AN1260

AN1260
Li-Ion/Li-Poly Battery Charge and System Load Sharing
Management Design Guide With MCP73871
Author:
is available. To prevent overcharging Li-Ion batteries,
an elapse timer is usually required as a secondary
method to turn off the battery charge activities, before
a proper termination condition is met. Minimum current
detection during the Constant Voltage (CV) stage is the
typical termination method for Li-Ion batteries. If a
system is constantly drawing current out of a Li-Ion
battery, the charge management system will never be
terminated properly by minimum current. It can turn on
and off periodically, or result in an error by a timer-fault
condition.
Brian Chu
Microchip Technology Inc.
INTRODUCTION
The rechargeable Li-Ion/Li-Poly batteries are widely
used in today’s portable Consumer Electronics (CE).
Commonly seen Li-Poly batteries are Li-Ion Polymer
batteries that use a solid polymer separator and share
the same charge algorithm with Li-Ion batteries. Thus,
Li-Ion batteries will represent both Li-Ion and Li-Poly
batteries in this application note. Because of the
growing features and the increasing size of the display
in a portable electronic product, the battery usage is
also modifying. The daily battery charging frequency
increases, and it becomes important to operate a
device while charging its battery.
Microchip’s MCP73871 was developed to overcome
these design challenges of Li-Ion battery-powered
applications. The MCP73871 is a monolithic solution
that offers compact size and rich features. It is an ideal
candidate to design in small form-factor systems, while
extending the system runtimes and battery life.
This application note is intended to offer detailed
design guidance for portable electronics designers who
are interested in taking advantage of using Microchip’s
MCP73871 in their projects. The MCP73871
demonstrates strategies to deliver Li-Ion charge
management solutions in a short time, satisfying space
and cost concerns.
The traditional method to design a battery-powered
system is to connect the system load directly on the
battery. The system load continuously discharges the
Li-Ion battery and costs a battery’s life cycle. In order to
maximize the life cycle of Li-Ion batteries, it is
recommended to terminate the charge properly and
power the system from the input power supply, when it
AC-DC Adapter
or USB Port
18, 19
470Ω 6
10 μF
IN
PG
470Ω 7
330 kΩ
OUT
STAT2
470Ω 8 STAT1
LBO
2
3
Low High
110 kΩ
Low High
Low High
Low High
FIGURE 1:
4
9
17
OUT
1, 20
System
Load
4.7 μF
14,
15,
16
VBAT
VBAT_SENSE
4.7 μF
5
THERM
NTC
Single-Cell
Li-Ion
Battery
VPCC
SEL
PROG2
PROG1
TE
PROG3
CE
13 RPROG1
12
10 kΩ
RPROG3
VSS 10,11(EP)
Typical MCP73871 Application.
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01260B-page 1
AN1260
MCP73871 DEVICE DESCRIPTION
The MCP73871 device is a fully integrated linear
solution for system load sharing and Li-Ion/Li-Polymer
battery charge management, with AC-DC wall adapter
and USB port power sources selection. It is also
capable of autonomous power source selection
between input or battery. Along with its small physical
size, the low number of required external components
makes the device ideally suited for portable
applications. The MCP73871 device automatically
obtains power for the system load from a single-cell
Li-Ion battery or an input power source (AC-DC wall
adapter or USB port). The MCP73871 device
specifically adheres to the current draw limits governed
by the USB specification. With an AC-DC wall adapter
providing power to the system, an external resistor sets
the magnitude of 1A maximum charge current, while
supporting up to 1.8A total current for the system load
and battery charge current.
EXAMPLE OF BATTERY CHARGER
AND SYSTEM LOAD SHARING
DESIGN SPECIFICATIONS
The example system that will be applied in this
application note requires an average of 100 mA load
current, and consumes a maximum of 500 mA peak
current for a short duration of time. A 950 mAh rated
Li-Ion battery is used to operate the example system.
The system continuously operates while charging the
Li-Ion battery. The input power supply supplies the
system load and charges the battery when a battery is
present in the system. When the input power source is
removed, the system is supported by the battery. When
the system load and the battery charge current requires
more energy than the supply current can afford, the
system load has higher priority than the battery
charger.
