Driving low power LEDs from 10mA to 65mA LED driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W family 01_00 | Feb 16, 2010 | PDF | 3.23 mb

Driving Low Power LEDs from
10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with
BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Application Note 182
http://www.infineon.com/lowcostleddriver
Rev. 1.1, 2010 -02 -11
Power Management & Multimarket
Edition 2010.02.11
Published by
Infineon Technologies AG
81726 Munich, Germany
© 2010 Infineon Technologies
AG All Rights Reserved.
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Application Note AN182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Application Note AN182
Revision History: 2010.02.11
Previous Revision: Rev. F
Page
Subjects (major changes since last revision)
----5
24
Update of document format
Addition of Table Of Contents
Changes to text in “Overview” section
Addition of section with specific example of increasing LED current with BCR401W /
402W and external current adjust resistor
12
Correction of reference designators R1 and R2 on Figure 11, Schematic Diagram of
24 Volt Striplight PCB
Moved section on optional Reverse Polarity Protection (RPP) after PCB schematic
diagrams
---
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Application Note AN182, Rev. G
3 / 38
2010.02.11
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Table Of Contents
Section Number / Topic
Page
Revision History
3
1. Overview
5
2. Applications Of Striplights
5
3. Description of Striplights used in this Applications Note
6
4. Details of PCB Construction
9
5. Schematic Diagram, 12 Volt Striplight
10
6. Schematic Diagram, 24 Volt Striplight
11
7. Optional Reverse Polarity Protection (RPP) with Schottky Diode(s)
12
8. Thermal Characteristics of Striplights (Thermal Resistances, Junction
Temperatures, etc.)
13
9. Performance over Voltage and Temperature of Striplight modified to use
traditional Resistor Biasing, vs. Performance of the same circuit using the
Infineon BCR402W Constant-Current LED Driver IC.
16
10. The “Voltage Drop Problem” – The Adverse Impact of Accumulated Voltage Drops over
long arrays or strings of Striplights, and how the BCR401W / 402W LED Driver ICs Eliminate
the problem
11. Procedure for Increasing Current via use of External Resistor
24
12. Bill Of Material (BOM), 12 Volt Striplight Application Board
27
13. Bill Of Material (BOM), 24 Volt Striplight Application Board
28
14. Summary and Conclusions
28
15. References
29
Application Note
4 / 30
Rev. 1.1 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
BCR402W Constant-Current LED Driver IC in 12V & 24V Low-Current (10 – 60mA)
“Striplight” Applications offers significant advantages over resistor biasing of LED’s.
1
Introduction & Overview
LED strip lights have been penetrating several applications like channel letters for advertising due to their
- long life time in comparison to fluorescent tubes
- energy efficiency
In a very high percentage of existing LED strips, resistor biasing has been used due to the low cost of
resistors. Unfortunately, LED’s should not be driven with a constant voltage source & resistor. In order to
maximize LED lifetimes and reliability, LEDs should be driven by a constant-current source,
instead of a power supply & resistor combination. Resistor biasing will frequently lead to a
significant reduction of the lifetime of LED’s due to a) LED’s having a Positive Temperature
Coeficient with respect to current b) the statistically “wide” range of forward voltage (VF) in a given
type of LED.
•
LED’s Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC)
LED’s are devices which will degrade due to their positive thermal coefficient. The warmer they get, the
lower their Forward Voltage (VF) drops and the more current they tend to draw. Increased current further
heats the LED, creating a destructive “spiral” of events which can ultimately lead to a thermal runaway
condition and destruction of the LED(s). This effect can be seen independently of the ambient
temperature. In the case of high ambient temperature and poor thermal design, the likelihood of thermal
runaway will be increased. Furthermore, the lifetime of LED’s is significantly reduced by increased device
(junction) temperatures, especially at temperatures higher than 85°C.
•
The wide range of LED Forward Voltage (VF) typically found in a given LED type
The LED manufacturer’s range of forward voltages for a given LED type can very significantly. As an
example, a white or blue LED may specify a minimum VF of 2.7 volts and a maximum of 3.7 volts. For a
target LED current of 20mA assuming the LED’s VF falls at the production average, the actual current
seen in the actual application may vary widely, e.g. from near 10mA (with 3.7V V F) up to 35mA (for VF’s of
2.7 V). In the worst-case situation when the following effects all combine:
-
LED’s with low VF
High ambient temperature
Poor or mediocre thermal design….
…the lifetime of the light using LEDs may even be lower than a light using incandescent or fluorescent
sources. In this case, one of the principal advantages of using LEDs – long lifetimes – is defeated. For this
reason, resistors are a poor choice for biasing LEDs.
Using the low-cost constant-current LED driver IC’s like BCR401W and BCR402W eliminate the problems
described with resistor biasing of LEDs described above, since the LED drivers deliver constant-current
regardless of how the LED’s forward voltages change over temperature or how the V F’s vary from one lot
of LEDs to the next. One additional, key feature of the BCR401W and 402W is the Negative
Temperature Coefficient (NTC) of output current with respect to temperature. The slope of this
Application Note
5 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
NTC – approximately -0.2% per degree C – means that the LED’s current gradually decreases as
the circuit heats up, which protects expensive LED strings from thermal runaway.
These LED drivers come in an industry-standard SOT343 package having dimensions of 2.0 x 2.1 x 0.9
mm, with a copper lead-frame to optimize / minimize thermal resistance. Maximum power dissipation is
500mW.
This Applications Note compares & contrasts standard resistor biasing versus using BCR402W in
two different general-purpose low-current (20mA) “Striplight” configurations, one running from +12V
DC & the other from +24V DC.
Even though the BCR401W and BCR402W have maximum input voltages of +18 Volts DC, it is
possible to safely use these LED drivers in higher-voltage systems provided a simple “trick” is
employed. This trick is described in Sections 3 and 7, pages 5 and 11 of this applications note.
