AP32306 - XMC1000/XMC4000 - Event Request Unit(ERU)

XMC 1000, XMC 4000
32-bit Microcontroller Series for Industrial Applications
Event Requ est Un it (ERU)
AP32306
Application Note
About this document
Scope and purpose
This application note describes the Event Request Unit (ERU) available in the XMC1000 and XMC4000
microcontroller families.
Intended audience
This document is intended for engineers who have a good understanding of the XMC1000 and XMC4000
microcontrollers.
Applicable Products

XMC1000 and XMC4000 Microcontroller Families
References
Infineon: Example Code, http://www.infineon.com/XMC1000 Tab: Documents
Infineon: XMC Lib, http://www.infineon.com/DAVE
Infineon: DAVE™, http://www.infineon.com/DAVE
Infineon: XMC Reference Manual, http://www.infineon.com/XMC1000 (or /XMC4000) Tab: Documents
Infineon: XMCData sheet, http://www.infineon.com/XMC1000 (or /XMC4000) Tab: Documents
V1.0
1
2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
About this document .....................................................................................................................1
Table of Contents ..........................................................................................................................2
1
1.1
1.2
Basics ..........................................................................................................................4
The Concept ........................................................................................................................................ 4
Use Cases ............................................................................................................................................. 4
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.5.1
Implementations ..........................................................................................................5
Event Request Selection ..................................................................................................................... 6
Signal Combination Logic ................................................................................................................... 7
Input and Trigger Functions ............................................................................................................... 7
Cross Connect Selection ..................................................................................................................... 7
Output Gating Selection ..................................................................................................................... 7
Output Gating by Designated Peripheral Trigger Inputs ............................................................. 7
3
3.1
3.2
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix .......................................................................................8
The ERU Pin Connection Tables ......................................................................................................... 8
The Principle Blocks of the ERU0 vs. the ERU1 in Detail .................................................................... 8
4
4.1
4.2
Getting Started with Event Request Unit – ERU ............................................................. 10
Initialization Example ....................................................................................................................... 10
Event Request Unit Block Diagrams and Control by Registers........................................................ 12
5
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.6.1
5.6.1.1
5.6.1.2
5.6.1.3
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests ............................................................... 13
External Interrupts as Events ............................................................................................................ 13
Handling External Service Requests by the ERU .............................................................................. 13
Scope of the ERU0 Event Request Sources ...................................................................................... 14
Service Request Handling ................................................................................................................. 14
Examples of Versatile External Interrupt Request Scenarios .......................................................... 15
Use Case Example 1: Triggering an External Interrupt Request ...................................................... 17
XMC Lib Implementation ............................................................................................................ 17
Configuration ......................................................................................................................... 17
Initialization ........................................................................................................................... 17
Implementation ..................................................................................................................... 18
6
6.1
6.2
Event Trigger Pulse and Level Status Generation ........................................................... 19
Event Detection and Evaluation Process ......................................................................................... 19
Distribution of Detected Events Back to System ............................................................................. 19
7
7.1
Getting Started with Event Request Unit Trigger Logic ................................................... 21
Trigger Control Setup Example ........................................................................................................ 21
8
8.1
8.2
8.3
Conditional Event Request Handling ............................................................................ 22
Event Request Selection ................................................................................................................... 22
Signal Combination Logic ................................................................................................................. 22
Top-Level Control of Event Request Selection and Combination ................................................... 22
9
9.1
Getting Started with ERU and Input Selection & Combination......................................... 25
Initialization example........................................................................................................................ 25
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Table of Contents
10
10.1
Runtime Handling of ERU and Input Selection & Combination ........................................ 27
Handling Event Concatenation and using Pattern Match Detection .............................................. 27
11
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.3.1
11.3.2
Time Windowing ......................................................................................................... 29
The ERU and Sequential Events Control .......................................................................................... 29
Use Case with the ERU in Time Windowing ...................................................................................... 29
Using Delayed Events in External Events Control as a State-Machine ............................................ 29
Combining Event Flags with Input Channel Events ................................................................... 30
Combining Event Flags with the Designated Peripheral Trigger Inputs ................................... 31
12
12.1
12.2
12.3
Event Request Routing to Service Providers .................................................................. 32
The Cross Connect Selection ............................................................................................................ 32
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix.......................................................................................................... 33
The ERU Pin Connection Tables ....................................................................................................... 33
13
Getting Started with Event Request Unit Cross Connect ................................................. 34
14
14.1
14.2
14.3
14.4
14.5
14.6
14.6.1
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests ............................................................... 36
Event Request Selection ................................................................................................................... 36
Signal Combination Logic ................................................................................................................. 36
Input and Trigger functions .............................................................................................................. 36
Cross Connect Selection ................................................................................................................... 36
Output Gating Selection ................................................................................................................... 36
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix.......................................................................................................... 36
The ERU Pin Connection Tables ................................................................................................. 37
15
15.1
15.1.1
Getting Started with Event Request Unit and Top-Level Control ..................................... 39
Cross Interconnection Example – Using CCU4, ERU1, ADC and GPIO ............................................. 39
ADC Request on Port Pin P2.1 State AND the Timer CCU40CC40 Status Bit ............................. 39
16
16.1
16.1.1
16.1.2
16.1.3
16.1.4
16.2
16.2.1
16.2.1.1
16.2.1.2
16.2.1.3
Control by Event Pattern Match ................................................................................... 41
The Output Gating Unit in Detail ...................................................................................................... 42
Pattern Detect status – PDOUT................................................................................................... 43
Pattern Event Edge Detection .................................................................................................... 43
Output Gating Selection ............................................................................................................. 43
Trigger and Interrupt Output – IOUT .......................................................................................... 44
Use Case Example 2: Gating a Peripheral Trigger Event with a Port Pin ......................................... 44
XMC Lib Implementation ............................................................................................................ 44
Configuration ......................................................................................................................... 44
Initialization ........................................................................................................................... 45
Implementation ..................................................................................................................... 45
17
Revision History .......................................................................................................... 46
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Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Basics
1
Basics
The Event Request Unit (ERU) enables time-critical interconnections when total real-time correctness and
safety is required. The ERU has tailor-made event schemes that provide high-level control interactions
between different modules. This reduces SW in timer-ADC-IO interactions.
1.1
The Concept
The Event Request Unit (ERU) is a modular logic that can select, combine, detect and memorize peripheral
events. When the gating conditions are met, the ERU can generate trigger pulses that are distributed back to
the system as requests for HW actions. The ERU can select input signals from up to 32 event sources and
request actions through four output channels.
The ability of the ERU to control events enables the creation of comprehensive embedded tasks in HW. The
event flow and action scheme can be configured by the user and then the ERU can process actions from
other parts of the system without any ongoing SW control.
1.2
Use Cases
The ERU is typically used to provide an alternative signal path when there is no direct signal path available.
For example, the ERU can signal the start of ADC conversions based on specific conditions like a port pin
state, a time window due to a second timer, or a certain event pattern.
ERU
1
1
0
0
ADC
CAPCOM
>1
&
TRIGGERS
Trigger Cross Connect
Event Trigger Logic
/ Event Status Flag
Event Combinations
&
Event Input Selectors
Source Inputs Channel 0
POSIF
2
Source Inputs Channel 1
DAC
3
3
EVENTS
GPIO
2
Source Inputs Channel 2
CAPCOM
Source Inputs Channel 3
ADC
Event Services by
Action Providers
Event Request Unit
Output Gating Unit 0
Service Requests
by Event Sources
IRQ/DMA
DSD
POSIF
DEV_ERU_01_Use_Case.vsd
Figure 1
Use Cases for an Event Request Unit (ERU)
2
Implementations
In the XMC4000 microcontrollers there are two ERUs: ERU0 and ERU1. The two ERUs are functionally the
same but each has a different application focus due to the nature of their connections to the system (see
Figure 2).
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Implementations