Note:
The MCP73871 device employs a Constant Current/
Constant Voltage (CC/CV) charge algorithm with a
selectable charge termination point. The constant
voltage regulation is fixed with four available options:
4.10V, 4.20V, 4.35V, or 4.40V to accommodate the
new, emerging battery charging requirements. The
MCP73871 device also limits the charge current based
on die temperature during high-power or high-ambient
conditions. This thermal regulation optimizes the
charge cycle time, while maintaining the device
reliability.
The MCP73871 device includes a low-battery indicator,
a power-good indicator and two charge status
indicators that allows for outputs with LEDs or
communication with host microcontrollers. The
MCP73871 device is fully specified over the ambient
temperature range of -40°C to +85°C.
This application note shows how to design a simple
system load sharing and battery management system
with Microchip’s popular MCP73871 for cost-sensitive
applications.
For more in-depth documentation on these subjects
please refer to Section “References”.
Note:
The above information is available in the
MCP73871 data sheet (DS22090).
DS01260B-page 2
Customers should contact their distributor, representative or field application
engineer (FAE) for support. Local sales
offices are also available to help customers. A listing of sales offices and locations
is included at the back of this document.
Technical support is available through the
web site at: http://www.microchip.com/
support. The information in this application note is for reference only. Product
design and production are the customer’s
responsibilities.
LI-ION/LI-POLYMER BATTERIES
Important attributes when selecting a battery are:
•
•
•
•
•
Internal Resistance
Operational Load Current
Energy Density (Size and Weight)
Charge/Discharge Cycles (Life Cycle)
Capacity (dominates the operational duration
without external power source present)
As with most engineering work, these key attributes do
not coincide with a reasonable cost. There is always a
trade-off between them when selecting the battery
chemistry for a portable application. Please refer to
Microchip’s AN1088 – “Selecting the Right Battery System for Cost-Sensitive Portable Applications While
Maintaining Excellent Quality” for the details of battery
chemistry comparisons. [5]
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1260
Li-Polymer batteries are also recognized as Li-Ion
Polymer batteries. Li-Polymer can be charged with the
same algorithm as Li-Ion batteries. The flexible formfactors, such as high energy density in weight (about
200 Wh/kg) and volume (about 400 Wh/kg), and a
relatively low profile to fit inside the compact
applications, make them ideal candidates for portable
products.
Note:
A protection circuit is required for Li-Ion
batteries to prevent overvoltage during the
charge cycle, and under voltage during
the discharge cycle; overcurrent as well in
both directions.
Batteries usually take a considerable amount of space
and weight in today’s portable devices. The energy
density for each chemistry dominates the size and
weight for the battery pack. Li-Ion has advantages in
both energy density weight and energy density volume
among other available battery technologies.
Wide Range Input
Buck Converter
MCP73871
OUT PIN
Boost Converter
Buck/Boost Converter
LDO
FIGURE 2:
Typical DC-DC Voltage
Converter Examples.
Note:
When operating with single cell Li-Ion
batteries, output voltage range can be
from 3.0V-4.2V. It is recommended not to
operate at minimum battery voltage, to
prolong a Li-Ion battery’s life. Please refer
to the battery manufacturer’s data sheet
or design guide for details.
MCP73871 DESIGN GUIDE
Power Supply Input (IN)
The integrated system load sharing and the power path
management features of the MCP73871 simplify the
design and reduce the circuit board space. Unlike
low-cost Li-Ion battery charge management solutions,
the MCP73871 requires additional planning ahead
when designing a system around it. This section will
offer a detailed design guidance to develop a Li-Ion
battery powered system.
The MCP73871 can use a regular wall wart or a USB
port from computers as its primary power supply. When
using a regulated wall wart, the proper input voltage
range must be between VBAT + 300 mV and 6V. The
rated supply current of the wall wart has to meet the
system requirement. Keep in mind that the MCP73871
device only supports up to 1.8A combined current for
the system load and the charge current of a Li-Ion
battery. When supplying from a USB port, the
MCP73871 submits to the current limits governed by
the USB specification.
System Output Terminal (OUT)
The MCP73871 powers a device from system output
terminals, pin 1 and pin 20. There is no fixed voltage
regulation to the system from the device. Therefore,
proper DC-DC converters might be required for system
design. A designer has to carefully review
specifications when developing a new product. The
OUT is supported by either input power supply or a
single cell Li-Ion battery. The available typical system
load is 1.65A, while the minimum is 1.5A from a wall
wart power supply. A system designer should always
consider the worst condition. Please refer to page 5 of
the MCP73871 Data Sheet (DS22090) for details.