Per data shown in this Applications Note, using a constant-current driver like BCR402W offers several
advantages over more traditional “resistor bias” schemes commonly employed for low-current
LED circuits, including:
1. Tighter control of LED current over variations in temperature & supply voltage. As shown
in Section 9 of this applications note, resistor biasing yields a huge 70 – 80% variation in
current, with increased current at high temperatures, tending to push the LEDs towards
a potentially dangerous Thermal Runaway condition. By contrast, using the BCR402W in
the same circuit yields a current shift of ~ 30% over the same changes of voltage and
temperature, with current intentionally decreasing with increasing temperature by virtue
of the BCR402W’s Negative Temperature Coefficient. This negative slope of current vs.
temperature, due to the LED Driver IC’s Negative Temperature Coefficient, protects LED
strings from Thermal Runaway.
2. More homogeneous and consistent light output between adjacent strings of LEDs as the
problem of “voltage drop over the string” (discussed in Section 10) and associated current
variation along a light string is eliminated,
3. improved LED lifetimes & reliability due to tighter control of LED current (& thus more control
over LED Junction Temperatures), as well as prevention of Thermal Runaway of LEDs due
to the BCR402W’s Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC).
2
Applications of Striplights
LED-based Striplights are useful for, and found in, a variety of lighting applications (Figure 1), including:
1. Channel Letter Lighting (used for advertising, etc.)
2. Illumination of refrigerators and freezers in supermarkets
3. Retail displays e.g. jewelry cases
4. Under-counter / cabinet lighting (residential or commercial)
5. Architectural / mood lighting.
6. In-vehicle lighting (cars, buses, trains, etc.)
Application Note
6 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Figure 1. Some Examples of LED based Striplight Applications, including Channel Letters, Mood
Lighting, and an Under-Counter Light Fixture.
3
Brief Description of Striplights shown in this Applications Note
The PC boards have DC connectors at each end, permitting the user to add or subtract Striplight
segments as needed, making the overall light array longer or shorter as required to accommodate different
applications such as advertising, channel letter lighting, illumination of refrigerator or freezer shelves,
under-counter / cabinet lighting, jewelry displays, etc. Please refer to Figure 2, which shows a string of
three 12-volt Striplight PCB’s connected together. Again, more or fewer boards can be added or
subtracted as needed by simply connecting additional PCB’s with the appropriate wire harness(es). The
wire harness used is shown in Figure 18 on page 25.
Figure 2. Photo of three sections of 12 Volt “Striplight” PC Boards Connected together.
White-color OSRAM LW T6SG TopLED LED’s are used. These LEDs have a color temperature of 5600
K, and have a low forward voltage (VF) of 3.2 volts, making them particularly attractive for the +12V
Striplight, given that the lower VF means one can have three LED’s in series, rather than only two, giving
higher power efficiency. The LEDs are operated at 20mA, which is the current which these particular LEDs
are mainly characterized for, as well as being the nominal (minimum) output current of the BCR402W.
Note, current may be adjusted to any desired value with the BCR402W from 20 to a maximum of 60mA,
by using an external resistor with the BCR402W; however one must ensure not to exceed either the LED’s
maximum current rating or the BCR402W’s maximum power dissipation rating of
Application Note
7 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
500mW. Section 11 of this Applications Note describes the procedure for increasing current above the
LED Driver’s nominal / minimum current. Refer to the Striplight’s schematic diagrams, Figures 9 and 10,
on pages 11 and 12. The optional external resistor connected between pins 3 and 4 of either the
BCR401W or BCR402W is the current adjust resistor. The reader is urged to consult Section 11 of this
Applications Note as well as the BCR401W / 402W datasheets [1], [2] for details on resistor value
selection for a given desired output current in the event a current > 10mA (BCR401W) or > 20mA
(BCR402W) is required. For users who anticipate needing to run LED current as low as 10mA, the
BCR401W should be used, as it has a nominal (minimum) output current of 10mA. Both BCR401W and
BCR402W have the exact same footprint and pin-out configuration. Users who wish to operate their LED
strings between 20 – 60mA should select the BCR402W. Photos of the two Striplight PCB designs (12 volt
& 24 volt) are given in Figures 3 – 6. Note, the designs are essentially identical, with the 24 volt design
having 6 LEDs instead of 3.
Of particular note, the 24 Volt design does not exceed the BCR402W’s maximum input voltage of
18 volts, since 3 LED’s are used in series between the +24V power supply rail and the power
supply input pin (Pin 3) of the BCR402W. Please refer to the schematic diagram of the 24 Volt Striplight,
in Figure 11 on page 12. This technique, which uses LED’s to drop the power supply voltage seen by the
LED driver, permits the user to safely employ these 18-volt-rated LED drivers in higher voltage systems
using power supply voltages over the maximum rating of the LED driver IC. Note, for the 24 Volt Striplight
PCB, the current flowing in the “upper” LEDs (D2, D3, D4) and “lower” LEDs (D5, D6, D7) is virtually
identical, with the vanishingly small difference between the two groups of LEDs typically being in the
microampere range. This small difference, which is far to little to give rise to any differences in light output
or quality, arises from the current consumption of the BCR401W / 402W itself. Note, in the 24 Volt PCB,
both sets of LEDs – ‘upper’ and ‘lower’ - have their current tightly controlled, as the BCR402W acts as a
high-impedance (load-insensitive) “current sink” for D2 – D4, and as a high impedance (load-insensitive)
“current source” for D5 – D7.
Figure 3. Top (component side) of 12V Striplight.
Application Note
8 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Figure 4. Bottom side of 12V Striplight.
Figure 5. Top (component side) of 24V Striplight.
Figure 6. Bottom side of 24V Striplight.
Application Note
9 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
4
Details of PC Board Construction, 12 Volt and 24 Volt Designs
The PC boards use standard, low-cost “FR4” glass-epoxy material. Both PCBs use two metal layers. The
12 Volt design has a PCB thickness of 0.8 mm / 0.031 inch. As the +24 volt PC board is approximately
twice as long, in order to make the board more resistant to bending and twisting, it uses a thicker dielectric
of 1.6 mm / 0.062 inch. Note, both designs utilize “2 ounce” copper plating with a finished metal
thickness of 0.07 mm / 0.0028 inch. This thicker metal plating is still a low-cost ‘standard’ metal
thickness in most PCB fabrication shops, but the increased metal thickness permits heat to more easily
flow out of the LEDs and LED driver IC, helping to reduce device junction temperatures. Note that the
“Gerber” & other fabrication files used for the generation of the PC boards shown in this Applications Note
are embedded in the “References” section of this Applications Note on page 29. [6], [7]. Cross-section
diagrams for each PCB type are given in Figures 7 and 8.
