CMOS linear image sensor / Technical information

Technical information
Current output type
CMOS linear image sensors with variable integration time function
S10121 to S10124 series
1
[Figure 1] Block diagram
Features
(a) NMOS linear image sensor (S3901 to S3904 series)
Start pulse
In previous current output type NMOS linear image
sensors, once a readout starts, the internal shift register
scans the readout switches from the first pixel to the
last pixel to read out all the pixels, and therefore the
integration times of all pixels are the same.
With current output type CMOS linear image sensors
with variable integration time function, a readout control
circuit is used to control the shift register output making
it possible to read out only specific pixels and set an
appropriate integration time for each pixel.
When a CMOS linear image sensor is used in a spectrometer
and the like, light dispersed according to wavelength
enters each pixel. The level of light entering each pixel
is different. The variable integration time function can
be used to set a long integration time for pixels with low
incident light levels and short integration time for those
with high incident light levels to enable measurements
with high S/N over a wide spectral range.
MOS shift register
Clock pulse
Video line
Switch
Photodiode
1
2
3
.....
n
KMPDC0057EA
(b) CMOS linear image sensor (S10121 to S10124 series)
Start pulse
MOS shift register
Clock pulse
Readout control circuit
Control pulse
Video line
Switch
Photodiode
1
2
3
.....
n
KMPDC0487EA
[Table 1] Comparison of NMOS linear image sensors and CMOS linear image sensors
NMOS linear image sensor
(S3901 to S3904 series)
Product name
Features
Type no.
Spectrophotometry
S3901
S3902
Spectrophotometry
S3903
128, 256, 512
Pixel pitch [µm]
S3904
256, 512, 1024
50
S10121
S10122
S10123
128, 256, 512
25
S10124
256, 512, 1024
50
25
Pixel height [mm]
2.5
0.5
0.5
2.5
2.5
0.5
0.5
2.5
Saturation charge [pC]
50
10
5
25
140
28
14
70
3.25
7.25
18.25
1.75
3.75
8.25
Peak sensitivity wavelength
[nm]
Power consumption
across Vdd and Vss
[mW]*1
1
•High UV sensitivity
•Low power consumption
•Smoothly varying spectral •Variable integration time for
response characteristics
each pixel
in UV region
•Large saturation charge
•Excellent output linearity
•High UV sensitivity
•Excellent output linearity
•Low power consumption
Application
Number of pixels
CMOS linear image sensor
(S10121 to S10124 series)
600
-
-
750
-
*1: f(CLK)=250 kHz (S10121/S10124 series), 500 kHz (S10122/S10123 series)
-
0.75
1.75
4.25
1.5
3.5
8.25
[Figure 2] Spectral response (typical example)
(b) Equivalent circuit
(a) 200 to 1200 nm
ϕst 1
0.4
CMOS linear image sensor
S10121 to S10124 series
Photosensitivity (A/W)
D Q
D Q
D Q
D Q
C Q
C Q
C Q
C Q
(Ta=25 °C)
ϕclk 22
CMOS linear
image sensor
S10111 to
S10114 series
0.3
ϕint 2
9 Active
Video
NMOS linear
image sensor
S3901 to
S3904 series
0.2
Readout switch
Vdd 4,7
GND 5,6,11
Photodiode
1 ch
2 ch
Last channel
Anti-blooming
switch
0.1
Vofg 3
10 Dummy
Video
Vofd 8
0
200
12 EOS
Shift register
with readout
control circuit
400
600
800
1000
1200
KMPDC0489EA
Wavelength (nm)
KMPDB0401EB
2
(b) Ultraviolet region
(Ta=25 °C)
0.1
Photosensitivity (A/W)
0.08
(1) Photodiode (photosensitive area)
The photosensitive area is made up of PN junction
photodiodes, which are composed an N-type diffusion
layer formed on a P-type silicon substrate. It serves as
a photoelectric converter that converts light signals
into electrical signals and also temporarily stores the
obtained signal charges. Vss is connected to the anode
of each photodiode. The photodiode is designed to
provide high UV sensitivity but low dark current. Figure 4
shows a structure diagram of the photosensitive area. “A”
indicates the photodiode pixel pitch; “B” indicates the
width of the photodiode diffusion layer; “C” indicates the
photodiode height.
