EasyPIC 6 User Manual

®
A large number of useful peripherals, ready-to-use practical code
examples and a broad set of add-on boards make MikroElektronika
development systems fast and reliable tools that can satisfy the needs
of experienced engineers and beginners alike.
User manual
Development system
EasyPIC 6
TO OUR VALUED CUSTOMERS
, ZDQW WR H[SUHVV P\ WKDQNV WR \RX IRU EHLQJ LQWHUHVWHG LQ RXU SURGXFWV DQG KDYLQJ FRQ¿GHQFH LQ
MikroElektronika.
It is our intention to provide you with the best quality products. Furthermore, we will continue to improve our
performance to better suit your needs.
Nebojsa Matic
General Manager
The Microchip® name and logo, PIC® and dsPIC® are registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and
other countries. All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their respective companies and are only used for the purpose of
LGHQWL¿FDWLRQRUH[SODQDWLRQDQGWRWKHRZQHU¶VEHQH¿WZLWKQRLQWHQWWRLQIULQJH
3
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction to EasyPIC6 Development System............................................................................................. 4
Key Features ................................................................................................................................................. 5
1.0. Connecting the System to your PC......................................................................................................... 6
2.0. Supported Microcontrollers...................................................................................................................... 7
3.0. On-Board Programmer............................................................................................................................ 8
4.0. mikroICD (Hardware In-Circuit Debugger)............................................................................................. 10
5.0. Power Supply.......................................................................................................................................... 11
6.0. RS-232 Communication Interface........................................................................................................... 12
7.0. PS/2 Communication Interface............................................................................................................... 13
8.0. ICD Connector........................................................................................................................................ 13
9.0. USB Communication.............................................................................................................................. 14
10.0. DS1820 Temperature Sensor............................................................................................................... 15
11.0. A/D Converter....................................................................................................................................... 16
12.0. LEDs..................................................................................................................................................... 17
13.0. Push Buttons........................................................................................................................................ 18
14.0. Keyboards............................................................................................................................................ 19
15.0. 2x16 LCD Display................................................................................................................................. 20
16.0. On-Board 2x16 LCD Display................................................................................................................. 21
17.0. 128x64 Graphic LCD Display................................................................................................................ 22
18.0. Touch Panel.......................................................................................................................................... 23
19.0. I/O Ports................................................................................................................................................ 24
20.0. Port Expander ...................................................................................................................................... 26
MikroElektronika
page
4
EasyPIC6 Development System
Introduction to EasyPIC® 6 Development Board
The EasyPIC6 development system is an extraordinary development tool suitable for programming and experimenting with PIC®
microcontrollers from MICROCHIP®. The board includes an on-board programmer with mikroICD® support (In-Circuit Debugger) providing
DQLQWHUIDFHEHWZHHQWKHPLFURFRQWUROOHUDQGWKH3&<RXDUHVLPSO\H[SHFWHGWRZULWHDFRGHLQVRPHRIRXUFRPSLOHUVJHQHUDWHDKH[¿OH
and program your microcontroller using the 3,&ÀDVK® programmer. Numerous on-board modules, such as 128x64 graphic LCD display, 2x16
LCD display, on-board 2x16 LCD display, keypad 4x4, port expander etc., allow you to easily simulate the operation of the target device.
Full-featured and userfriendly development board
for PIC microcontrollers
High-Performance USB 2.0
On-Board Programmer
Hardware In-Circuit Debugger for step by step debugging at hardware level
Port Expander provides easy
I/O expansion (2 additional
ports) using serial interface
On-Board 2x16 serial LCD
Display
Graphic LCD display with
backlights
The 3,&ÀDVKprogram provides a complete list of all supported microcontrollers.
The latest version of this program with updated list of supported microcontrollers
can be downloaded from our website www.mikroe.com
3DFNDJHFRQWDLQV
Development board:
CD:
Cables:
Documentation:
(DV\3,&
product CD with appropriate software
86%FDEOH
(DV\3,& manual, mikroICD manual, 3,&ÀDVK
manual, ,QVWDOOLQJ86%GULYHUV manual and
(OHFWULFDO6FKHPDWLF of the (DV\3,&development system
6\VWHPVSHFL¿FDWLRQ
Power supply:
over a DC connector (7V to 23V AC or 9V to 32V DC); or
over a USB cable (5V DC)
Power consumption: up to 40mA (depending on how many on-board modules
are currently active)
Size:
26,5 x 22cm (10,43 x 8,66inch)
Weight:
~417g (0.919lbs)
MikroElektronika
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
10
11
12
28
13
27
14
26
25
15
24
23
22
21
20
19
Key Features
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Power supply voltage regulator
On-board programmer USB connector
USB 2.0 programmer with mikroICD support
DS1820 temperature sensor socket
External MICROCHIP debugger (ICD2 or ICD3) connector
USB communication connector
A/D converter test inputs
PS/2 connector
On-board 2x16 LCD display
DIP switches to enable pull-up/pull-down resistors
Port pins’ pull-up/pull-down mode selection
I/O port connectors
PIC microcontroller sockets
18
17
16
14. Touch panel controller
15. Port expander
16. 128x64 graphic LCD display connector
17. 128x64 graphic LCD display contrast potentiometer
18. Touch panel connector
19. Menu keypad
20. Keypad 4x4
21. Push buttons to simulate digital inputs
22. Logic state selector
23. Protective resistor ON/OFF jumper
24. Reset button
25. 36 LEDs to indicate pins’ logic state
26. Alphanumeric LCD display contrast adjustment
27. Alphanumeric LCD display connector
28. RS-232 communication connector
MikroElektronika
page
6
EasyPIC6 Development System
1.0. Connecting the System to your PC
6WHS
Use the USB cable to connect the EasyPIC6 development system to your PC. One end of the USB cable provided with a connector of the USB
B type should be connected to the development system as shown in Figure 1-2, whereas the other end of the cable (USB A type) should be
connected to your PC. When establishing a connection, make sure that jumper J6 is placed in the USB position as shown in Figure 1-1.