Figure 7. Cross-Section of +12 Volt Striplight PCB.
Figure 8. Cross Section of +24 Volt PCB is below. Note, dielectric thickness is doubled as
compared to +12 Volt PCB to increase stiffness and decrease bending / twisting.
PCB CROSS SECTION SHOWING "FINISHED" PCB THICKNESS.
NOTE THIS IS A SIMPLE 2-LAYER PC BOARD.
TOP LAYER / COMPONENT SIDE
0.062 inch / 1.575 mm
SPECIFICATION FOR TOTAL "FINISHED" PCB THICKNESS INCLUDING
PLATING AND SOLDERMASK: 0.062 + 0.005 / - 0.005 INCH)
BOTTOM LAYER (GROUND PLANE)
Application Note
10 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
5
Schematic Diagram, +12 Volt Striplight
Figure 9. Schematic Diagram of 12 Volt Striplight PCB.
+12 Volts DC
(To 3 pin header)
+12 Volts DC
(To 3 pin header)
R1*
Zero Ohm
Jumper
(Optional)
IC1
D1 (Optional Reverse Polarity Protection)
BAS3010A-03W
BCR402W **
3
R2** (Optional)
Value TBD
ONLY use if
> 10 mA (BCR401W)
or > 20mA (BCR402W)
is needed
4
1
IS
2
D2 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
V
V
Fmin
Ftyp
V
Fmax
D3 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
VFmin = 2.9V
VFtyp = 3.2 V
VFmax = 3.7 V
= 2.9V
= 3.2 V
= 3.7 V
D4 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
VFmin = 2.9V
VFtyp = 3.2 V
VFmax = 3.7 V
(To 3 pin header)
(To 3 pin header)
* R1 is only used if user wishes to omit D1. In this case, R1 = zero ohm jumper
** BCR401W may also be used, however to get 20mA curreent, an external current adjust
resistor (R2) would be required. Specifically,
a) for BCR401W: If desired current > 10mA, R2 is required. (Minimum current = 10mA).
b) for BCR402W: If desired current > 20mA, R2 is required. (Minimum current = 20mA).
Refer to BCR401W & BCR402W datasheets for information on selection of value of R2 to
achieve a given current. Note, maximum current for BCR401W or BCR402W is 60mA.
Application Note
11 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
6
Schematic Diagram, +24 Volt Striplight
Note ! The 24 Volt design simply inserts 3 LED’s between power supply rail & BCR402W supply voltage
pin (Pin 3). Forward drop of LED’s D2, D3, and D4 reduce voltage at input of BCR402W to < 18 volts,
keeping BCR402W within safe voltage limits & allowing the BCR402W to be used in 24 Volt systems.
Figure 10. Schematic Diagram of 24 Volt Striplight PCB.
+24 Volts DC
(To 3 pin header)
+24 Volts DC
(To 3 pin header)
R2*
Zero Ohm
Jumper
(Optional)
D1 (Optional Reverse Polarity Protection)
BAT64-02W
D2 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
V
Fmin
V
Ftyp
V
Fmax
= 2.9V
= 3.2 V
IC1
BCR402W **
= 3.7 V
3
D3 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
V
V
Fmin
Ftyp
V
Fmax
R1** (Optional)
Value TBD
ONLY use if
> 10 mA (BCR401W)
or > 20mA (BCR402W)
is needed
4
= 2.9V
= 3.2 V
= 3.7 V
1
I
S
D4
LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
V Fmin = 2.9V
V
Ftyp
= 3.2 V
V
Fmax
= 3.7 V
2
D5 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
V
Fmin
V
Ftyp
V
Fmax
= 2.9V
= 3.2 V
= 3.7 V
D6 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
VFmin = 2.9V
VFtyp = 3.2 V
VFmax = 3.7 V
(To 3 pin header)
D7 LED
OSRAM TopLED
LW T6SG
VFmin = 2.9V
VFtyp = 3.2 V
VFmax = 3.7 V
(To 3 pin header)
* R1 is only used if user wishes to omit D1. In this case, R1 = zero ohm jumper
** BCR401W may also be used, however to get 20mA curreent, an external current adjust
resistor (R2) would be required. Specifically,
a) for BCR401W: If desired current > 10mA, R2 is required. (Minimum current = 10mA).
b) for BCR402W: If desired current > 20mA, R2 is required. (Minimum current = 20mA).
Refer to BCR401W & BCR402W datasheets for information on selection of value of R2 to
achieve a given current. Note, maximum current for BCR401W or BCR402W is 60mA.
Application Note
12 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
7
Optional Reverse Polarity Protection (RPP) with Schottky Diode(s)
Both Striplight designs may use a single Schottky diode for what Infineon Technologies refers to as
“Simple” Reverse Polarity Protection (RPP). See Figure 11, which shows various RPP schemes. In the
“Simple RPP” scheme used in these Striplights, if the installer attaches the DC power input plug
“backwards” / in the wrong way, Schottky diode D1 (refer to schematics) prevents current from flowing in
the circuit, protecting the LEDs from reverse polarity induced damage. For the 12 Volt Striplight, the
Infineon Technologies BAS3010A-03W Schottky diode is chosen; for the 24 Volt Striplight, BAT64-02W is
selected. The reason for using two different diodes arises from a trade-off of cost vs. forward voltage.
Given the forward voltage (VF) of the LEDs, there is not as much overall voltage margin in the 12 Volt
design as there is in the 24 Volt design. To ensure proper operation in “worst case” conditions – like under
conditions of low temperature when LED forward voltages are highest, or when LEDs with VF’s at the
higher end of the specification range are used – the lower voltage drop of BAS3010A-03W gives more
margin in the 12 Volt circuit. On the other hand, the 24 Volt circuit has more “extra” voltage available after
adding up all the voltage drops of the circuit elements; thus a lower-cost Schottky diode (BAT64-02W) with
a higher voltage drop may be used without concern. Table 1 gives the voltage drops of each Schottky
diode. Note, on these application circuits, if the user does not wish to use Reverse Polarity Protection, D1
may simply be omitted, and a zero ohm resistor or ‘jumper’ (R1 in 12V design, R2 in 24V PCB) is installed.
