AN9770: Engine Knock Sensing Applications (HIP9011EVAL1Z)

Engine Knock Sensing Applications
(HIP9011EVAL1Z)
®
Application Note
HIP9011EVAL1Z Evaluation Board
November 6, 2006
AN9770.1
There continues a driving effort by the Government and the
automotive industry to make cars more efficient with lower
emissions. Tighter and more extensive control of automobile
engines by microcontrollers has resulted in significant strides
towards these goals.
One of the factors contributing to these improvements is
engine ignition control. The HIP9011 helps in the ongoing
battle to enhance engine performance by providing more
detailed information to the engine microcontroller.
An important point to remember - automotive engines operate
most efficiently when the engine is placed in the ignition timing
condition just prior to ping or pre-ignition. The closer an
engine can operate to this condition, the higher the
performance. This is analogous to an operational amplifier,
where the higher the gain, the lower the distortion. In the case
of the knock signal processing IC, it provides a means of
detecting engine knock or ping at levels that were previously
unrealizable by amplification and filter means. Figure 1 shows
the HIP9011 in a typical engine application.
ENGINE CONTROL MODULE
MOSI
CS
HIP9011
MOSI †SO
SCK
INTOUT
INT/HOLD
A/D
CONVERTER
HOST
MICROCONTROLLER
KNOCK
SENSOR
KNOCK
SENSOR
SPI
INTERFACE
OTHER ENGINE
SENSOR SIGNALS
ENGINE CONTROL SIGNALS
FIGURE 1. HIP9011 IN A TYPICAL ENGINE CONTROL APPLICATION
1
CAUTION: These devices are sensitive to electrostatic discharge; follow proper IC Handling Procedures.
1-888-INTERSIL or 1-888-468-3774 | Intersil (and design) is a registered trademark of Intersil Americas Inc.
Copyright Intersil Americas Inc. 1999, 2006. All Rights Reserved
All other trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners.
CH0IN 19
CH0NI 20
+
CHIFB 17
CH1IN 16
CH1NI 15
+
CHANNEL SELECT
SWITCHES
CH0FB 18
3RD ORDER
ANTIALIASING FILTER
Application Note 9770
PROGRAMMABLE
GAIN
STAGE
2 - 0.111
64 STEPS
PROGRAMMABLE
BANDPASS
FILTER
1 - 20kHz
64 STEPS
ACTIVE
FULL WAVE
RECTIFIER
PROGRAMMABLE
INTEGRATOR
40 - 600μs
32 STEPS
TO SWITCHED
CAPACITOR
NETWORKS
POWER SUPPLY
AND
BIAS CIRCUITS
VMID 3 VDD 1 GND 2
DIFFERENTIAL
TO SINGLE-ENDED
CONVERTER,
SAMPLE AND
HOLD AND
OUTPUT DRIVER
PROGRAMMABLE
DIVIDER
REGISTERS
AND
STATE MACHINE
INTOUT 4
OSCIN 9
CLOCK
OSCOUT 10
SCK 13
CS 8
SI 12
SO 11
INT/HOLD 7
SPI
INTERFACE
TEST 14
FIGURE 2. SIMPLIFIED BLOCK DIAGRAM OF THE HIP9011, SINGLE CHANNEL KNOCK SIGNAL PROCESSING IC
Operation of the Signal Processing IC
Inputs from one or two piezoelectric sensors mounted on the
engine block are capacitively coupled to the inputs of the
operational amplifiers within the HIP9011. Two sensors are
shown in the examples in this application note, one for each
side of a “V” type of engine configuration. Engines configured
in-line may use sensors placed on either end of the engine
block. Often only one sensor is used by strategically locating a
point where optimum signal output is available. The ability of
this IC to have programmable gain changes at each ignition
pulse can help with these configurations. In some high end
applications two HIP9011 are used.