DC connector
USB connector
1
2
J6 power supply selector
)LJXUHConnecting USB cable (jumper J6 in the USB position)
Power OFF/ON switch
)LJXUHPower supply
6WHS
Follow the instructions for installing USB drivers and the 3,&ÀDVK programmer provided in the relevant manuals. It is not possible to program
PIC microcontrollers without having these devices installed. In case that you already have some of the MikroElektronika’s compilers installed
on your PC, there is no need to reinstall the 3,&ÀDVKprogrammer as it will be automatically installed along with compiler installation.
6WHS
Turn on your development system by setting the power supply switch to the ON position. Two LEDs marked as ‘POWER’ and ‘USB LINK’ will
be automatically turned on to indicate that your development system is ready for use. Use the 3,&ÀDVK programmer to dump a code into the
microcontroller and employ the board to test and develop your projects.
127(
If you use some additional modules, such as LCD, GLCD, extra boards etc., it is necessary to place them properly on the development system before it is turned on. Otherwise, they can be permanently damaged.
)LJXUHPlacing additional modules on the board
MikroElektronika
7
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
2.0. Supported Microcontrollers
The (DV\3,& development system provides eight separate sockets for PIC microcontrollers in DIP40, DIP28, DIP20, DIP18, DIP14 and
DIP8 packages. These sockets allow supported devices in DIP packages to be plugged directly into the development board.
There are two sockets for PIC microcontrollers in DIP18 package provided on the board. Which of these sockets you will use depends solely
on the pinout of the microcontroller in use. The EasyPIC6 development system comes with the microcontroller in a DIP40 package.
Jumpers next to the sockets are used for selecting functions of
the microcontroller pins:
Jumper
Position
J22
RA0 - I/O pin
9&$3¿OWHUFDSDFLWRUIRU)
J23
9&$3¿OWHUFDSDFLWRUIRU)
RA0 - I/O pin
J16
RA5
VCC
J13
OSC - RA6, RA7 are OSC. pins
I/O
- RA6, RA7 are I/O pins
J14
OSC - RA4, RA5 are OSC. pins
I/O
- RA4, RA5 are I/O pins
- I/O pin
- 18F2331/2431 power supply
)LJXUHMicrocontroller sockets
PIC microcontrollers normally use a quartz crystal for the purpose of stabilizing clock frequency. The EasyPIC6 provides two sockets for
quartz-crystal. Microcontrollers in DIP18A, DIP18B, DIP28 and DIP40 packages use socket X1 (OSC1) for quartz-crystal. If microcontrollers
in DIP8, DIP14 and DIP20 packages are used, it is necessary to move quartz crystal from socket X1 to socket X2 (OSC2). Besides, it
is also possible to replace the existing quartz-crystal with another one. The value of the quartz-crystal depends on the maximum clock
frequency allowed. Microcontrollers being plugged into socket 10F use their own internal oscillator and are not connected to any of the
aforementioned quartz-crystal sockets.
1
3
4
)LJXUHPlugging microcontroller into appropriate socket
Prior to plugging the microcontroller into the appropriate socket, make sure that the power supply is turned off. Figure 2-2 shows how to
correctly plug a microcontroller. Figure 1 shows an unoccupied 40-pin DIP socket. Place one end of the microcontroller into the socket
as shown in Figure 2. Then put the microcontroller slowly down until all the pins thereof match the socket as shown in Figure 3. Check
again that everything is placed correctly and press the microcontroller easily down until it is completely plugged into the socket as shown
in Figure 4.
127(
Only one microcontroller may be plugged into the development board at the same time.
MikroElektronika
page
8
EasyPIC6 Development System
2Q%RDUG86%3,&ÀDVK3URJUDPPHU
The 3,&ÀDVK programmer is an obligatory tool when working with microcontrollers. The EasyPIC6 has an on-board 3,&ÀDVK programmer
with mikroICD support which allows you to establish a connection between the microcontroller and your PC. Use the 3,&ÀDVK programmer to
ORDGD+(;¿OHLQWRWKHPLFURFRQWUROOHU)LJXUHVKRZVWKHFRQQHFWLRQEHWZHHQDFRPSLOHU3,&ÀDVKprogrammer and microcontroller.
Jumpers J10 used for connecting PGM line
Jumpers J8 and J9 used for selecting socket
with the microcontroller
Jumper J7 used for selecting the MCLR pin’s
function
)LJXUH3,&ÀDVKZLWKPLNUR,&'programmer
1 Write a program in some of PIC
FRPSLOHUVDQGJHQHUDWHD+(;¿OH
Compiling
program
Executing code in binary
and hexadecimal format
1
Write a code in some of PIC compilers, generate
DKH[¿OHDQGWKHRQERDUGSURJUDPPHUZLOOWDNH
care of loading data into the microcontroller.
2
2 Use the 3,&ÀDVK programmer to
select an appropriate microcontroller
DQGWRORDGWKH+(;¿OH
3 Click the :ULWH button to load the
program into the microcontroller.
3
The 3,&ÀDVK programmer
window contains several options
for microcontroller settings. A
number of buttons which will
make the programming process
easier are provided on the right
side of the window. There is
also an option at the bottom of
the window which will enable
you to monitor the programming
progress.
)LJXUHThe principle of programmer’s operation
127(
For more information on the 3,&ÀDVK programmer refer to the relevant manual provided in the EasyPIC6 development system package.
MikroElektronika
There are two ways of programming PIC microcontrollers: Low Voltage and High Voltage programming modes. The 3,&ÀDVK programmer uses
solely High Voltage programming mode during its operation. This mode requires voltage higher than the microcontroller’s power supply voltage
(the range between 8V to 14V, depending on the type of the microcontroller in use) to be brought to the MCLR/Vpp pin in order so that the
process of programming/debugging may be performed.
page
9
EasyPIC6 Development System
7KH/RZ9ROWDJHSURJUDPPLQJPRGHFDQEHHQDEOHGGLVDEOHGXVLQJFRQ¿JXUDWLRQELWVRIWKHPLFURFRQWUROOHU,IWKH/RZ9ROWDJHSURJUDPPLQJ
mode is enabled, the programming process is initiated by applying a logic one (1) to the PGM pin. Unlike this mode, the High Voltage programming
mode is always enabled and the programming process starts by applying a high voltage to the MCLR/Vpp pin.