ERU0 selects External Event Requests, mainly from General Purpose IOs (GPIO).
ERU1 selects Internal Event Requests from embedded peripherals (PERIPH) and also from General
Purpose IOs.
ERU0 links trigger pulses (named TRIGGER) to the interrupt system only. ERU1 can also link trigger pulses to
the peripherals and distribute Event Pattern Match Detect status signals (named LEVEL).
Figure 2 shows how units are interfaced to the ERUs and interact via a Top-Level Interconnect Matrix. To
complete the picture of possible interaction scenarios, the diagram also shows how operations can be
extended to involve DMA transfers (by the GPDMA) which are triggered by a handler (DLR) on the Interrupt
Service Request Lines (SRn).
ERU0
EXTERNAL EVENTS
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
- Select
- Combine
x - Detect y
- CrossConnect
- Gate
IOUTy
TRIGGER
GPDMA
GPIO
GPIO
Interrupt
Service
Requests
GPIO
GPIO
SR1-4
SR5-8
ERU1
xA[3:0]
INTERNAL EVENTS
xB[3:0]
- Select
- Combine
x - Detect y
- CrossConnect
- Gate
IOUTy
TRIGGER
PDOUTy
LEVEL
PERIPH
PERIPH
PERIPH
x=0-3
Top-Level
Cross
Interconnect
y=0-3
DEV_ERU_01_ERU01_principle_simplified.vsd
Figure 2
Signal Flow Principle with ERUs in XMC4000
In the XMC1000 microcontroller, up to two ERUs are implemented: ERU0 and ERU1. Unlike the XMC4000, the
ERUs in the XMC1000 are not differentiated by the connections they have to the system (see Figure 3). Both
ERUs (ERUx) select Internal Event Requests from both embedded peripherals (PERIPH) and General Purpose
IOs. ERUx links the trigger pulses (named TRIGGER) to the interrupt system and the peripherals. Both ERUs
can distribute Event Pattern Match Detect status signals (named LEVEL).
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AP32306
Implementations
Interrupt
Service
Requests
GPIO
EXTERNAL EVENTS
GPIO
SRn
GPIO
GPIO
LEVEL
ERUx
xA[3:0]
INTERNAL EVENTS
xB[3:0]
- Select
- Combine
x - Detect y
- CrossConnect
- Gate
GOUTy
IOUTy
TRIGGER
PDOUTy
LEVEL
PERIPH
PERIPH
PERIPH
x=0-3
Top-Level
Cross
Interconnect
y=0-3
DEV_ERU_01_ERUx_principle_simplified.vsd
Figure 3
Signal Flow Principle with ERUs in XMC1000
Note: The functional description and examples provided in this document are based on the XMC4000
implementation unless otherwise stated. Nevertheless, besides the differences in the ERU port
connections and the lack of support for DMA transfers, they can be mostly applied also to the XMC1000.
2.1
Event Request Selection
Input lines, xA(3:0) and xB(3:0), are connected to the corresponding ERU input channel x (x=0-3). Each input
line of the ERU is hard-wired to a specific event source. A specific Event Request, from an I/O pin or a
peripheral unit, is selected by a MUX switch at either the xA(3:0) or at the xB(3:0) input line group of ERU0 or
ERU1, according to the ERU Pin Connection tables.
2.2
Signal Combination Logic
An Event Request signal pair (A,B), selected by the input line groups xA(3:0) and xB(3:0) respectively, can be
processed as a compound event. The Combination Logic of the channel x input stage can create a
conditional signal before it is transferred to the Event Trigger Logic stage for event edge detection.
2.3
Input and Trigger Functions
A signal edge is regarded as a true event edge if it complies with the considered edge, positive or negative. If
it is a true event, an event flag FLx is set, a trigger pulse TRx is created and, if enabled, the event and the
event flag level status are passed to the Cross Connect Select stage. The flag can be reset by a false event or
by SW.
Application Note
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AP32306
Implementations
2.4
Cross Connect Selection
The Cross Connect Select stage, for each channel x of an ERU, is an Event Trigger pulse routing matrix that is
able to switch the trigger pulse distribution path back to the system via any output channel y (y=0-3). This
can target a certain event service action provider according to the Top-Level control by the ERU Pin
Connections tables.
2.5
Output Gating Selection
The Output Gating Selection stage of an ERU can gate the Trigger Pulse signals (TRIGGER) in the output
channels IOUTy (y=0-3) by the Event Pattern Match/Mismatch Detect status (LEVEL) output signal, PDOUTy
(y=0-3). An Event Pattern is a combination of memorized x-channel events stored in the event flags FLx (x=03).
2.5.1
Output Gating by Designated Peripheral Trigger Inputs
ERU1 has designated trigger inputs from the ADC and from some of the CAPCOM4/-8 units that can be linked
directly to the Gated Trigger stage of an Output Gating Unit channel (OGUy). By this “kitchen entrance”-like
concept, these Peripheral Triggers act immediately, unconditionally in the output gating by the event flags
FLx.
Application Note
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AP32306
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix
3
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix
Most interconnect lines go directly from one system unit to another system unit without passing through an
ERU. For example, an ADC conversion can be started directly by a signal from a timer. These immediate
interconnections are described virtually by the so called Top-Level Interconnect matrix – a table which is
embodied by a block in the drawings (see Figure 4).
Top Level Control
GPIO
GPIO
ERU1
POSIF
ERU1
CAN
CCU4x
USIC
ADC
POSIF
CAN
Inter
Connect
Matrix
CCU4x
USIC
ADC
CCU8x
CCU8x
LEDTS
LEDTS
DSD
DSD
DAC
DAC
DEV_ERU_01_Top_Level_Interconnect.vsd
Figure 4
The Top-Level Interconnect Matrix
3.1
The ERU Pin Connection Tables
The ERU Pin Connection tables (which describe the ERU0 and ERU1 interfaces to peripheral units or IOs) are
actually subsets of the total system Top-Level Interconnect matrix – split up like this in order to ease
understanding of those paths where an ERU is involved.
3.2
The Principle Blocks of the ERU0 vs. the ERU1 in Detail
The principle difference between the ERU0 and the ERU1 implementations in XMC4000 are which event
request sources they are connected to as service providers and which action providers they are linked to as
service requestors: ERU0 for external events - and ERU1 for internal events plus 3 Peripheral Trigger “kitchen
entrances” (see Figure 5).
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AP32306
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix
Event Request Unit 0 – ERU0
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
EXTERNAL EVENTS
xB[3:0]
B
x=0-3
Output
Gating Unit y
>1
TRIGGER
IOUTy
&
y=0-3
PD or G
Select
0
0
1
Option:
LEVEL
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
Cross
Connect
Select
0 à TRIGGER out / 1 à LEVEL out
IO:s
GPIO
GPDMA
Req Ack
GPIO
DLR
GPIO
NVIC.SR1
NVIC.SR2
VADC.G0CH6,7
VADC.G2CH6,7
RTC_XTAL1
RTC_IO_1
NVIC.SR3
NVIC.SR4
Service Request Lines
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
INTERNAL EVENTS
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0-3
yper[2:0]
NVIC.SR1-SR8
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
>1
&
PDOUTy
LEVEL
IOUTy
TRIGGER
Peripheral
Select
y=0-3
Peripheral Trigger
PER
PER
PER
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_01_ERU0_ERU1.vsd
Figure 5
XMC4000 Event Request Unit Overview (ERU0 versus ERU1)
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Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit – ERU
4
Getting Started with Event Request Unit – ERU
There is one Input Selection Register and two Control Registers per input channel x (x=0-3). These are used
to setup the entire functionality of an ERU at the Top Level and to target the Output Channels y (y=0-3):



