspected. If the application ID has
the value 0xBB, the programming executive is resident
in memory and the device can be programmed using
the mechanism described in Section 5.0 “Device
Programming”. However, if the application ID has any
other value, the programming executive is not resident
in memory. It must be loaded to memory before the
device can be programmed. The procedure for loading
the programming executive to the memory is described
in Section 12.0 “Programming the Programming
Executive to Memory”.
TABLE 11-13: SERIAL INSTRUCTION EXECUTION FOR READING THE APPLICATION ID WORD
Command
(Binary)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize TBLPAG and the read pointer (W0) for TBLRD instruction.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
200800
880190
205BE0
207841
000000
BA0890
000000
000000
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
#0x80, W0
W0, TBLPAG
#0x5BE, W0
VISI, W1
[W0], [W1]
Step 3: Output the VISI register using the REGOUT command.
0001
0000
<VISI>
000000
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
Clock out contents of the VISI register
NOP
DS70102K-page 53
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
12.0
PROGRAMMING THE
PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
TO MEMORY
12.1
Overview
Storing the programming executive to executive
memory is similar to normal programming of code
memory. The executive memory must first be erased,
and then the programming executive must be
programmed 32 words at a time. This control flow is
summarized in Table 12-1.
If it is determined that the programming executive does
not reside in executive memory (as described in
Section 4.0 “Confirming the Contents of Executive
Memory”), it must be programmed into executive
memory using ICSP and the techniques described in
Section 11.0 “ICSP™ Mode”.
TABLE 12-1:
Command
(Binary)
PROGRAMMING THE PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector and erase executive memory.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize the NVMCON to erase executive memory.
0000
0000
24072A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4072, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 3: Unlock the NVMCON for programming.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 4: Initiate the erase cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #15
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P13a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #15
NOP
NOP
Step 5: Initialize the TBLPAG and the write pointer (W7).
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
200800
880190
EB0380
000000
000000
MOV
MOV
CLR
NOP
NOP
#0x80, W0
W0, TBLPAG
W7
Step 6: Initialize the NVMCON to program 32 instruction words.
0000
0000
24001A
883B0A
MOV
MOV
#0x4001, W10
W10, NVMCON
Step 7: Load W0:W5 with the next 4 words of packed programming executive code and initialize W6 for
programming. Programming starts from the base of executive memory (0x800000) using W6 as a read
pointer and W7 as a write pointer.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
2<LSW0>0
2<MSB1:MSB0>1
2<LSW1>2
2<LSW2>3
2<MSB3:MSB2>4
2<LSW3>5
DS70102K-page 54
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#<LSW0>, W0
#<MSB1:MSB0>, W1
#<LSW1>, W2
#<LSW2>, W3
#<MSB3:MSB2>, W4
#<LSW3>, W5
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 12-1:
Command
(Binary)
PROGRAMMING THE PROGRAMMING EXECUTIVE (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 8: Set the read pointer (W6) and load the (next four write) latches.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0300
000000
BB0BB6
000000
000000
BBDBB6
000000
000000
BBEBB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
BB0BB6
000000
000000
BBDBB6
000000
000000
BBEBB6
000000
000000
BB1BB6
000000
000000
CLR
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLWTL
NOP
NOP
W6
[W6++], [W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [++W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6++], [++W7]
[W6++], [W7++]
Step 9: Repeat Steps 7-8 eight times to load the write latches for the 32 instructions.
Step 10: Unlock the NVMCON for programming.
0000
0000
0000
0000
200558
883B38
200AA9
883B39
MOV
MOV
MOV
MOV
#0x55, W8
W8, NVMKEY
#0xAA, W9
W9, NVMKEY
Step 11: Initiate the programming cycle.
0000
0000
0000
—
A8E761
000000
000000
—
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
000000
000000
A9E761
000000
000000
BSET NVMCON, #15
NOP
NOP
Externally time ‘P12a’ ms (see Section 13.0 “AC/DC Characteristics and
Timing Requirements”)
NOP
NOP
BCLR NVMCON, #15
NOP
NOP
Step 12: Reset the device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 13: Repeat Steps 7-12 until all 23 rows of executive memory are programmed.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 55
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
12.2
Programming Verification
After the programming executive has been
programmed to executive memory using ICSP, it must
be verified. Verification is performed by reading out the
contents of executive memory and comparing it with
the image of the programming executive stored in the
programmer.