The input coupling capacitor and series input resistors to the
inverting input of the operational amplifiers within the HIP9011
serve as a high pass filter to reduce low frequency components
from the transducer. AC coupling also has the advantage of
reducing the possibility of driving the output of the input
amplifier towards the positive supply with increased leakage
resistance of the transducer or environment with time. Leakage
resistance to ground will pull the inverting input of the
operational amplifier to ground, thus forcing its output high. The
non-inverting input of the HIP9011 is not committed, but in most
applications, it is usually returned to the mid supply voltage,
available as an output terminal of the device.
A signal from the engine’s microcontroller determines which
transducer input signal will be processed by the HIP9011
operational amplifier for each ignition pulse by toggling the
transmission gate on the output of these amplifiers. From here
the signal is applied to an anti aliasing filter within the HIP9011.
This filter excludes input signals above 20kHz from passing on
to the following switched capacitor filter and gain stages.
Signals above 20kHz could cause problems with the 200kHz
clocking frequency of the switched capacitor filters and
amplifiers. A filter channel is provided in the HIP9011, with a
tuning range from 1.22kHz to 19.98kHz, in 64 steps. Serial
control signals are sent via the SPI bus to the HIP9011 by the
microcontroller. These control signals set the filter frequencies
within these ICs.
2
The output of the Filter Stage in the HIP9011 is applied to a full
wave rectifier and then to an integrator. The integrator operation
is initiated by the INT/HOLD signal from the microcontroller. It is
only during the rising edge of the INT/HOLD signal that the
integrator starts from its initial reset condition of 0.125V.
Integration is towards the positive supply when a knock signal
is present. Severity of the knock signal and the integrators
programmable time constant determines the final level. The
integrator time constant is programmable in 32 steps from 40μs
to 600μs. This time constant can be viewed as an output signal
attenuator. Again, the value of the time constant is set by the
SPI control signals from the microcontroller.
Immediately after the INT/HOLD signal goes low, the
integrators output signal, INTOUT is held in the HIP9011’s
output sample and hold circuit for the microcontroller’s A/D
converter to process. Figure 2 shows the block diagram of the
HIP9011. Figure 3 shows the waveforms for the integrator,
INTOUT on the top trace. The center trace shows the input
signal from a simulated pressure transducer mounted on the
cylinder. An expanded waveform of the simulated engine input
signal during the integration period is shown in the circled
display of Figure 3. The bottom trace shows the INT/HOLD
signal.
From this discussion we see that we have an IC that can detect
low levels of engine knock or ping by using bandpass filters,
rectification and an integration process. The gated integrator
allows the IC to only monitor engine noise during the time that
engine knock is expected to occur, thus, vastly reducing the
influence of background noise.
Integrator Operation
Observation of the integrator output signal, INTOUT, is
important to the setup and understanding of the operation of
this signal processing IC. This observation can be distorted by
instrumentation used to view the INTOUT signal. In Figure 5,
the upper waveform shows what looks like inaccuracies in the
INTOUT signal. This is due to aliasing of the oscilloscope
sampling system with only 500 samples. Not shown in this
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
display is the 200kHz clock signal that only appears during the
integration portion of the sample cycle. This signal causes
aliasing or a “low frequency beat” in the oscilloscope display
between the 500 samples and the 200kHz pulses appearing on
the ramp only during the integration interval. Once the signal is
acquired, the INTOUT signal during the hold period remains
constant and free of the 200kHz pulses until the next integration
period. The sample and hold circuit within the HIP9011 is timed
so that it only samples during a non pulse period, thus
preventing it from acquiring either peaks or valleys.
The lower trace of Figure 5 more accurately depicts the
INTOUT waveform. Note the 200kHz clock signal on the
integrator ramp. One million samples were used for this
display. Also note that INTOUT is constant between
integration cycles and shows no 200kHz pulses.
For observation purposes only, or when working with a
digital oscilloscope with limited samples, an external anti
aliasing filter may be assembled with a series 51k resistor
and a 510pF capacitor to ground. The filter attenuates the
internal 200kHz clock signal during integration, For
operation with a sampling A/D converter that is strobed and
samples after the integration cycle, no filter is needed.