EXISEL
EXICONx
EXOCONx
Input Selection Register
Input and Trigger Control Register
Output Control Register
Initializations and functions are determined by writing to the respective register bitfields (see Figure 6).
4.1
Initialization Example
// Set up ERU1 Input Channel x=0, targeting the Output Channel y=2 (IOUT2):
// Select Event Request for input A and B in the ERU1_EXISEL register bitfields:
EXS0A = 0; //select input ERU1_0A0 – i.e. A connected to GPIO port pin P1.5
EXS0B = 1; //select input ERU1_0B1 – i.e. B connected to CCU80.ST0 status bit 0
// Select logical combinations that should be taken into account as event request
NA = 0; // input A is used directly, i.e. not inverted
NB = 0; // input A is used directly, i.e. not inverted
SS = 3; // setup source combination, i.e. logical condition: input A AND input B
// Select Event Trigger Logic conditions for trigger, level detect and event edge
PE = 1; // set trigger pulse enable, i.e. an output trigger pulse will be created
LD = 0; // define event flag sticky, i.e. it will not be rebuild by HW, but by SW
RE = 1; // detection on Rising Edge, i.e. event edge on positive signal transition
FE = 0; // no detection on Falling Edge
// Perform Cross Connect Selection, i.e. select target output channel y (here y=2)
// for the Event Trigger Logic Output Pulse TR0 from input channel x (here x=0):
OCS = 2; // the channel output (IOUT2) would trigger the following destinations:
// CCU4x.IN2(K) - i.e. CAPCOM4 Unit CCU4x, Slice CC42 Timer Input
// CCU8x.IN2(G) - i.e. CAPCOM8 Unit CCU8x, Slice CC42 Timer Input
// VADC.G2REQTRN - i.e. ADC Trigger Request N Input, Group 2
// VADC.G3REQTRN - i.e. ADC Trigger Request N Input, Group 3
// ERU1.1B3 - i.e. A trigger feed-back to ERU1 Channel Input 1B3
// NVIC.SR7 - i.e. A trigger puls to Service Request Line nr 7
// POSIF0.MSET(F) - i.e. POSIF 0 Multi Channel Next Pattern Update Set
// POSIF1.MSET(F)- i.e. POSIF 1 Multi Channel Next Pattern Update Set
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AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit – ERU
// Select Event Output Trigger Control 2 Register ERU1_EXOCON2 for output gating
// Select Output Gating functions – Here: just a straight forward alternative:
ISS = 0;
// set the Internal Peripheral Trigger Source Selection =0, “no source”
GEEN = 0; // disable “Gating Event Enable on Pattern Detection Changes” trigger
GP = 1;
// set “Output Gating Select on Pattern Detection” =1, to activate IOUT2
IPEN0, IPEN1, IPEN2, IPEN3 = 0; // disable the Pattern Detection Enable flags
Application Note
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AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit – ERU
4.2
Event Request Unit Block Diagrams and Control by Registers
Event Request Select
Cross Connect Selection
Event Trigger Logic
Channel x
Trigger Pulse Distrubution
xA0
xA1
A
A
A’
A & B,
A & B’
A’& B
A’& B’
A + B,
A + B’
A’+ B
A’+ B’
B
B’
xA2
xA3
xB0
xB1
Considered
event edge:
Rise or Fall
B
xB2
&
True
d
dt
LEVEL
S
False
&
“Sticky” 1
Event
Flag? 0
xB3
TRx à OGU0 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU1 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU2 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU3 Trigger Input x
TRIGGER
TRx
Trigger x
Enable
Event
Flag
1
R
Event Pattern Detection
FLx à OGU0 Level Input x
FLx à OGU1 Level Input x
FLx à OGU2 Level Input x
FLx à OGU3 Level Input x
Q
FLx
Q
Clear by SW
Matrix to Output Gating Unit OGUy[3:0]
REGISTER.BITFIELD:
EXISEL.
EXSxA
EXICONx.
NA
EXICONx.
NB
EXICONx.
SS
EXISEL.
EXSxB
EXICONx.
RE
EXICONx.
FE
EXICONx.
LD
REGISTER.
BITFIELD:
EXICONx.
PE
Pattern Detect Result Flag:
EXOCONy.
PDR
Output Gating Unit - OGUy
Pattern Detect
EXOCONy.
IPEN0,
FL0
EXOCONy.
IPEN1,
FL1
EXOCONy.
IPEN2,
FL2
EXOCONy.
IPEN3
FL3
1
Output Gating Select
PDOUTy
&
IPEN0
1
”1" ”0"
1
PDR
Result
Flag
IPEN1
1
IPEN2
delay
1
(ERU1
only!)
EXOCONy.GP:
case 3: on “Pattern Mismatch”
case 2: on “Pattern Match”
case 1: no ”Output Gating”
case 0: no ”Trigger Pulse” and
no ”Interrupt request”
=1
Pattern
Edge Trigger
IPEN3
&
Gated
Trigger
GEEN
TR0
TR1
Pattern Match Out
on enabled Event Flags
LEVEL
1
EXOCONy.
GEEN
>1
Event
Trigger
TR2
TR3
PT Select:
EXOCONy.
ISS
EXOCONy.
OCS
EXICONx.
FL
>1
IOUTy
TRIGGER
delay
y = 0-3
PT0
”0"
PT1
1
PT2
delay
Periferal Trigger ”0"
&
1
”0"
”1"
ERU1
ERU0
DEV_ERU_01_Blocks_Registers.vsd
Figure 6
Event Request Unit Block Diagrams and Control by Registers
Application Note
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Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
5
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
Instead of the traditional concept of External Interrupts, the notion here is rather of External Events. This is
because the device can do more than just enabling external interrupt services.
5.1
External Interrupts as Events
Service request signals from external sources are always regarded as event requests and may benefit from
the value adding logic operations offered by the ERU. For example, the service request can be routed on-thefly by cross connection within the ERU to alternative service providers or immediate DMA support. All this is
achieved without any latency impact.
5.2
Handling External Service Requests by the ERU
The Event Request Unit 0 (ERU0) selects and detects external events requests. It then creates and routes
each Trigger Pulse (TRIGGER) to the appropriate service provider via a Service Request Line. This process
addresses a service provider in SW, or by extension, a DMA action (see Figure 7).
Event Request Unit 0 – ERU0
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
xB[3:0]
B
x=0-3
Cross
Connect
Select
>1
TRIGGER
IOUTy
&
y=0-3
PD or G
Select
0
0
1
Option:
LEVEL
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
0 = TRIGGER out / 1 = LEVEL out
EXTERNAL EVENTS
GPIO
GPDMA
Req Ack
GPIO
DLR
GPIO
0A3 , 1A3
2A3 , 3A3
1A1
1B1
VADC.G0CH6,7
VADC.G2CH6,7
RTC_IO_1
RTC_XTAL1
NVIC.SR1
NVIC.SR2
NVIC.SR3
NVIC.SR4
SR1 … SR4
Service Request Lines
DEV_ERU_02_Event_Request_Unit_0.vsd
Figure 7
Schematic view of the ERU0 blocks for handling External Event Requests
Application Note
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Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
5.3
Scope of the ERU0 Event Request Sources
The Event Request Unit 0 (ERU0) has no internal event request sources. It only handles external event
requests coming from off-chip sources, via General Purpose IO Port Pins (GPIO). However, some special IOs
can be found, namely the dedicated IO-pins for Voltage Range Comparators and RTC. See Table 1.
Table 1
ERU0 Pin Connections
Global Inputs
Connected To
Corresponding Port Pins respectively
ERU0_0A0 … ERU0_0A2
GPIO
P0.1, P3.2, P2.5
ERU0_0A3
VADC_G0CH6
P14.6 (used for out of range comparator)
ERU0_0B0 … ERU0_0B3
GPIO
P0.0, P3.1, P2.4
ERU0_1A0
GPIO
P0.10,
ERU0_1A1A, ERU0_1A1B
RTC_IO_1
P3.7
ERU0_1A2
GPIO
P2.3
ERU0_1A3
VADC_G0CH7
P14.7 (used for out of range comparator)
ERU0_1B0
GPIO
P0.9
ERU0_1B1
RTC_XTAL1
P3.7
ERU0_1B2 … ERU0_1B3
GPIO
P2.2, P2.6
ERU0_2A0 … ERU0_2A2
GPIO
P1.5, P0.8, P0.13
ERU0_2A3
VADC_G2CH6
P15.6 (used for out of range comparator)
ERU0_2B0 … ERU0_2B3
GPIO
P1.4, P0.7, P0.12, P0.4
ERU0_3A0 … ERU0_3A2
GPIO
P1.1, P3.6, P0.11
ERU0_3A3
VADC_G2CH7
P15.7 (used for out of range comparator)
ERU0_3B0 … ERU0_3B3
GPIO
P1.0, P3.5, P0.6, P0.2
5.4
Service Request Handling
From the concept point of view an ERU is both a service provider and a service request source. ERU0 is the
only input for all external event requests and thus a service provider. In turn ERU0 is a service request source
for the NVIC (i.e. the Nested Vector Interrupt Controller) or the DMA Handler (DLR) for the DMA support.
4 Dual-Quad Input Channels x:
ERU0_xA[3:0] , ERU0_xB[3:0])
EXTERNAL EVENTS
Top-Level
Event
Request
Unit 0
GPIO
4 Trigger Outputs y:
ERU0_IOUTy
TRIGGER
GPDMA
Req Ack
GPIO
DLR
GPIO
I/O:s
VADC.G0CH6,7
VADC.G2CH6,7
RTC_IO_1
RTC_XTAL1
NVIC.SR2
NVIC.SR3
NVIC.SR4
SR1 … SR4
Service Request Lines
DEV_ERU_02_Fig_ERU000.vsd
Application Note
NVIC.SR1
14
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
Figure 8
Signal Flow Principle with the Event Request Unit 0 – ERU0
5.5
Examples of Versatile External Interrupt Request Scenarios
Figure 9 shows the four fundamental stages of routing external requests via ERU0 to the service providers.
Any mix of using these fundamental ERU0 operations shown by the scenarios Ex1 - Ex4 can be performed as
well. Note the pattern detection condition of two consecutive events in Ex4 that performs a state-machinelike task.
Application Note
15
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
ERU0
ERU0_IOUT0
ERU0_0A0
Ex 1: A ”straight forward”
External Interrupt Request
on neg. or pos. signal edge
TRIGGER
or
NVIC.SR1
GPIO
NVIC.SR2
GPIO
NVIC.SR3
NVIC.SR4
ERU0
ERU0_IOUT2
TRIGGER
ERU0_0A0
Ex 2: A ”cross connected”
External Interrupt Request
from Channel 0 to SR-line 3
NVIC.SR1
GPIO
NVIC.SR2
GPIO
NVIC.SR3
NVIC.SR4
ERU0
ERU0_0A0
ERU0_IOUT0
&
ERU0_0B3
Ex 3: ”Combined events” for
External Interrupt Requests
from Channel 0 to SR-line 1
TRIGGER
NVIC.SR1
GPIO
NVIC.SR2
GPIO
NVIC.SR3
&:
NVIC.SR4
IOUT0 TRIGGER:
ERU0
ERU0_2A0
&
ERU0_IOUT0
TRIGGER
S Q
R
ERU0_0B3
Ex 4: Latched, ”postponed”,
External Interrupt Request
on Channel 0 by Channel 2
FL0 = Q:
NVIC.SR1
GPIO
NVIC.SR2
GPIO
NVIC.SR3
NVIC.SR4
&:
IOUT0 TRIGGER:
External
Service
Request
latched in
Event Flag
FL0
Latched
Service
Request
released
by
Channel 2
SR1 … SR4
Service Request Lines
DEV_ERU_02_Fig_ERU_Ext_Int_Scenarious.vsd
Figure 9
Examples of Versatile External Interrupt Request Scenarios with the ERU0
5.6
Use Case Example 1: Triggering an External Interrupt Request
In this use case example, ERU0 is used to trigger an external interrupt request upon detection of a falling
edge on the port pin P2.5. When the interrupt is serviced by the CPU, the port pin P0.0 is toggled.
Application Note
16
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
The example is developed based on the XMC1200 device.
5.6.1
XMC Lib Implementation
The next sections describe how the Infineon XMC library (XMC Lib) can be used to implement the example.
5.6.1.1
Configuration
P2.5 is connected to the channel 1 input A1 so the associated Event Trigger Logic 1 (ETL1) is used. It is
configured to:
Select input ERU_1A1 as the only input; input Bx is not required because it is not used.
Enable falling edge detection.
Select the status flag EXICON1.FL as a sticky flag to indicate the occurrence of the falling edge event.
Enable output pulse trigger to any available Output Gating Unit (OGUy) for interrupt request generation.
In this example, OGU0 is selected




