AN1415

AN1415
Video Playback and Streaming Solutions
Using the PIC® MCU
INTRODUCTION
The required bandwidth for data access from off-chip
components can be a bottleneck in the system performance for microcontroller (MCU) video applications.
This restriction translates into limiting the number of
read and write accesses to the external memory device
during a given time period. A popular solution is to use
a compression algorithm. The quality of the video
depends on, and in most cases, is directly proportional
to the complexity of the compression algorithm.
Another solution is to adhere to the bandwidth limitations by reading a lower resolution video and to rescale
it (i.e., upscaling) during display. There are several
methods of upscaling a video.
This application note describes four methods of playing
a video file using a PIC® microcontroller (MCU) and
hardware solutions available from Microchip. Two
major constraints for these solutions are the bandwidth
required for the data access and the processor speed.
For example, the first method uses video upscaling to
achieve the desired performance, while the second
method takes advantage of the LCD controller on the
Multimedia Expansion Board (MEB) to write the video
data directly to the frame buffer. Both of these methods
read a video file from a Secure Digital (SD) card and
display it on a QVGA LCD screen.
METHOD 1: VIDEO PLAYBACK ON
PIC32 USING UPSCALING BY
INTERPOLATION
EQUATION 2:
BPS = 320 ⋅ 240 ⋅ 30 ⋅ 16 ⋅ = 36.8Mbps
Using the linear interpolation technique, we can reduce
this requirement, as shown in Equation 3.
EQUATION 3:
320
240
BPS = ⎛⎝ ---------⎞⎠ ⋅ ⎛ ---------⎞ ⋅ 30 ⋅ 16 = 9.2Mbps
⎝ 2 ⎠
2
Interpolation is the technique of using known data to
estimate values of unknown data. The known data is
the data with smaller resolution. The unknown data is
the difference in the data between the smaller and the
higher resolution images. Figure 1 (A) represents the
16 pixels in an image with a 4 x 4 grid. Figure 1 (B)
represents the 64 pixels in an image with an 8 x 8 grid.
Each of the pixels in Figure 1 (A) is interpolated in 2D
to obtain four pixels in Figure 1 (B). This is the nearest
neighbor interpolation. Since this is a linear interpolation technique, this has the least computation cost. This
technique assumes high correlation in spatial locality of
the same image with different resolutions. Figure 2
shows the visual representation of the linear
interpolation technique.
FIGURE 1:
The data throughput required to play the video file can
be calculated using the formula in Equation 1.
EQUATION 1:
BPS = H RES ⋅ V RES ⋅ FPS ⋅ BPP
Where,
BPS = bits per second
HRES = Horizontal resolution
VRES = Vertical resolution
FPS = Frames per second
BPP = bits per pixel
For uncompressed QVGA video at 30 frames per second and 16 bits per pixel, the bandwidth required is
calculated, as shown in Equation 2.
MATRIX OF ORIGINAL
PIXELS (A) AND
INTERPOLATED PIXELS (B)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
(A)
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
13
13
14
14
15
15
16
16
13
13
14
14
15
15
16
16
(B)
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 1
AN1415
FIGURE 2:
LINEAR INTERPOLATION OF PIXELS
2D Interpolation
?
??
?
??
?
400% ? ?
?
??
?
??
?
?
??
?
? ?
?
? ?
?
??
?
??
?
Original
?
??
?
? ?
?
? ?
?
??
?
??
?
?
??
?
? ?
?
? ?
?
??
?
??
?
?
??
?
? ?
?
? ?
?
??
?
??
?
?
?
?
?
?
Before
After
Hardware Requirements
Board Setup
• Starter Kit I/O Expansion Board (DM320002)
• PIC32 Starter Kit: GP (DM320001),
USB II (DM320003), or Ethernet (DM320004)
• PICtail™ Daughter Board for SD™ and MMC
Cards (AC164122)
• Secure Digital (SD) card
• Graphics LCD Controller PICtail™ Plus SSD1926
Board (AC164127-5)
• Graphics Display Truly 3.2'' 240 x 320 Board
(AC164127-4)
Figure 3 shows the hardware setup used for Method 1.
The SD card that is loaded with the prepared video is
inserted into the PICtail Daughter Board for SD and
MMC Cards, which is connected to the Starter Kit I/O
Expansion Board.