S10121 to S10124 series
0.06
Conventional type
S10111 to S10114 series
0.04
0.02
0
200
220
240
260
280
Description of each section
300
Wavelength (nm)
KMPDB0411EB
[Figure 4] Structure of photosensitive area
[Figure 3] Device structure
Dummy
Video
9 Active
Video
10
Vofg 3
Video line
8 Vofd
Vdd 4
Readout switch
7 Vdd
B
A
1.0 μm
Shift register with
readout control circuit
ϕint 2
11 GND
Oxidation silicon
GND 5
Dummy
photodiode
Photodiode array
Dummy
photodiode
6 GND
Anti-blooming switch
N-type silicon
KMPDC0488EA
1.0 μm
ϕst 1
EOS
12
400 μm
ϕclk
22
C
(a) Block diagram
P-type silicon
S10121
S10122
S10123
S10124
A
B
C
2.5 mm
series
50 μm 45 μm
0.5 mm
series
0.5 mm
series
25 μm 20 μm
2.5 mm
series
KMPDA0124EC
2
The readout switch is made up of an address switch array,
which is composed of N-channel MOS transistors whose
source is the photodiode cathode, drain is the video line,
and gate is the address pulse input. Each photodiode is
connected to the active video line via an address switch.
The address pulse from the shift register turns on the
address switch and causes the output signal to appear
in the video line. The readout switch ON resistance is
approximately 500 Ω.
(3) Anti-blooming switches
The anti-blooming switch is made up of switches, which
are composed of N-channel MOS transistors whose
source is the photodiode cathode, gate is the overflow
gate, and drain is the overflow drain.
When a light level higher than the saturation exposure
enters a photodiode, the photodiode cannot store a
signal charge in excess of the saturation charge. The
excess signal charge overflows and diffuses into the
adjacent photodiodes and the video lines, resulting in
deterioration of signal purity, so-called “blooming.”
An anti-blooming switch is provided in the S10121 to S10124
series for each photodiode separately from the normal
signal output line connected to the video line, in order to
allow the excess charge to bleed off.
(4) Shift register with readout control function
The shift register with readout control function is composed
of a D type flip-flop for every channel plus one extra D
type flip-flop and NOR gates [Figure 5].
The CLK signal is input to pin C of each D type flip-flop
of every channel that makes up the shift register (), and
the ST signal connected to pin D of the ch 1 D type flipflop (). The D type flip-flop retains the input to pin D as
output of pin Q on the falling edge of the CLK signal. Pin
Q of ch 1 is connected to pin D type of ch 2 (‘), and this
pattern is repeated to the last channel. Applying ST and
CLK signals externally causes the D type flip-flop circuit
to operate, and the signal is output from each channel in
order from ch 1.
Furthermore, to allow readout control, the inverted signal
from pin Q and the INT signal are input to the two input
terminals of each NOR gate (’). The on and off of the
address switch of each channel can be controlled using
the INT signal.
When the readout of all pixels is complete, an EOS (endof-scan) pulse is output at the next timing after the last
pixel.
[Figure 5] Circuit of shift register with readout control function
1 ch
Q1
D Q
ST
C Q
2 ch
Q2
D Q
Q1
C Q
Last channel
Qn
D Q
Q2
C Q
D Q D type
flip-flop
Qn
C Q
Qn + 1
EOS
CLK
INT
NOR gate
S1
S2
Sn
To address switch
KMPDC0490EA
The INT signal and the output from the D type flip-flops
enter the NOR gates. When consecutive pixels are read
out, a high-level period must be provided in the INT
signal to prevent the shift register output of adjacent
pixels from turning on simultaneously in the gray area of
Figure 6, in order to ensure only a single pixel is turned
on. The INT signal must be set to high level for at least 30
ns before and after the CLK falling signal. However, this is
not necessary during the period between an EOS and the
next rising edge of the ST signal.
Timing chart
3
Figure 6 shows a timing chart of the shift register section.
The CLK signal is changed from high level to low level
once during the high-level period of ST. This starts the
operation of the D flip-flops making up the shift register.
[Figure 6] Shift register operation
T1 T2
NOR output signals DFF output signals Input signals
(2) Readout switches
T3
T4
CLK
ST
INT
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
S1
S2
S3
S4
Address switch ON
Address switch ON
Active Video
1 ch
Address switch ON
Address switch OFF
2 ch
3 ch
4 ch
Read
Not read
QX: Pin Q output of X ch
SX: NOR gate output of X ch
KMPDC0491EA
· T1
CLK changes to low level, and Q1 changes to low level.
Since the INT signal is at high level, S1 remains at low
level.
· T2
When the INT signal changes to low level while Q1 is
at low level, S1 changes to high level, and the readout
switch of the ch 1 shift register turns on.