XMC_ERU_ETL_CONFIG_t button_event_generator_config =
{
.input = ERU0_ETL1_INPUTA_P2_5,
.source = XMC_ERU_ETL_SOURCE_A,
.edge_detection = XMC_ERU_ETL_EDGE_DETECTION_FALLING,
.status_flag_mode = XMC_ERU_ETL_STATUS_FLAG_MODE_SWCTRL,
.enable_output_trigger = true,
.output_trigger_channel = XMC_ERU_ETL_OUTPUT_TRIGGER_CHANNEL0
};
To enable the interrupt request generation, OGU0 has to be configured to react on the trigger event from
ETL1. The pattern detection and the peripheral trigger features are not used so it is not necessary to define
the related data types.
XMC_ERU_OGU_CONFIG_t button_event_detection_config =
{
.enable_pattern_detection = false,
.service_request = XMC_ERU_OGU_SERVICE_REQUEST_ON_TRIGGER
};
5.6.1.2
Initialization
The selected ETL and OGU channels are then initialized with the configurations defined in Section 5.6.1.1.
This is done by calling their respective initialization functions in main().
XMC_ERU_ETL_Init(ERU0_ETL1, &button_event_generator_config);
XMC_ERU_OGU_Init(ERU0_OGU0, &button_event_detection_config);
Besides the ERU, the ports and the NVIC also need to be initialized to enable the P2.5 input and P0.0 general
purpose output pins, and the ERU0.SR0 interrupt.
Application Note
17
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Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
5.6.1.3
Implementation
When a falling edge is applied on the P2.5 input, the ERU0.SR0 interrupt is triggered. In the interrupt service
routine, the status flag is cleared and the P0.0 output is toggled.
void ERU0_0_IRQHandler(void)
{
XMC_ERU_ETL_ClearStatusFlag(ERU0_ETL1);
XMC_GPIO_ToggleOutput(LED);
}
Application Note
18
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Event Trigger Pulse and Level Status Generation
6
Event Trigger Pulse and Level Status Generation
An Event can be represented by a Rising or Falling Edge transition (or by both transitions) of an Event
Request carrier signal, indicating that a certain event has occurred. The event edge is regarded as a true
event edge if it equals the considered event edge, expected from a selected source according to the TopLevel agenda.
6.1
Event Detection and Evaluation Process
The Event Trigger Logic input signal from the Event Request Select stage represents a certain selected I/O
pin or system unit status, hard wired to the ERU input channel x (x=0-3) stage. The Event Trigger Logic in
turn detects and sorts the true and false event edge signals by demultiplexing onto two separate branches
(see Figure 10).
6.2


Distribution of Detected Events Back to System
The true event TRIGGER branch can, if enabled, generate an event Trigger Pulse TRx targeting a specific
ERU output IOUTy. The channel (y=0-3) is Top-Level selected via the successive Cross Connect Select.
The true event LEVEL branch sets the Event Flag FLx used by all Output Gating Units for Pattern
Detection.
Application Note
19
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Event Trigger Pulse and Level Status Generation
Event Trigger Logic
Considered
event edge:
Rise or Fall
Signal from the Event
Request Select stage
Trigger x
Enable
TRIGGER
TRx
&
True
d
dt
LEVEL
S
False
&
“Sticky” 1
Event
Flag? 0
1
Q
Event
Flag
R
FLx
Trigger to the Cross
Connect Selection
Level to the Cross
Connect Selection
Q
Clear by SW
Service Requests
for NVIC or DMA
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0..3
yper[2:0]
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
>1
&
PDOUTy
LEVEL
IOUTy
TRIGGER
Peripheral
Select
y=0..3
Peripheral Trigger
PERIF
PERIF
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_03_Event_Edge_Detection.vsd
Figure 10
The Event Trigger Logic for Event Detection, Trigger Pulse and Level Status Generation
Application Note
20
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit Trigger Logic
7
Getting Started with Event Request Unit Trigger Logic
There is one Input Selection Register and two Control Registers per input channel x (x=0-3). These are used
to setup the entire functionality of an ERU at the Top Level and to target the Output Channels y (y=0-3):



