DAP Connector

AURIX™, TriCore™, XC2000, XE166,
XC800 Families
DAP Connector
AP24003
Application Note
V1.4, 2014-05
Microcontrollers
Edition 2014-05
Published by
Infineon Technologies AG
81726 Munich, Germany
© 2014 Infineon Technologies AG
All Rights Reserved.
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DAP Connector
AP24003
Trademarks of Infineon Technologies AG
AURIX™, C166™, CanPAK™, CIPOS™, CIPURSE™, EconoPACK™, CoolMOS™, CoolSET™,
CORECONTROL™, CROSSAVE™, DAVE™, DI-POL™, EasyPIM™, EconoBRIDGE™, EconoDUAL™,
EconoPIM™, EconoPACK™, EiceDRIVER™, eupec™, FCOS™, HITFET™, HybridPACK™, I²RF™,
ISOFACE™, IsoPACK™, MIPAQ™, ModSTACK™, my-d™, NovalithIC™, OptiMOS™, ORIGA™,
POWERCODE™; PRIMARION™, PrimePACK™, PrimeSTACK™, PRO-SIL™, PROFET™, RASIC™,
ReverSave™, SatRIC™, SIEGET™, SINDRION™, SIPMOS™, SmartLEWIS™, SOLID FLASH™, TEMPFET™,
thinQ!™, TRENCHSTOP™, TriCore™.
Other Trademarks
Advance Design System™ (ADS) of Agilent Technologies, AMBA™, ARM™, MULTI-ICE™, KEIL™,
PRIMECELL™, REALVIEW™, THUMB™, µVision™ of ARM Limited, UK. AUTOSAR™ is licensed by AUTOSAR
development partnership. Bluetooth™ of Bluetooth SIG Inc. CAT-iq™ of DECT Forum. COLOSSUS™,
FirstGPS™ of Trimble Navigation Ltd. EMV™ of EMVCo, LLC (Visa Holdings Inc.). EPCOS™ of Epcos AG.
FLEXGO™ of Microsoft Corporation. FlexRay™ is licensed by FlexRay Consortium. HYPERTERMINAL™ of
Hilgraeve Incorporated. IEC™ of Commission Electrotechnique Internationale. IrDA™ of Infrared Data
Association Corporation. ISO™ of INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION. MATLAB™ of
MathWorks, Inc. MAXIM™ of Maxim Integrated Products, Inc. MICROTEC™, NUCLEUS™ of Mentor Graphics
Corporation. MIPI™ of MIPI Alliance, Inc. MIPS™ of MIPS Technologies, Inc., USA. muRata™ of MURATA
MANUFACTURING CO., MICROWAVE OFFICE™ (MWO) of Applied Wave Research Inc., OmniVision™ of
OmniVision Technologies, Inc. Openwave™ Openwave Systems Inc. RED HAT™ Red Hat, Inc. RFMD™ RF
Micro Devices, Inc. SIRIUS™ of Sirius Satellite Radio Inc. SOLARIS™ of Sun Microsystems, Inc. SPANSION™
of Spansion LLC Ltd. Symbian™ of Symbian Software Limited. TAIYO YUDEN™ of Taiyo Yuden Co.
TEAKLITE™ of CEVA, Inc. TEKTRONIX™ of Tektronix Inc. TOKO™ of TOKO KABUSHIKI KAISHA TA. UNIX™
of X/Open Company Limited. VERILOG™, PALLADIUM™ of Cadence Design Systems, Inc. VLYNQ™ of Texas
Instruments Incorporated. VXWORKS™, WIND RIVER™ of WIND RIVER SYSTEMS, INC. ZETEX™ of Diodes
Zetex Limited.
Last Trademarks Update 2011-11-11
Application Note
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V1.4, 2014-05
DAP Connector
AP24003
Revision History
Revision History
DAP
Revision History: V1.4 2014-05
Previous Version(s): V1.0, V1.1, V1.2, V1.3
Page
Subjects (major changes since last revision)
12
FM modulation of DAP clock recommended for high-speed DAP
13
Table 6-1 added with DAP connector pinning for AURIX™
We Listen to Your Comments
Is there any information in this document that you feel is wrong, unclear or missing?
Your feedback will help us to continuously improve the quality of this document.
