AN2397 PSoC® 1 and CapSense® Controllers CapSense Data Monitoring Tools.pdf

AN2397
PSoC® 1 and CapSense® Controllers – CapSense Data Monitoring Tools
Author: Kurian Polachan
Associated Project: No
Associated Part Family: CY8CMBR3xxx, CY8CMBR2xxx,
CY8C201xx, CY8C20x34, CY8C20xx6A/AS/H, CY8C20xx7/S,
CY8C21x34/B, CY8C24x94, CY8C22x45
Software Version: Bridge Control Panel 1.12
Related Application Notes: AN49943, AN42137
AN2397 shows how to monitor CapSense data from PSoC 1 and CapSense controllers using the I2C or UART
interface. With the tools described in this application note, you can view and log real-time sensor data for CapSense
tuning and debugging.
Contents
1
2
Introduction ...............................................................1
CapSense Resources...............................................2
2.1
PSoC Designer ................................................2
2.2
Code Examples ...............................................3
2.3
Technical Support ............................................4
3
Selecting the Right Method ......................................4
4
Setup ........................................................................5
4.1
Monitoring via I2C ............................................6
4.2
Monitoring via UART ........................................6
5
Methods for CapSense Data Monitoring ...................6
5.1
I2C with BCP for Programmable Controllers ....6
5.2
UART with BCP for Programmable Controllers
10
1
5.3
I2C with EZ-Click for CY8CMBR2110 and
CY8CMBR3xxx Controllers ........................................ 14
5.4
UART
with
BCP
for
CY8CMBR20xx Controllers ........................................ 18
6
Enabling
UART-to-USB
Bridge
Using
CY3240-I2USB Bridge .................................................... 21
6.1
Converting CY3240-I2USB to UART-to-USB
Bridge ...................................................................... 21
6.2
UART-to-USB Driver Installation ................... 21
7
Glossary ................................................................. 24
8
Summary ................................................................ 28
Worldwide Sales and Design Support ............................. 30
Introduction
During the CapSense design process, you will need to monitor CapSense sensor data, such as raw count, baseline,
and difference count, for tuning and debugging.
This document helps you to select the proper tool for viewing and logging CapSense sensor data. The two supported
communication interfaces are I2C and UART. You should be familiar with CapSense sensing technology before you
read this document. If you would like more information about general CapSense theory and operation, see Getting
Started with CapSense.
Depending on the device type you are using for design, use one of the following resources:



PSoC 1 and CapSense Controllers: Refer to the Selecting the Right Method section in this application note.
PSoC 3 or PSoC 5LP: Refer to the “Tuner GUI” section in the PSoC 3 and PSoC 5LP CapSense Design Guide.
PSoC 4: Refer to the “Manual Tuning Process” section in the PSoC 4 CapSense Design Guide.
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2
CapSense Resources
Cypress provides a wealth of data at Cypress CapSense Controllers website to help you to select the right CapSense
device for your design, and quickly and effectively integrate the device into your design. To learn more about
CapSense and the available design resources, refer to the application note AN64846 – Getting Started with
CapSense.
The following is an abbreviated list for CapSense:


Product Selectors: Refer to the CapSense
Selector Guide section in AN64846. In
addition, PSoC Designer includes a device
selection tool.

Datasheets describe and provide electrical
specifications for the CapSense device
family.

Application Notes and Code Examples
cover a broad range of topics, from basic to
advanced level. Many of the application
notes include code examples.

2.1
Overview: CapSense Portfolio – Refer to the
CapSense Product Portfolio section in
AN64846, CapSense Roadmap.
Technical Reference Manuals (TRM)
provide detailed descriptions of the internal
architecture of the CapSense devices.


Development Kits:

CY3280-MBR3 CapSense MBR3 Evaluation Kit is
designed to showcase the abilities of the
CapSense MBR3 devices. MBR3 devices are
register-configurable devices and support buttons,
proximity sensing, water tolerance and many more
features.

CY3280-BK1 Universal CapSense Controller Basic Kit 1 enables you to evaluate the
programmable CapSense controllers. This kit
contains the evaluation boards for CY8C20x34
and CY8C21x34 devices.