TABLE 12-2:
Command
(Binary)
Reading the contents of executive memory can be
performed using the same technique described in
Section 11.10 “Reading Code Memory”. A
procedure for reading executive memory is shown in
Table 12-2. Note that in Step 2, the TBLPAG register is
set to 0x80 such that executive memory may be read.
READING EXECUTIVE MEMORY
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 1: Exit the Reset vector.
0000
0000
0000
040100
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 2: Initialize TBLPAG and the read pointer (W6) for TBLRD instruction.
0000
0000
0000
200800
880190
EB0300
MOV
MOV
CLR
#0x80, W0
W0, TBLPAG
W6
Step 3: Initialize the write pointer (W7), and store the next four locations of executive memory to W0:W5.
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
EB0380
000000
BA1B96
000000
000000
BADBB6
000000
000000
BADBD6
000000
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
BA1B96
000000
000000
BADBB6
000000
000000
BADBD6
000000
000000
BA1BB6
000000
000000
DS70102K-page 56
CLR
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDH.B
NOP
NOP
TBLRDL
NOP
NOP
W7
[W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[++W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7++]
[++W6], [W7++]
[W6++], [W7]
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 12-2:
Command
(Binary)
READING EXECUTIVE MEMORY (CONTINUED)
Data
(Hexadecimal)
Description
Step 4: Output W0:W5 using the VISI register and REGOUT command.
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0001
0000
0000
0001
883C20
000000
—
883C21
000000
—
883C22
000000
—
883C23
000000
—
883C24
000000
—
883C25
000000
—
MOV
NOP
Clock
MOV
NOP
Clock
MOV
NOP
Clock
MOV
NOP
Clock
MOV
NOP
Clock
MOV
NOP
Clock
W0, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W1, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W2, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W3, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W4, VISI
out contents of VISI register
W5, VISI
out contents of VISI register
Step 5: Reset the device internal PC.
0000
0000
040100
000000
GOTO 0x100
NOP
Step 6: Repeat Steps 3-5 until all 736 instruction words of executive memory are read.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 57
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
13.0
AC/DC CHARACTERISTICS AND TIMING REQUIREMENTS
TABLE 13-1:
AC/DC CHARACTERISTICS
Standard Operating Conditions
(unless otherwise stated)
Operating Temperature: 25° C is recommended
AC/DC CHARACTERISTICS
Param.
No.
Sym
Characteristic
Min
Max
Units
Conditions
9.00
13.25
V
—
D110
VIHH
High Programming Voltage on MCLR/VPP
D112
IPP
Programming Current on MCLR/VPP
—
300
μA
D113
IDDP
Supply Current during programming
—
30
mA
Row Erase
Program
memory
—
30
mA
Row Erase
Data EEPROM
Bulk Erase
—
—
30
mA
D001
VDD
Supply voltage
2.5
5.5
V
—
D002
VDDBULK
Supply voltage for Bulk Erase
programming
4.5
5.5
V
—
D031
VIL
Input Low Voltage
VSS
0.2 VSS
V
—
D041
VIH
Input High Voltage
0.8 VDD
VDD
V
—
D080
VOL
Output Low Voltage
—
0.6
V
IOL = 8.5 mA
D090
VOH
Output High Voltage
VDD - 0.7
—
V
IOH = -3.0 mA
D012
CIO
Capacitive Loading on I/O Pin (PGD)
—
50
pF
To meet AC
specifications
P1
TSCLK
Serial Clock (PGC) period
50
—
ns
ICSP™ mode
1
—
μs
Enhanced
ICSP mode
20
—
ns
ICSP mode
400
—
ns
Enhanced
ICSP mode
P1a
P1b
TSCLKL
TSCLKH
Serial Clock (PGC) low time
Serial Clock (PGC) high time
20
—
ns
ICSP mode
400
—
ns
Enhanced
ICSP mode
Input Data Setup Timer to PGC ↓
15
—
ns
—
P2
TSET1
P3
THLD1
Input Data Hold Time from PGC ↓
15
—
ns
—
P4
TDLY1
Delay between 4-bit command and
command operand
20
—
ns
—
P4a
TDLY1a
Delay between 4-bit command operand
and next 4-bit command
20
—
ns
—
P5
TDLY2
Delay between last PGC ↓ of command to
first PGC ↑ of VISI output
20
—
ns
—
P6
TSET2
VDD ↑ setup time to MCLR/VPP
100
—
ns
—
2
—
μs
ICSP mode
5
—
ms
Enhanced
ICSP mode
P7
THLD2
Input data hold time from MCLR/VPP ↑
P8
TDLY3
Delay between last PGC ↓ of command
word to PGD driven ↑ by programming
executive
20
—
μs
—
P9a
TDLY4
Programming Executive Command
processing time
10
—
μs
—
DS70102K-page 58
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE 13-1:
AC/DC CHARACTERISTICS (CONTINUED)
Standard Operating Conditions
(unless otherwise stated)
Operating Temperature: 25° C is recommended
AC/DC CHARACTERISTICS
Param.