All PIC microcontrollers have the Low Voltage programming mode enabled by default. In some rare cases, in order to enable the microcontroller
to be programmed in the High Voltage programming mode, it is necessary to apply a logic zero (0) to the PGM pin, which prevents the
microcontroller from entering the Low Voltage programming mode. Depending on the microcontroller in use, it is possible to select one of the
following pins RB3, RB4 and RB5 to be used as the PGM pin. Jumper J10 is used as the PGM pin selector as shown in Figure 3-3.
Jumper J10 default position
when RB3, RB4 and RB5
pins are not connected to
the PGM line.
Jumper J10 position
when the PGM line
is connected to the
RB5 pin.
Jumper J10 position
when the PGM line is
connected to the RB4
pin.
Jumper J10 position
when the PGM line
is connected to the
RB3 pin.
)LJXUHVarious positions of jumper J10
Build-in programmer with mikroICD
Multiplexer
MCU-PGD
MCU-PGC
MCLR
Programming lines
PGD
PGC
PROG
VCC
DD+
GND
USB
DATA
MCLR
User interface
R
R
R
During programming, a multiplexer disconnects
the microcontroller pins used for programming
from the rest of the board and connects them to
the 3,&ÀDVK programmer. After the programming
is complete, these pins are disconnected from the
programmer and may be used as input/output
pins.
)LJXUHProgrammer schematic
Microcontroler is plugged
into one of the following
sockets: DIP40, DIP28
DIP18A or DIP18B.
(Default position)
Microcontroller is plugged
into one of the following
sockets: DIP20, DIP14 or
DIP8.
Jumpers J8 and J9 are used for selecting the socket to receive the
programming signal. Figure 3-5 shows the position of jumpers J8
and J9 depending on DIP sockets in use.
)LJXUHThe position of jumpers J8 and J9
MCLR used as the
MCLR/Vpp pin.
)LJXUHThe position of jumper J7
MCLR used as an
I/O pin.
The function of the MCLR (Master Clear) pin depends on the position
of jumper J7. When placed in the left-hand position, the MCLR pin
has default function, i.e. is used as MCLR/Vpp. Otherwise, when the
jumper is placed in the right-hand position, the MCLR pin is available
as an I/O pin.
MikroElektronika
page
10
EasyPIC6 Development System
4.0. mikroICD (In-Circuit Debugger)
The mikroICD (In-Circuit Debugger) is an integral part of the on-board programmer. It is used for the purpose of testing and debugging
programs in real time. The process of testing and debugging is performed by monitoring the state of all registers within the microcontroller
while operating in real environment. The mikroICD software is integrated in all compilers designed by mikroElektronika (mikroBASIC®,
mikroC® and mikroPASCAL®$VVRRQDVWKHPLNUR,&'GHEXJJHUVWDUWVXSDZLQGRZDVVKRZQLQ¿JXUHEHORZDSSHDUV
The mikroICD debugger communicates with the PC through the programming pins which cannot be used as I/O pins while the process of
the program debugging is in progress.
PLNUR,&'GHEXJJHURSWLRQV
Icon commands
Start Debugger
Run/Pause Debugger
Stop Debugger
Step Into
Step Over
Step Out
Toggle Breakpoint
Show/Hide Breakpoints
Clear Breakpoints
A complete list of registers within the
programmed microcontroller
A list of selected registers to be monitored. The state of these registers
changes during the program execution,
which can be viewed in this window
[F9]
[F6]
[Ctrl+F2]
[F7]
[F8]
[Ctrl+F8]
[F5]
[Shift+F4]
[Ctrl+Shift+F4]
Each of these commands is activated via
keyboard shortcuts or by clicking appropriate
icon within the :DWFK9DOXHV window.
Double click on the 9DOXH¿HOG
enables you to change data format
Figure 4-1: mikroICD Watch Values window
The mikroICD debugger also offers functions such as running a program step by step (single stepping), pausing the program execution
to examine the state of currently active registers using breakpoints, tracking the values of some variables etc. The following example
illustrates a step-by-step program execution using the 6WHS2YHUcommand.
6WHS
In this example the 41st program
line is highlighted in blue, which
means that it will be executed
next. The current state of all
registers within the microontroller
can be viewed in the mikroICD
:DWFK9DOXHV window.
6WHS
After the 6WHS2YHUcommand is
executed, the microcontroller will
execute the 41st program line.
The next line to be executed is
highlighted in blue. The state
of registers being changed by
executing this instruction may
be viewed in the :DWFK 9DOXHV
window.
127(
1
During operation, the program line to be executed next is
highlighted in blue, while the breakpoints are highlighted in
red. The Run command executes the program in real time
until it encounters a breakpoint.
2
For more information on the mikroICD debugger refer to the PLNUR,&''HEXJJHU manual.
MikroElektronika
11
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
5.0. Power Supply
The EasyPIC6 development system may use one of two power supply sources:
1. +5V PC power supply through the USB programming cable;
2. External power supply connected to a DC connector provided on the development board.
The MC34063A voltage regulator is used for enabling external power supply voltage to be either AC (in the range of 7V to 23V) or DC
(in the range of 9V to 32V). Jumper J6 is used as power supply selector. When using USB power supply, jumper J6 should be placed in
the USB position. When using external power supply, jumper J6 should be placed in the EXT position. The development system is turned
OFF/ON by changing the setting on the OFF/ON switch respectively.
DC connector (2)
Power supply voltage regulator
USB connector (1)
Jumper J6 used for
selecting power supply
OFF/ON switch
Figure 5-1: Power supply
The programmer uses the MOSFET switch for suspending power supply on the development system during programming. When the
process of programming is complete, the programmer enables the development system to be supplied with power.