3
· T3
Q1 is at low level. When the INT signal changes to high
level, S1 changes to low level, and the readout switch
the integration time (one cycle of the start pulse) of the
first pixel. The integration time can be varied for each
pixel by applying INT pulse as shown in figure 8.
[Figure 8] Timing chart (variable integration time function)
of the ch 1 shift register turns off.
CLK
· T4
Q4 is at low level. When the INT signal is at high level,
S4 remains at low level, and the readout switch of the
1 cycle
ST
Readout
timing
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
1 2 3 4
INT
ch 4 shift register remains off.
1 ch integration time
[Figure 7] Timing chart
2 ch integration time
3 ch integration time
4 ch integration time
CLK
tpi(ST), integration time
Output
ST
Invalid data
INT
KMPDC0233ED
Active Video
(available period)
Last pixel
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
EOS
Enlarged
view
Valid data
tf(CLK)
1st 2nd 3rd 4th
5
tr(CLK)
Operating principle
CLK
1/f(CLK)
tr(ST)
ST
t(ST-CLK)
tf(ST)
t(CLK-ST)
t(INT-CLK)
t(CLK-INT) INT should be high
when not reading pixels.
INT
tr(INT)
Active Video (available period)
Parameter
S1012*-128
S1012*-256
Start pulse (ST) cycle
S1012*-512
S1012*-1024
INT pulse rise and fall times
INT pulse - clock pulse timing
Clock pulse - INT pulse timing
Start pulse rise and fall times
Clock pulse duty ratio
Clock pulse rise and fall times
Clock pulse - start pulse timing
Start pulse - clock pulse timing
1st
2nd
Symbol
tpi(ST)
tr(INT), tf(INT)
t(INT-CLK)
t(CLK-INT)
tf(ST), tr(ST)
tf(CLK), tr(CLK)
t(CLK-ST)
T(ST-CLK)
tf(INT)
3rd
Min.
130/f(CLK)
258/f(CLK)
514/f(CLK)
1026/f(CLK)
0
30
30
0
40
0
20
20
4th
Typ.
20
20
50
20
-
5th
Max.
Unit
s
30
ns
1 / [2 × f(CLK)] ns
1 / [2 × f(CLK)] ns
ns
30
%
60
ns
30
ns
ns
KMPDC0249EE
4
Variable integration time function
Controlling CLK of pin INT makes it possible to change
the integration time of each pixel to “an integer multiple
of the readout cycle.” If CLK of pin INT is set to high
level at the readout timing of a specific pixel, the signal
for that pixel is not output [Figure 8]. If the signal from
the specified pixel is not output, integration continues
for that pixel. For example, if the integration time of
a readout cycle is 100 ms and this function is used to
output a signal every three cycles for a specific pixel,
the integration time for that pixel is 300 ms. Increasing
the integration time of a specific pixel makes it possible
to efficiently detect low-level wavelength component
signals of dispersed light.
The timing chart of the variable integration time function
is shown in Figure 8. Here, an example is provided for a
case where the integration times of the second, third, and
fourth pixels are set to twice, three times, and four times
Figure 9 shows the setup of a photodiode and readout
switch for a single pixel. Figure 10 shows the equivalent
circuit of the setup. The details of the readout operation
are explained below.
The photodiode is a PN junction photodiode consisting
of an N-type diffusion region formed on a P-type silicon
substrate. The readout switch is made up of N-channel
MOS transistors whose source is the photodiode cathode,
drain is the the video line side, and gate is the address
pulse input from the shift register. The photodiode anode
(silicon substrate) is connected to GND, and the video line
is biased at the positive potential Vb.
When an address pulse from the shift register enters
the gate of the readout switch, the switch turns on. As a
result, the photodiode cathode is set to the same potential
as the video line, and the photodiode is initialized to a
reverse-bias state. At this point, the photodiode junction
capacitance Cj is supplied with a charge, Qj = Cj × Vb,
from the power supply. When the switch turns off and
integration starts, the stored charge is discharged by the
charge generated by the incident light, and the cathode
potential approaches GND potential. The amount
of discharge increases in proportion to the incident
light level, but the maximum amount is limited by the
amount of charge initially stored. This corresponds
to the saturation charge. When an address pulse is
received again and the readout switch turns on, a charge
equal to the that discharged during the integration
time is supplied from the power supply through the
load resistance RL, so that the photodiode is initialized
again. At this point, a potential difference due to the
charge current appears across the load resistance R L,
and is detected as an output voltage. This output has a
differential waveform with a negative polarity with respect
to the video line bias voltage Vb. This signal readout
method is called current-to-voltage conversion, and its
simplified operating diagram is shown in Figure 11.