CY8CKIT-024 CapSense Proximity Shield enables
you to evaluate and develop CapSense proximity
applications. The shield has been designed to
work with any of the Cypress Pioneer development
platforms.
The MiniProg1 and MiniProg3 devices provide an
interface for flash programming.
PSoC Designer
PSoC Designer is a free Windows-based Integrated Design Environment (IDE). Develop your applications using a
library of precharacterized analog and digital peripherals in a drag-and-drop design environment. Then, customize
your design leveraging the dynamically generated API libraries of code. Figure 1 shows PSoC Designer windows.
Note: This is not the default view.
1.
Global Resources – all device hardware settings.
2.
Parameters – the parameters of the currently selected User Modules
3.
Pinout – information related to device pins
4.
Chip-Level Editor – a diagram of the resources available on the selected chip
5.
Datasheet – the datasheet for the currently selected UM
6.
User Modules – all available User Modules for the selected device
7.
Device Resource Meter – device resource usage for the current project configuration
8.
Workspace – a tree-level diagram of files associated with the project
9.
Output – output from project build and debug operations
Note: For detailed information on PSoC Designer, go to PSoC® Designer > Help > Documentation >
Designer Specific Documents > IDE User Guide.
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Figure 1. PSoC Designer Layout
2.2
Code Examples
This webpage lists the PSoC Designer based Code Examples. These Code Examples can speed up your design
process by starting you off with a complete design, instead of a blank page, and show how PSoC Designer User
Modules can be used for various applications. In addition, the CapSense Controller Code Examples design guide
provides important code examples to be used in a CapSense design.
To access the Code Examples integrated with PSoC Designer, follow the path Start Page > Design Catalog >
Launch Example Browser as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 2. Code Examples in PSoC Designer
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In the Example Projects Browser shown in Figure 3, you have the following options.




Keyword search to filter the projects

Create a new project (and a new workspace if needed) based on the selection. This can speed up your design
process by starting you off with a complete, basic design. You can then adapt that design to your application.
Listing the projects based on Category
Review the datasheet for the selection (on the Description tab)
Review the code example for the selection. You can copy and paste code from this window to your project, which
can help speed up code development, or
Figure 3. Code Example Projects, with Sample Codes
2.3
Technical Support
If you have any questions, our technical support team is happy to assist you. You can create a support
request on the Cypress Technical Support page.
You can also use the following support resources if you need quick assistance.


3
Self-help
Local Sales Office Locations
Selecting the Right Method
Cypress offers a wide range of programmable and configurable (CapSense Express) CapSense controllers.
The communication interface and the tool used for data monitoring differ depending on the device. Figure 4
guides which method to select. Click the link to go to the corresponding section. The hardware setup is
presented in the next section.
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Figure 4. Data Monitoring Method Selection Chart
I2C Interface
I2C with
Bridge Control Panel
UART Interface
UART with
Bridge Control Panel
CY8CMBR2110
CY8CMBR3xxx
I2C with EZ-Click
CY8CMBR20xx
UART with
Bridge Control Panel
CY8C201xx
AN42137
Programmable CapSense
Controllers
CapSense Express
Controllers
For the CY8C201xx family, the CapSense data viewing tool is integrated directly into PSoC Designer™
version 5.0 SP6. Refer to AN42137 for more information.
For the programmable CapSense controllers, either I2C or UART can be used as communication interface.
Table 1 guides which interface to use.
Table 1. I2C vs. UART for Programmable Controllers
I2C
UART
2
1
Data Loss
Yes
No
Bidirectional Communication
Support
Yes
No
Comparison Matrices
Pins Required
Note EZ-Click does not support reading sensor data from programmable controllers.
4

I2C requires two free port pins (SCL and SDA) from the CapSense controller and UART needs only one
pin, the transmitter pin of the TX8 user module.

In the I2C method, the PC reads data from the CapSense controller asynchronously (asynchronous to
CapSense scanning). In this case, samples will be lost if the CapSense scanning rate is higher than the
rate at which the PC reads data from the CapSense controller. In the UART method, data from the
CapSense controller is synchronously transmitted to the PC (data is transmitted after every CapSense
scan). No samples are lost in this mode of communication.