FIGURE 3:
DS01415A-page 2
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1415
Preparing the Video File
Operation
This demonstration plays back an AVI video file from
the PICtail Daughter Board for SD and MMC Cards. To
ensure proper playback, the video must be formatted
correctly before being copied to the SD card. The video
format must be:
The Graphical User Interface (GUI) is based on the
Microchip Graphics Library and is implemented with
the Microchip Graphics Display Designer. The SD card
is detected and the file system is initialized using the
Microchip Memory Disk Drive (MDD) library. A list of
playable files is then shown on the LCD screen. The
user selects the file to be played by touching a filename
on the touchscreen.
• 16 BPP RGB
• 160 x 120 (will be upscaled in software)
• No sound
There are several open source software packages
available to process and convert video files. In this
demonstration example the ffmpeg application is used.
The following procedure describes how to resize a AVI
(.avi) file using ffmpeg.
1.
2.
Download and install ffmpeg from:
http://ffmpeg.org/download.html
Resize the file using ffmpeg:
a) In Windows, open a command shell using
cmd.exe.
b) Change to the directory that contains your
.avi file.
c) In the Command shell, type:
ffmpeg -i <fn>.avi -s 160x120
-pix_fmt rgb565 <fn>.avi
where <fn> is the prefix of the file name to convert.
Figure 4 shows an example dialog.
3.
4.
The SPI controller is initialized for data transfer. Data is
read from the SD card using the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) port. To maximize data throughput, the SD
bit clock is running at the maximum supported by the
standard, 25 MHz. The data is sent to the SSD1926
using the 16-bit Parallel Master Port (PMP).
Direct Memory Access (DMA) is used to read data from
the SD card. Data is read from the SD card using the
SPI interface into the SPI buffer, which is monitored by
the DMA, thus saving valuable processor time. The SPI
buffer is further duplicated into ping-pong buffers. Pingpong buffers are coupled such that while data is written
into one buffer, data is sent to the display from the other
buffer. This is done to reduce “sit-on” read time. For
example, if 2 bytes of data are to be transferred from
the SD card to the display, the first byte can be written
into one of the ping-pong buffers. While the second
byte is written into another buffer, data can be read into
the display from the first buffer.
Copy the resulting file to an SD card that has
been formatted for the FAT16 file system.
Insert the SD card into the PICtail Daughter
Board for SD and MMC Cards.
You are now ready to run the demonstration.
FIGURE 4:
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 3
AN1415
METHOD 2: STREAMING RAW VIDEO
FROM A micro-SD CARD USING THE
SSD1926 LCD GRAPHICS
CONTROLLER ON THE MEB
This section describes the implementation of video
playback from a micro-SD card using the Multimedia
Expansion Board (MEB) and a PIC32/PIC24/dsPIC®
DSC starter kit. The demonstration will play a raw video
file in RGB565 format from a micro-SD card to the
QVGA LCD on the MEB.
Preparing the Video File
This demonstration opens a raw video file stored on a
micro-SD card and plays it on the QVGA LCD of the
MEB. Several software packages are available to convert video files from one type to another. This example
describes how to convert a WMV (.wmv) file to a raw
video file using ffmpeg.
1.
2.
Required Hardware
• Multimedia Expansion Board (DM320005)
• A PIC32 starter kit (GP, Ethernet, or USB II)/
PIC24 starter kit/dsPIC DSC starter kit
• micro-SD Card
• Standard-A to mini-B USB cable
Required Software
• MPLAB® 8.x or later
• Raw video file
Download and install ffmpeg from:
http://ffmpeg.org/download.html
Convert the file to RGB565 format:
a) In Windows, open a command shell using
cmd.exe.
b) Change to the directory that contains your
.wmv file.
c) In the Command shell, type:
ffmpeg -i <fn>.wmv -s 320x240
-pix_fmt rgb565 <fn>.rgb
where <fn> is the prefix of the file name to convert.
Figure 5 shows an example dialog.
3.
4.
Copy the resulting file to a micro-SD card that
has been formatted for the FAT16 file system.
Insert the card into the MEB.
You are now ready to run the demonstration.
FIGURE 5:
DS01415A-page 4
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1415
Running the Demonstration
Implementation
The demonstration will display a menu containing files
on the micro-SD card, as shown in Figure 6. To play a
video, select it by touching the name, and it should start
playing, as shown in Figure 7. The menu will return
when the video has completed playback.