AC/DC connector
USB connector power supply
330
35A
8N6
Side view
SMD MOSFET
IRFR9024N
A
OFF
K
0.22
SWC
SWE
CT
GND
E1
330uF
D12
D15
C8
VCC
VCC-5V
VCC-USB
LD42
POWER
J6
D7
R56
R55
1K
3K
MBRS140T3
A
K
106
10V
Side view
E2
E3
10uF
330uF
106
10V
Side view
MC
34063A
Bottom view
L2
220uH
DRVC
IPK
Vin
CMPR
on-board
programmer
MOSFET
switch
Top view
MC34063A
220pF
Side view
Side view
U10
D14
AC/DC
CN16
VCC-MCU
221
4x1N4007
D13
ON
R57
Side view
R14
2K2
+
Side view
Figure 5-2: Power supply source schematic
MikroElektronika
page
12
EasyPIC6 Development System
6.0. RS-232 Communication Interface
RS-232 serial communication is performed through a 9-pin SUB-D connector and the microcontroller USART module. In order to enable
such communication, it is necessary to establish a connection between RX and TX communication lines (KDQGVKDNLQJ lines CTS and
RTS are optionally used) and microcontroller pins provided with USART module using a DIP switch. The microcontroller pins used in such
communication are marked as follows: RX - UHFHLYHGDWD, TX - WUDQVPLWGDWD, CTS - FOHDUWRVHQG and RTS - UHTXHVWWRVHQG. Baud rate
goes up to 115kbps.
The USART (universal synchronous/asynchronous receiver/transmitter) is one of the most common ways of exchanging data between the
PC and peripheral components. In order to enable the USART module of the microcontroller to receive input signals with different voltage
levels, it is necessary to provide a voltage level converter such as MAX-202C.
RS-232 connector
Figure 6-1: RS-232 module
The function of DIP switches SW7 and SW8 is to determine which of the microcontroller pins are to be used as RX and TX lines. The
microcontroller pinout varies depending on the type of the microcontroller. Figure 6-2 shows the microcontroller in DIP40 package
(PIC16F887).
6:5;&76 21
6:7;576 21
SUB-D 9p
MAX202
Bottom view
1
5
9
6
!"
R3
1K
R54
1K
PICxxxx
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
DIP40
Figure 6-2: RS-232 module schematic
127(
Make sure that your microcontroller is provided with the USART module as it is not necessarily integrated in all microcontrollers.
MikroElektronika
13
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
7.0. PS/2 Communication Interface
The PS/2 connector enables input units, such as keyboard and mouse, to be connected to the development system. In order to enable
PS/2 communication, it is necessary to correctly place jumpers J20 and J21, thus connecting DATA and CLK lines to the microcontroller
pins RC0 and RC1. Do not connect/disconnect input units to the PS/2 connector while the development system is turned on as it may
permanently damage the microcontroller.
PS/2 connector
Figure 7-1: PS/2 connector
(J20 and J21 are not connected)
Figure 7-2: PS/2 connector
(J20 and J21 are connected)
VCC
VCC-MCU
R37
1K
R38
1K
J20 RC0
J21 RC1
PS/2
NC
CLK
VCC-MCU
+5V
NC
X1
8MHz
DATA
Front view
C6
4 2 1 3
22pF
C7
22pF
6
5
Bottom view
PICxxxx
DATA
NC
GND
VCC
CLK
NC
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
VCC-MCU
DIP40
Figure 7-3: PS/2 connector connection schematic
Figure 7-4: EasyPIC6 connected to keyboard
8.0. ICD Connector
ICD (In-Circuit Debugger) connector enables the microcontroller to communicate with external ICD debugger (ICD2 or ICD3)* from
MICROCHIP. Jumpers J8 and J9 are placed in the same way as when using the 3,&ÀDVK programmer with mikroICD designed by
MikroEektronika.
CN1
ICD connector
CLK-PIC
DATA-PIC
GND
VCC
MCLR
1
2
3
4
5
6
RJ12
1 3 5
2 4 6
Front view
Side view
Bottom view
Figure 8-1: ICD connector
)LJXUH ICD connector pinout and pin labels
*ICD2 and ICD3 are registered trademarks of MICROCHIP®
MikroElektronika
page
14
EasyPIC6 Development System
9.0. USB Communication
The USB connector enables PIC microcontrollers with a built-in USB communication module to be connected to peripheral components. In
order to enable USB communication, it is necessary to change the position of jumpers J12 from left-hand to right-hand, thus connecting the USB
DATA lines (D+ i D-) to RC4 and RC5 microcontroller pins and the RC3/VUSB pin to capacitors C16 and C17. If USB communication is not used,
jumpers J12 should be left in the left-hand position. The status of USB communication (OFF/ON) is indicated by LED. Figures 9-3 and 9-4 show
schematics of the most commonly used microcontrollers with integrated USB module.
USB connector
Figure 9-1: USB communication Figure 9-2: USB communication
disabled (default position)
enabled
Jumper
J12 in the
left-hand
position
C6
22pF
C7
22pF
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
Jumper
J12 in the
left-hand
position
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
GND
VCC-MCU
OSC1
X1
8MHz
Bottom view
C6
22pF
PIC18F2550
X1
8MHz
PIC18F4550
VCC-MCU
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3/VUSB
RD0
RD1
OSC2
C7
22pF
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
VCC-MCU
Bottom view
D+ GND
D-
DIP28
VCC
D+ GND
D-
CN4
VCC
CN4
USB B
USB B
J12
VCC-BUS
DD+
GND
RC5
RC4
RC5
J12
RC4
RC3
RC3
LD44
USB ON
LD44
USB ON
C16
100nF
C17
100nF
R42
4K7
Figure 9-3: PIC18F4550 USB communication schematic
MikroElektronika
VCC-BUS
DD+
GND
DIP40
C16
C17
100nF
100nF
R42
4K7
Figure 9-4: PIC18F2550 USB communication schematic
15
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
10.0. DS1820 Temperature Sensor
1-wire® serial communication enables data to be transferred over one single communication line while the process itself is under the
control of the master microcontroller. The advantage of such communication is that only one microcontroller pin is used. All VODYH devices
have by default a unique ID code, which enables the master device to easily identify all devices sharing the same interface.