BCP does not support sending data to the CapSense controller over UART.
Setup
CapSense controllers support either I2C or UART interface to monitor CapSense data. The hardware setup
differs based on the communication interface. Choose the right setup depending on the interface supported
by your CapSense device.
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4.1
Monitoring via I2C
In this method, data is read from the CapSense controller via the I 2C interface and is transmitted to the PC
through USB using the CY3240-I2USB[a] Bridge (I2C-to-USB converter) or the MiniProg3 kit, as shown in
Figure 5. On the PC side, you use the Bridge Control Panel (BCP) or EZ-Click™ tool to view and log the
sensor data. BCP is a tool provided by Cypress to read the data over I2C or UART and is installed along with
PSoC Programmer. EZ-Click is used to set up the sensor configuration, monitor the real-time sensor output,
and run production-line system diagnostics for CY8CMBR2110 and CY8CMBR3xxx devices.
Figure 5. Reading Data from CapSense Controller via I2C Interface
Touch
Signal
4.2
CapSense
Controller
I2C
CY3240-I2USB
Bridge/
Miniprog3
USB
Bridge Control
Panel/EZ-Click
Plot
Monitoring via UART
In this method, data is read from the CapSense controller via a UART/RS232 interface and is transmitted to
the PC through the USB interface or RS232 serial port, as shown in Figure 6. On the PC side, you need to
use the BCP tool to view and log the sensor data.
Figure 6. Reading Data from CapSense Controller via UART
Touch
Signal
CapSense
Controller
RS232
UART to USB
Bridge
RS232 Level
Translator
USB
Bridge Control
Panel
Plot
RS232
Serial Port
RS232 data transmitted by the CapSense controller can be sent to the PC using one of the following
methods:

UART-to-USB bridge: Refer to the section Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB Bridge
to use the CY3240-I2USB kit. Refer to AN49943 for implementing a UART-to-USB Bridge for a PSoC 1
device.

RS232 level translator: If your PC has an RS232 serial port, you can use an RS232 level translator to
transmit the data from the CapSense controller to the PC.
5
Methods for CapSense Data Monitoring
5.1
I2C with BCP for Programmable Controllers
Code example 2 in the CapSense Controller Code Examples Design Guide demonstrates how to read
CapSense data from an I2C slave device and plot it in the BCP tool.
5.1.1
Step A: Install BCP
1. The BCP tool installs with PSoC Programmer. Download it from www.cypress.com/programmer.
a
CY3240-I2USB kit is obsolete and Miniprog3 is the replacement. However, CY3240-I2USB kit is provided along with other CapSense kits
– CY3280-BK1, CY3280-20x66, CY3218-CAPEXP1, CY3218-CAPEXP2.
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2.
5.1.2
After installation, open the application by going to Start > All Programs > Cypress > Bridge Control
Panel [version] > Bridge Control Panel [version].
S t e p B : I m p l e m e n t I 2 C S l a ve I n t e r f a c e i n C a p S e n s e C o n t r o l l e r
1.
Create a new project for any one of the programmable CapSense controllers in PSoC Designer.
2.
Place an EzI2Cs User Module in the project.
3.
Set the following User Module parameters:





4.
Slave_Addr to 0 (this address can be anything from 0 to 127)
Address_Type to Static
ROM_Registers, in most cases, to Disable
I2C Clock to 400 kHz Fast
I2C Pins to P1[0]-P1[1] or P1[5]-P1[7]
Define the RAM buffer that will contain the data needed for I 2C transmission. Refer to the code example
2 to learn how to do this. Define the array or structure whose address will be specified when the
SetRamBuffer function is called. For example:
struct I2C_Regs
{
BYTE bSnsIndex;
BYTE bSnsMask;
WORD wRawCount;
WORD wBaseline;
WORD wDiffCount;
WORD wCentroid;
} MyI2C_Regs;
5.
//
//
//
//
//
//
read/write value
read only value
read only value
read only value
read only value
read only value
Insert the following two lines into the initialization part of the program:
EzI2Cs_SetRamBuffer(sizeof(MyI2C_Regs),1,(BYTE*)&MyI2C_Regs);
EzI2Cs_Start();
Modify the first line to set the arguments of the EzI2Cs_SetRamBuffer function as required. The first
argument sets the length of the data that can be read. The second sets the length of the data that can
be written to. The third argument sets the address of the I2C buffer. Refer to EzI2C Slave User Module
Datasheet for details on these functions.
6.
Update the RAM buffer after every scan. For example:
MyI2C_Regs.bSnsMask = CSD_baSnsOnMask[0];
MyI2C_Regs.wRawCount = CSD_waSnsResult[MyI2C_Regs.bSnsIndex];
MyI2C_Regs.wBaseline = CSD_waSnsBaseline[MyI2C_Regs.bSnsIndex];
MyI2C_Regs.wDiffCount = CSD_waSnsDiff[MyI2C_Regs.bSnsIndex];
MyI2C_Regs.wCentroid = CSD_wGetCentroidPos(1);
The EzI2Cs User Module works in the background with I2C interrupt handlers.
The first byte received by the I2C slave is the offset into the buffer, which data is read from or written to.
The default offset is 0. To learn more about working with the EzI2Cs User Module, refer to the user
module datasheet.
Note To guarantee data integrity of variables that are two or more bytes long, check the
EzI2Cs_bBusy_Flag variable before changing these variables in the code. For example:
EzI2Cs_DisableInt();
if(!(EzI2Cs_bBusy_Flag == EzI2Cs_I2C_BUSY_RAM_READ))
{
MyI2C_Regs.wData++; //safely increment a 2 byte variable
}
EzI2Cs_ResumeInt();
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5.1.3
Step C: Set Up the Hardware
Figure 5 shows how to interconnect the components for this method.
If you are using the CY3240-I2USB Bridge, see the CY3240-I2USB Bridge Guide for information on how to
connect the I2C pins of the CapSense controller to the CY3240-I2USB Bridge.
If you are using MiniProg3, see the MiniProg3 User Guide for information on how to connect the I2C pins of
the CapSense controller to the MiniProg3.
5.1.4
Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data U sing BCP
Figure 7, Figure 8, and Figure 9 show screenshots of various BCP windows. Help topics are available in the
BCP menu bar for additional information about the application user interface, supported commands, variable
definition, and different modes of data acquisition (Repeat Mode, To File Mode).
Figure 7. BCP: Commands Editor View
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Figure 8. BCP: Chart View (Plotting of RawCount and Baseline)
Figure 9. BCP: Table View of Sensor Data
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5.2
UART with BCPa for Programmable Controllers
5.2.1
S ys t e m R e q u i r e m e n t s
This method requires the following system configuration:


A free serial communication (COM/RS232) port [b]
Microsoft Windows XP, 7, or later
Refer to the section Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB Bridge to use CY3240-I2USB kit.
Refer to AN49943 for implementing UART-to-USB Bridge for a PSoC 1 device.
Follow these steps to view CapSense data using this method.
5.2.2
Step A: Install BCP
The BCP tool installs with PSoC Programmer. Download it from www.cypress.com/programmer.
5.2.3
Step B: Send Data from CapSense Controller
For programmable devices, follow these steps in a PSoC Designer Project:
1.
Place the TX8SW User Module in the PSoC Designer project.
2.
Set the following User Module parameters:
3.


Port Pin: Select the RS232 serial transmitter pin.



Parity: Set to NONE.
Baud Rate: Select a baud rate from the list. Possible choices are 115200, 57600, 38400, 19200,
9600, 4800, 2400, and 1200 bits per second.
Stop Bits: Set to ONE.
Data Bits: Set to 8.
Insert the following string into the initialization part of the program:
TX8SW_Start();
4.
Now we will learn how to send CapSense data in a specific packet structure so that BCP can parse the
data. The code snippets given here should be inserted in the main loop after CapSense scan is done.
The BCP application receives the data that is divided into packets:
Packet0
Packet1
…
PacketN
…
Each packet consists of a header, a data element, and a tail, as described in Table 2. The RX8
command entered in the BCP application should match with the packet structure sent by PSoC, as
explained in Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data Using BCP, to correctly parse the packet. We will
assume the packet format given in Table 2 and write the code accordingly.
a
Multichart used for data monitoring over UART is replaced by Bridge Control Panel and is no longer supported.
b
This requirement is optional if an UART-to-USB bridge is used for reading serial (RS232) data.
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Table 2. Data Packet Structure
Packet Element
Header
Content
0x0D
0x0A
Raw Count 0
Raw Count 1
…
Data
Baseline 0
Baseline 1
…
Signal 0
Signal 1
…
0x00
0xFF
Tail
0xFF
5.
The header allows the BCP to divide the input byte stream into packets. It can contain any sequence of
bytes that is not part of the data. The header used here consists of two bytes: a carriage return (0x0D)
and a line feed (0x0A). To send the header, call the standard TX8 User Module function:
TX8SW_PutCRLF();
// Send Header
The header is followed by data. The data section consists of three 16-bit words (Rawcount, Baseline,
Diffcount) for each sensor. Each word is represented using one unsigned integer variablea in BCP. Data
words should be ordered according to Table 2 The following code sequence sends the data section,
with all sensor results in the proper order, to the PC:
TX8SW_Write((char *) (CSD_waSnsResult), CSD_TotalSensorCount*2);
TX8SW_Write((char *) (CSD_waSnsBaseline), CSD_TotalSensorCount*2);
TX8SW_Write((char *) (CSD_waSnsDiff), CSD_TotalSensorCount*2);
For 16-bit values like RawCount, the MSB is sent out first, followed by the LSB.
6.
The packet is bounded by the tail, which allows BCP to determine the packet length. Again, the tail can
contain any sequence of bytes that is not part of data. The tail used here consists of three bytes: 0x00
0xFF 0xFF. To send the tail, add the following code to your project:
TX8SW_PutChar(0x00); // Send Tail
TX8SW_PutChar((CHAR)0xFF);
TX8SW_PutChar((CHAR)0xFF);
5.2.4
Step C: Set up the hardware
Figure 6 shows how to interconnect the components for this method. Follow these rules if the CY3240I2USB Bridge is used as a UART-to-USB bridge.