This demonstration takes advantage of the Solomon
Systech SSD1926 LCD controller to stream raw video
data directly from a file on the micro-SD card to the
video frame buffer in the SSD1926 on-chip memory. By
streaming data directly from the card to the display buffer, the additional overhead of moving data through the
microcontroller is avoided.
It should be noted that video file to be played in Method
2 has to be in the .RGB format as shown in Figure 6.
FIGURE 6:
As shown in Figure 8, the PIC MCU interfaces to the
SSD1926 via the MEB. The software utilizes the Microchip Graphics Library to create a GUI for the demonstration. The Microchip MDD file system library is used
to locate the file and provide file size and location information. The SSD1926 SD driver from the Microchip
Applications Library is used to access the micro-SD
card.
FIGURE 8:
Multimedia Expansion Board
PIC32 Starter Kit
QVGA LCD
SSD1926
micro-SD Card
FIGURE 7:
Operation
This demonstration is based on the SSD1926 JPEG
and micro-SD Card demonstration in the Microchip
Applications Library. The GUI is based on the Microchip Graphics Library and is implemented with the
Microchip Graphics Display Designer. The Microchip
MDD library is used to access the file system on the
micro-SD card.
During video playback, data is transferred directly from
the micro-SD card to the frame buffer in the SSD1926
one frame at a time using Direct Memory Access
(DMA). When a frame has completed transfer, the file
pointer is set to the next frame, and the process is
repeated until the file has finished playing.
To maximize data throughput, the SD bit clock is running at the maximum speed supported by the standard,
25 MHz. Four-bit data transfer, multi-block transfer and
auto-command 12 are enabled. Refer to the SSD1926
data sheet, which can be requested from Solomon
Systech for details.
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 5
AN1415
METHOD 3: STREAMING
UNCOMPRESSED AVI VIDEO OVER
ETHERNET ON THE MEB USING
PIC32
Software Requirement
• MPLAB 8.x or later
Packet Structure
This method describes the implementation of AVI video
streaming over Ethernet using the MEB and the PIC32
Ethernet Starter Kit.
Video File Requirement
• Uncompressed AVI file in Device Independent
Bitmap (DIB) format
• Video resolution of 320 x 240
• Video frame rate of up to 20 frames per second (use
a video file with a lower frame rate if network traffic
is high)
Hardware Requirement
•
•
•
•
Multimedia Expansion Board (DM320005)
PIC32 Ethernet Starter Kit (DM320004)
Ethernet (RJ-45) crossover cable
Standard-A to mini-B USB cable
FIGURE 9:
Bytes
This demonstration uses a custom-developed PC
application (UDPApp.exe) to stream the video
information over the Ethernet.
The video packets are delivered over the Ethernet
using UDP as the transport layer protocol. The PC
application delivers three types of packets to the PIC32
device. These are the AVI Information Packet, Video
Packet, and Time Sync Packet.
AVI Information Packet: The data field in this packet
contains information about the resolution of the video,
the number of video frames, and the duration of video
frame in microseconds. The PC application extracts
this information from the AVI file and delivers them to
the PIC32 device. This information is used by the
PIC32 device to control the video playback rate and the
screen resolution. The AVI information packet is the
first packet to be sent from the PC application to the
PIC32 device. The structure of this packet is shown in
Figure 9.
AVI INFORMATION PACKET STRUCTURE
2
2
4
2
2
4
4
Packet
Length
Packet
Type
Pixel
Address
Size X
Size Y
Number of
Frames
Frame
Duration
Data Field
Where:
Packet Length = 20
Packet Type = 4 (AVI Information Packet)
Pixel Address = not used for this packet
Size X = 320 (width of screen in pixels)
Size Y = 240 (height of the screen in pixels)
Number of Frames = number of frames supported by the AVI file
Frame Duration = duration of the video frame in microseconds
DS01415A-page 6
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1415
Video Packet: The PC application delivers the raw
video data to the PIC32 device using video packets.
The data field in the video packet contains the pixel
data in RGB565 (16-bit) format. Before transmitting the
video packets to the PIC32 device, the PC application
parses the AVI file and converts the pixel data from
RGB888 (24-bit) format to RGB565 (16-bit) format.
Converting the pixel data from 24-bit format to 16-bit
format saves a considerable amount of Ethernet bandwidth. The video packet also contains the pixel
address, which helps the PIC32 device in plotting the
pixel data on the LCD. The structure of the video packet
is shown in Figure 10.