Typical voltage converters are included, but not limited
to buck, boost, buck/boost and LDO.
• Buck Converter – Step down to proper voltage
level
• Boost Converter – Step up to proper voltage level
• Buck/Boost Converter – Step down and up
depends on the input source and output
requirement
• LDO – Low dropout voltage regulator for step
down only
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
INPUT CURRENT LIMIT CONTROL (ICLC)
Input Current Limit Control (ICLC) prevents the system
and charger from overdrawing the available current
from power sources. When the system demands more
current than the input power supply can provide, or the
input ICLC is reached, the switch will become forward
biased, and the battery is able to supplement the input
current to the system load.
The ICLC sustains the system load as its highest
priority. This is done by reducing the non-critical charge
current, while adhering to the current limits governed
by the USB specification, or the maximum AC-DC
adapter current supported. Further demand from the
system is supported by the battery, if possible.
Selectable USB Port Input Current:
• Low: 1 Unit Load/High: 5 Unit Loads
Note:
Each unit load is of 100 mA. A device
should not draw more than the specified
unit of loads.
DS01260B-page 3
AN1260
Fast Charge Current Set (PROG1)
700
600
Current (mA)
500
400
Input Current
Battery Current
Load Current
300
200
100
0
Ideal
Diode
-100
-200
0
Fast Charge Current Set (PROG1) determines the
maximum constant current with a resistor tie from
pin 13 to the ground (VSS). PROG1 also sets the
maximum allowed charge current and the termination
current set point (10% of fast charge current). The
programming resistance for desired charge current can
be calculated using the following equation:
EQUATION 1:
100 200 300 400 500 600 700
1000V
I CHAREG = -------------------R PROG1
Load Current (mA)
FIGURE 3:
Control.
USBHigh - Input Current Limit
Figure 3 illustrates the function of ICLC when USBHIGH
is selected.
RESISTOR VS. CURRENT
Where:
RPROG1
=
kilo-ohms (kΩ
IREG
=
milli-ampere (mA
The Input Source Type Selection (SEL) pin is used to
select the input power source for the input current limit
control feature. With logic-level high, the MCP73871
allows maximum current of 1800 mA from a typical wall
wart. With logic-level low, the MCP73871 assumes that
a USB port input power source is selected.
For example, a fast charge current that equals 760 mA
is calculated to meet the design specification for a
950 mAh rated battery at 0.8C. A 750 mA fast charge
current is selected to simplify the design process. A
1.3 kΩ resistor is chosen to allow a 750 mA fast charge
current. A 750 mA precondition current, 10% of fast
charge current, is applied to the Li-Ion battery when
VBAT is below the preconditioning cut-off voltage.
USB Port Current Set (PROG2)
EQUATION 2:
Input Source Type Selection (SEL)
The USB Port Current Regulation Set input (PROG2) is
a digital input selection. A logic-low limits a 1-unit load
input current from the low-power port (100 mA); a logichigh limits a 5-unit load input current from the highpower port (500 mA).
Unlike many monolithic battery charge management
controllers that set the charge current for USB port
operations, the PROG2 of MCP73871 sets input
current limits for both system load and battery charge
current, which ensures that no overcurrent is drawn
from the USB ports.
Note:
The overcurrent protection circuit that
ensures proper operations and the safety
of USB ports should be implemented at
the host and self-powered hubs. The
MCP73871
serves
as
secondary
overcurrent protection from USB port only.
CHARGE CURRENT
950mA  0.8 = 760mA
Note:
EQUATION 3:
Select IREG = 750 mA
SELECT RESISTOR
1000V
RPROG1 = ----------------- = 1.3k 
750mA
EQUATION 4:
When:
FAST CHARGE
SEL = High
IFastCh arg e = ISupply – I SystemLoad
When:
SEL = Low ;PROG2 = High
I FastCh arg e = 500mA – ISystemLoad
When:
SEL = Low ;PROG2 = Low
I FastCh arg e = 100mA – ISystemLoad
The supply current has to be sufficient for the system
load current and fast charge current. Otherwise, the
system load current has priority over fast charge
current.