4
[Figure 9] Structure of readout section
Address pulse
from shift register
Video line
Output signal
hυ
Photodiode
Switch
N
Load resistance RL
N
P
Supply voltage V
KMPDC0061EA
[Figure 10] Equivalent circuit of current-to-voltage
conversion method
Address pulse
from shift register
Video line
Output signal
Switch
Load resistance RL
Photodiode
Supply voltage V
KMPDC0062EA
[Figure 11] Operation of current-to-voltage conversion method
Address pulse
from shift register
+V
current integration, amplification, and DC restoration on
the video signals received from the sensor. The voltage
regulator generates Vofd (=Vb) and Vofg.
Digital supply voltage, analog supply voltage, master clock
pulse, and master start pulse are applied to the driver
circuit from external sources. On the other hand, the driver
circuit outputs data video signal, trigger pulse, and EOS
pulse.
The timing signal generator consists of a PLD (programmable
logic device) and transmits (1) clock pulse and start pulse
to operate the sensor shift register, (2) reset signals to
the current integrating circuit to process output signals,
and (3) clamp signal to the DC restoration circuit. The
generator also provides a trigger output signal for external
sample-and-hold and transmits it via a buffer. These signals
are synchronized with an external master clock pulse and
are initialized by an external master start pulse.
The video signal processor comprises four sections: firststage amplifier, second-stage amplifier, clamp circuit, and
last-stage amplifier. The first stage amplifier integrates the
video output current from the sensor. Video bias voltage
Vb (=Vofd) is applied to the non-inverting input terminal
of the first stage amplifier. A reset switch is connected
in parallel with the integration capacitor, so that the
capacitance is reset by a reset signal input to the switch
each time a pixel is read out. The first stage amplifier also
cancels the switching noise that is synchronized to the
clock pulse. The first stage amplifier output, which is a
positive boxcar waveform with respect to the 2 V video
bias, is given by equation (1). Denoting the output voltage
(unit: V) as V and the output charge (unit: pC) as Q,
V = Q/Cf ······(1)
Photodiode
potential
[Figure 12] External driver circuit example
GND
Timing signal generator
Video signal processor
Low output
High output
MCLK
Reset
CLK
MST
PLD
ST
Sensor
INT
Output voltage +V
Cf
Active
Video
Amp
+
-
Buffer
Data
Video
C-V
Time
Clamp
KMPDC0063EA
EOS
Trigger
In actual operation, the stored charge gradually discharges
due to the re-combination current and the surface leakage
current in the depletion layer in addition to the photocurrent
described above. These currents that are unrelated to the
illumination of light are referred to as dark current and its
output is called dark output.
6
External current integrating driver circuit example
As shown in Figure 12, a driver circuit consisting of a
timing signal generator, video signal processor, voltage
regulator, and so on must be prepared. The timing signal
generator generates pulses required by the sensor, signal
processor, and so on. The video signal processor performs
5
Vofg
0.2 V
Vofd
Vb
2V
Voltage regulator
KMPDC0492EA
The second-stage amplifier performs non-inverting
amplification. Then, a clamp circuit composed of a
capacitor and switch performs CDS (correlated double
sampling). The clamp switch is turned on for a given
period (clamp period) immediately after the integration
capacitance is reset in order to fix the clamp circuit
output potential to ground. This eliminates the reset
noise that occurs in the integration capacitance reset
switch. The last-stage non-inverting amplifier transmits
data video signals.
The voltage regulator generates two voltages: Vofg and
Vofd. Vofg is applied to the MOS transistor gate, and
therefore hardly any current flows to pin OFG. The
current that flows through pin OFD depends on the oversaturated state. Up to several tens of mA may flow. To use
in a over-saturated state, the drive capability must be
increased to allow current to flow through pin Vofd.
[Figure 13] Timing chart example of external driver circuit
MST
MCLK
ST
CLK
INT
Reset
Clamp
Trigger
Data Video
EOS
7
Q&A
What is the difference between the CMOS linear image
sensor S10121 to S10124 series and the NMOS linear
image sensor S3901 to S3904 series?
See the comparison table of Table 1. The S10121 to
S10124 series feature large saturation charge and variable
integration time function. In addition, a smooth spectral
response is achieved in the ultraviolet region [Figure 2
(b)].