Please send your proposal (including a reference to this document) to:
[email protected]
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Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Revision History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1
1.1
1.2
1.3
About this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scope and purpose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Intended audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
DAP Physical Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3
Pin Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
4
User Pins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5
5.1
5.2
5.3
DAP/SPD Enabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DAP Enabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SPD Enabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SPD or DAP Enabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10
10
10
11
6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Target System Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High Speed DAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AURIX™ / TriCore™ Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
XC2000 / XE166 Families . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
XC800 Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12
12
13
14
14
Application Note
5
6
6
6
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AP24003
About this document
1
About this document
1.1
Scope and purpose
Infineon’s DAP (Device Access Port) is a two-wire tool access port for microcontrollers and similar devices. It
allows robust high speed connections over a long cable for automotive applications.
SPD (Single Pin DAP) is a single wire DAP variant for low pin count devices.
This document describes the connector, it’s pins, how to enable DAP, and some guidelines on integration.
1.2
Intended audience
This document is intended for PCB designers and tool vendors.
1.3
Related documentation
For more detailed informations about DAP/SPD please refer to the DAP/SPD section in the target device
documentation.
•
Samtec FTSH series documentation (www.samtec.com)
•
DAS Product Brief (www.infineon.com/DAS)
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DAP Connector
AP24003
DAP Physical Connector
2
DAP Physical Connector
On the target board the standard connector is a 0.05 inch double row, 10 pin micro terminal with keying shroud.
There are many varieties of these, such as the Samtec FTSH-105-01-L-DV-K for example. It is offered as a
standard dual row header 1.27 mm x 1.27 mm with 0.4 mm square pins.
The figure below shows the DAP pinout top-view of the connector on the target board. The keying shroud is on
the side with the uneven pin indexes. For mechanical protection of the connector pins it is recommended that this
side is closer to the edge of the target board.
.
2
4
6
8
10
1
3
5
7
9
Keying Shroud
Cable
Figure 2-1 DAP Connector
The figure on the left, below, shows a DAP connector mounted as recommended at the edge of the PCB. The
keying shroud enforces the right polarity and provides mechanical protection of the connector pins. To the left of
the DAP connector is the much larger OCDS L1 connector (AP24001), with 0.1 inch pitch.
.
Figure 2-2 DAP Connector next to OCDS L1 Connector
In the picture on the right, the DAP cable is plugged in. Please note that the cable plug (width approximately
10.5mm) is much wider than the DAP connector (width approximately 6.5mm) on the board. This means that for
about 2.5 mm either side of the DAP connector, there can not be parts which are higher than 2 mm.
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Pin Description
3
Pin Description
Note that ‘Direction’ in the following table is from the target system point of view.
Table 3-1
DAPPins
Pin Name
Direction Description
1
VREF
O
Supply voltage from the target system.
The voltage has to be strong enough to supply the target side of the level shifters
within the tool hardware up to about 20 Mhz DAP operating frequency.
The required supply current is in the range of 5 mA, mainly caused by signal
switching. It can be reduced by lowering frequency and capacitance.
Beyond 20 MHz the tool hardware has to supply the level shifter from another source
and use this pin just as a voltage reference.
2
DAP1
IO
DAP: Data pin.
SPD
IO
SPD: Data pin.
UART
IO
Single-wire UART.
Serial communication interface (e.g. used for Bootstrap Loader BSL).
3
GND
Recommended pin for signal return of DAP1 for high frequency impedance matching.
4
DAP0
I
DAP: Clock.
SUP
I
SPD: Optional user pin value for feedback into the target system. Otherwise
reserved.
5
GND
Recommended pin for signal return of DAP0 for high frequency impedance matching.
6
DAP2
IO
DAP: Optional second data pin.
USER0
IO/O
Generic signal that can be used for non specified functions.
7
KEY
(GND in
cable)
If the recommended connector with keying shroud is not used, this pin provides
another option to enforce polarization. In that instance this pin is removed from the
target connector and the associated jack in the cable connector closed with a plastic
pin for example.
8
DAP3
IO
DAP: Optional third data pin.
USER1
IO/I
Generic signal that can be used for non-specified functions.
(DAPEN) I
Optional indicator that the tool is connected.
This can be used to enable the DAP interface of the device.
9
GND
Supply ground.
10
RESET
IO
Application Note
Target reset signal. Open drain active low signal.