EXISEL
EXICONx
EXOCONx
Input Selection Register
Input and Trigger Control Register
Output Control Register
The Trigger Pulse TRx (TRIGGER) Enable and the Event Flag FLx (LEVEL) status are controlled by the input
registers ERU0_EXICONx and ERU1_EXICONx respectively.
7.1
Trigger Control Setup Example
Initializations and functions are determined by writing to the respective register EXICONx.bitfield (see Figure
11).
Assume the following case:
// Initialize
FL = 0; // Clear the event flag, i.e. it will not be rebuild by HW, but by SW
// Select Event Trigger Logic conditions for trigger, level detect and event edge
PE = 1; // set trigger pulse enable, i.e. an output trigger pulse will be created
LD = 0; // define event flag sticky, i.e. it will not be rebuild by HW, but by SW
RE = 1; // detection on Rising Edge, i.e. event edge on positive signal transition
FE = 0; // no detection on Falling Edge
Event Trigger Logic
Considered
event edge:
Rise or Fall
Signal from the Event
Request Select stage
&
True
d
dt
False
“Sticky” 1
Event
Flag? 0
REGISTER.
BITFIELD:
TRIGGER
TRx
Trigger x
Enable
EXICONx.
RE
EXICONx.
FE
EXICONx.
LD
LEVEL
S
&
Q
Event
Flag
1
R
FLx
Trigger to the Cross
Connect Selection
Level to the Cross
Connect Selection
Q
Clear by SW
EXICONx.
FL
EXICONx.
PE
DEV_ERU_03_Edge_Detection_Registers.vsd
Figure 11
The Event Trigger Logic Input and Control Register
Application Note
21
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Conditional Event Request Handling
8
Conditional Event Request Handling
An operation that is triggered beyond its deadline should, from a hard realtime perspective, be considered
as useless. Such an event might in some applications cause hazards or catastrophic consequences. An ERU
offers the possibility to ensure realtime correctness or safety by conditional request handling of compound
events.
8.1
Event Request Selection
Each input line, to xA(3:0) or xB(3:0) of an ERU input channel x (x=0-3), is hard wired to a unique event
source. This means a specific Event Request, from an I/O pin or a peripheral unit, is selected by a MUX switch
at either the xA(3:0) or at the xB(3:0) input line group of the ERU0 or ERU1, according to the ERU Pin
Connections tables.
8.2
Signal Combination Logic
An Event Request signal pair (A, B), selected by the input line groups xA(3:0) and xB(3:0) respectively, can
represent a considered compound event. Such a conditional signal can be created by the Combination Logic
in the channel x input stage before it is transfered to the Event Trigger Logic stage for event edge detection.
8.3
Top-Level Control of Event Request Selection and Combination
Figure 12 and Figure 13 show the implementation of the request selection and combination stages. Event
request signals on the input lines xA(3:0) and xB(3:0) of a channel x (x=0-3) can be selected and combined on
a Top-Level by the EXISEL and EXICONx registers:
Application Note
22
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Conditional Event Request Handling
Event Request Select
xA0
xA1
A
xA2
xA3
Input
Channel x
x = 0-3
xB0
xB1
B
xB2
A
A’
A & B,
A & B’
A’& B
A’& B’
A + B,
A + B’
A’+ B
A’+ B’
B
B’
Signal to Event
Trigger Logic
xB3
Service Requests
for NVIC or DMA
Channel x[3:0]
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0-3
yper[2:0]
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
>1
Peripheral
Select
&
PDOUTy
LEVEL
IOUTy
TRIGGER
y=0..3
Peripheral Trigger
PERIF
PERIF
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_04_Event_Request_Select.vsd
Figure 12
Focusing the ERU1 Event Request Select & Combination Logic Input Stage
Application Note
23
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Conditional Event Request Handling
xA0
xA1
xA[3:0]
xA2
Event Request Select
A
&
1
xA3
Input
Channel x
xB0
xB1
xB[3:0]
xB2
xB3
1
B
1
A & B,
A & B’
A’& B
A’& B’
A
A’
B
B’
A + B,
A + B’
A’+ B
A’+ B’
Signal to Event
Trigger Logic
x=0-3
Event Request Select
xA0
xA1
A
xA2
xA3
Input
Channel x
x = 0-3
xB0
xB1
xB2
B
A
A’
A & B,
A & B’
A’& B
A’& B’
A + B,
A + B’
A’+ B
A’+ B’
B
B’
Signal to Event
Trigger Logic
xB3
Channel x[3:0]
DEV_ERU_04_Logic_Combination_of_Signals.vsd
Figure 13
Detailed view of the Event Request Select Logic Stage
Application Note
24
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with ERU and Input Selection & Combination
9
Getting Started with ERU and Input Selection &
Combination
There is one Input Selection Register and two Control Registers per input channel x (x=0-3). These are used
to setup the entire functionality of an ERU at the Top Level and to target the Output Channels y (y=0-3):



EXISEL
EXICONx
EXOCONx
9.1
Input Selection Register
Input and Trigger Control Register
Output Control Register
Initialization example
// Assume that an EXTERNAL INPUT SIGNAL should be detected within a TIME WINDOW:
// Set up ERU1 Input Channel x=0 for connection to the EXTERNAL INPUT SIGNAL at
// Port Pin P1.15 and CAPCOM8 CCU80.ST0 Status Bit controlling the TIME WINDOW.
// Select Event Request for input A and B in the ERU1_EXISEL register bitfields:
EXS0A = 0; // select input ERU1_0A0 – i.e. A connected to GPIO port pin P1.5
EXS0B = 1; // select input ERU1_0B1 – i.e. B connected to CCU80.ST0 status bit 0
// Select logical combinations that should be taken into account as event request
NA = 0; // input A is used directly, i.e. not inverted
NB = 0; // input A is used directly, i.e. not inverted
SS = 3; // setup source combination, i.e. logical condition: input A AND input B
Event Request Select
Channel x
xA0
xA1
A
xA2
xA3
Input
Channel x
x = 0-3
xB0
xB1
xB2
B
A
A’
A & B,
A & B’
A’& B
A’& B’
A + B,
A + B’
A’+ B
A’+ B’
B
B’
Signal to Event
Trigger Logic
xB3
REGISTER.
BITFIELD:
EXISEL.
EXSxA
EXISEL.
EXSxB
Application Note
EXICONx.
NA
EXICONx.
NB
EXICONx.
SS
DEV_ERU_04_Event_Request_Select_Registers.vsd
25
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with ERU and Input Selection & Combination
Figure 14
The Event Request Select Stage Control Registers
Application Note
26
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Runtime Handling of ERU and Input Selection & Combination
10
Runtime Handling of ERU and Input Selection &
Combination
10.1
Handling Event Concatenation and using Pattern Match Detection
The following example shows a state-machine-like configuration setup of ERU1. It is used to explain how a
certain sequence of events can be concatenated on a Top-Level control and detected by an Event Pattern
Match on the ERU output gating stage. One example scenario is a Debounce Rejection Filter.
Event
Start
Bouncing to
be rejected!
1
GPIO:
P1.15
NVIC.SR5
1
SEL
ERU1
ERU1_1A0
ERU1_IOUT2
ERU1_IOUT0
S Q
R
TR1
SEL
FL1
3
ERU1_2A2
S Q
&
R
FL2
4
TRIGGER
TR2
2
ERU1_PDOUT0
Pattern Detect
4
LEVEL
SW
CCU40.ST2
3
Compare
Timer
CC42
CCU40.IN2(K)
TR1
2
Delay by the CC42 Timer Single Shot
Start of Single Shot by Trigger TR1
2
4
PERIPH
4
Bounce-free
Event Signal
Top-Level
Event
Target
Cross
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_04_Debouncing_by_Event_Request_concatenation_v2.vsd
Figure 15
Concatenation of events with Time Window for a press-button Debounce Rejection Filter
1. Bouncing signal from SWITCH-ON. This signal is connected to the ERU1 Channel 1 Input Selection Pin A0
(ERU1_1A0). The event is detected on the Rising Edge, memorized in event flag FL1 and then trigger
pulse TR1 is generated on the Output Gating Unit 2 (IOUT2) after the ERU1 internal Cross Connect Stage.
2. Trigger TR1 on Output Gating Unit 2 (IOUT2) starts the Timer CCU40T42 in Single Shot mode by an
External Event Control command (including the Extended Mode condition for Flush/Start).
3. On the single shot timer Compare Event that starts the Single Shot time frame, the CCU40ST2 status bit
ST2 is set. This signal is connected to the ERU1 Channel 2 Input Selection Pin A2 (ERU1_2A2) and sets the
sticky flag FL2 and sends a trigger pulse TR2 on IOUT0 after the Cross Connect Stage.
Application Note
27
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Runtime Handling of ERU and Input Selection & Combination
4. On the Output Gating Unit 0 (IOUT0) pin the trigger pulse TR2 can be distributed to the Service Request
Line nr 5. On the PDOUT0 output pin of the Output Gating Unit 0 there is Pattern Match Detection by the
AND-Gate and the flags FL1 and FL2. This is the debounced press-button switch signal that has been
extracted by event concatenation. It is then sent to the Peripheral Unit named the “Event Target”.
Application Note
28
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Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Time Windowing
11
Time Windowing
11.1
The ERU and Sequential Events Control
The ERU top-level control of events enables creation of comprehensive embedded tasks in HW. These tasks
can concatenate actions from different units and so act like a state machine. This enables interactions to be
controlled at a low level without involving SW. The results are controlled by the event flow and an action
scheme that is configured on a top-level by the user.
11.2
Use Case with the ERU in Time Windowing
An Event Request signal pair (A,B), selected by the input line groups xA(3:0) and xB(3:0) respectively, can
represent a considered compound event (see Figure 16). Such a conditional signal can be derived by the
Combination Logic in the channel x input stage. When using timers as input sources, complex windowing
functions can be realized.
NVIC.SRn
1
ERU1_0A2
2
ERU1_0B1
ERU1_IOUT2
TRIGGER
3
LEVEL
event
edge
1
2
ERU1
&
window
3
.ST0
CCU40
.ST0
CCU80
4
CCU41
CCU41IN2(K)
3
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_05_Time_Windowing_by_Input_Combinations.vsd
Figure 16
Time Windowing by Input Combination of Timer Signals
11.3
Using Delayed Events in External Events Control as a State-Machine
The ERU Output Gating Stage OGUy (y=0-3) offers the possibility to construct compound event conditions
that involve memorized events and require a certain sequence of events to be satisfied. The event flags FLx,
set by “events before”, can be used for gating conditions of the “events after” that occur at the input
channels later on.
Application Note
29
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Time Windowing
11.3.1
Combining Event Flags with Input Channel Events
Output Gating Unit - OGUy
Pattern Detect
1
FL0
IPEN0
IPEN1
1
(ERU1
only!)
1
=1
delay
1
0
Pattern
Edge Trigger
&
Gated
Trigger
GEEN
CCU80.ST0
TR0
>1
TR1
Event TRIGGER TRx
Event
Trigger
>1
1
&
IOUTy
TRIGGER
delay
TR2
TR3
CCU40.ST0
LEVEL
1
0
FL3
IPEN3
”1" ”0"
1
PD
Result
Flag
0
FL2
IPEN2
PDOUTy
&
1
FL1
Event FLAG FLx
Output Gating Select
y = 0..3
PT0
Peripheral TRIGGER
PT1
1
PT2
delay
Periferal Trigger ”0"
ERU1
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0..3
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
>1
LEVEL
&
IOUTy
TRIGGER
Peripheral
Select
yper[2:0]
PDOUTy
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
ERU1
Peripheral Trigger
ERU0
y=0..3
0
0
1
PER
PER
PER
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_05_Time_Windowing_by_OGUy.vsd
Figure 17
Combining Event Flags and External Events Control
11.3.2
Combining Event Flags with the Designated Peripheral Trigger Inputs
ERU1 has designated trigger inputs from the ADC and from some of the CAPCOM4/-8 units that can be linked
directly to the Gated Trigger stage of an Output Gating Unit channel OGUy (see Figure 18). By this “kitchen
Application Note
30
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Time Windowing
entrance”-like concept these Peripheral Triggers act immediately, unconditionally in the output gating by
the event flags FLx.
Output Gating Unit - OGUy
Pattern Detect
1
FL0
IPEN0
IPEN1
1
(ERU1
only!)
1
=1
delay
1
0
Pattern
Edge Trigger
&
Gated
Trigger
GEEN
TR0
CCU80.ST0
Event TRIGGER TRx
>1
TR1
Event
Trigger
>1
1
IOUTy
y = 0..3
PT0
OGU01
PT1
OGU02
PT2
OGU03
1
delay
Periferal Trigger ”0"
CCU40.ST0
&
TRIGGER
delay
TR2
TR3
Peripheral TRIGGER
LEVEL
1
0
FL3
IPEN3
”1" ”0"
1
PD
Result
Flag
0
FL2
IPEN2
PDOUTy
1
FL1
Event FLAG FLx
Output Gating Select
&
ERU1
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
0B1
x=0..3
yper[2:0]
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
>1
Peripheral
Select
OGU02
CCU40
CCU80
CCU41
IOUT0
TRIGGER
ERU1
CCU80.ST0
LEVEL
&
ERU0
Peripheral Trigger
CCU40.ST0
PDOUTy
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
y=0..3
0
0
1
CCU41IN0(K)
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_05_Time_Windowing_using_OGU02.vsd
Figure 18
Combining Event Flags and Peripheral Trigger
Application Note
31
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Event Request Routing to Service Providers
12
Event Request Routing to Service Providers
12.1
The Cross Connect Selection
The Cross Connect Select stage, for each channel x of an ERU, is an Event Trigger pulse routing matrix that is
able to switch the trigger pulse distribution path back to the system via any output channel y (y=0-3). The
target can be a certain event service action provider that is defined by the Top-Level control by the ERU Pin
Connections tables.
Cross Connect Selection
Signals from Event
Trigger Logic:
Trigger Pulse Distrubution
TRx à OGU0 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU1 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU2 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU3 Trigger Input x
Event Trigger TRx
Event Trigger to
Output Gating
Unit – OGUy
y = 0-3
Event Pattern Detection
FLx à OGU0 Level Input x
FLx à OGU1 Level Input x
FLx à OGU2 Level Input x
FLx à OGU3 Level Input x
Event Flag FLx
Event Flag to
Output Gating
Unit – OGUy
y = 0-3
Matrix to Output Gating Unit OGUy[3:0]
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0-3
Output
Gating Unit y
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
>1
&
LEVEL
IOUTy
TRIGGER
Peripheral
Select
yper[2:0]
PDOUTy
y=0..3
Peripheral Trigger
PER
PER
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_06_Cross_Connect_Selection.vsd
Figure 19
The Cross Connect Selection Stage
12.2
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix
Most interconnect lines go directly from one system unit to another unit, without passing an ERU. For
example, an ADC conversion can be started directly by a signal from a timer. These immediate
interconnections are described virtually by the so called Top-Level Interconnect matrix - a table which is
embodied by a block (see Figure 19).
Application Note
32
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Event Request Routing to Service Providers
12.3
The ERU Pin Connection Tables
It should be mentioned and understood though that the ERU Pin Connections tables (which describe the
ERU0 and ERU1 interfaces to peripheral units or IOs) are actually subsets of the total system Top-Level
Interconnect matrix. They are split up like this in order to ease understanding of those paths where an ERU is
involved.
Application Note
33
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit Cross Connect
13
Getting Started with Event Request Unit Cross Connect
There is one Input Selection Register and two Control Registers per input channel x (x=0-3). These are used
to setup the entire functionality of an ERU at the Top Level and to target the Output Channels y (y=0-3):