How should the dummy video terminal be used?
KMPDC0386EB
Precautions when configuring the driver circuit
· Separate the analog circuit ground and the digital circuit
The dummy video terminal outputs only the switching
noise component. The dummy video terminal is used
in the current-to-voltage conversion method, but
this method is not recommended because obtaining
highly accurate readout is difficult. Note that the
dummy video terminal is not used when the current
integrating readout circuit is used.
ground.
· Connect the video output terminal to the amplifier input
What is the voltage Vb that is listed in the condition
terminal in the shortest possible distance.
· When wiring, avoid crossing of analog and digital signals
or running them in parallel as much as possible.
· Use a series power supply having only small voltage
fluctuations.
Vb is a video bias voltage for using the current integrating
readout method; there is no terminal on the image sensor
for Vb. See Figure 12, which provides an connection
example of the integrating circuit and Vb. Vb is a voltage
for the non-inverting input terminal of the integration
amplifier. It is a reset voltage for the photodiode.
Hamamatsu provides the C10808 series as a driver circuit
for the CMOS linear image sensor S10121 to S10124
series. For details on the C10808 series, refer to the
datasheet.
[Figure 14] Block diagram (C10808 series)
C10808 series
ST
CLK
INT
Timing signal generator
EOS
Video signal processor
Buffer
Buffer
PLD
MStart, MCLK
EOS, Trigger
D.GND
RESET
Video
Amp
Sensor
C-V
+2 V +12 V -12 V
Buf
Is it necessary to operate Vb and Vofd at the same voltage?
Normally, operate Vb and Vofd at the same voltage.
Vofd is connected to the drain of the overflow-drain
MOS transistor. An equivalent circuit is shown in
Figure 3 (b). In the over-saturated state, current flows
from Vofd to the photodiode. For example, if 100000
lx, an extremely intense light, is incident, several
tens of milliamperes of current flows. Therefore, we
recommend a circuit in which an op amp is connected
as a buffer.
Data Video
What is the optimum voltage for video bias voltage Vb?
CLAMP
+3.3 V, +5 V
column of electrical characteristics?
A measurement example of a video bias voltage and
saturation charge is shown in Figure 15. The video bias
voltage ranges from 0.5 V to 2.5 V and is typically 2 V.
A.GND
+15 V
-15 V
Voltage regulator
KACCC0558EA
6
[Figure 15] Video bias voltage vs. saturation charge
(typical example)
(a) S10121-512Q
sensor at such wavelengths?
The image sensor has some sensitivity for light whose
wavelength is 200 nm and less, but it is outside the
guaranteed range. Please use it at your own risk.
200
Saturation charge (pC)
whose wavelength is 200 nm and less? If so, are
there any points to consider when using the image
(Ta=25 °C, driver circuit C10808-01)
250
Does the image sensor have sensitivity for light
150
How is the EOS pulse used?
100
The EOS pulse can be used to determine whether all the
shift register stages are operating normally.
50
How should the Cf value be set when using the current
integrating readout circuit?
0
0
1
2
3
Video bias voltage (V)
KMPDB0402EA
(b) S10124-1024Q
(Ta=25 °C, driver circuit C10808-01)
120
What are the points to consider when constructing a
100
Saturation charge (pC)
Set the value by considering the saturation output
charge Qsat, the output voltage of the amplifier to
be used, and so forth. For example, in the case of the
S10121 series, if the saturation output charge Qsat is
140 pC and 5 V of amplitude relative to the video bias
voltage can be provided for the output voltage of the
op amp, Cf=Qsat/V=140 pC/5 V=28 pF.
current integrating readout circuit?
80
60
40
20
0
0
1
2
3
Video bias voltage (V)
KMPDB0403EA
Is it necessary to set the overflow gate voltage Vofg
Consider the following points if you are selecting ICs for
the current integrating readout circuit.
 First-stage amplifier: For the first-stage amplifier,
select an IC with low noise and low input bias current
while considering the switching speed.
 Second- and third-stage amplifiers: Select amplifiers
that can handle high load capacitance.
‘ Reset switch and clamp switch: Use FET or analog
switches. Select switches with minimal ON resistance
and low reset noise and charge injection. Also, consider
the signal voltage range.
Are window materials other than the quartz window or
to 0.2 V? Is there a problem with using 0 V? Also, is it
windowless types supported?
okay to apply the voltage through a resistor divider?
Windowless types can be provided. Consult with your
nearest Hamamatsu sales office. Please also consult us
about window materials other than the quartz window.