May be used bi-directionally to drive or sense the target reset signal.
Usually driven by the tool to reset the target system.
The target system is responsible for providing a pull-up to VREF on this signal to
establish a logic one.
The resistor shall not have a value less than 1 kOhms.
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User Pins
4
User Pins
Support of user pins (USER0, USER1) is optional for a given tool. Please refer to the specific tool documentation
about the availability of this feature and its control.
If supported by the tool, these pins can be used to conveniently control target system specific features, such as
selecting microcontroller boot options. Both signals can be bi-directional, depending on the tool hardware.
If only a subset of pin directions is supported, the rule is that USER0 is Out (optional In) and USER1 is In (optional
Out).
Table 4-1
USER, DAP2, DAPEN Pin behavior
Pin
Name
6
USER0 IO/O
O
Generic signal that can be used for non specified functions. From a DAS
Client it can be accessed as user signal 0.
DAP2
O
DAP2 data signal
USER1 IO/I
IH
Generic signal that can be used for non specified functions. From a DAS
Client it can be accessed as user signal 1.
DAP3
IH
DAP3 data signal.
IH
Some target devices have an explicit pin to enable DAP only when a tool is
connected. This pin will have a weak pull down on the target system/chip
side. Only when the tool hardware drives it high, DAP will be enabled. Note
that depending on the target device this pin is evaluated at the de-activation
of the reset (positive edge on RESET pin).
8
Direction Default Description
IO
IO
DAPEN I
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DAP/SPD Enabling
5
DAP/SPD Enabling
There are three options for DAP/SPD enabling:
1. Always enabled.
2. Enabled with DAPEN pin.
3. Enabled with DAP1/SPD value (H) at RESET de-activation.
The first option includes the case that the DAP/SPD interface is enabled with a setting in the Flash config sector
evaluated during device startup. Specific devices can support one or several of these options to be flexible to the
needs of different systems, so a tool has to support all options.
5.1
DAP Enabling
The tool and device behavior is summarized in the following table:.
Table 5-1
DAP Enabling with DAP1 or DAPEN
Pin
Name
Tool Behavior
Device Behavior
2
DAP1
Automatically pulled high (4.7-10 kOhms)
when RESET is activated, and for 5 ms
afterwards, since the sample point for the
DAP1 value can be delayed depending on
the device type.
The DAP1 pin value is latched at reset deactivation:
L: DAP stays disabled
H: DAP is enabled
8
USER1 In the initial tool hardware state this signal is Will enable DAP if High at RESET release.
DAPEN driven high (VREF).
Depending on the device type, it has to stay static
It is under the responsibility and control of the High during operation.
user to change the pin state depending on
the target system.
Provisions for Tool ‘Hot Attach’
If the device has a dedicated DAP interface which is always enabled, the hot attach of a tool is possible without
restrictions. If not, the conditions for DAP1 or DAPEN (Table 5-1) have to also be satisfied when no tool is
connected.
For DAPEN this is easily achieved for instance with a pull-up resistor, or with hard-wiring.
However, for devices where the enabling is controlled with DAP1, some circuitry is required, since the pull-up or
driving of DAP1 needs to be disabled when the tool operates the DAP protocol. The condition for this disabling
can be the level of the DAPEN pin at the tool connector, which is driven High when the tool is connected.
5.2
SPD Enabling
SPD is enabled by applying a High value to the SPD pin of the device at RESET de-activation. This means the
tool behavior, described in Table 5-1 for DAP1, is applied to the SPD pin as well.
Application Note
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DAP/SPD Enabling
5.3
SPD or DAP Enabling
SPD has a reduced performance compared to DAP, so some devices will support SPD and DAP. To distinguish
between SPD and DAP within the device, the encoding listed in Table 5-2 is used. The values in the first two
columns are the levels seen by the device at RESET release.
Table 5-2
SPD/DAP Enabling with DAP0/1
DAP0 DAP1 Device Behavior
H
H
DAP mode will be enabled.
L
H
SPD mode will be enabled.
H
L
Reserved (e.g. JTAG will be enabled).
L
L
DAP and SPD disabled.
SPD Only Option
On the target board the availability of the SPD or DAP mode is configured with the connection between the DAP0
pin of the device and the DAP0 pin of the connector. When they are not connected it means that the tool is using
SPD mode and the DAP0 pin is fully available for the application.