EXISEL
EXICONx
EXOCONx
Input Selection Register
Input and Trigger Control Register
Output Control Register
The Cross Connect Selection should be mapped to the EXICONx register bit field OCS (see Figure 20).
Cross Connect Selection
Signals from Event
Trigger Logic:
Trigger Pulse Distrubution
TRx à OGU0 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU1 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU2 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU3 Trigger Input x
Event Trigger TRx
Event Trigger to
Output Gating
Unit – OGUy
y = 0-3
Event Pattern Detection
FLx à OGU0 Level Input x
FLx à OGU1 Level Input x
FLx à OGU2 Level Input x
FLx à OGU3 Level Input x
Event Flag FLx
Event Flag to
Output Gating
Unit – OGUy
y = 0-3
Matrix to Output Gating Unit OGUy[3:0]
REGISTER.
BITFIELD
EXICONx.
OCS
DEV_ERU_06_Cross_Connect_Selection_Registers.vsd
Figure 20
Using the Input and Trigger Control Register EXICONx for Cross Connect Selection
// Pseudo code Example:
// Perform Cross Connect Selection, e.g. select target output channel y = 2
// in the 3-bit bit field OCS of the register ERU1_EXICON0, to map
// a Cross Connection for the Event Trigger Pulse TR0 in channel x =0:
EXICON.OCS = 010B;
// The channel output IOUT2 would trigger the following destinations in
// this case:
// CCU4x.IN2(K)
- i.e. CAPCOM4 Unit CCU4x, Slice CC42 Timer Input
// CCU8x.IN2(G)
- i.e. CAPCOM8 Unit CCU8x, Slice CC42 Timer Input
// VADC.G2REQTRN
- i.e. ADC Trigger Request N Input, Group 2
// VADC.G3REQTRN
- i.e. ADC Trigger Request N Input, Group 3
// ERU1.1B3 - i.e. A trigger feed-back to ERU1 Channel Input 1B3
// NVIC.SR7 - i.e. A trigger puls to Service Request Line nr 7
// POSIF0.MSET(F) - i.e. POSIF 0 Multi Channel Next Pattern Update Set
// POSIF1.MSET(F) - i.e. POSIF 1 Multi Channel Next Pattern Update Set
// according to the ERU1 Pin Connection Tables.
Application Note
34
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
14
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
Top-Level Control of Event Requests enables flexible control and cross-unit distribution of event signals. The
Event Request Unit (ERU1) can combine events via the Top-Level Interconnect Matrix. This means cross-unit
event flow can be controlled at the top-level according to a user request-to-action event pattern setup. This
can be then gated without requiring any SW interactions (see Figure 21).
14.1
Event Request Selection
Each input line, to xA(3:0) or xB(3:0) of an ERU input channel x (x=0-3), is hard wired to a specific event
source. So, a specific Event Request, from an I/O pin or a peripheral unit, is selected by a MUX switch at
either the xA(3:0) or at the xB(3:0) input line group of the ERU0 or ERU1, according to the ERU Pin
Connections tables.
14.2
Signal Combination Logic
An Event Request signal pair (A,B), selected by the input line groups xA(3:0) and xB(3:0) respectively, can
represent a considered compound event. Such a conditional signal can be created by the Combination Logic
of the channel x input stage before it is transferred to the Event Trigger Logic stage for event edge detection.
14.3
Input and Trigger functions
A signal edge is regarded as a true event edge if it complies with the considered edge, positive or negative. If
it is a true event edge an event flag FLx is set and a trigger pulse TRx is created. If enabled, the trigger pulse
and the event flag level status are passed to the Cross Connect Select stage. The flag can be reset by a false
event or by SW.
14.4
Cross Connect Selection
The Cross Connect Select stage for each channel x of an ERU is an Event Trigger pulse routing matrix. The
matrix is able to switch the trigger pulse distribution path back to the system via any output channel y (y=03). It can target a certain event service action provider according to the Top-Level control by the ERU Pin
Connections tables.
14.5
Output Gating Selection
The Output Gating Selection stage of an ERU can gate the Trigger Pulse signals (TRIGGER) in the output
channels IOUTy (y=0-3) by the Event Pattern Match/Mismatch Detect status (LEVEL) output signal, PDOUTy
(y=0-3). An Event Pattern is a combination of memorized x-channel events stored in the event flags FLx (x=03).
14.6
Top-Level Interconnect Matrix
Most interconnect lines go directly from one system unit to another unit without passing an ERU. For
example, an ADC conversion can be started directly by a signal from a timer. These immediate
Application Note
35
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
interconnections are described virtually by the so called Top-Level Interconnect matrix. This table is
embodied by a block in the drawing (see Figure 21).
14.6.1
The ERU Pin Connection Tables
It should be mentioned and understood though that the ERU Pin Connections tables (which describe the
ERU0 and ERU1 interfaces to peripheral units or IOs) are actually subsets of the total system Top-Level
Interconnect matrix. They are split up like this in order to ease understanding of those paths where an ERU is
involved.
Application Note
36
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Top-Level Control of External Event Requests
Cross Connect Selection
Event Request Select
xA0
Trigger Pulse Distrubution
xA1
TRx à OGU0 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU1 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU2 Trigger Input x
TRx à OGU3 Trigger Input x
A
A
A’
A & B,
A & B’
A’& B
A’& B’
A + B,
A + B’
A’+ B
A’+ B’
B
B’
xA2
xA3
xB0
xB1
B
xB2
Event TRIGGER TRx
Signal to
Event
Trigger
Logic
Event Pattern Detection
FLx à OGU0 Level Input x
FLx à OGU1 Level Input x
FLx à OGU2 Level Input x
FLx à OGU3 Level Input x
Event FLAG FLx
xB3
Channel x[3:0]
Matrix to Output Gating Unit OGUy[3:0]
Event Request Unit 1
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0-3
Output
Gating Unit y
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
PDOUTy
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
>1
LEVEL
IOUTy
&
TRIGGER
Peripheral
Select
yper[2:0]
y=0-3
Peripheral Trigger
PER
PER
Top-Level
Interconnect
Output Gating Unit - OGUy
Pattern Detect
FL0
Top Level Control
GPIO
GPIO
ERU1
ERU1
POSIF
POSIF
CAN
Inter
Connect
Matrix
USIC
ADC
CCU8x
CCU4x
USIC
LEDTS
DSD
DAC
DAC
IPEN1
FL2
1
IPEN2
FL3
1
TR1
PDOUTy
1
delay
Event
Trigger
Input
Peripheral
Trigger
1
delay
&
Gated
Trigger
>1
&
IOUTy
TRIGGER
y = 0-3
PT0
1
delay
PT1
PT2
Periferal Trigger
LEVEL
(ERU1
only!)
=1
Pattern
Edge Trigger
GEEN
>1
”1" ”0"
1
PD
Result
Flag
TR2
TR3
ADC
DSD
1
TR0
CCU8x
LEDTS
IPEN0
FL1
Output Gating Select
&
IPEN3
CAN
CCU4x
1
”0"
”0"
”0"
”1"
Case: ERU1
Case: ERU0
DEV_ERU_07_Cross_System_Distribution.vsd
DEV_ERU_07_Cross_System_Distribution.vsd
Figure 21
Cross System Events Top-Level Control and Distribution
Application Note
37
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit and Top-Level Control
15
Getting Started with Event Request Unit and Top-Level
Control
There is one Input Selection Register and two Control Registers per input channel x (x=0-3). These are used
to setup the entire functionality of an ERU at the Top Level and to target the Output Channels y (y=0-3):