Laboratory Setup
It is desirable to get a “feeling” for the operation of the
HIP9011 before proceeding to an evaluation with an engine,
Figure 6 shows a bench test setup where this can be easily
accomplished.
One generator is used to provide the INT/HOLD signal to the
Evaluation Board. In the actual application this signal would be
supplied by the engine controller. The width of this signal may
vary from several hundred microseconds to several
milliseconds depending upon the engine rpm and engine type.
Generally, there is a large signal at high engine rpms and lower
signals at low rpms. At the lower rpm, the integration period
may be extended to gain more samples and effectively produce
high sensitivity to obtain more output.
The second generator provides the signal that serves as a
knock signal. It is interesting to note the variation of the
integrator output, INTOUT, as the IC filter frequency or oscillator
frequency is varied from 200Hz to 100kHz. Figure 4 shows the
IC’s filter response as a sweep frequency signal is applied to
only the filter circuit for five selected filter frequencies from
1.22kHz to 19.98kHz. These curves were taken only of the
filters to show their response and comparatively constant
output through out the entire filter frequency range.
Figure 7 shows the HIP9011 connected to an engine. The
microcontroller with inputs from the engine, provides the
INT/HOLD signal to initiate operation of the integrator within
the knock signal processing IC.
Evaluation Board
Figure 8 shows the schematic diagram of the evaluation board.
A 4MHz crystal is supplied with the board. 4MHz ceramic
resonators such as the TDK FRC4.0MCS have been
successfully used in the board. Three pins are provided on the
board to accept resonators to replace the crystal.
A prewired input amplifier configuration board is provided as
shown in Figure 9. This board is connected for single ended
operation.
Figure 10 shows the schematic diagram for a differential
input board that may be wired for the HIP9011. This may be
fabricated with the one generic blank board supplied with the
evaluation board.
Figure 11 is a top view of the evaluation board.
Software Displays
Figure 12 shows the display for the HIP9011 appearing on the
computer when using the Evaluation Board in a Microsoft®
Windows® setup. In some Windows setups the text displayed
may override the boxes and be difficult to read due to computer
settings. This can be corrected by changing the font size on the
computer. This is described in the “Installing Knock Signal
Processor Software” section of this application note.
FIGURE 3. WAVEFORMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE HIP9011
3
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
1.0
0.9
0.8
OUPUT SIGNAL (V)
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.2
0.1
0.0
200
500
1k
2k
5k
10k
20k
50k
100k
FREQUENCY (Hz)
FIGURE 4. RESPONSE OF ONLY THE FILTERS WITHIN THE HIP9011
The codes written by the computer for each function are
displayed on the lower right side of the display. Multiple
settings may easily be obtained by opening more windows
with different settings and clicking with the mouse on the
desired window, to activate the desired setting.
look like a severe knock signal that can not be handled by
the control system. Software would then retard the timing to
a minimum that would allow the engine to function, but at a
lower efficiency level. Service would be required to restore
normal engine operation.
Figure 13 through Figure 17 shows the writing sequence to
the knock processing IC by the computer for various settings
of the knock signal processing ICs.
Another Open Knock Sensor Approach with a
Software Algorithm
Open Knock Sensor Detection
One means to detect an open sensor is to couple a low level,
low frequency AC signal to the amplifier input. If the coupling
capacitor value carrying this signal is small compared to the
capacitance of the piezoelectric transducer, the coupled
signal will be attenuated. To a first order, this would be the
capacitance ratio Ccoupling/Csensor. Moreover, if the low
level signal’s frequency is below the normal spectrum of
engine signals it will be further attenuated by the bandpass
filters. To accomplish this function on the Evaluation Board,
two terminals are provided. One is marked 900Hz, while the
other is the ground return for that signal. When the
piezoelectric transducer is removed from the input circuit,
the previously attenuated 900Hz signal will become large
and drive the IC’s input operational amplifier to full output,
which will produce higher frequency components that will
4
The main focus of this method to detect sensor disconnect is
based on exploiting the re-programmability of the gain stage
within the IC. If a user reprograms the gain stage, for
example, at every 5th engine revolution for an open sensor
condition, the response time and accuracy of the feedback
knock sensor control should not impair the engine
performance over most of the entire engine speed range.