Note: For such a target system, where only SPD is used, the circuitry on the target board for the user pin with the
alternate DAP0 functionality has to make sure that this pin is not pulled or driven High during RESET deactivation.
Application Note
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Target System Integration
6
Target System Integration
6.1
High Speed DAP
AURIX™ TriCore™ devices support DAP frequencies up to 160 MHz over the full automotive temperature range.
The DAP connector and the associated flat ribbon cable are suited for this frequency with acceptable EMC
behavior, if the following points are considered.
Recommendations for PCB Design
•
Very short direct connection between DAP connector and device pins
•
Solid GND plane or GND traces below or beside all DAP signals
•
Further connections to DAP signals need to be removable (e.g. 0R bridges) for high speed operation
•
Keep trace length of DAP1 and DAP2 equal
Termination Recommendations for Longer Signal Paths
•
Use serial termination method on both ends for DAP1/DAP2 signals since they are bi-directional
•
DAP0 can be terminated only at source (depending on the properties of the DAP0 driver)
•
All terminations must match the line impedance (50 ohms recommended)
•
Total trace length on board of less then 10 cm (the parasitic load of cable has to be considered as well)
FM Modulated DAP0 Clock
A frequency modulation (FM) of the clock drastically reduces the emissions of the DAP interface. For instance a
1.25 % FM modulation will reduce the emissions by 3 to 20 dB below 1 GHz.
Further Information
•
Application Note AP24026 EMC Design Guidelines for Microcontroller Board Layout
•
TC2xx PCB and High Speed Serial Interface Design Guideline Application Note
Application Note
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Target System Integration
6.2
AURIX™ / TriCore™ Family
Table 6-1
DAP Connections on the Target Board for AURIX™
Pin
Name
Device Pin
2
DAP1
DAP1
4
DAP0
DAP0
6
DAP2
DAP2/TGI3/TGO3
DAP or trigger pin (or user functionality) on P21.7
8
DAP3
DAP3/TGI2/TGO2
DAP or trigger pin (or user functionality) on P21.6
(DAPEN) TRST
10
RESET
Table 6-2
Remark
DAP will only be enabled if TRST is high during PORST de-activation. The
recommendation is not to use this connector pin for this purpose since this
can also be statically ensured in the board.
PORST
DAP Connections on the Target Board for TriCore™
Pin
Name
Device Pin
2
DAP1
DAP1
4
DAP0
DAP0
6
DAP2
DAP2
USER0
user defined
If DAP2 is not needed, this pin can be connected to a user defined signal.
AURIX™ devices for instance have DAP and trigger functionality overlaid
to the same device pin (P21.7 DAP2/TGI3/TGO3).
DAPEN
TRST
DAP will only be enabled if the tool is connected and drives this pin high
during PORST de-activation.
USER1
user defined
If DAP enabling is controlled elsewhere, this pin can be connected with a
user defined signal.
RESET
PORST
8
10
Application Note
Remark
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Target System Integration
6.3
XC2000 / XE166 Families
Table 6-3
DAP, SPD and UART Connections on the Target Board for XC2000/XE166
Pin
Name
Device Pin
2
DAP1
DAP1
SPD
SPD/UART
4
DAP0
DAP0
6
USER0
user defined Can be connected with a user defined signal.
8
DAPEN
TRST
USER1
user defined If DAP enabling is controlled elsewhere, this pin can be connected to a user
defined signal.
RESET
PORST
10
6.4
Remark
SPD and/or single-wire UART for Bootstrap Loader (BSL)
DAP will only be enabled if the tool is connected and drives this pin high during
PORST de-activation.
XC800 Family
For XC800 devices the DAP, SPD and single-wire UART port availability differs across products.
Table 6-4
DAP, SPD and UART Connections on the Target Board for XC800
Pin
Name
Device Pin
Remark
2
SPD
SPD/UART
SPD and/or single-wire UART for Bootstrap Loader (BSL)
DAP1
DAP1
If XC800 device supports 2-pin DAP.
4
DAP0
DAP0
6
USER0
user defined Can be connected with user defined signals.
8
USER1
user defined
10
RESET
RESET
Application Note
Can be used to control the power supply if the XC800 device has no RESET pin.
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