DS01260B-page 4
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1260
Termination Current Set (PROG3)
The charge cycle is terminated when, during the
Constant Voltage mode, the average charge current
diminishes below a threshold established with the
value of a resistor connected from PROG3 to VSS or
the internal timer has expired. The charge current is
latched off and the MCP73871 enters a Charge
Complete mode.
EQUATION 5:
Note:
If the VPCC function is not required in a
system, the VPCC pin can simply connect
to VIN. The resistors are selected at a
hundred kohm range, to minimize the
supply current from the voltage divider.
VIN
RESISTOR VS. CURRENT
1000V
I TERMINATION = -------------------R PROG3
330 kΩ
Where:
RPROG3
=
kilo-ohms (kΩ
ITERMINATION
=
milli-ampere (mA
VPCC
The termination current is the same for inputs, from
either the USB port or the AC-DC adapter, and needs
to be less than the charge current set to ensure system
function properly.
Voltage Proportional Charge Control
(VPCC)
Voltage Proportional Charge Control (VPCC) is a key
feature of MCP73871 that allows the output to maintain
the proper voltage level, even when the input varies.
Equation 6 demonstrates how to calculate the proper
value for VPCC. When the VPCC voltage drops below
1.23V, it triggers the dynamic function of MCP73871 to
maintain the proper output voltage level, with support
from the Li-Ion battery. Equation 6 assumes the
required input voltage of 5V. The resistor selection is
flexible. Figure 4 depicts the connection of the voltage
divider that supplies proper voltage for the VPCC pin.
The divider is based on the calculation of Equation 6.
However, if the input drops below UVLO, the Li-Ion battery will become the primary power source.
EQUATION 6:
VPCC DIVIDER
R2
V VPCC =  -------------------  VIN = 1.23V
R 1 + R2
110 kΩ
FIGURE 4:
VPCC Divider.
Battery Temperature Monitor (THERM)
The MCP73871 continuously monitors the battery
temperature during a charge cycle by measuring the
voltage between the THERM and VSS pins. An internal
50 μA current source provides the bias for a typical
10 kΩ negative-temperature coefficient thermistor
(NTC). The MCP73871 compares the voltage at the
THERM pin to the factory-set thresholds of 1.23V and
0.25V, typically. Once a voltage outside the thresholds
is detected during a charge cycle, the MCP73871
immediately suspends the charge cycle. The charge
cycle resumes when the voltage at the THERM pin
returns to the normal range.
The charge temperature window can be set by placing
fixed value resistors in series-parallel with a thermistor.
The resistance values of RT1 and RT2 can be calculated
with the following equations, in order to set the
temperature window of interest.
Assume: R 2 = 110k 
110k 
1.23V =  ------------------------------  5V
 110k  + R 1
R1 = 337.2k 
R1 = 330 kΩ is selected
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01260B-page 5
AN1260
EQUATION 7:
NTC
Charge Enable (CE)
RT2  RCOLD
24k  = RT1 + --------------------------------RT2 + R COLD
With the CE input low, the Li-Ion battery charger feature
of the MCP73871 will be disabled. The charger feature
is enabled when CE is active-high. Allowing the CE pin
to float during the charge cycle may cause system
instability. The CE input is compatible with 1.8V logic.
RT2  RHOT
5k  = RT1 + -----------------------------RT2 + R HOT
Where:
Charge Status Outputs (STAT1, STAT2)
RT1 is the fixed series resistance
RT2 is the fixed parallel resistance
RCOLD is the thermistor resistance at the
lower temperature of interest
RHOT is the thermistor resistance at the
upper temperature of interest
THERM
RT1
10 kΩ
NTC
RT2
STAT1 and STAT2 are open-drain logic outputs for
connection to LEDs that are used for charge status
indication. Alternatively, a pull-up resistor can be
applied for interfacing to a host microcontroller. The
Low Battery Output (LBO) indicator shares the same
output pin with STAT1. It reminds the system or the end
user when the Li-Ion battery level is low. The LBO feature is enabled when the system is running from the LiIon batteries. The LBO indicator can be used as an
indication to the user via a lit up LED, or to the system
via a pull-up resistor, when interfacing to a host microcontroller that an input source, other than the battery, is
supplying power. When using a low battery output indicator, the STAT1 pin needs to connect to a working voltage source, other than VIN.