The approach is to adjust the GAIN stage prior to supplying
the knock signal to the Band Pass Filter stage. To determine
the sensor disconnect threshold value for the knock sensor
system, the gain would be reduced to the lowest
programmable level. This would then provide a signal
level/reference value closest to that produced by a sensor
that was disconnected.
Then with the GAIN stage programmed to a more
normal/frequent operating value, should a sensor become
disconnected, the INTOUT signal level would drop to a level
Microsoft® and Windows® are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
near the level/value that was determined when the GAIN
stage was set at the lowest value of gain. From this higher
gain value/operating condition, the system could then
determine that the sensor has been disconnected.
Another approach that has been suggested is to, at engine
start up, advance the engine timing to the knock level and
observe the INTOUT signal. If knock cannot be detected, the
sensor is assumed open.
Application Tips
Here are several important points about the application of
the HIP9011 that will enhance the performance of a system
using this IC. First, as mentioned previously, it is suggested
that a coupling capacitor be placed in series with the
transducer. This minimizes the possibility of pulling the
inverting input of the operational amplifiers within the IC to
ground. Grounding the inverting input forces the amplifier
output high, thus limiting the signal handling ability of the
amplifiers.
Other Applications
Because of the extremely unique design of this signal
processing IC with over 130,000 programming
combinations, the user is afforded maximum flexibility of
signal detection and processing. Other applications are
possible such as security systems with acoustical spectrum
analysis with the aid of the filter within this device. Room,
area or system profiles can be stored and compared with
current values.
Analysis of heavy transmissions or other machinery with
sensors used to detect bearing wear and other acoustical
qualities is possible. Here preventive maintenance would be
one of the key qualities.
Another important point is to insure that the input amplifier
and following stages operate at near their maximum peak to
peak signal level without overload under the maximum
expected input. Doing this allows the integrator stage to be
set to lower gain settings, larger time constants, and thus
reduces sensitivity in the output stage. This is analogous to a
public address amplifier where the master gain control,
analogues to the integrator stage, is set to full gain and the
input gain control set to minimum gain. Under these
conditions the public system will be noisy.
As a goal keep the output of the input operational amplifiers
within half of the maximum expected output swing. This will
insure that the following analog initializing filter has sufficient
dynamic range. The switched capacitor gain stage can be
used to either attenuate or amplify the signal. By observing
these conditions, the signal going into the integrator stage
will usually require a large time constant to keep the
integrator from saturating. Also, remember that the effective
system gain can be increased by increasing the integration
window when higher gain is needed, usually, at lower engine
speeds.