FIGURE 10:
Time Sync Packet: The PC application transmits the
video packets in bursts. Each burst contains the video
information for an entire video frame. At the end of
each burst, the PC application sends out a time sync
packet and waits for an acknowledgement from the
PIC32 device. The next burst of video packets from the
PC application is transmitted soon after the reception of
acknowledgement from the PIC32 device. Insertion of
the time sync packet between the bursts of video
packets helps in controlling the video playback speed.
Figure 11 shows the structure of the time sync packet.
Figure 12 shows the video frame rate control
mechanism using the time sync packet.
VIDEO PACKET STRUCTURE
Bytes
2
2
4
2
2
4
Packet
Length
Packet
Type
Pixel
Address
Pixel 1
Pixel 2
.......
Pixel ‘n’
Data Field
Where:
Packet Length = 8 + 2 x (number of pixels)
Packet Type = 1 (Video Packet)
Pixel Address = address of the first pixel in the data field
Pixel 1 .... Pixel ‘n’ = Pixels in the data field
FIGURE 11:
TIME SYNC PACKET STRUCTURE
Bytes
2
2
4
Packet
Length
Packet
Type
Pixel
Address
Where:
Packet Length = 8
Packet Type = 3 (Time Sync Packet)
Pixel Address = not used for this packet
Note: There is no Data Field for this packet type.
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 7
AN1415
FIGURE 12:
Packets
from PC
Application
CONTROLLING VIDEO FRAME RATE USING TIME SYNC PACKET
T
V1
V2
V3
Vn
T
V1
(Burst of Video Packets)
Start of
next burst
Packets
from PIC32
A
A
1/(Frames Per Second)
Where:
T = Time Sync Packet
A = Acknowledgement Packet
V1 ... Vn = Video Packets
The PC application expects an acknowledgement
packet from the PIC32 device for the AVI information
packet and the time sync packet. Figure 13 shows the
structure of this acknowledgement packet.
FIGURE 13:
Bytes
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT PACKET STRUCTURE
2
2
4
1
1
1
Packet
Length
Packet
Type
Pixel
Address
‘A’
‘C’
‘K’
Data Field
Where:
Packet Length = 11
Packet Type = 5 (Acknowledgement Packet)
Pixel Address = not used for this packet
Data Field contains the string “ACK”.
DS01415A-page 8
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1415
Operation
This demonstration utilizes the TCP/IP stack and the
Graphics stack from the Microchip Application Library.
Soon after board initialization, the PIC32 device starts
to listen for new packets on the Ethernet. The PC application sends out an AVI information packet as the first
packet to the PIC32 device. The AVI information packet
contains the frame duration information in microseconds. The frame duration information is used by the
PIC32 device to play the video at the correct speed.
The video packets follows the AVI information packet
over the Ethernet. The video packet contains pixel
addresses and pixel data. The PIC32 device uses DMA
transfer to write pixel data to the SSD1926 (graphics
controller) via the PMP interface.
Running the Demonstration
1.
Set the IP address and subnet mask of the
server PC to 192.168.1.12 and 255.255.255.0,
respectively.
2. Connect the PIC32 Ethernet Starter Kit to the
MEB.
3. Connect the PC to the starter kit’s debugger
using the mini-B USB cable.
4. Connect the PIC32 Ethernet Starter Kit to the
PC using the Ethernet (RJ-45) cable.
5. Start
MPLAB
IDE
and
open
the
video_stream_demo.mcp project.
6. Select PIC32 Ethernet Starter Kit as the
debugger in MPLAB IDE.
7. Rebuild the project in Debug mode.
8. Program the starter kit and run the
demonstration.
9. Ping the PIC32 device to make sure the Ethernet connection is working. This can be done by
typing ping 192.168.1.11 in a command
shell on the PC. The default IP address of the
PIC32 device is: 192.168.1.11.
10. In a Windows command shell, change to the
directory
where
the
PC
application,
UDPApp.exe, is installed.
11. Run the PC application by typing:
UDPApp [filename] [delay] 192.168.1.11
Where,
[filename] is the video file in AVI format, and
[delay] is the delay between UDP packets in
microseconds. Ideally, set this value between
100 and 200. Increasing the delay value plays
the video at slower rate. Decreasing the delay
value leads to loss of packets and may
deteriorate the video quality.