Table 1. Comparison of BAS3010A-03W and BAT64-02W Schottky diodes, used for optional
Reverse Polarity Protection (RPP).
Infineon Part Number
BAT64-02W
BAS3010A-03W
Forward Voltage @ 20mA, 25°C, mV
~ 400
~ 250
Package
SCD80
SOD323
Relative Cost
Lowest
Low
Figure 11. Some possible Reverse Polarity Protection (RPP) schemes using Schottky Diodes. The
simplest scheme (“Basic”, on left) is used for the two Striplight designs.
Application Note
13 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
8
Thermal Characteristics of 12V and 24V Striplights (Thermal
Resistances, Junction Temperatures of LEDs, etc.)
The device Junction Temperatures and thermal resistances from Junction to Ambient (Rth J-A) for both an
LED and the BCR402W was determined for both the 12 volt and 24 Volt PCB designs. This testing was
conducted at Room Temperature (~ 25°C). A summary of the results is given in Table 3 on page 16.
Some common definitions for thermal measurements and resistances are listed here for reference:
TJ = device junction temperature inside chip (LED or BCR402W LED Driver)
TA = ambient temperature, °C
PTOT = total power dissipation in a given device; for the LEDs, this is the product of the voltage across
the LED multiplied by the current flowing through the LED; for the BCR402W, this value is the
voltage across the BCR402W (between pins 3 and 2) times the current through the BCR402W
TS = soldering point temperature (biggest tab on BCR402W, e.g. Pin 2; Cathode connection on LEDs)
RTH J-A = thermal resistance from device junction to ambient (dependent on PCB construction, etc.)
RTH S-A = thermal resistance from device soldering point to ambient (dependent on PCB construction, etc.)
Note: R TH J-A = R TH J-S + R TH S-A and R TH S-A = (TS – TA) / PTOT
RTH J-S = thermal resistance from device junction to soldering point (given in device datasheets, not
dependent upon PCB construction)
Determine device junction temperatures from this formula: TJ = Ts + PTOT x RTH J-S
Determine thermal resistance from LED junction to Ambient: R TH J-A LED = R TH J-S LED + R TH S-A LED
Determine thermal resistance from BCR402W junction to Ambient: R TH J-A BCR = R TH J-S BCR + R TH S-A BCR
The procedure taken for the Application Circuits shown in this document is outlined as follows:
a. Determination of Soldering Point Temperature of LED (TSLED): one thermocouple wire is attached
to the LED’s cathode connection to PCB (with solder). One of the LEDs closest to the center of the PCB
was chosen, as this would likely represent a “worst case” location with the highest temperatures.
b. Determination of Soldering Point Temperature of BCR402W (TS BCR402W): A second thermocouple
wire is attached (soldered) to the current output pin (Pin 2) of the BCR402W.
c. Striplight is turned on, and allowed to run for 30 minutes, to ensure PC board reaches steady-state
or equilibrium conditions. Note, the PCB assembly is clamped in a vise with rubber grips; the rubber
contact points have extremely high thermal resistance, and the contact area between the PCB and the
vise is very small, so the measurement should suffer minimal error from being held in the vise. Please
refer to Figure 12 on the next page. Soldering point temperatures for a. and b. above are recorded.
Table 2 on the following page summarizes the measurement results.
Application Note
14 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Figure 12. Photo of a 24 Volt Striplight undergoing thermal testing.
ma
Table 2. Soldering Point Temperatures (TS) of LED and BCR402W as measured for both 12 Volt and
24 Volt PCB designs, running at ~ 20mA, in T = 25°C ambient temperature conditions. Power
supply voltages are fixed at 12.0 or 24.0 volts. Also listed is the power dissipation (P TOT) in each
device, along with each devices thermal resistance from Junction to Soldering Point (R th J-S)
which are taken from device datasheets.
12 Volt Striplight PCB
24 Volt Striplight PCB
TS LED
35°C
37°C
TS BCR402W
37°C
41°C
Voltage across LED
2.98 V
2.97 V
Voltage
across
BCR402W
(Pins 3 to 2)
2.90 V
5.98 V
Current
20.4 mA
21.2 mA
P TOT LED
60.8 mW
63.0 mW
P TOT BCR402W
59.2 mW
126.8mW
Note – maximum permitted dissipation in the LEDs is 185mW for TA = 25°C; maximum permitted power
dissipation in BCR402W is 500mW for TS < 95°C. Refer to device datasheets.
Application Note
15 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
A. Calculation of Junction Temperatures of LED and BCR402W:
For the 12 Volt Striplight PC Boards:
a) LED: TJ LED = Ts LED + PTOT LED x RTH J-S LED Note RTH J-S LED is given in Device Datasheet as 180°C/W
TJ LED = 35°C + (0.0608W)(180°C/W)
TJ LED = 45.9°C, which is 79.1 degrees below the maximum permitted junction
temperature of 125°C
b) BCR402W: TJ BCR = Ts BCR + PTOT BCR x RTH J-S BCR Note RTH J-S LED is 110°C/W from datasheet
TJ BCR = 37°C + (0.0592W)(110°C/W)
TJ BCR = 43.5°C, which is 106.5 degrees below maximum permitted junction
temperature of 150°C
For the 24 Volt Striplight PC Boards:
a) LED: TJ LED = Ts LED + PTOT LED x RTH J-S LED Note RTH J-S LED is given in Device Datasheet as 180°C/W
TJ LED = 37°C + (0.063W)(180°C/W)
TJ LED = 48.3°C, which is 76.7 degrees below the maximum permitted junction
temperature of 125°C
b) BCR402W: TJ BCR = Ts BCR + PTOT BCR x RTH J-S BCR Note RTH J-S LED is 110°C/W from datasheet
TJ BCR = 41°C + (0.1268W)(110°C/W)
TJ BCR = 54.9°C, which is 95.1 degrees below maximum permitted
junction temperature of 150°C
B. Calculation of Thermal Resistance from Junction to Ambient (RTH J-A) of LED and BCR402W:
Note, R TH J-A = R TH J-S + R TH S-A ; we must determine R TH S-A for both the LED and the BCR402W on
each type of Striplight (12 and 24 volt types).