No.
Sym
Characteristic
Min
Max
Units
Conditions
P9b
TDLY5
Delay between PGD ↓ by programming
executive to PGD released by
programming executive
15
—
μs
—
P10
TDLY6
Delay between PGD released by
programming executive to first PGC ↑ of
response
5
—
μs
—
P11
TDLY7
Delay between clocking out response
words
10
—
μs
—
P12a
TPROG
Row Programming cycle time
1
4
ms
ICSP mode
P12b
TPROG
Row Programming cycle time
0.8
2.6
ms
Enhanced
ICSP mode
P13a
TERA
Bulk/Row Erase cycle time
1
4
ms
ICSP mode
P13b
TERA
Bulk/Row Erase cycle time
0.8
2.6
ms
Enhanced
ICSP mode
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 59
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
APPENDIX A:
A.1
DEVICE-SPECIFIC
INFORMATION
Checksum Computation
The checksum computation is described in Section 6.8
“Checksum Computation”. Table A-1 shows how this
16-bit computation can be made for each dsPIC30F
device. Computations for read code protection are
shown both enabled and disabled. The checksum
values assume that the Configuration registers are also
erased. However, when code protection is enabled, the
value of the FGS register is assumed to be 0x5.
TABLE A-1:
Device
A.2
A.2.1
dsPIC30F5011 and dsPIC30F5013
ICSP PROGRAMMING
The dsPIC30F5011 and dsPIC30F5013 processors
require that the FBS and FSS registers be programmed
with 0x0000 before the device is chip erased. The steps
to perform this action are shown in Table 11-4.
A.2.2
ENHANCED ICSP PROGRAMMING
The dsPIC30F5011 and dsPIC30F5013 processors
require that the FBS and FSS registers be programmed
with 0x0000 using the PROGC command before the
ERASEB command is used to erase the chip.
CHECKSUM COMPUTATION
Read Code
Protection
Checksum Computation
CFGB+SUM(0:001FFF)
Erased
Value
Value with
0xAAAAAA at 0x0
and Last
Code Address
0xD406
0xD208
dsPIC30F2010
Disabled
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F2011
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:001FFF)
0xD406
0xD208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F2012
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:001FFF)
0xD406
0xD208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F3010
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:003FFF)
0xA406
0xA208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F3011
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:003FFF)
0xA406
0xA208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F3012
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:003FFF)
0xA406
0xA208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F3013
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:003FFF)
0xA406
0xA208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F3014
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:003FFF)
0xA406
0xA208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F4011
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:007FFF)
0x4406
0x4208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F4012
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:007FFF)
0x4406
0x4208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F4013
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:007FFF)
0x4406
0x4208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F5011
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:00AFFF)
0xFC06
0xFA08
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F5013
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:00AFFF)
0xFC06
0xFA08
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:00AFFF)
0xFC06
0xFA08
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
dsPIC30F5015
Item Description:
SUM(a:b) = Byte sum of locations a to b inclusive (all 3 bytes of code memory)
CFGB
= Configuration Block (masked) = Byte sum of ((FOSC&0xC10F) + (FWDT&0x803F) +