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 9
AN1415
METHOD 4: STREAMING
UNCOMPRESSED AVI VIDEO OVER
ETHERNET ON WVGA USING PIC32
This method is a variation of Method 3, which uses a
different technique to display the video on a larger
resolution display, such as a WVGA.
Video File Requirements
• Uncompressed AVI video file in DIB format
• Video resolution of 400 x 240
• Video frame rate of up to 20 FPS (use a video file
with a lower frame rate if network traffic is high)
Operation and Running the
Demonstration
To operate and run the demonstration, use the information described in Method 3: Streaming Uncompressed
AVI Video over Ethernet on the MEB Using PIC32, with
the exception of the display.
In Method 4, the technique of horizontal interpolation of
pixels is adopted. The video on the graphics display is
obtained by interlacing alternate fields (set of all odd
and even lines in a frame) from alternate frames. The
frame rate from the interpolation can be increased by
this method.
Figure 14 describes the interlaced video format for the
SD card.
Hardware Requirements
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Graphics PICtail™ Plus Epson S1D13517
Board (AC164127-7)
PIC32 Ethernet Starter Kit (DM320004)
Ethernet (RJ-45) cross-over cable
Standard-A to mini-B USB cable
Graphics Display Truly 7'' 800 x 480 Board
(AC164127-9)
Software Requirement
FIGURE 14:
SD CARD FORMAT
P(0,0,0)P(0,1,0).........................P(0,X-1,0)
P(1,0,0)P(1,1,0).........................P(1,X-1,0)
Y
P(Y-1,0,0)P(Y-1,1,0)....,,,...........P(Y-1,X-1,0)
• MPLAB 8.x or later
X
Where:
P(a,b,c) = the pixel in the original video stored on the SD
card, where (a,b,c) = the pixel indices
a = the vertical index; b = the horizontal index; c = the
frame number
X and Y = the horizontal and vertical resolution of the video
Figure 15 describes the interlaced video format for the
graphics display.
DS01415A-page 10
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
AN1415
FIGURE 15:
GRAPHICS DISPLAY FORMAT
P(0,0,0)P(0,0,0)P(0,1,0)P(0,1,0)P(0,2,0)P(0,2,0)............................P(0,X-1,0)P(0,X-1,0)
P(0,0,1)P(0,0,1)P(0,1,1)P(0,1,1)P(0,2,1)P(0,2,1)............................P(0,X-1,1)P(0,X-1,1)
P(1,0,0)P(1,0,0)P(1,1,0)P(1,1,0)P(1,2,0)P(1,2,0)............................P(1,X-1,0)P(1,X-1,0)
P(1,0,1)P(1,0,1)P(1,1,1)P(1,1,1)P(1,2,1)P(1,2,1)............................P(1,X-1,1)P(1,X-1,1)
2Y
P(Y-1,0,0)P(Y-1,0,0)P(Y-1,1,0)P(Y-1,1,0)P(Y-1,2,0)P(Y-1,2,0).......P(Y-1,X-1,0)P(Y-1,X-1,0)
P(Y-1,0,1)P(Y-1,0,1)P(Y-1,1,1)P(Y-1,1,1)P(Y-1,2,1)P(Y-1,2,1).......P(Y-1,X-1,1)P(Y-1,X-1,1)
2X
Where:
P(a,b,c) = the pixel on the graphic display, where (a,b,c) = the pixel indices
a = the vertical index; b = the horizontal index; c = the frame number
2X and 2Y = the horizontal and vertical resolution of the graphics display
CONCLUSION
This application note provides four methods that can be
used for video playback and video streaming
applications using a PIC32 device.
These methods can be used in situations such as distance education or surveillance cameras, as well as
news and entertainment videos for display on the
Internet. In addition, video playback from a secure
digital card can find uses in situations where data
needs to be stored for future review, such as video from
surveillance cameras or educational lectures.
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 11
AN1415
APPENDIX A:
SOURCE CODE
Software License Agreement
The software supplied herewith by Microchip Technology Incorporated (the “Company”) is intended and supplied to you, the
Company’s customer, for use solely and exclusively with products manufactured by the Company.
The software is owned by the Company and/or its supplier, and is protected under applicable copyright laws. All rights are reserved.
Any use in violation of the foregoing restrictions may subject the user to criminal sanctions under applicable laws, as well as to civil
liability for the breach of the terms and conditions of this license.