Connect the serial transmitter pin of the CapSense controller to the I2C_SDA pin of the CY3240-I2USB
Bridge.

Wire the ground of the CapSense controller to the GND pin of the CY3240-I2USB Bridge.
See the CY3240-I2USB Bridge user guide for details about the CY3240-I2USB pinouts.
a
Each data is represented using a named variable in BCP. e.g. rc0 can be used to represent the rawcount of sensor 0. BCP supports up to
32 such variables. The data type of variables can be byte, int, long int, and float and they can be either signed or unsigned. Refer to BCP
help manual for more information.
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5.2.5
Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data Using BCP
To read the CapSense sensor data using BCP, follow these steps:
1.
Open the BCP application by going to Start > All Programs > Cypress > Bridge Control Panel
[version] > Bridge Control Panel [version]. Figure 10 shows the main window of the application.
Figure 10. Main Window
2.
Configure the UART protocol settings.
In the main window shown in Figure 10, select the required COM port under Connected Ports. RX8 (UART)
is selected as protocol automatically. Now, select Protocol Configuration from the Tools menu. The
settings dialog box appears as shown in Figure 11. Choose RX8 (UART) tab and configure the settings to
match with the PSoC Designer project.
Figure 11. Settings Dialog Box
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3.
Monitor the CapSense data.
The following steps quickly show how to monitor the data using BCP. Refer to the BCP help manual (press
F1) for more information.
a.
Add the variables in the Variable Settings window, which can be accessed at Chart > Variable
Settings from the main window shown in Figure 10. To add a variable, check the Active box, edit the
Variable Name, choose the Type (data type), and Color. Click OK when all the variables are added.
The variable settings can be saved to a file by clicking Save and can be loaded later by clicking Load.
Figure 12 shows the variable settings window in which variables for Rawcount (rc0, rc1), Baseline (bl0,
bl1), and Different count (dc0, dc1) added for two sensors.
Figure 12. Variable Settings Window
Enter the following RX8 command in the command area of the main window, as shown in Figure 10.
RX8 [H = 0D 0A] +
@1rc0 @0rc0 @1rc1 @0rc1 @1bl0 @0bl0 @1bl1 @0bl1 @1dc0 @0dc0 @1dc1 @0dc1 +
[T = 00 FF FF]
The command structure is explained below. ‘+’ symbol is used to split the command into multiple lines.
RX8
Command instructing BCP to expect UART data
[H = 0D 0A]
Header bytes
@1rc0….@0dc1
Data bytes
[T = 00 FF FF]
Tail bytes
BCP looks at the data as byte stream. Therefore, a multibyte variable should be split into as many bytes
as required and each byte should be represented as @Xvariablename, Where X is a number indicating
the byte position in the variable.
For example, the MSB of the Rawcount (2 bytes) for sensor 0 is denoted as @1rc0 and the LSB as
@0rc0. @1rc0 appears before @0rc0 in the command since MSB is sent out first.
b.
Select the entire RX8 command and click Repeat. The received data is displayed in the results window.
Now, go to the Chart tab and select the required variables to monitor. Figure 13 shows plotting of
Rawcount and Baseline for sensor 0.
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Figure 13. Bridge Control Panel Chart Window
5.3
I2C with EZ-Click for CY8CMBR2110 and CY8CMBR3xxx Controllers
EZ-Click is a GUI-based tool that is used to configure the CY8CMBR2110 and CY8CMBR3xxx CapSense
devices via an I2C interface.
5.3.1
Step A: Install EZ-Click Tool
1. Download EZ-Click from www.cypress.com/go/EZ-Click and install the software.
2. After installation, open the EZ-Click tool from the default location: Start > All Programs > Cypress >
EZ-Click 2.0 > EZ-Click 2.0.
5.3.2
Step B: Configure CY8CMBR2110 /CY8CMBR3xxx Controller
Refer to the EZ-Click 2.0 User Guide for more information on these tasks:
1.
2.
3.
Create a new project in the EZ-Click tool.
Specify various parameters for the selected CapSense controller and generate the configuration file.
Choose Configuration > Select Target Device to configure the CapSense controller, as shown in