EXISEL
EXICONx
EXOCONx
Input Selection Register
Input and Trigger Control Register
Output Control Register
Initializations and functions are determined by writing to the respective register bit fields.
15.1
Cross Interconnection Example – Using CCU4, ERU1, ADC and GPIO
15.1.1
ADC Request on Port Pin P2.1 State AND the Timer CCU40CC40 Status
Bit
Setup ERU1 Input Channel x=0, targeting the Output Channel y=2 (IOUT2), from which a link to the ADC
Trigger Request N Input, Group 2 or 3 can be routed – as follows:
// Select Event Request for input A and B in the ERU1_EXISEL register bit fields:
EXS0A = 2; // select input ERU1_0A2 – i.e. A connected to CCU40.ST0 status bit 0
EXS0B = 0; // select input ERU1_0B0 – i.e. B connected to a GPIO port pin P2.1
// Select logical combinations that should be taken into account as event request
NA = 0; // input A is used directly, i.e. not inverted
NB = 0; // input B is used directly, i.e. not inverted
SS = 3; // setup source combination, i.e. logical condition: input A AND input B
// Select Event Trigger Logic conditions for trigger, level detect and event edge
PE = 1; // set trigger pulse enable, i.e. an output trigger pulse will be created
LD = 0; // define event flag sticky, i.e. it will not be rebuild by HW, but by SW
RE = 1; // detection on Rising Edge, i.e. event edge on positive signal transition
FE = 0; // no detection on Falling Edge
// Perform Cross Connect Selection, i.e. select target output channel y (here y=2)
// for the Event Trigger Logic Output Pulse TR0 from input channel x (here x=0):
// Target register for the following mapping is EXICONx, i.e. here ERU1_EXICON0:
OCS = 2;
// CCU4x.IN2(K) - i.e. CAPCOM4 Unit CCU4x, Slice CC42 Timer Input
// CCU8x.IN2(G) - i.e. CAPCOM8 Unit CCU8x, Slice CC42 Timer Input
// VADC.G2REQTRN - i.e. ADC Trigger Request N Input, Group 2
Application Note
38
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Getting Started with Event Request Unit and Top-Level Control
// VADC.G3REQTRN - i.e. ADC Trigger Request N Input, Group 3
// ERU1.1B3 - i.e. A trigger feed-back to ERU1 Channel Input 1B3
// NVIC.SR7 - i.e. A trigger puls to Service Request Line nr 7
// POSIF0.MSET(F) - i.e. POSIF 0 Multi Channel Next Pattern Update Set
// POSIF1.MSET(F - i.e. POSIF 1 Multi Channel Next Pattern Update Set
// Select Event Output Trigger Control 2 Register ERU1_EXOCON2 for output gating
// Select Output Gating functions – Here: just a straight forward alternative:
// Target register for the following mapping is EX0CONy, i.e. here ERU1_EXOCON2:
GEEN = 0; // disable “Gating Event Enable on Pattern Detection Changes” trigger
GP
= 1; // set “Output Gating Select on Pattern Detection” =1, to activate IOUT2
IPEN0, IPEN1, IPEN2, IPEN3 = 0; // disable the Pattern Detection Enable flags.
Application Note
39
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Control by Event Pattern Match
16
Control by Event Pattern Match
An Output Gating Unit OGUy (y=0-3) can gate all the event signals of an ERU into one output trigger signal
(TRIGGER) at the IOUTy output pin - controlled by an Event Pattern Detect status (LEVEL) at the PDOUTy pin.
An Event Pattern is a combination of true events, selected by an Input Enable IPENx bit for each event flag
FLx.
Output Gating Unit - OGUy
Pattern Detect
FL0
1
Output Gating Select
PDOUTy
&
IPEN0
FL1
1
IPEN1
Event FLAG FLx
FL2
1
(ERU1
only!)
=1
delay
1
Pattern
Edge Trigger
IPEN3
&
Gated
Trigger
GEEN
TR0
>1
TR1
Event TRIGGER TRx
Event
Trigger
>1
&
1
IOUTy
TRIGGER
delay
TR2
TR3
y = 0..3
PT0
Peripheral TRIGGER
LEVEL
1
IPEN2
FL3
”1" ”0"
1
PD
Result
Flag
”0"
PT1
1
PT2
delay
”0"
”1"
Periferal Trigger ”0"
ERU1
ERU0
Event Request Unit 1 – ERU1
Output
Gating Unit y
Input
Channel x
xA[3:0]
xB[3:0]
x=0..3
Event
Request
Select
Event
Trigger
Logic
A
d
dt
B
Event Flag
Cross
Connect
Select
>1
LEVEL
&
IOUTy
TRIGGER
Peripheral
Select
yper[2:0]
PDOUTy
Output
Gating
Select
PD G
ERU1
Peripheral Trigger
ERU0
y=0..3
0
0
1
PER
PER
PER
Top-Level
Interconnect
DEV_ERU_08_Fig_ERU01_OGUy_01.vsd
Figure 22
ERU and the Output Gating Unit (OGUy, y=0-3)
Application Note
40
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Control by Event Pattern Match
16.1
The Output Gating Unit in Detail
The Output Gating Unit OGUy (y=0-3) is comprised of three stages:



a Pattern Detect stage
a Pattern Edge Trigger stage
and an Output Gating Select MUX that controls the Gated Trigger stage (see Figure 23).
Only the enabled inputs of event flags FLx values satisfy the pattern that can gate ERU trigger events as a
“TRIGGER” from the IOUTy output pin.
REGISTER.
BITFIELD:
Pattern Detect Result Flag:
EXOCONy.
PDR
Output Gating Unit - OGUy
Pattern Detect
EXOCONy.
IPEN0,
FL0
EXOCONy.
IPEN1,
FL1
EXOCONy.
IPEN2,
FL2
EXOCONy.
IPEN3
FL3
1
Output Gating Select
PDOUTy
&
IPEN0
1
IPEN1
”1" ”0"
1
PDR
Result
Flag
(ERU1
only!)
1
delay
1
=1
Pattern
Edge Trigger
IPEN3
&
Gated
Trigger
GEEN
EXOCONy.
GEEN
TR1
>1
Event
Trigger
TR2
TR3
>1
IOUTy
TRIGGER
delay
y = 0-3
”0"
PT1
1
PT2
delay
Periferal Trigger ”0"
&
1
PT0
PT Select:
EXOCONy.
ISS
Pattern Match Out
on enabled Event Flags
EXOCONy.GP:
case 3: on “Pattern Mismatch”
case 2: on “Pattern Match”
case 1: no ”Output Gating”
case 0: no ”Trigger Pulse” and
no ”Interrupt request”
1
IPEN2
TR0
LEVEL
”0"
”1"
ERU1
ERU0
DEV_ERU_08_OGUy_and_Registers.v
sd
Figure 23
The Output Gating Unit (OGUy) in Detail
16.1.1
Pattern Detect status – PDOUT
The Pattern Detect function is an AND-operation of all event memorizing flags FLx that are regarded by the
Pattern Enable EXOCONy.IPENx bits. The PD Result flag is affected and the status is linked to the Output
Gating Select MUX – and (in ERU1 only) also delivered as a “LEVEL” event to the PDOUTy output pin.
16.1.2
Pattern Event Edge Detection
If at least one pattern detection input flag FLx is enabled (by IPENx) and a change of the pattern detection
result from pattern match to pattern miss (or vice-versa) is detected, then a trigger event is generated to
indicate a pattern edge trigger event (if enabled by EXOCONy.GEEN) and linked to the Gated Trigger stage at
the IOUTy.
Application Note
41
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Control by Event Pattern Match
16.1.3
Output Gating Selection
The Output Gating condition to be selected by the EXOCONy.GP case switch (MUX) is one of the following:




case 3: on Pattern Mismatch
case 2: on Pattern Match
case 1: no Output Gating
case 0: no Trigger Pulse (nor any Interrupt Request)
Note: The Pattern Detect status (LEVEL) is distributed in any case via the PDOUTy pin. (ERU1 only).
16.1.4
Trigger and Interrupt Output – IOUT
The Trigger and Interrupt pin IOUTy is the derived OR combination of three trigger categories (which is
gated according to the Output Gating condition selection that is mapped to the EXOCONy.GP register bit
field):



A Pattern-Match / Pattern-Miss Event Edge Trigger
Any combination of the Event Edge Triggers TR0, TR1, TR2 or TR3, detected by the ERU input channels x
A Peripheral Trigger (ERU1 only though) that is bypassed directly to the OGUy (via the “Kitchen
Entrance”)
16.2
Use Case Example 2: Gating a Peripheral Trigger Event with a Port Pin
In this use case example, the CCU40 timer slice CC41 is running in the edge aligned mode and the period
match while counting up event generates an interrupt request only if it occurs after a falling edge on the
port pin P2.5. This can be realized by using ERU0 to gate the CCU40 peripheral trigger depending on the
pattern detection status on P2.5.
The example is developed based on the XMC1200 device.
16.2.1
XMC Lib Implementation
The next sections describe how the Infineon XMC library (XMC Lib) can be used to implement the example.
16.2.1.1 Configuration
Since P2.5 is connected to the channel 1 input A1, the associated Event Trigger Logic 1 (ETL1) is used. It is
configured to:




Select input ERU_1A1 as the only input; input Bx is not required because it is not used.
Enable falling edge detection.
Select the status flag EXICON1.FL to be automatically updated with each transition on the channel input.
Disable the output pulse trigger; the output trigger channel need not be defined because it is not used.
XMC_ERU_ETL_CONFIG_t button_event_generator_config =
{
.input = ERU0_ETL1_INPUTA_P2_5,
.source = XMC_ERU_ETL_SOURCE_A,
.edge_detection = XMC_ERU_ETL_EDGE_DETECTION_FALLING,
Application Note
42
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Control by Event Pattern Match
.status_flag_mode = XMC_ERU_ETL_STATUS_FLAG_MODE_HWCTRL,
.enable_output_trigger = false,
};
To gate the CCU40 peripheral trigger with the pattern detection status of the input channel 1, the Output
Gating Unit 0 (OGU0) is used and configured to:
Select CCU40.SR0 as the peripheral trigger input.
Select the status flag from ETL1 as the pattern detection input.
Configure the interrupt request generation to be based on the logical AND of the peripheral trigger and
pattern match events.



XMC_ERU_OGU_CONFIG_t button_event_detection_config =
{ .enable_pattern_detection = false,
.pattern_detection_input = XMC_ERU_OGU_PATTERN_DETECTION_INPUT1,
.peripheral_trigger = XMC_ERU_OGU_PERIPHERAL_TRIGGER1,
.service_request = XMC_ERU_OGU_SERVICE_REQUEST_ON_TRIGGER_AND_PATTERN_MATCH
};
16.2.1.2 Initialization
The selected ETL and OGU channels are then initialized with the configurations defined in Section 16.2.1.1.
This is done by calling their respective initialization functions in main().
XMC_ERU_ETL_Init(ERU0_ETL1, &button_event_generator_config);
XMC_ERU_OGU_Init(ERU0_OGU0, &button_event_detection_config);
Besides the ERU, the following peripherals also need to be initialized:



Ports to enable the P2.5 input and P0.0 general purpose output pins.
NVIC to enable the ERU0.SR0 interrupt.
CCU40 timer slice CC41 to count in edge aligned mode and to generate a service request upon period
match while counting up.
16.2.1.3 Implementation
Only period match while counting up events that occur after the falling edge and before the next rising edge
on P2.5, generate the interrupt request to the CPU.
In the interrupt service routine, the status flags are cleared and the P0.0 output is toggled.
void ERU0_0_IRQHandler(void)
{
XMC_ERU_ETL_ClearStatusFlag(ERU0_ETL1);
XMC_CCU4_SLICE_ClearEvent(SLICE_PTR, XMC_CCU4_SLICE_IRQ_ID_PERIOD_MATCH);
XMC_GPIO_ToggleOutput(LED);
}
Application Note
43
V1.0, 2015-07
Event Request Unit (ERU)
AP32306
Revision History
17
Revision History
Current Version is V1.0, 2015-07
Page or Reference
Description of change
V1.0, 2015-07
Initial Version
Application Note
44
V1.0, 2015-07
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Microsystems, Inc. SPANSION™ of Spansion LLC Ltd. Symbian™ of Symbian Software Limited. TAIYO YUDEN™ of Taiyo Yuden Co. TEAKLITE™ of CEVA, Inc.
TEKTRONIX™ of Tektronix Inc. TOKO™ of TOKO KABUSHIKI KAISHA TA. UNIX™ of X/Open Company Limited. VERILOG™, PALLADIUM™ of Cadence Design
Systems, Inc. VLYNQ™ of Texas Instruments Incorporated. VXWORKS™, WIND RIVER™ of WIND RIVER SYSTEMS, INC. ZETEX™ of Diodes Zetex Limited.
Last Trademarks Update 2014-07-17
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Edition 2015-07
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