For the 12 Volt Striplight PC Boards:
a) LED:
RTH S-A (LED) = (TS – TA) / PTOT LED
RTH S-A (LED) = (35°C – 25°C) / (0.0608W) = 164.5 °C/W
RTH J-A (LED) = RTH J-S (LED) + RTH S-A (LED) = 180°C/W + 164.5 °C/W = 344.5 °C/W
b) BCR402W:
RTH S-A (BCR) = (TS – TA) / PTOT BCR
RTH S-A (BCR) = (37°C – 25°C) / (0.0592W) = 202.7 °C/W
RTH J-A (BCR) = RTH J-S (BCR) + RTH S-A (BCR) = 110°C/W + 202.7 °C/W = 312.7 °C/W
Application Note
16 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
For the 24 Volt Striplight PC Boards:
a) LED:
RTH S-A (LED) = (TS – TA) / PTOT LED
RTH S-A (LED) = (37°C – 25°C) / (0.063W) = 190.5 °C/W
RTH J-A (LED) = RTH J-S (LED) + RTH S-A (LED) = 180°C/W + 190.5 °C/W = 370.5 °C/W
b) BCR402W:
RTH S-A (BCR) = (TS – TA) / PTOT BCR
RTH S-A (BCR) = (41°C – 25°C) / (0.1268W) = 126.2 °C/W
RTH J-A (BCR) = RTH J-S (BCR) + RTH S-A (BCR) = 110°C/W + 126.2 °C/W = 236.2 °C/W
Table 3. Summary of Junction Temperatures and Thermal Resistances for both the 12 Volt and 24
Volt Striplight Designs at 20mA operation. Ambient Temperature (TA) for these results is 25°C.
TJ LED
TJ BCR402W
RTH S-A (LED)
RTH S-A (BCR)
RTH J-A (LED)
RTH J-A (BCR)
9
12 V Striplight
24V Striplight
45.9 °C
43.5 °C
164.5 °C/W
202.7 °C/W
344.5 °C/W
312.7 °C/W
48.3 °C
54.9 °C
190.5 °C/W
126.2 °C/W
370.5 °C/W
236.2 °C/W
Performance over Voltage & Temperature of Striplight modified to use
traditional RESISTOR Biasing, versus Performance of the same circuit
using the Infineon BCR402W Constant-Current LED Driver IC
One sample of each of a 12 Volt PCB and a 24 Volt PCB was modified to remove the BCR402W LED
Driver, & replace the LED Driver IC with a fixed resistor. Both the modified circuit boards with resistor
bias, and the standard board with BCR402W installed are tested over voltage (12 or 24 Volts +/- 5%) &
temperature (-40 to +85C) in a temperature test chamber, with results given in Tables 4 and 5 on the
following pages. A photo of the modified 12 volt circuit is in Figure 13, showing how the BCR402W has
been removed, and a zero ohm jumper and 130 ohm resistor is connected. In addition, a schematic
diagram for the modified 12 volt PCB (with 130 ohm resistor instead of BCR402W) is given in Figure 14,
showing how voltages across circuit elements vary over temperature, when the power supply voltage is
held constant at 12 or 24 volts. Figure 15 shows a 12 Volt circuit, but with the BCR402W installed, along
with the various circuit element voltages at –40, +25 and +85°C, again with the power supply voltage held
constant, for comparison.
Of particular interest to the reader should be the variation in LED forward voltage (V F LED) with
temperature changes. The LED’s forward voltage decreases as the LED heats up. This variation in
LED VF is a key issue with regard to biasing of LEDs, and the decreasing VF of LEDs as
temperature increases can contribute to thermal runaway and destruction of LEDs, particularly in
circuits using simple resistor bias. The constant-current drive of the BCR402W, combined with the
BCR402W’s Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC), eliminates the potential problem of thermal
runaway, and using the BCR402W drastically reduces LED current variation over temperature and supply
voltage as compared with resistor biasing.
Application Note
17 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Table 4. LED Current Variation, 12 Volt Striplight, using RESISTOR biasing (left side) and BCR402W
LED Driver. For data on left, BCR402W LED Driver IC has been removed, and a 130 ohm resistor
put in its place to yield ~ 20mA current at 12.0 Volts, 25°C. Note the large variation in current when
resistors are used, and the much improved stability of LED current over both voltage and
temperature with the BCR402W.
12 Volt Striplight Board
Resistor Bias – 130 Ω Resistor
12 Volt Striplight Board
With BCR402W LED Driver
Ambient
Temperature,
°C
Supply Voltage,
Volts
LED
Current, mA
LED Current, mA
-40
11.4
12.3
23.3
-40
12.0
15.3
23.6
-40
12.6
19.0
23.7
+25
11.4
17.0
20.7
+25
12.0
20.1
20.7
+25
12.6
24.9
20.8
+85
11.4
20.7
17.0
+85
12.0
24.6
17.1
+85
12.6
28.7
17.2
Worst-case variation with resistor bias = (28.7 – 12.3) / 20.1 => 81.5 % variation !
Worst-case variation with BCR402W bias = (23.7 – 17.0) / 20.7 => 32.4 % variation, much improved.
Also note, the Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) of the BCR402W circuit, which helps to prevent
Thermal Runaway in LEDs.
Application Note
18 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Figure 13. Photo of a 12 Volt Striplight PCB, modified by removing the BCR402W LED Driver IC,
and replacing the BCR402W with a 130 ohm resistor. A zero ohm “jumper” was also needed to
complete the connections.
Application Note
19 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Application Note
(To 3 pin header)
(To 3 pin header)
2.89 V
D3 LED
(To 3 pin header)(To3pinheader)
(To 3 pin header)
D4 LED
R1
2.01 V130ohms
20 / 30
(To 3 pin header)
3.23 V
D3 LED3.22V
3.01 V
3.01 V
D2 LED3.22V
2.72 V130ohms
R1
20.1 mA
15.3 mA
0.32 V
D1
(To 3 pin header)
D2 LED
D1
0.24 VBAS3010A-03WBAS3010A-03W
(To 3 pin header)
(To 3 pin header)
(To 3 pin header)
+12.0 Volts DC
+12.0 Volts DC
ROOM +25 CCOLD-40C
+12.0 Volts DC
+12.0 Volts DC
LED
3.02 V
D4 LED
2.87 V
D2 LED
130 ohms
R1
24.6 mA
BAS3010A-03W
D3 LED
3.21 V
0.16 V
(To 3 pin header)
D1
(To 3 pin header)
HOT +85 C
Applied
+12 V Striplight, RESISTOR ONLY bias. +12.0V DC
+12.0 Volts DC
Temperature.