The saturation charge is influenced by variance in
Vofg. The larger the Vofg, the smaller the saturation
charge. Since Vofg is connected to the anti-blooming
MOS transistor gate in the sensor, it is at high input
impedance and hardly any current flows. Therefore,
there is no problem in applying Vofg through a resistor
divider. Using Vofg at 0 V will cause problems such as
increased time lag (unread signals) and deterioration
in the sensitivity uniformity between pixels at near
saturation output. To prevent these problems, use Vofg
at 0.2 V.
To what light levels does the overflow prevention
function (anti-blooming function) work?
Under standard conditions, it has been confirmed
that blooming does not occur up to 100 times the
saturation exposure.
If all pixels are read out without using the variable
integration time function, is it okay to leave the INT
pulse at the low-level voltage?
The rising and falling edges of the internal pulse Q
generated from the shift register overlap with the
falling edges of the CLK signal [gray area in Figure 6].
If the INT pulse is kept at the low-level voltage at all
times, there is a possibility that the readout switches of
two pixels turn on simultaneously. Therefore, the INT
pulse must be applied so that it is at high level for 30 ns
before and after the CLK falling edges.
Which section of the video signal should I refer to
for the dark output reference?
Refer to the video output of each pixel during the dark
states. This product does not have a dark output reference
like the optical black of the CCD.
7
What are the soldering conditions?
Use a soldering temperature of 260 °C or less, and
perform the soldering within 5 seconds. This condition
applies to a single pin. There is no problem in soldering
multiple pins consecutively. We recommend that you grip
the root of the lead you are soldering with tweezers
or a similar tool to dissipate heat and prevent heat from
conducting to the product package. As long as these
conditions are met, there is no problem in using lead-free
solder. This product does not support flow soldering.
Information described in this material is current as of September, 2014.
Product specifications are subject to change without prior notice due to improvements or other reasons. This document has been carefully prepared and
the information contained is believed to be accurate. In rare cases, however, there may be inaccuracies such as text errors. Before using these products,
always contact us for the delivery specification sheet to check the latest specifications.
Type numbers of products listed in the delivery specification sheets or supplied as samples may have a suffix "(X)" which means preliminary specifications or a
suffix "(Z)" which means developmental specifications.
The product warranty is valid for one year after delivery and is limited to product repair or replacement for defects discovered and reported to us within
that one year period. However, even if within the warranty period we accept absolutely no liability for any loss caused by natural disasters or improper
product use.
Copying or reprinting the contents described in this material in whole or in part is prohibited without our prior permission.
www.hamamatsu.com
HAMAMATSU PHOTONICS K.K., Solid State Division
1126-1 Ichino-cho, Higashi-ku, Hamamatsu City, 435-8558 Japan, Telephone: (81) 53-434-3311, Fax: (81) 53-434-5184
U.S.A.: Hamamatsu Corporation: 360 Foothill Road, Bridgewater, N.J. 08807, U.S.A., Telephone: (1) 908-231-0960, Fax: (1) 908-231-1218
Germany: Hamamatsu Photonics Deutschland GmbH: Arzbergerstr. 10, D-82211 Herrsching am Ammersee, Germany, Telephone: (49) 8152-375-0, Fax: (49) 8152-265-8
France: Hamamatsu Photonics France S.A.R.L.: 19, Rue du Saule Trapu, Parc du Moulin de Massy, 91882 Massy Cedex, France, Telephone: 33-(1) 69 53 71 00, Fax: 33-(1) 69 53 71 10
United Kingdom: Hamamatsu Photonics UK Limited: 2 Howard Court, 10 Tewin Road, Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire AL7 1BW, United Kingdom, Telephone: (44) 1707-294888, Fax: (44) 1707-325777
North Europe: Hamamatsu Photonics Norden AB: Torshamnsgatan 35 16440 Kista, Sweden, Telephone: (46) 8-509-031-00, Fax: (46) 8-509-031-01
Italy: Hamamatsu Photonics Italia S.r.l.: Strada della Moia, 1 int. 6, 20020 Arese (Milano), Italy, Telephone: (39) 02-93581733, Fax: (39) 02-93581741
China: Hamamatsu Photonics (China) Co., Ltd.: B1201, Jiaming Center, No.27 Dongsanhuan Beilu, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100020, China, Telephone: (86) 10-6586-6006, Fax: (86) 10-6586-2866
Cat. No. KMPD9008E01 Sep. 2014 DN
8
Similar pages