5
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
CAPTURED WAVEFORMS
INT/HOLD
(PIN 7)
FINAL INTEGRATION VALUE
DISPLAY ERROR
INITIAL INTEGRATOR RESET
DISPLAY ERROR
INTOUT (PIN 4)
NOTE: SAMPLING RATE SET TOO LOW
INTHOLD (PIN 7)
INTOUT (PIN 4)
NOTE: FREEDOM FROM THE EFFECTS OF
ALIASING WITH MORE SAMPLES
FIGURE 5. INTOUT (PIN 4) OUTPUT WAVEFORM DISPLAY INACCURACIES DUE TO DIGITAL SAMPLING SCOPE SETTINGS
6
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
PULSE GENERATOR USED
TO GENERATE 0 TO 5V
INT/HOLD SIGNAL
SINE WAVE GENERATOR
1kHz TO 20kHz, 0mV TO 500mV
SINE WAVE GENERATOR
PULSE GENERATOR
1- 10ms
50Hz
2.46kHz
GROUND - PIN 1
INT/HOLD - PIN 5
9 PIN D SUBMINIATURE
CONNECTOR PINOUT
9 PIN D SHELL CABLE - MALE
1 - GROUND
2 - MOSI
3 - +5V
5 - INT/HOLD
4 - SCK
6 - INTOUT
7 - TEST
8 - CS
9 - MISO
THESE CONNECTIONS
INCLUDE GROUND
C1
3
J3 J
R2
R3
7
R1
74HCT14 C4
UL
1
GND
CS
SCK
INT/HOLD
R4
GND
TEST
25 PIN D SHELL
CABLE - MALE TO MALE
TO PC PARALLEL PORT
PC
IND
®W
OFT 98®
S
O
ICR DOWS
GM
N
NIN R WI
N
O
RU
OW
S9
MDSI OR SI
CB R5
R6
DSOUT
XL
C6
C7
INTOUT
R5
900Hz
1
5V
GND
C5
SCK JP
CS JP
TEST JP
MOS1 OR S1JP
C2
3
5
C10 C11 2
VRL
C3
J4
1
4
13
CONFIGURATION NETWORK
U4
D1
1
1
TRIGGER SCOPE ON
THIS SIGNAL
OR TRIGGER
FROM PULSE GENERATOR
J2
74HCT1E5
U2
J1
C9
DSCIN
VMID
MISO OR S0
HIP9010/L1
U3
GND EXTCLOCK
J5
HIP9011EVAL1Z REV A Evaluation Board
RoHS 1-888-INTERSIL
5®
120V AC TO 9V DC WALL SUPPLY
FIGURE 6. KNOCK SENSOR IC EVALUATION BOARD CONNECTIONS FOR BENCH TESTING
7
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
ENGINE CONTROL MODULE
KNO
CK
SEN
SOR
KNOCK SENSOR
HOST
MICROCONTROLLER
INT/HOLD PIN 5 ON 9 PIN CONNECTOR
PUTS
SOR IN
E SEN
ENGIN
S
NAL
L SIG
TRO
N
O
INE C
ENG
9 PIN D SHELL CABLE (MALE)
(SUPPLIES INT/HOLD SIGNAL FROM
ENGINE CONTROL MODULE)
C1
3
J3 J
R2
R3
7
R1
74HCT14 C2
UL
1
GND
CS
GND
R4
C6
INT/HOLD
R6
C7
INTOUT
TEST
MDSI OR SI
R5
900Hz
SCK
1
5V
GND
C5
SCK JP
CS JP
TEST JP
MOS1 OR SI JP
C2
3
5
C10 C11 2
VRI
C3
J4
1
4
13
CONFIGURATION NETWORK
U4
D1
1
1
J2
74HCT1E5
U2
J1
CB
DSOUT
XL
DSCIN
C9
VMID
MISO OR S0
GND
HIP9010/11
U3
EXT CLOCK
J5
HIP9011EVAL1Z REV A Evaluation Board
RoHS 1-888-INTERSIL
120V AC TO 9V DC WALL SUPPLY
FIGURE 7. KNOCK SENSOR IC EVALUATION BOARD CONNECTIONS FOR TESTING WITH AN ENGINE
8
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
900Hz
5V
V+ = 5V
0.1μF
100μF
0.22μF
0.1μF
0.022μF
INTOUT
1N4002
9