Voltages & Currents over Temperature, Fixed Voltage, Variable
+12.0 Volts DC
2
.
8
7
V
Figure 14. Schematic of 12 Volt Striplight with Resistor Bias. In this test, supply voltage was held
constant at +12.0 Volts while Striplight was in a temperature test chamber that varied from –40 to
+85°C. Test wires from each node on PC board passed out of temperature chamber’s access port,
allowing the various component voltages to be monitored over temperature. Note extreme
variation of LED Forward Voltage (VF) over temperature, which is very typical of LEDs. This
variation in VF can give rise to bias point instability over operating conditions, unless a constantcurrent LED Driver like the BCR402W is used.
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note
I
1
IC1
21 / 30
P
(To 3
pinheader)
S
+12.0 VoltsDC
(To 3 pinheader)
= (1.76V)(23.6mA) = 41.5 mW
(To 3 pin header)
D4 LED
3.31 V
D3 LED
D2 LED
3.30 V
2
3.29 V
(To 3 pin header)
P
= (2.74V)(20.7mA) =
56.7
(To 3 pin header)
D4 LED
3.01 V
S
D3 LED
D2 LED
2
3.01 V
I
1
3.00 V
mW
D2 LED
2
P
(To 3 pin header)
D4 LED
2.82 V
S
BCR402W *
D3 LED
2.82 V
I
1
4
3.41 V
4
4
3
2.74 V
3
3
BCR402W *
1.76 V
0.14 V
IC1
BAS3010A-03W
17.1 mA
(To 3 pin header)
D1
HOT +85 C
+12.0 Volts DC
0.24 V
BCR402W *
D1
(To 3 pin header)
+12.0 Volts DC
(3.41V)(17.1mA)
=
(To 3 pin header)
(To 3 pin header)
+12.0 Volts DC
58.3 mW
2.81 V
with BCR402W, +12.0V DC Applied
IC1
0.34 V
20.7 mA
BAS3010A-03W
BAS3010A-03W
D1
(To 3 pin header)
(To 3 pin header)
23.6mA
+12.0 Volts DC
ROOM +25 C
+12 V Striplight, Standard Configuration
+12.0 Volts DC
COLD -40 C
Voltages & Currents over Temperature
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Application Note No. 182
Figure 15. Schematic of 12 Volt Striplight with BCR402W Bias. Supply voltage was held constant at
+12.0 Volts while Striplight was in a temperature test chamber that varied from –40 to +85°C. Test
wires from each node on PC board passed out of temperature chamber’s access port, allowing the
various component voltages to be monitored over temperature. Note extreme variation of LED
Forward Voltage (VF) over temperature, which is very typical of LEDs. This variation in V F can give
rise to bias point instability over operating conditions, unless a constant-current LED Driver like
the BCR402W is used.
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Table 5. LED Current Variation, 24 Volt Striplight, using RESISTOR biasing (left side) and
BCR402W LED Driver. For data on left, BCR402W LED Driver IC has been removed, and a 300 ohm
resistor put in its place to yield ~ 20mA current at 24.0 Volts, 25°C. Note large variation in current
when resistors are used, and the much improved stability of LED current over both voltage and
temperature with the BCR402W.
Ambient
Temperature,
°C
-40
-40
-40
24 Volt Striplight Board
Resistor Bias – 300 Ω Resistor
Supply Voltage,
LED
Volts
Current, mA
24 Volt Striplight Board
With BCR402W LED Driver
LED Current, mA
22.8
24.0
25.2
13.7
17.1
20.6
24.3
24.5
24.6
+25
+25
+25
22.8
24.0
25.2
17.0
20.5
24.1
21.0
21.2
21.5
+85
+85
+85
22.8
24.0
25.2
20.1
23.8
27.6
18.1
18.3
18.5
Worst-case variation with resistor bias = (27.6 – 13.7) / 20.5 => 67.8 % variation !
Worst-case variation with BCR402W bias = (24.6 – 18.1) / 21.2 => 30.6 % variation, much improved. Also
note, the Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) of the BCR402W circuit, which causes current to
decrease at higher temperatures, thereby helping to prevent Thermal Runaway in LEDs.
10
The “Voltage Drop Problem“ – The Adverse Impact of Accumulated
Voltage Drops over long arrays or strings of Striplights, and how the
BCR401W / BCR402W LED Driver ICs eliminate the problem
In some lighting applications employing Striplights, e.g. Channel Letters, long arrays or strings of
Striplights must be used. Generally, the string is fed DC power at one end, meaning that, as current flows
from the end of the array nearest the power supply down towards the far end of the array, a voltage drop
or voltage loss accumulates.
If resistors are used for biasing the LEDs, and the same value resistor is used in each Striplight section (as
would be required for manufacturing / cost considerations), the sections farthest from the power supply will
draw less current than the sections closer to the power supply. This problem of voltage drop can give
rise to a gradient in light output over the length of the array (inhomogeneous or varying light
output from one end of the array to the other). On the other hand, if a constant-current LED driver
like the BCR402W is used, LED current will be very consistent from section to section, regardless
of accumulated voltage drop, as long as sufficient voltage is available to turn on each circuit
section. A photo showing 50 pieces of the 12 Volt Striplights connected in an array is given in Figure 16.