THIS SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED IN AN “AS IS” CONDITION. NO WARRANTIES, WHETHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE APPLY TO THIS SOFTWARE. THE COMPANY SHALL NOT, IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, BE LIABLE FOR
SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER.
All of the software covered in this application note is
available as a single WinZip archive file. This archive
can be downloaded from the Microchip corporate Web
site at:
www.microchip.com
DS01415A-page 12
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
Note the following details of the code protection feature on Microchip devices:
•
Microchip products meet the specification contained in their particular Microchip Data Sheet.
•
Microchip believes that its family of products is one of the most secure families of its kind on the market today, when used in the
intended manner and under normal conditions.
•
There are dishonest and possibly illegal methods used to breach the code protection feature. All of these methods, to our
knowledge, require using the Microchip products in a manner outside the operating specifications contained in Microchip’s Data
Sheets. Most likely, the person doing so is engaged in theft of intellectual property.
•
Microchip is willing to work with the customer who is concerned about the integrity of their code.
•
Neither Microchip nor any other semiconductor manufacturer can guarantee the security of their code. Code protection does not
mean that we are guaranteeing the product as “unbreakable.”
Code protection is constantly evolving. We at Microchip are committed to continuously improving the code protection features of our
products. Attempts to break Microchip’s code protection feature may be a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If such acts
allow unauthorized access to your software or other copyrighted work, you may have a right to sue for relief under that Act.
Information contained in this publication regarding device
applications and the like is provided only for your convenience
and may be superseded by updates. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your application meets with your specifications.
MICROCHIP MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR
WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WHETHER EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, WRITTEN OR ORAL, STATUTORY OR
OTHERWISE, RELATED TO THE INFORMATION,
INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ITS CONDITION,
QUALITY, PERFORMANCE, MERCHANTABILITY OR
FITNESS FOR PURPOSE. Microchip disclaims all liability
arising from this information and its use. Use of Microchip
devices in life support and/or safety applications is entirely at
the buyer’s risk, and the buyer agrees to defend, indemnify and
hold harmless Microchip from any and all damages, claims,
suits, or expenses resulting from such use. No licenses are
conveyed, implicitly or otherwise, under any Microchip
intellectual property rights.
Trademarks
The Microchip name and logo, the Microchip logo, dsPIC,
KEELOQ, KEELOQ logo, MPLAB, PIC, PICmicro, PICSTART,
PIC32 logo, rfPIC and UNI/O are registered trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
FilterLab, Hampshire, HI-TECH C, Linear Active Thermistor,
MXDEV, MXLAB, SEEVAL and The Embedded Control
Solutions Company are registered trademarks of Microchip
Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Application Maestro, chipKIT,
chipKIT logo, CodeGuard, dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net,
dsPICworks, dsSPEAK, ECAN, ECONOMONITOR,
FanSense, HI-TIDE, In-Circuit Serial Programming, ICSP,
Mindi, MiWi, MPASM, MPLAB Certified logo, MPLIB,
MPLINK, mTouch, Omniscient Code Generation, PICC,
PICC-18, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit, PICtail, REAL ICE,
rfLAB, Select Mode, Total Endurance, TSHARC,
UniWinDriver, WiperLock and ZENA are trademarks of
Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other
countries.
SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated
in the U.S.A.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their
respective companies.
© 2011, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in the
U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
Printed on recycled paper.