Power Good (PG)
FIGURE 5:
Resistor Connection.
Battery Charge Control Output (VBAT)
and Battery Voltage Sense (VBAT_SENSE)
Connect to the positive terminal of Li-Ion batteries for
restoring energy back to the batteries. It is
recommended to apply a ceramic capacitor with low
Equivalent Series Resistance (ESR) and Equivalent
Series Inductance (ESL) to ensure loop stability when
the battery is disconnected. A precision internal voltage
sense regulates the final voltage on this
VBATTERY_VOLTAGE_SENSE to the positive terminal of a Li-Ion
battery.
Timer Enable (TE)
The Timer Enable (TE) input option is used to enable or
disable the internal timer. A low signal on this pin
enables the internal timer and a high signal disables
the internal timer. The TE input can be used to disable
the timer when the system load is substantially limiting
the available supply current to charge the battery. The
TE input is compatible with 1.8V logic.
Note:
The Power Good (PG) is an open-drain logic output for
the input power supply indication. The PG output is low
whenever the input to the MCP73871 is above the
UVLO threshold and greater than the battery voltage.
The PG output can be used as an indication to the user
via a lit up LED, or to the system via a pull-up resistor,
when interfacing to a host microcontroller that an input
source, other than the battery, is supplying power.
Table 1 depicts the status outputs of MCP73871 in various conditions.
TABLE 1:
STATUS OUTPUTS
STATE
STAT1 STAT2
Shutdown
PG
High Z
High Z
Preconditioning
L
High Z
L
Constant Current
L
High Z
L
L
High Z
L
High Z
L
L
Constant Voltage
Charge Complete - Standby
High Z
Temperature Fault
L
L
L
Timer Fault
L
L
L
High Z
Low Battery Output
L
High Z
No Battery Present
High Z
High Z
L
No Input Power Present
High Z
High Z
High Z
The built-in safety timer is available for the
following options: 4 HR, 6 HR and 8 HR.
DS01260B-page 6
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1260
Design Specifications/Requirement
• Input Voltage Range:
- 2A rated 5V +/- 5% AC-DC adapter
- 950 mAh Li-Ion battery (3.6V Nominal)
• Constant Charge Current:
- 1C (Please refer to the recommended value
from selected battery manufacturer)
• Constant Charge Voltage: 4.2V
• Precondition Current:
- 0.1C or recommend value (Please refer to
the recommended value from selected
battery manufacturer)
• Termination Current
- 0.07C (Please refer to the recommended
value from selected battery manufacturer)
• Low battery warning
• Safety Timer: Turn charger off after 6 hours before
termination.
Note:
“C” Rate Definition: The theoretical
capacity of a battery is determined by the
amount of active materials in the battery. It
is expressed as the total quantity of
electricity involved in the electrochemical
reaction, and is defined in terms of
coulombs or ampere-hours.
EQUATION 8:
SELECT RESISTOR
1000V
R PROG1 = ----------------- = 1.05k 
950mA
TESTING CONDITIONS:
- Battery Open Voltage: 3.8V (Both Charge
and Discharge)
- Battery Capacity: 950 mAh
- Battery Charge Voltage: 4.2V
- Battery Nominal Voltage: 3.6V
- Supply Voltage: 5.2V
- Constant Current (Fast Charge): 950 mA
- Minimum System Load: 100 mA
- Maximum System Load: 520 mA
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01260B-page 7
AN1260
SUMMARY
For input power management, the ICLC avoids the
overcurrent drain from a restricted power source, such
as a USB port. VPCC enables system load in maintaining proper voltage level when input power supply is
insufficient. Depending on the power path conditions,
the battery will either be in Help mode or primary power
source.
The MCP73871 also offers three standard status
outputs, two statuses for battery management and one
for power good. In addition to the standard status
outputs, the low battery indicator is also available from
the MCP73871. In order to minimize external
components, there are many factory preset options to
choose from. Please refer to the MCP73871 Data
Sheet (DS22090) for additional information.