DS1820 is a temperature sensor that uses 1-wire® standard for its operation. It is capable of measuring temperatures within the range of
-55 to 125°C and provides ±0.5°C accuracy for temperatures within the range of -10 to 85°C. Power supply voltage of 3V to 5.5V is required
for its operation. It takes maximum 750ms for the DS1820 to calculate temperature with 9-bit resolution. The EasyPIC6 development
system provides a separate socket for the DS1820. It may use either RA5 or RE2 pin for communication with the microcontroller. Jumper
J11’s purpose is selection of the pin to be used for 1-wire® communication. Figure 10-5 shows 1-wire® communication with microcontroller
through the RA5 pin.
NOTE: Make sure that halfcircle on the board matches
the round side of the
DS1820
Figure 10-1: DS1820
connector (1-wire communication is not used)
Figure 10-2: J11 in the
left-hand position (1-wire
communication through
the RA5 pin)
Figure 10-3: J11 in the
right-hand position (1-wire
communication through
the RE2 pin)
Jumper J11
in the upper position
VCC-MCU
R1
1K
DS1820
J11
DQ
GND
DQ
VCC-MCU
VCC-MCU
DQ
X1
8MHz
Botoom view
VCC-MCU GND
C6
22pF
C7
22pF
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
PICxxxx
Figure 10-4: DS1820
plugged into appropriate
socket
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
VCC-MCU
DIP40
Figure 10-5: 1-wire communication schematic
MikroElektronika
page
16
EasyPIC6 Development System
11.0. A/D Converter
An A/D converter is used for the purpose of converting an analog signal into the appropriate digital value. A/D converter is linear, which means
that the converted number is linearly dependent on the input voltage value.
The A/D converter built into the microcontroller provided with the EasyPIC6 development system converts an analog voltage value into a
10-bit number. Voltages varying from 0V to 5V DC may be supplied through the A/D test inputs. Jumper J15 is used for selecting some of the
IROORZLQJSLQV5$5$5$5$RU5$IRU$'FRQYHUVLRQ7KH5UHVLVWRUKDVDSURWHFWLYHIXQFWLRQDVLWLVXVHGIRUOLPLWLQJFXUUHQWÀRZ
through the potentiometer or the microcontroller pin. The value of the input analog voltage can be changed linearly using potentiometer P1.
RA0 is A/D input
VCC-MCU
J15
RA0
RB3
RA1
RB2
RA4
OSC1
MCLR OSC2
GND
VCC
RA2
RB7
RA3
RB6
RB0
RB5
RB1
RB4
R63
P1
10K
220R
P1
10K
Figure 11-2: The RA0 pin
used as A/D conversion input
Figure 11-1: ADC (default
jumper positions)
VCC-MCU
X1
8MHz
C6
22pF
Top view
C7
22pF
DIP18A
Figure 11-3: Microcontroller in DIP18A package and A/D converter test
inputs connection
RA0 is A/D input
VCC-MCU
RA0 is A/D input
J15
R63
P1
10K
220R
VCC-MCU
Top view
X1
8MHz
C6
22pF
C7
22pF
PICxxxx
P1
10K
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
VCC-MCU
P1
10K
J15
R63
220R
P1
10K
VCC-MCU
VCC-MCU
X1
8MHz
Top view
C6
22pF
C7
22pF
DIP40
Figure 11-4: Microcontroller in DIP40 package and A/D converter test
inputs connectiion
127(
Figure 11-5: Microcontroller in DIP28 package and A/D converter test
inputs connection
In order to enable the microcontroller to accurately perform A/D conversion, it is necessary to turn off LED diodes and
pull-up/pull-down resistors on port pins used by the A/D converter.
MikroElektronika
17
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
12.0. LEDs
/('GLRGH/LJKW(PLWWLQJ'LRGHLVDKLJKO\HI¿FLHQWHOHFWURQLFOLJKWVRXUFH:KHQFRQQHFWLQJ/('VLWLVQHFHVVDU\WRSODFHDFXUUHQW
limiting resistor the value of which is calculated using formula R=U/I where R is referred to resistance expressed in ohms, U is referred to
voltage on the LED and I stands for LED diode current. A common LED diode voltage is approximately 2.5V, while the current varies from
1mA to 20mA depending on the type of LED diode. The EasyPIC6 development system uses LEDs with current I=1mA.
The EasyPIC6 has 36 LEDs which visually indicate the logic state of each microcontroller I/O pin. An active LED diode indicates that
a logic one (1) is present on the pin. In order to enable LEDs, it is necessary to select appropriate port PORTA/E, PORTB, PORTC or
PORTD using the DIP switch SW9.
Notch indicating the
SMD LED cathode
I
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
A
R=U/I
K
SMD LED
472
R
Microcontroller
SMD resistor limiting current
ÀRZWKURXJKDQ/('
Figure 12-1: LEDs
6:3257% 21
%
#
#
#
#
#
#
$
$
$
!"
!"
%
Figure 12-2: LED diode and PORTB connection schematic
MikroElektronika
page
18
EasyPIC6 Development System
13.0. Push Buttons
The logic state of all microcontroller digital inputs may be changed using push buttons. Jumper J17 is used to determine the logic state to be
applied to the desired microcontroller pin by pressing the appropriate push button. The purpose of the protective resistor is to limit maximum
current thus preventing a short circuit from occurring. Advanced users may, if needed, disable such resistor using jumper J24. Just next to the
push buttons, there is a RESET button which is not connected to the MCLR pin. The reset signal is generated by the programmer.