ISBN: 978-1-61341-787-4
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2009 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona; Gresham, Oregon and design centers in California
and India. The Company’s quality system processes and procedures
are for its PIC® MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping
devices, Serial EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and
analog products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design
and manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS01415A-page 13
Worldwide Sales and Service
AMERICAS
ASIA/PACIFIC
ASIA/PACIFIC
EUROPE
Corporate Office
2355 West Chandler Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85224-6199
Tel: 480-792-7200
Fax: 480-792-7277
Technical Support:
http://www.microchip.com/
support
Web Address:
www.microchip.com
Asia Pacific Office
Suites 3707-14, 37th Floor
Tower 6, The Gateway
Harbour City, Kowloon
Hong Kong
Tel: 852-2401-1200
Fax: 852-2401-3431
India - Bangalore
Tel: 91-80-3090-4444
Fax: 91-80-3090-4123
India - New Delhi
Tel: 91-11-4160-8631
Fax: 91-11-4160-8632
Austria - Wels
Tel: 43-7242-2244-39
Fax: 43-7242-2244-393
Denmark - Copenhagen
Tel: 45-4450-2828
Fax: 45-4485-2829
India - Pune
Tel: 91-20-2566-1512
Fax: 91-20-2566-1513
France - Paris
Tel: 33-1-69-53-63-20
Fax: 33-1-69-30-90-79
Japan - Yokohama
Tel: 81-45-471- 6166
Fax: 81-45-471-6122
Germany - Munich
Tel: 49-89-627-144-0
Fax: 49-89-627-144-44
Korea - Daegu
Tel: 82-53-744-4301
Fax: 82-53-744-4302
Italy - Milan
Tel: 39-0331-742611
Fax: 39-0331-466781
Atlanta
Duluth, GA
Tel: 678-957-9614
Fax: 678-957-1455
Boston
Westborough, MA
Tel: 774-760-0087
Fax: 774-760-0088
Chicago
Itasca, IL
Tel: 630-285-0071
Fax: 630-285-0075
Cleveland
Independence, OH
Tel: 216-447-0464
Fax: 216-447-0643
Dallas
Addison, TX
Tel: 972-818-7423
Fax: 972-818-2924
Detroit
Farmington Hills, MI
Tel: 248-538-2250
Fax: 248-538-2260
Indianapolis
Noblesville, IN
Tel: 317-773-8323
Fax: 317-773-5453
Los Angeles
Mission Viejo, CA
Tel: 949-462-9523
Fax: 949-462-9608
Santa Clara
Santa Clara, CA
Tel: 408-961-6444
Fax: 408-961-6445
Toronto
Mississauga, Ontario,
Canada
Tel: 905-673-0699
Fax: 905-673-6509
Australia - Sydney
Tel: 61-2-9868-6733
Fax: 61-2-9868-6755
China - Beijing
Tel: 86-10-8569-7000
Fax: 86-10-8528-2104
China - Chengdu
Tel: 86-28-8665-5511
Fax: 86-28-8665-7889
China - Chongqing
Tel: 86-23-8980-9588
Fax: 86-23-8980-9500
Korea - Seoul
Tel: 82-2-554-7200
Fax: 82-2-558-5932 or
82-2-558-5934
China - Hangzhou
Tel: 86-571-2819-3187
Fax: 86-571-2819-3189
Malaysia - Kuala Lumpur
Tel: 60-3-6201-9857
Fax: 60-3-6201-9859
China - Hong Kong SAR
Tel: 852-2401-1200
Fax: 852-2401-3431
Malaysia - Penang
Tel: 60-4-227-8870
Fax: 60-4-227-4068
China - Nanjing
Tel: 86-25-8473-2460
Fax: 86-25-8473-2470
Philippines - Manila
Tel: 63-2-634-9065
Fax: 63-2-634-9069
China - Qingdao
Tel: 86-532-8502-7355
Fax: 86-532-8502-7205
Singapore
Tel: 65-6334-8870
Fax: 65-6334-8850
China - Shanghai
Tel: 86-21-5407-5533
Fax: 86-21-5407-5066
Taiwan - Hsin Chu
Tel: 886-3-5778-366
Fax: 886-3-5770-955
China - Shenyang
Tel: 86-24-2334-2829
Fax: 86-24-2334-2393
Taiwan - Kaohsiung
Tel: 886-7-536-4818
Fax: 886-7-330-9305
China - Shenzhen
Tel: 86-755-8203-2660
Fax: 86-755-8203-1760
Taiwan - Taipei
Tel: 886-2-2500-6610
Fax: 886-2-2508-0102
China - Wuhan
Tel: 86-27-5980-5300
Fax: 86-27-5980-5118
Thailand - Bangkok
Tel: 66-2-694-1351
Fax: 66-2-694-1350
Spain - Madrid
Tel: 34-91-708-08-90
Fax: 34-91-708-08-91
UK - Wokingham
Tel: 44-118-921-5869
Fax: 44-118-921-5820
China - Xian
Tel: 86-29-8833-7252
Fax: 86-29-8833-7256
China - Xiamen
Tel: 86-592-2388138
Fax: 86-592-2388130
China - Zhuhai
Tel: 86-756-3210040
Fax: 86-756-3210049
DS01415A-page 14
Netherlands - Drunen
Tel: 31-416-690399
Fax: 31-416-690340
08/02/11
© 2011 Microchip Technology Inc.
Similar pages