(FBORPOR&0x87B3) + (FBS&0x310F) + (FSS&0x330F) + (FGS&0x0007) + (FICD&0xC003))
DS70102K-page 60
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
TABLE A-1:
Device
dsPIC30F5016
dsPIC30F6010
dsPIC30F6010A
dsPIC30F6011
dsPIC30F6011A
dsPIC30F6012
dsPIC30F6012A
dsPIC30F6013
dsPIC30F6013A
dsPIC30F6014
dsPIC30F6014A
dsPIC30F6015
CHECKSUM COMPUTATION (CONTINUED)
Read Code
Protection
Checksum Computation
Erased
Value
Value with
0xAAAAAA at 0x0
and Last
Code Address
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:00AFFF)
0xFC06
0xFA08
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:015FFF)
0xF406
0xF208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:015FFF)
0xF406
0xF208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:015FFF)
0xF406
0xF208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:015FFF)
0xF406
0xF208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Disabled
CFGB+SUM(0:017FFF)
0xC406
0xC208
Enabled
CFGB
0x0404
0x0404
Item Description:
SUM(a:b) = Byte sum of locations a to b inclusive (all 3 bytes of code memory)
CFGB
= Configuration Block (masked) = Byte sum of ((FOSC&0xC10F) + (FWDT&0x803F) +
(FBORPOR&0x87B3) + (FBS&0x310F) + (FSS&0x330F) + (FGS&0x0007) + (FICD&0xC003))
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 61
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
APPENDIX B:
HEX FILE FORMAT
Flash programmers process the standard HEX format
used by the Microchip development tools. The format
supported is the Intel® HEX 32 Format (INHX32).
Please refer to Appendix A in the “MPASM User’s
Guide” (DS33014) for more information about hex file
formats.
The basic format of the hex file is:
:BBAAAATTHHHH...HHHHCC
Each data record begins with a 9-character prefix and
always ends with a 2-character checksum. All records
begin with ‘:’ regardless of the format. The individual
elements are described below.
• BB - is a two-digit hexadecimal byte count
representing the number of data bytes that appear
on the line. Divide this number by two to get the
number of words per line.
• AAAA - is a four-digit hexadecimal address
representing the starting address of the data
record. Format is high byte first followed by low
byte. The address is doubled because this format
only supports 8-bits. Divide the value by two to
find the real device address.
• TT - is a two-digit record type that will be ‘00’ for
data records, ‘01’ for end-of-file records and ‘04’
for extended-address record.
• HHHH - is a four-digit hexadecimal data word. Format is low byte followed by high byte. There will
be BB/2 data words following TT.
• CC - is a two-digit hexadecimal checksum that is
the two’s complement of the sum of all the
preceding bytes in the line record.
DS70102K-page 62
Because the Intel hex file format is byte-oriented, and
the 16-bit program counter is not, program memory
sections require special treatment. Each 24-bit
program word is extended to 32 bits by inserting a socalled “phantom byte”. Each program memory address
is multiplied by 2 to yield a byte address.
As an example, a section that is located at 0x100 in
program memory will be represented in the hex file as
0x200.
The hex file will be produced with the following contents:
:020000040000fa
:040200003322110096
:00000001FF
Notice that the data record (line 2) has a load address
of 0200, while the source code specified address
0x100. Note also that the data is represented in “littleendian” format, meaning the Least Significant Byte
(LSB) appears first. The phantom byte appears last,
just before the checksum.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
APPENDIX C:
Note:
REVISION HISTORY
Revision histories were not recorded for
revisions A through H. The previous
revision (J), was published in August
2007.