VCC-MCU
R17
10K
RESET button
RSTbut
C14
100nF
Jumper J24 used for enabling protective resistor
Jumper J17 used for
selecting logic state to
be applied to the pin by
pressing button
Push buttons used for
simulating digital inputs
Figure 13-1: Push buttons
By pressing any push button (R0-R7) when jumper J17 is in the VCC-MCU position, a logic one (5V) will be applied to the appropriate
microcontroller pin as shown in Figure 13-2.
Jumper J17 in the
pull-up position
! """"
!
Figure 13-2: PORTB push button connection schematic
MikroElektronika
19
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
14.0. Keypads
There are two keypads provided on the EasyPIC6 development system. These are keypad 4x4 and keypad MENU. Keypad 4x4 is a standard
alphanumeric keypad connected to the microcontroller PORTD. The performance of such a keypad is based on the ‘scan and sense’ principle
ZKHUHWKH5'5'5'DQG5'SLQVDUHFRQ¿JXUHGDVLQSXWVFRQQHFWHGWRSXOOGRZQUHVLVWRUV7KH5'5'5'DQG5'SLQVDUH
FRQ¿JXUHGDVKLJKOHYHOYROWDJHRXWSXWV3UHVVLQJDQ\EXWWRQZLOOFDXVHDORJLFRQHWREHDSSOLHGWRLQSXWSLQV3XVKEXWWRQGHWHFWLRQLV
performed from within software. For example, pressing button ‘6’ will cause a logic one (1) to appear on the RD2 pin. In order to determine
which of the push buttons is pressed, a logic one (1) is applied to each of the following output pins RD4, RD5, RD6 and RD7.
Keypad MENU buttons are connected in a similar way to the PORTA buttons. The only difference is in the button arrangement. The keypad
MENU buttons are arranged so as to provide easy navigation through menus.
VCC-MCU
RN4
8x10K
J17
J4
SW4
BAT43
RD0
RD1
RD2
RD3
RD4
RD5
RD6
RD7
A
R59
R60
R61
R62
T46
T54
T50
T38
T43
T47
T56
T51
T57
D9
T59
T58
T39
T44
T48
T52
T40
T45
T49
T53
D10
220R
RD7
T42
T55
220R
RD6
D8
220R
RD5
T37
R58
220R
D11
RA5
RD4
RA2
VCCMCU
J24
Side view
K
RA0
22pF
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
RA3
22pF
C7
)LJXUHKeypad MENU
RA1
C6
RA4
X1
8MHz
VCC-MCU
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
PICxxxx
VCC-MCU
)LJXUHKeypad 4x4 performance
)LJXUHKeypad 4x4
Jumper J17 is
in the pull-up
position. Pins
5'5'
RD2 and RD3
are connected
to pull-down
resistors through
DIP switch SW4
RD3
RD2
RD1
RD0
220R
DIP40
Figure 14-4: Keypads (4x4 and MENU) and microcontroller connection schematic
MikroElektronika
page
20
EasyPIC6 Development System
15.0. 2x16 LCD Display
The EasyPIC6 development system provides an on-board connector to plug alphanumeric 2x16 LCD display into. Such connector is
connected to the microcontroller through the PORTB port. Potentiometer P4 is used for display contrast adjustment. The LCD switch
on the DIP switch SW6 is used for turning on/off display backlight. Communication between an LCD display and the microcontroller is
established using a 4-bit mode. Alphanumeric digits are displayed in two lines each containing up to 16 characters of 7x5 pixels.
Connector for alphanumeric
LCD display
Contrast adjustment
potentiometer
Figure 15-1: Alphanumeric LCD connector
Figure 15-2: 2x16 LCD display
6:/&'%&. 21
VCC-MCU
C6
22pF
C7
22pF
DIP40
)LJXUH2x16 LCD display connection schematic
MikroElektronika
SW6
P4
10K
Top view
LCD-GLCD
BACKLIGHT
VCC-MCU
GND
VCC-MCU
R43
10
VO
RB4
GND
RB5
GND
GND
GND
GND
RB0
RB1
RB2
RB3
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
CN7
GND
VCC
VO
RS
R/W
E
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
LED+
LED-
X1
8MHz
PICxxxx
VCC-MCU
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
VCC
21
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
16.0. On-Board 2x16 LCD Display
On-board 2x16 display is connected to the microcontroller through a port expander. In order to use this display, it is necessary to set the DIP
switch SW10 to the ON position, thus connecting the on-board LCD display to port expander’s port 1. The DIP switch SW6 enables the port
expander to use serial communication. Potentiometer P5 is used for display contrast adjustment.
Unlike common LCD display, the on-board LCD display has no backlights and receives data to be displayed through the port expander
which employs SPI communication for the purpose of communicating with the microcontroller. Similar to standard 2x16 LCD display, the
on-board 2x16 LCD display also displays digits in two lines each containing up to 16 characters of 7x5 pixels.
DIP switch SW10 to
turn the on-board 2x16
LCD display ON
Contrast adjustment
potentiometer
Figure 16-1: On-board 2x16 LCD display
6:&65676&.0,62026, 21
6: 21
C6
22pF
C7
22pF
VCC-MCU
SW6
RA2
RA3
RC3
RC4
RC5
PE-CS#
PE-RST#
SPI-SCK
SPI-MISO
SPI-MOSI
VCC-MCU
U5
P1.2
P1.3
P1.4
P1.5
P1.6
P1.7
VCCMCU
CN17
COG-RS
COG-E
COG-D4
COG-D5
COG-D6
COG-D7
PE-INTA
PE-INTB
GND
Vo
VCC-MCU
RS
R/W
E
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
PE-CS#
SPI-SCK
SPI-MOSI
SPI-MISO
P5
10K
SW10
P1.2
P1.3
P1.4
P1.5
P1.6
P1.7
RB0
RB1
X1
8MHz
PICxxxx
VCC-MCU
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
R2
100K
GPB0
GPB1
GPB2
GPB3
GPB4
GPB5
GPB6
GPB7
VCC
GND
CS
SCK
SI
SO
GPA7
GPA6
GPA5
GPA4
GPA3
GPA2
GPA1
GPA0
INTA
INTB
RESET
A2
A1
A0
PE-INTA
PE-INTB
PE-RST#
MCP23S17
VCC-MCU
DIP40
Top view
Figure 16-2: On-board 2x16 LCD display connection schematic
MikroElektronika
page
22
EasyPIC6 Development System
17.0. 128x64 Graphic LCD Display
128x64 graphic LCD display (128x64 GLCD) provides an advanced method for displaying graphic messages. It is connected to the
microcontroller through PORTB and PORTD. GLCD display has the screen resolution of 128x64 pixels which allows you to display diagrams,
tables and other graphical contents. Since the PORTB port is also used by 2x16 alphanumeric LCD display, you cannot use both displays
simultaneously. Potentiometer P3 is used for the GLCD display contrast adjustment. Switch 8 on the DIP switch SW6 is used for turning
on/off display backlight.