IDISCHARGE = 520 mA
BATTERY = 950 mAh
4.5
4.0
-0.1
-0.2
3.5
-0.3
3.0
-0.4
2.5
-0.5
2.0
1.5
Discharge Current (A)
0
5.0
Battery Voltage (V)
System Voltage (V)
The MCP73871 helps system designers simplify the
design complexities and minimize the external
component for portable devices. Integrated loadsharing and power path management allow seamless
switching between system load and charge current in
different conditions. The MCP73871 also offers an
independent charge current and termination current
settings through resistors and preset logic inputs.
-0.6
0
10
20
30
40
Time (Minutes)
FIGURE 7:
Discharge Profile.
The MCP73871 Evaluation Board, User’s Guide and
Gerber File are available through Microchip’s web site:
http://www.microchip.com.
1.2
6.0
5.5
5.0
4.5
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0.0
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
ISYSTEM = 100 mA
BATTERY = 950 mAh
0.2
Supply Current (A)
Battery Voltage (V)
System Voltage (V)
Figure 6 and Figure 7 depict the example system with
a typical 950 mAh rated Li-Ion battery. Figure 6 shows
a typical charge profile with a continuous current at
100 mA from the system load and 950 mA fast charge
current. Figure 7 shows a typical discharge profile of a
continuous current at 520 mA.
FIGURE 8:
Board.
MCP73871 Evaluation
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
Time (Minutes)
FIGURE 6:
Typical Charge Profile With
100 mA System Load.
DS01260B-page 8
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1260
REFERENCES
[1]
MCP73871 Data Sheet, “Stand-Alone System
Load Sharing and Li-Ion/Li-Polymer Battery
Charge Management Controller”, Microchip
Technology Inc., DS22090, ©2008.
[2]
“Lithium Batteries”, Gholam-Abbas Nazri and
Gianfranco Pistoia Eds.; Kluwer Academic
Publishers, ©2004.
[3]
“Handbook of Batteries, Third Edition”, David
Linden, Thomas B. Reddy; McGraw Hill Inc.,
©2002.
[4]
AN1149, “Designing A Li-Ion Battery Charger
and Load Sharing System With Microchip’s
Stand-Alone
Li-Ion
Battery
Charge
Management Controller”, Brian Chu; Microchip
Technology Inc., DS01149, ©2008.
[5]
AN1088, “Selecting the Right Battery System for
Cost-Sensitive Portable Applications. While
Maintaining Excellent Quality”, Brian Chu;
Microchip Technology Inc., DS01088, ©2007.
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01260B-page 9
AN1260
NOTES:
DS01260B-page 10
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
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Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
FilterLab, Hampshire, HI-TECH C, Linear Active Thermistor,
MXDEV, MXLAB, SEEVAL and The Embedded Control
Solutions Company are registered trademarks of Microchip
Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Application Maestro, chipKIT,
chipKIT logo, CodeGuard, dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net,
dsPICworks, dsSPEAK, ECAN, ECONOMONITOR,
FanSense, HI-TIDE, In-Circuit Serial Programming, ICSP,
Mindi, MiWi, MPASM, MPLAB Certified logo, MPLIB,
MPLINK, mTouch, Omniscient Code Generation, PICC,
PICC-18, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit, PICtail, REAL ICE,
rfLAB, Select Mode, Total Endurance, TSHARC,
UniWinDriver, WiperLock and ZENA are trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their
respective companies.
© 2009-2011, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in
the U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
Printed on recycled paper.