INT/HOLD
20pF
9 PIN FEMALE
D-SHELL
9
1M
5
3
26
4
25
5
24
6
23
8
25 PIN FEMALE
D-SHELL
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
22
21
10
19
11
18
12
17
13
16
14
15
1
3
PIN NUMBERS
ARE THE
BACKSIDE OR
PC BOARD SIDE
OF THE
CONNECTOR
TEST
MOSI OR SI
SCK
10
1/6
74HCT14
-PAPER EMPTY
-BUSY
6
9
DATA 7
11
8
7
6
DATA 6
DATA 5
DATA 4
DATA 3
MOSI
OR
SI
5
5
CS
SCK
TEST
6
4
1/4
74HCT125
V+
DATA 2
DATA 1
DATA 0
-STROBE
1k
V+
14
5
1/674HCT14
1
2
1/6 74HCT14
10
11
1/6 74HCT14
12
13
1/4 1/6 74HCT14
3
4
AUTO FD XT
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
V+
v+
20
9
4.99k
4
2
5
13 +SELECT
12
5
-SLCTIN 17 4
16
-INIT
3
11 -ERROR 15
2
14
13
1
1K
CONFIGURATION
BOARD
5 PIN
FEMALE
DIN
CONNECTOR
MISO or SO
CS
12
4.99k
27
7
VMID
1
1/4
74HCT125
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
28
2
Application Note 9770
6
HIP9011
V+
EXT CLOCK
4MHz
CRYSTAL
20pF
V+
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
0.1μF
7805
INPUT VOLTAGE
7V TO 15V
1K
9
8 1/4 74HCT125
10
FIGURE 8. HIP9011 EVALUATION BOARD SCHEMATIC DIAGRAM
V+
1/6 74HCT14
8
9
14
3
2
7
0.1μF
7
1/4 74HCT125
1
0.1μF
10
900Hz
V+ = 5V
R3, 10K
R1, 10K
18
0.1μF
2
20
EXTERNAL
0.022μF
VMID
+
16
R2, 10K
C2, 0.1μF
HIP9011 SINGLE ENDED INPUT
20
18
17
5
16
+
7
14
8
13
9
10
HIP9011
27
3
26
R1, 10K
24
6
23
8
R3, 20K
R4, 20K
12
11
12
R2, 10K
3
V+
0.1μF
PIN NUMBERS
ARE THE BACKSIDE
OR PC BOARD SIDE
OF THE CONNECTOR
18
17
16
13
14
21
1
19
10
11
4
2
5
22
20
9
5 PIN
FEMALE
DIN
CONNECTOR
25
5
7
15
28
2
4
19
4
6
R4, 20K
+
-
3
15
17
1
C1, 0.1μF
C2, 0.1μF
15
VMID
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
FIGURE 9. SCHEMATIC AND FUNCTIONAL DIAGRAMS OF THE HIP9011 SINGLE-ENDED CONFIGURATION BOARD (HIP9011CONFIG1Z)
Application Note 9770
+
C1, 0.1μF
19
1
900Hz
R3, 10K
R1, 10K C1, 0.1μF
18
+
19
20
R6, 10K
EXTERNAL
VMID
11
R8, 20K
R7, 10K
17
+
-
15
16
R2, 10K C2, 0.1μF
R4, 20K
HIP9011 DIFFERENTIAL INPUT
1
2
R5, 10K
+
-
20
17
5
16
+
14
8
13
9
HIP9011
10
8
9
10
12
11
11
12
R7, 10K
R8, 20K
C2, 0.1μF
28
2
27
3
26
4
25
5
24
6
23
7
22
8
21
9
20
10
19
11
18
12
17
13
16
14
15
V+
22
21
0.1μF
1
3
PIN NUMBERS
ARE THE
BACKSIDE OR
PC BOARD SIDE
OF THE
CONNECTOR
19
10K
1
4
2
5
20
R2
14
25
18
17
16
15
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
HIP9011 GENERIC CONFIGURATION BOARD (HIP9011_28DIP1Z)
NOTE: Generic configuration board for end-users custom differential input amplifier designs.