.
Contrast adjustment
potentiometer
GLCD connector
Touch panel connector
Figure 17-2: GLCD connector
Figure 17-1: GLCD display
6:*/&'%&. 21
SW6
22pF
DIP40
Figure 17-3: GLCD display connection schematic
MikroElektronika
LCD-GLCD
BACKLIGHT
Top view
R28
10
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
%$
"
'
"&
"
PICxxxx
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
VCC
23
page
EasyPIC6 Development System
18.0. Touch Panel
The touch panel is a thin, self-adhesive, transparent panel sensitive to touch. It is placed over a GLCD display. The main purpose of this
SDQHOLVWRUHJLVWHUSUHVVXUHDWVRPHVSHFL¿FGLVSOD\SRLQWDQGWRIRUZDUGLWVFRRUGLQDWHVLQWKHIRUPRIDQDORJYROWDJHWRWKHPLFURFRQWUROOHU
Switches 5,6,7 and 8 on the DIP switch SW9 are used for connecting touch panel to the microcontroller.
1
3
4
Figure 18-1: Touch panel
)LJXUHVKRZVKRZWRSODFHDWRXFKSDQHORYHUD*/&'GLVSOD\0DNHVXUHWKDWWKHÀDWFDEOHLVWRWKHOHIWRIWKH*/&'GLVSOD\DV
shown in Figure 4.
VCC-MCU
SW9
Q15
BC856
R49
10K
RIGHT
BOTTOM
LEFT
DRIVEA
DRIVEB
R44
1K
R47
10K
VCC-MCU
CN13
VCC-MCU
R48
1K
Q13
BC846
Q14
BC856
R46
10K
Q12
BC846
R52
100K
VCC-MCU
R45
10K
VCC-MCU
BOTTOM
C26
100nF
RIGHT
TOP
LEFT
BOTTOM
GLCD
C25
100nF
LEFT
Q16
BC846
R53
100K
X1
8MHz
R50
1K
R51
10K
C6
22pF
6:%27720/()7'5,9($'5,9(% 21
TOUCHPANEL
CONTROLLER
C7
22pF
RB7
RB6
RB5
RB4
RB3
RB2
RB1
RB0
VCC
GND
RD7
RD6
RD5
RD4
RC7
RC6
RC5
RC4
RD3
RD2
PICxxxx
TOP
MCLR
RA0
RA1
RA2
RA3
RA4
RA5
RE0
RE1
RE2
VCC
GND
OSC1
OSC2
RC0
RC1
RC2
RC3
RD0
RD1
VCC-MCU
DIP40
Figure 18-2: Touch panel connection schematic
1
3
4
Figure 18-3: Placing touch panel
)LJXUHVKRZVLQGHWDLOKRZWRFRQQHFWDWRXFKSDQHOWRWKHPLFURFRQWUROOHU%ULQJWKHHQGRIWKHÀDWFDEOHFORVHWRWKH&1FRQQHFWRUDV
VKRZQLQ)LJXUH3OXJWKHFDEOHLQWRWKHFRQQHFWRUDVVKRZQLQ)LJXUHDQGSUHVVLWHDVLO\VRDVWR¿WWKHFRQQHFWRUDVVKRZQLQ)LJXUH
Now you can plug a GLCD display into the appropriate connector as shown in Figure 4.
127(
LEDs and pull-up/pull-down resistors on the RA0 and RA1 pins of the PORTA port must be turned off when using a touch panel.
MikroElektronika
page
24
EasyPIC6 Development System
19.0. Input/Output Ports
Along the right side of the development system, there are seven 10-pin connectors which are connected to the microcontroller’s I/O ports.
Some of the connector’s pins are directly connected to the microcontroller pins, whereas some of them are connected using jumpers. DIP
switches SW1-SW5 enable each connector pin to be connected to one pull-up/pull-down resistor. Whether port pins are to be connected to
a pull-up or pull-down resistor depends on the position of jumpers J1-J5.
2x5 PORTA male connector
Jumper for pull-up/ pulldown resistor selection
Figure 19-2: J2 in the
pull-down position
Additional module connected
to PORTC
DIP switch to turn
on
pull-up/pull-down
resistors for each pin
Figure 19-1: I/O ports
)LJXUH J2 in the
pull-up position
6: 21
Jumper J2 in the pull-down position
-XPSHU-LQWKH9&&0&8SRVLWLRQ
"
#$
%&
%&
! !
!
Figure 19-4: PORTB schematic connection
MikroElektronika
Pull-up/pull-down resistors enable voltage signal to be brought to the microcontroller pins. The logic level at pin idle state depends on the
pull-up/pull-down jumper position. The RB0 pin along with the relevant DIP switch SW2, jumper J2 and RB2 push button with jumper J17 are
used here for the purpose of explaining the performance of pull-up/pull-down resistors. The principle of their operation is identical for all the
microcontroller pins.
####
#$
!
"
!
!
page
25
EasyPIC6 Development System
In order to enable PORTB pins to be connected to
pull-down resistors, it is necessary to set jumper J2
in the lower position, thus providing 8x10K resistor
network with a logic zero (0V). To bring a signal to
the RB0 pin, it is necessary to set switch 1 on the DIP
switch SW2 to the ON position. This will cause the
microcontroller RB0 pin to be ‘pulled down’ to the low
logic level (0V) in its idle state.