The voltage available across each of the 50 Striplight sections is measured with a Digital Multi Meter
(DMM) and listed in Table 6. A plot of available voltage vs. the position of the Striplight PC Board (board
numbers 1 through 50, with #1 being closest to the power supply) is given in Figure 17. It can be seen that
over 50 Striplights, there is approximately a 1 volt drop or loss of available voltage. The reader should
Application Note
22 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
bear in mind that, this 1 volt of total drop occurs when each individual Striplight only draws ~ 20mA. The
wire harnesses (Figure 18) that are closest to the power supply carry the most current; as one moves
from the power supply towards the end of the array, the total current carried by the wire + PCB traces
decreases. The wire harnesses used here are constructed of stranded 22 AWG wire and crimp connectors
rated at 4 amperes. One can imagine how much more severe the voltage drop would be, if the LED
currents were higher, and / or lower-cost, smaller-diameter wire were used. Again, due to the voltage drop
issue, resistor bias of the individual Striplight sections would cause LED current at the Strip sections most
distant from the power supply to have less current than the sections closer to the power supply. On the
other hand, using the BCR402W constant-current LED Driver forces all Striplight sections to have equal
LED current regardless of how few or how many Striplight sections are added or subtracted, as long as the
available voltage is high enough to ensure proper operation of the BCR401W / 402W, e.g. the available
voltage needs to be higher than the sum of a) LED forward voltages, b) (optional) voltage drop of Reverse
Polarity Protection Schottky diode, and c) overhead voltage of BCR402W (~ 1.2 Volts).
Figure 16. 50 sections of 12 Volt Striplight are connected. The available voltage across each
Striplight is measured with a Digital Multimeter. Striplight sections furthest away from power
supply input at the top of the photo have lower voltage available to them than the sections closest
to the power supply (at bottom of photo), due to voltage drop in the connecting wire harnesses as
well as voltage drops on the PCB traces. Using the BCR402W instead of Resistor biasing forces
each section to have equal LED current, regardless of the voltage drops.
Application Note
23 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Table 6. Available voltage across each PC Board in a string of 50 striplights as shown in Figure 14.
PCB #
Voltage Across PCB
(Volts)
12.01
11.97
11.93
11.90
11.86
11.83
11.79
11.76
11.72
11.69
11.66
11.62
11.59
11.56
11.53
11.51
11.48
11.45
11.43
11.41
11.38
11.35
11.33
11.31
11.29
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
PCB #
Voltage Across PCB
(Volts)
11.27
11.25
11.23
11.21
11.20
11.18
11.17
11.15
11.14
11.13
11.11
11.10
11.09
11.08
11.07
11.07
11.06
11.05
11.05
11.04
11.04
11.03
11.03
11.03
11.03
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
Figure 17. Available Voltage across Striplight boards, numbers 1 – 50 in a long string or array.
Board #1 (left side of graph) is closest to power supply, Board #50 is at end of array (right side of
graph). Note voltage “sag” or drop. Voltage drop in this example is relatively minimal as each PCB
only draws ~ 20mA, and the wire used is 22AWG. With higher LED current, or if lower-cost, higher
resistivity wire were used, voltage drop would be far more pronounced.
Available Voltage Across Each Striplight Section.
String of 50 12-Volt Striplights. Total Current draw ~ 1.0 Amps.
12.20
Voltage, V
12.00
11.80
11.60
11.40
11.20
11.00
1
4
7
10
13
16
19
22
25
28
31
34
37
40
43
46
49
Striplight Section # (1 - 50)
Application Note
24 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Figure 18. DC Wire Harness used to connect Striplight Boards. Note, this harness uses thicker
gauge wire than would be used in a real, cost-sensitive commercial Striplight application, meaning
that voltage drops seen in a real-world application would likely be worse than shown in Table 6.
11
Procedure for Increasing Current via use of External Resistor
BCR401W and BCR402W each have nominal (minimum) output currents when no external current
adjust resistor is used. The BCR401W has a minimum output current of 10mA whereas the
BCR402W minimum output current is 20mA. If the user wishes to increase current beyond the device’s
nominal output current, it is very easy to do so, using just a single external resistor connected between
pins 3 and 4 of either device. The LED driver’s nominal output current with no external resistor is primarily
determined by the value of an internal, integrated resistor within either the BCR401W or BCR402W chip.
When the user places an external resistor in parallel to the LED driver’s internal resistor by connecting an
external resistor between pins 3 and 4, the composite or net resistance between pins 3 and 4 is
decreased, which increases the LED driver’s output current. Note – as BCR401W and BCR402W each
have different internal resistor values, the external resistor value selected to achieve a given target output
current will be differ between BCR401W and BCR402W. The user must ensure that under all
conditions, 1) the LED driver’s maximum output current of 60mA is not exceeded and 2) the LED
driver’s maximum power dissipation of 500mW is not exceeded. The BCR401W or BCR402W power
dissipation is simply the product of (Output Current) x (Voltage across pins 2 and 3).
The following step-by-step example shows the procedure for selecting an appropriate external resistor
value to increase LED current from the nominal ~ 20mA of the BCR402W to ~ 37mA. The resistor used for
increasing current on the 12V Striplight PCB is R2; on the 24 Volt Striplight it is R1. Please refer to
Figure 19.
Figure 19. Location of External Current Adjust Resistors (R2 for 12V PCB; R1 for 24V PCB)
.
Application Note
25 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Procedure:
1. Decide what output current is needed. In this example, we want a current of ~ 37mA.
2. Refer to the curve in the device datasheet entitled “Output Current vs. External Resistor”. These
curves, while in the device datasheets, are also shown in Figure 20 for reference. Figure 21
shows the same plot for the BCR402W only, with markings in red color for the selected operating
point used in this example (~ 37mA) and corresponding external resistor value (43 Ω)..
3. Locate the desired output current on the Y axis (37mA in this example), move straight across to the
right to intersect the curve, then drop straight down to the X axis to read off the desired external
resistor value. In our example here for a desired output current of ~ 37mA, an external resistor
value of approximately 42 - 43 ohms is read off from the curves. The nearest standard resistor
value was selected (43 ohms in this case.)
One example of a 12V Striplight and a 24V Striplight was modified per this procedure, and the resulting
output currents are tabulated in Table 7 on the following page. Note the close agreement between the
datasheet curve and resulting output currents on the actual Striplights.
Figure 20. LED Output Current vs. External Current Adjust Resistor Value, for BCR401W and
BCR402W. Taken from BCR401W and BCR402W datasheets. Note logarithmic scale used on x-axis
for external resistor value!
Application Note
26 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
Figure 21. Curve from BCR402W datasheet “Output Current vs. External Resistor” showing
operating point selected for the example in this section with red color lines. Note logarithmic scale
of x-axis for external resistor value Rext.