ISBN: 978-1-61341-274-9
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2002 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona; Gresham, Oregon and design centers in California
and India. The Company’s quality system processes and procedures
are for its PIC® MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping
devices, Serial EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and
analog products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design
and manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01260B-page 11
Worldwide Sales and Service
AMERICAS
ASIA/PACIFIC
ASIA/PACIFIC
EUROPE
Corporate Office
2355 West Chandler Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85224-6199
Tel: 480-792-7200
Fax: 480-792-7277
Technical Support:
http://www.microchip.com/
support
Web Address:
www.microchip.com
Asia Pacific Office
Suites 3707-14, 37th Floor
Tower 6, The Gateway
Harbour City, Kowloon
Hong Kong
Tel: 852-2401-1200
Fax: 852-2401-3431
India - Bangalore
Tel: 91-80-3090-4444
Fax: 91-80-3090-4123
India - New Delhi
Tel: 91-11-4160-8631
Fax: 91-11-4160-8632
Austria - Wels
Tel: 43-7242-2244-39
Fax: 43-7242-2244-393
Denmark - Copenhagen
Tel: 45-4450-2828
Fax: 45-4485-2829
India - Pune
Tel: 91-20-2566-1512
Fax: 91-20-2566-1513
France - Paris
Tel: 33-1-69-53-63-20
Fax: 33-1-69-30-90-79
Japan - Yokohama
Tel: 81-45-471- 6166
Fax: 81-45-471-6122
Germany - Munich
Tel: 49-89-627-144-0
Fax: 49-89-627-144-44
Atlanta
Duluth, GA
Tel: 678-957-9614
Fax: 678-957-1455
Boston
Westborough, MA
Tel: 774-760-0087
Fax: 774-760-0088
Chicago
Itasca, IL
Tel: 630-285-0071
Fax: 630-285-0075
Cleveland
Independence, OH
Tel: 216-447-0464
Fax: 216-447-0643
Dallas
Addison, TX
Tel: 972-818-7423
Fax: 972-818-2924
Detroit
Farmington Hills, MI
Tel: 248-538-2250
Fax: 248-538-2260
Indianapolis
Noblesville, IN
Tel: 317-773-8323
Fax: 317-773-5453
Los Angeles
Mission Viejo, CA
Tel: 949-462-9523
Fax: 949-462-9608
Santa Clara
Santa Clara, CA
Tel: 408-961-6444
Fax: 408-961-6445
Toronto
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada
Tel: 905-673-0699
Fax: 905-673-6509
Australia - Sydney
Tel: 61-2-9868-6733
Fax: 61-2-9868-6755
China - Beijing
Tel: 86-10-8569-7000
Fax: 86-10-8528-2104
China - Chengdu
Tel: 86-28-8665-5511
Fax: 86-28-8665-7889
Netherlands - Drunen
Tel: 31-416-690399
Fax: 31-416-690340
China - Chongqing
Tel: 86-23-8980-9588
Fax: 86-23-8980-9500
Korea - Seoul
Tel: 82-2-554-7200
Fax: 82-2-558-5932 or
82-2-558-5934
China - Hangzhou
Tel: 86-571-2819-3180
Fax: 86-571-2819-3189
Malaysia - Kuala Lumpur
Tel: 60-3-6201-9857
Fax: 60-3-6201-9859
China - Hong Kong SAR
Tel: 852-2401-1200
Fax: 852-2401-3431
Malaysia - Penang
Tel: 60-4-227-8870
Fax: 60-4-227-4068
China - Nanjing
Tel: 86-25-8473-2460
Fax: 86-25-8473-2470
Philippines - Manila
Tel: 63-2-634-9065
Fax: 63-2-634-9069
China - Qingdao
Tel: 86-532-8502-7355
Fax: 86-532-8502-7205
Singapore
Tel: 65-6334-8870
Fax: 65-6334-8850
China - Shanghai
Tel: 86-21-5407-5533
Fax: 86-21-5407-5066
Taiwan - Hsin Chu
Tel: 886-3-6578-300
Fax: 886-3-6578-370
China - Shenyang
Tel: 86-24-2334-2829
Fax: 86-24-2334-2393
Taiwan - Kaohsiung
Tel: 886-7-213-7830
Fax: 886-7-330-9305
China - Shenzhen
Tel: 86-755-8203-2660
Fax: 86-755-8203-1760
Taiwan - Taipei
Tel: 886-2-2500-6610
Fax: 886-2-2508-0102
China - Wuhan
Tel: 86-27-5980-5300
Fax: 86-27-5980-5118
Thailand - Bangkok
Tel: 66-2-694-1351
Fax: 66-2-694-1350
Spain - Madrid
Tel: 34-91-708-08-90
Fax: 34-91-708-08-91
UK - Wokingham
Tel: 44-118-921-5869
Fax: 44-118-921-5820
China - Xian
Tel: 86-29-8833-7252
Fax: 86-29-8833-7256
China - Xiamen
Tel: 86-592-2388138
Fax: 86-592-2388130
China - Zhuhai
Tel: 86-756-3210040
Fax: 86-756-3210049
DS01260B-page 12
Italy - Milan
Tel: 39-0331-742611
Fax: 39-0331-466781
Korea - Daegu
Tel: 82-53-744-4301
Fax: 82-53-744-4302
05/02/11
 2009-2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
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