FIGURE 10. SCHEMATIC AND FUNCTIONAL DIAGRAMS OF THE HIP9011 GENERIC CONFIGURATION BOARD (HIP9011_28DIP1Z)
Application Note 9770
VMID
26
23
R4, 20K
13
†HIP9011 DIFFERENTIAL BOARD NOT SUPPLIED
5 PIN
FEMALE
DIN
CONNECTOR
24
R3, 10K
7
15
7
R5, 10K
R1
5
10K
6
18
4
6
R6, 10K
4
19
28
27
3
3
0.022μF
C1, 0.1μF
2
V+ = 5V
0.1μF
1
POWER
TIP +7V TO +15V
9 PIN D SUBMINIATURE
CONNECTOR
25 PIN D SUBMINIATURE
CONNECTOR
SIGNAL INPUT
5 PIN DIN
CONNECTOR
J4
1
1
9
J3
D1
J
R1
4
13
C10
R2
C1
7
R3
VRL
1
74HCT14 C4
U1
2
5
C5
5V
1
SCK JP
CS JP
TEST JP
MDSI OR SI JP
C3
GND
900Hz
R5
CS
GND
SCK
C8
HIP9011
C6
INT/HOLD
DSCOUT
1
GND
R6
X1
R4
DSCIN
C7
C9
VMID
INTOUT
HIP9011
U3
TEST
MOSI OR SI
MDSO OR S0
GND
EXT CLOCK
J5
HIP9011EVAL1Z REV A Evaluation Board
RoHS 1-888-INTERSIL
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
FIGURE 11. HIP9011 EVALUATION BOARD (HIP9011EVAL1Z)
Application Note 9770
C2
C11
CONFIGURATION NETWORK
U4
J2
74HCT125
U2
12
3
J1
Application Note 9770
Installing Knock Signal Processor Software in
Microsoft® Windows 95® and Windows 98®
1. Download the HIP9011EVAL1Z evaluation board
software (HIP9011.exe) from the Intersil website to your
computer desktop.
2. To run the software, double-click the HIP9011.exe
program icon. Multiple programs can be displayed with
different conditions. Double-clicking on the desired
program will activate those conditions.
WARNING: Set system font to small. Large fonts will cause
the program to be unreadable.
If the INT/HOLD signal from either the pulse generator or the
engine is not applied to the Parallel Port of the PC, the PC
will lock up when you click on the blocks within the block
diagram.
When the system is operating, the computer < > keys will
step through each item in the selected window on the block
diagram. The function is selected or activated by clicking the
left mouse button when the spark plug pointer is on that
desired function box. The End and Home keys will take the
function to either extreme. Clicking with the pointer on the
dots of the channel selection switch will activate that
channel. Channel 0 is set to a gain of one and Channel 1 is
set to a gain of two, so you can see the INTOUT signal
increase when switching from Channel 0 to Channel 1.
FIGURE 12. HIP9011 DISPLAY ON PC - DISPLAY IS IN COLOR
Intersil Corporation reserves the right to make changes in circuit design, software and/or specifications at any time without notice. Accordingly, the reader is cautioned to
verify that the Application Note or Technical Brief is current before proceeding.
For information regarding Intersil Corporation and its products, see www.intersil.com
13
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Application Note 9770
INT/HOLD
INT/HOLD
SI
SI = 100000110
SCK
SCK
CS
-70.0000μs
CS
188.0000μs
530.0000μs
REAL TIME
230.0000μs
60.0μs/DIV
238.0000μs
10.0μs/DIV
288.0000μs
REAL TIME
NOTE: Above display shows all five words written to the HIP9011 by
the PC. The following displays show in more detail each of four words
for Gain, Filter Frequency, Integrator TC and Prescaler.
FIGURE 13. DATA WRITING SEQUENCE TO THE HIP9011 VIA
THE SPI BUS
FIGURE 14. WRITING THE GAIN BYTE TO THE HIP9011
INT/HOLD
INT/HOLD
SI = 00110000
SI = 11001010
SCK
SCK
CS
-6.0000μs
44.0000μs
10.0μs/DIV
CS
94.0000μs
REAL TIME
284.0000μs
FIGURE 15. WRITING THE BANDPASS BYTE TO THE HIP9011
334.0000μs
10.0μs/DIV
384.0000μs
REAL TIME
FIGURE 16. WRITING THE INTEGRATOR BYTE TO THE
HIP9011
INT/HOLD
SI = 01000001
SCK
CS
94.0000μs
144.0000μs
10.0μs/DIV
194.0000μs
REAL TIME
FIGURE 17. WRITING THE PRESCALER BYTE TO THE HIP9011
14
AN9770.1
November 6, 2006
Similar pages