Table 7. Results, example using External Resistor to increase LED current from nominal 20mA of
BCR402W to target of ~ 37mA. External resistor = 43 Ω. External resistor values for a given output
current are different for BCR401W & BCR402W ! Room temperature results (T=25°C).
No External Resistor
With External Current
Adjust Resistor = 43 Ω
12 volt PCB, using BCR402W
21.1 mA
35.9 mA
24 Volt PCB, using BCR402W
21.5 mA
36.8 mA
Application Note
27 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
12
Bill Of Material (BOM), +12 Volt Striplight Application Board
Reference
Designator
Value
D1
---
BAS3010A-03W Schottky Diode
SOD323 package
~ 250mV voltage drop at 20mA
Infineon
Technologies
R1
0 ohm
Various
R2
TBD
‘0603’ case size chip resistor, zero
ohms
‘0603’ case size chip resistor
D2, D3, D4
---
IC1
J1, J2
---
Application Note
---
Part # / Description
Manufacturer
LW T6SG Series LED
TOPLED long life
Enhanced Optical Power Light Emitting
Diode
BCR402W Constant-Current LED
Driver IC, 20mA minimum current
adjustable up to 60mA, with
Negative Temperature Coefficient,
18V Max Voltage rating. (Note,
BCR401W may be substituted if
user desires LED current from 10 to
20mA).
MTA-100 Series 3 pin connector, right
angle, Part Number # 640455-3
PC Board, Part # 402W-090608 Rev A
28 / 30
Various
OSRAM Opto
Semiconductors
Infineon
Technologies
Tyco (AMP)
Infineon
Technologies
Function
Optional
Reverse
Polarity
Protection (RPP); if RPP is
not required, OMIT D1 and
then INSERT R1 (Zero ohm
jumper).
Zero ohm ‘jumper’; ONLY use if
D1 is NOT used.
OPTIONAL:
only needed if
desired LED current is > 20mA
(when using BCR402W) or
>
10mA (when BCR401W
is
used).
Please refer
to
BCR401W and
BCR402W
datasheets for info on selection
of proper resistor value for
attaining
a
desired current.
Value of R2 will be DIFFERENT
when using BCR402W, then
when using BCR401W).
Refer to OSRAM datasheet for
complete ordering code
LED Driver IC
3 Pin DC connector header, 2
per PC board
Printed Circuit Board, +12 Volt
Striplight Application
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
13
Bill Of Material (BOM), +24 Volt Striplight Application Board
Reference
Designator
Value
D1
---
R1
0 ohm
R2
TBD
D2, D3, D4,
D5, D6, D7
---
IC1
---
J1, J2
---
14
Part # / Description
Manufacturer
BAT64-02W Schottky Diode
SCD80 package
~ 400mV voltage drop at 20mA
Infineon
Technologies
‘0603’ case size chip resistor, zero ohms
Various
‘0603’ case size chip resistor
Various
LW T6SG Series LED
TOPLED long life
Enhanced Optical Power Light Emitting
Diode
BCR402W Constant-Current LED
Driver IC, 20mA minimum current
adjustable up to 60mA, with Negative
Temperature Coefficient, 18V Max
Voltage rating. (Note, BCR401W may
be substituted if user desires LED
current from 10 to 20mA).
MTA-100 Series 3 pin connector, right
angle, Part Number # 640455-3
PC Board, Part # 402W-090611 Rev A
OSRAM Opto
Semiconductors
Infineon
Technologies
Tyco (AMP)
Infineon
Technologies
Function
Optional Reverse Polarity
Protection (RPP); if RPP is
not required, OMIT D1 and
then INSERT R1 (Zero ohm
jumper).
Zero ohm ‘jumper’; ONLY use
if D1 is NOT used.
OPTIONAL:
only needed if
desired LED current is > 20mA
(when using BCR402W) or
>
10mA (when BCR401W is
used).
Please refer
to
BCR401W
and BCR402W
datasheets
for info
on
selection of
proper resistor
value for attaining a desired
current. Value of R2 will be
DIFFERENT
when
using
BCR402W, then when
using
BCR401W).
Refer to OSRAM datasheet for
complete ordering code
LED Driver IC
3 Pin DC connector header, 2
per PC board
Printed Circuit Board, +24 Volt
Striplight Application
Summary and Conclusions
Using Infineon’s BCR401W or BCR402W Constant Current LED Driver IC instead of Resistors for biasing
LED-based Striplights offers the following advantages to the lighting systems designer:
1. tighter control of LED current over temperature & supply voltage variations, with Negative
Temperature Coefficient (NTC) of LED Driver helping prevent Thermal Runaway in LEDs
2. more homogeneous, consistent light output between adjacent strings of LED’s
3. Improved LED lifetimes and reliability arising from tighter control of LED current (and thus better
control over LED junction temperatures), as well as prevention of Thermal Runaway in the LEDs.
Application Note
29 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
Application Note No. 182
Driving Low Power LEDs from 10 to 65mA LED Driver ICs with BCR401W and BCR402W Family
15
References
Note – the references below are embedded into this document and may be opened from within Adobe
Acrobat by double-clicking on the respective paper clip icon.
[1]. BCR401W LED Driver IC Datasheet, Infineon Technologies AG.
[2]. BCR402W LED Driver IC Datasheet, Infineon Technologies AG.
[3]. BAS3010A-03W Schottky Diode Datasheet, Infineon Technologies AG.
[4]. BAT64 Series Schottky Diode Datasheet, Infineon Technologies AG.
[5]. OSRAM Opto Semiconductors LW T6SG Light-Emitting Diode Datasheet. OSRAM Opto
Semiconductors GmbH.
[6]. The embedded ZIP-format file below contains Gerber, Drill and Fabrication Drawing files for the +12
Volt Striplight Printed Circuit Board shown in this Applications Note.
[7]. The embedded ZIP-format file below contains Gerber, Drill and Fabrication Drawing files for the +24
Volt Striplight Printed Circuit Board shown in this Applications Note.
Application Note
30 / 30
Rev. 1.1, 2010-01-07
www.infineon.com
Published by Infineon Technologies AG
AN182
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