Jumper J17, used to determine the pin logic state
provided by pressing push-buttons, should be set in
the opposite position of jumper J2.
Accordingly, every time you press the RB0 push
button, a logic one (1) will appear on the RB0 pin.
Figure 19-5: Jumper J2 in pull-down and J17 in pull-up positions
####
#$
!
"
!
!
In order to enable PORTB pins to be connected to
pull-up resistors, it is necessary to set jumper J2 in
the upper position (5V) and jumper J17 in the lower
position (0V). This enables each PORTB pin to be
‘pulled up’ to the high logic level (5V) in its idle state.
In order to do this, it is necessary to set appropriate
switch on the DIP switch SW2 to the ON position.
Accordingly, every time you press the RB0 push
button, a logic zero (0) will appear on the RB0 pin.
)LJXUH Jumper J2 in pull-up and J17 in pull-down positions
In this case, jumpers J2 and J17 have the same logic
state which means that pressing push button will not
cause any pin to change its logic state.
)LJXUH Jumpers J2 and J17 in the same position
MikroElektronika
page
26
EasyPIC6 Development System
20.0. Additional I/O Ports
The SPI communication lines and MCP23S17 circuit provide the EasyPIC6 development system with a means of increasing the number of
available I/O ports by two. If the port expander is connected over the DIP switch SW6, the following pins RA2, RA3, RC3, RC4 and RC5 will
be used for SPI communication and thus cannot be used as I/O pins. Switches INTA and INTB on the DIP switch SW10 enable interrupt.
0&36HQDEOHVELWSDUDOOHOH[SDQVLRQDQGPD\EHFRQ¿JXUHGWRRSHUDWHLQHLWKHURUELWPRGH
PORT0
Jumper for selecting
pull-up/pull-down resistor
PORT1
DIP switch connecting port
expander to the microcontroller
Figure 20-2: DIP switch SW6 when port
expander is enabled
Figure 20-1: Port expander
6:&65676&.0,62026, 21
6:,17$,17% 21
Jumpers J18 and J19 in the upper position
!"
#
$%
&'
&'
!"
Figure 20-3: Port expander schematic
MikroElektronika
)
"
!"
!"
(
!
!
!"
!"
)
(
!
!
DISCLAIMER
All the products owned by MikroElektronika are protected by copyright law and international copyright treaty.
Therefore, this manual is to be treated as any other copyright material. No part of this manual, including
product and software described herein, may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, translated or
transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior written permission of MikroElektronika. The
PDQXDO3')HGLWLRQFDQEHSULQWHGIRUSULYDWHRUORFDOXVHEXWQRWIRUGLVWULEXWLRQ$Q\PRGL¿FDWLRQRIWKLV
manual is prohibited.
0LNUR(OHNWURQLND SURYLGHV WKLV PDQXDO µDV LV¶ ZLWKRXW ZDUUDQW\ RI DQ\ NLQG HLWKHU H[SUHVVHG RU LPSOLHG
LQFOXGLQJEXWQRWOLPLWHGWRWKHLPSOLHGZDUUDQWLHVRUFRQGLWLRQVRIPHUFKDQWDELOLW\RU¿WQHVVIRUDSDUWLFXODU
purpose.
MikroElektronika shall assume no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions and inaccuracies that may
DSSHDULQWKLVPDQXDO,QQRHYHQWVKDOO0LNUR(OHNWURQLNDLWVGLUHFWRUVRI¿FHUVHPSOR\HHVRUGLVWULEXWRUVEH
OLDEOHIRUDQ\LQGLUHFWVSHFL¿FLQFLGHQWDORUFRQVHTXHQWLDOGDPDJHVLQFOXGLQJGDPDJHVIRUORVVRIEXVLQHVV
SUR¿WVDQGEXVLQHVVLQIRUPDWLRQEXVLQHVVLQWHUUXSWLRQRUDQ\RWKHUSHFXQLDU\ORVVDULVLQJRXWRIWKHXVH
of this manual or product, even if MikroElektronika has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
MikroElektronika reserves the right to change information contained in this manual at any time without prior
notice, if necessary.
All the product and corporate names appearing in this manual may or may not be registered trademarks
RUFRS\ULJKWVRIWKHLUUHVSHFWLYHFRPSDQLHVDQGDUHRQO\XVHGIRULGHQWL¿FDWLRQRUH[SODQDWLRQDQGWRWKH
RZQHUV¶EHQH¿WZLWKQRLQWHQWWRLQIULQJH
HIGH RISK ACTIVITIES
The products of MikroElektronika are not fault – tolerant nor designed, manufactured or intended for use or
resale as on – line control equipment in hazardous environments requiring fail – safe performance, such as
LQWKHRSHUDWLRQRIQXFOHDUIDFLOLWLHVDLUFUDIWQDYLJDWLRQRUFRPPXQLFDWLRQV\VWHPVDLUWUDI¿FFRQWUROGLUHFW
life support machines or weapons systems in which the failure of Software could lead directly to death,
SHUVRQDOLQMXU\RUVHYHUHSK\VLFDORUHQYLURQPHQWDOGDPDJHµ+LJK5LVN$FWLYLWLHV¶0LNUR(OHNWURQLNDDQGLWV
VXSSOLHUVVSHFL¿FDOO\GLVFODLPDQ\H[SUHVVHGRULPSOLHGZDUUDQW\RI¿WQHVVIRU+LJK5LVN$FWLYLWLHV
Copyright 2003 – 2009 by MikroElektronika. All rights reserved.
,I\RXKDYHDQ\TXHVWLRQVFRPPHQWVRUEXVLQHVVSURSRVDOVGRQRWKHVLWDWHWRFRQWDFWXVDWRI¿FH#PLNURHFRP
If you are experiencing some problems with any of our products or just need additional information, please place your ticket at
www.mikroe.com/en/support
If you want to learn more about our products, please visit our website at www.mikroe.com
Similar pages