Revision K (November 2010)
This version of the document includes the following
updates:
• Added Note three to Section 5.2 “Entering
Enhanced ICSP Mode”
• Updated the first paragraph of Section 10.0
“Device ID”
• Updated Table 10-1: Device IDs
• Removed the VARIANT bit and updated the bit
definition for the DEVID register in Table 10-2:
dsPIC30F Device ID Registers
• Removed the VARIANT bit and updated the bit
field definition and description for the DEVID
register in Table 10-3: Device ID Bits Description
• Updated Note 3 in Section 11.3 “Entering ICSP
Mode”
• Updated Step 11 in Table 11-4: Serial Instruction
Execution for BUlk Erasing Program Memory
(Only in Normal-voltage Systems)
• Updated Steps 5, 12 and 19 in Table 11-5: Serial
Instruction Execution for Erasing Program
Memory (Either in Low-voltage or Normal-voltage
Systems)
• Updated Steps 5, 6 and 8 in Table 11-7: Serial
Instruction Execution for Writing Configuration
Registers
• Updated Steps 6 and 8 in Table 11-8: Serial
Instruction Execution for Writing Code Memory
• Updated Steps 6 and 8 in Table 11-9: Serial
Instruction Execution for Writing Data EEPROM
• Updated Entering ICSP™ Mode (see Figure 11-4)
• Updated Steps 4 and 11 in Table 12-1:
Programming the Programming Executive
• Renamed parameters: P12 to P12a and P13 to
P13a, and added parameters P12b and P13b in
Table 13-1: AC/DC Characteristics
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 63
dsPIC30F Flash Programming Specification
NOTES:
DS70102K-page 64
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
Note the following details of the code protection feature on Microchip devices:
•
Microchip products meet the specification contained in their particular Microchip Data Sheet.
•
Microchip believes that its family of products is one of the most secure families of its kind on the market today, when used in the
intended manner and under normal conditions.
•
There are dishonest and possibly illegal methods used to breach the code protection feature. All of these methods, to our
knowledge, require using the Microchip products in a manner outside the operating specifications contained in Microchip’s Data
Sheets. Most likely, the person doing so is engaged in theft of intellectual property.
•
Microchip is willing to work with the customer who is concerned about the integrity of their code.
•
Neither Microchip nor any other semiconductor manufacturer can guarantee the security of their code. Code protection does not
mean that we are guaranteeing the product as “unbreakable.”
Code protection is constantly evolving. We at Microchip are committed to continuously improving the code protection features of our
products. Attempts to break Microchip’s code protection feature may be a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If such acts
allow unauthorized access to your software or other copyrighted work, you may have a right to sue for relief under that Act.
Information contained in this publication regarding device
applications and the like is provided only for your convenience
and may be superseded by updates. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your application meets with your specifications.
MICROCHIP MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR
WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WHETHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, WRITTEN OR ORAL, STATUTORY OR
OTHERWISE, RELATED TO THE INFORMATION,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ITS CONDITION,
QUALITY, PERFORMANCE, MERCHANTABILITY OR
FITNESS FOR PURPOSE. Microchip disclaims all liability
arising from this information and its use. Use of Microchip
devices in life support and/or safety applications is entirely at
the buyer’s risk, and the buyer agrees to defend, indemnify and
hold harmless Microchip from any and all damages, claims,
suits, or expenses resulting from such use. No licenses are
conveyed, implicitly or otherwise, under any Microchip
intellectual property rights.
Trademarks
The Microchip name and logo, the Microchip logo, dsPIC,
KEELOQ, KEELOQ logo, MPLAB, PIC, PICmicro, PICSTART,
PIC32 logo, rfPIC and UNI/O are registered trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
FilterLab, Hampshire, HI-TECH C, Linear Active Thermistor,
MXDEV, MXLAB, SEEVAL and The Embedded Control
Solutions Company are registered trademarks of Microchip
Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Application Maestro, CodeGuard,
dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net, dsPICworks, dsSPEAK, ECAN,
ECONOMONITOR, FanSense, HI-TIDE, In-Circuit Serial
Programming, ICSP, Mindi, MiWi, MPASM, MPLAB Certified
logo, MPLIB, MPLINK, mTouch, Omniscient Code
Generation, PICC, PICC-18, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit,
PICtail, REAL ICE, rfLAB, Select Mode, Total Endurance,
TSHARC, UniWinDriver, WiperLock and ZENA are
trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the
U.S.A. and other countries.
SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their
respective companies.
© 2010, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in the
U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
Printed on recycled paper.
ISBN: 978-1-60932-636-4
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2002 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona; Gresham, Oregon and design centers in California
and India. The Company’s quality system processes and procedures
are for its PIC® MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping
devices, Serial EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and
analog products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design
and manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS70102K-page 65
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08/04/10
DS70102K-page 66
© 2010 Microchip Technology Inc.
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