Figure 14.
Depending on the kit (CY3280-MBR2 kit or CY3280-MBR3 kit) or the device you have connected to the
PC, different Ports and Devices will be available to select, as shown in Figure 15. Select the port to
which the device is connected. Select an option for Power and I2C Speed, and click OK.
Note: The CY3280-MBR3 kit and CY3280-MBR2 kit come with a built-in I2C-to-USB bridge and can be
directly connected to the PC using a USB A to Mini-B cable. If the CY8CMBR2110 or CY8CMBR3xxx
device is placed on a custom board, you need to use either the CY3240-I2USB Bridge or the MiniProg3
kit to connect the device to the PC.
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Figure 14. Generating Configuration in EZ-Click
Figure 15. Selecting the Target Device in EZ-Click
4.
5.
6.
Choose Configuration > Generate Config File to generate the configuration file.
Choose Configuration > Apply Current Config to configure the CapSense controller.
After the CapSense controller is successfully configured, click the CapSense output tab in the EZ-Click
tool to view the CapSense sensor data, as shown in Figure 16.
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Figure 16. CapSense Output Tab in EZ-Click
5.3.3
Step C: View Raw Count and Baseline
1. To view the raw count and baseline, select the Button Output option in the Select view parameter, as
shown in Figure 16.
2. In the Button parameter, specify the sensor for which the raw count and baseline data has to be
displayed.
3. In the Graph parameter, select the Raw count vs Baseline option. Leave all other parameters at their
default values.
Refer to the EZ-Click User Guide for information on these parameters.
4. Click the Start button to acquire and display the raw count and baseline values of the sensor specified
in the Button parameter.
To view the raw count value of all the sensors at the same time, select the Parameter output option in
the Select view parameter and the Raw count option in the Parameter menu and click the Start
button.
5.3.4
Step D: View Difference Count
The difference count value of a sensor is displayed in different windows depending on whether the
Automatic threshold parameter (available in the CapSense sensor configuration tab) is enabled or
disabled.
When the Automatic threshold parameter is enabled, follow this procedure to view the difference count:
1.
2.
In the Select view parameter, select the Button Output option.
In the Graph parameter, select the Diff count vs Finger threshold option and click the Start button to
display the difference count of the sensor, as Figure 17 shows.
When the Automatic threshold parameter is disabled, follow this procedure to view the difference count:
1.
In the Select view parameter, select the Parameter output option.
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2.
In the Parameter menu, select the Difference count option and click the Start button to display the
difference count of the sensor, as Figure 18 shows.
Figure 17. Viewing Difference Count When Automatic Threshold Is Disabled
Figure 18. Viewing Difference Count When Automatic Threshold Is Enabled
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5.4
UART with BCP for CY8CMBR20xx Controllers
5.4.1
S ys t e m R e q u i r e m e n t s
This method requires the following system configuration:


5.4.2
A free serial communication (COM/RS232) port [a]
Microsoft Windows 9x, 2000, XP, or later
Supported Baud Rates
Unlike the programmable controllers, which can be programmed to send RS232 data at user-defined baud
rates, the baud rates of CY8CMBR20xx devices are fixed. Table 3 maps CY8CMBR20xx devices to the
supported baud rate.
Table 3. Baud Rates Supported by CY8CMBR20xx
CY8CMBR20xx
Baud Rate
CY8CMBR2044
117.6 kbps
CY8CMBR2010/CY8CMBR2016
115.2 kbps
See the section Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB Bridge for information about how to
put together a UART-to-USB bridge to read RS232 data (clocked out at 117.6 kbps and 115.2 kbps).
Follow Step A: Install BCP and Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data Using BCP to view CapSense data
using this method.
CY8CMBR20xx devices can be configured to send out the debug data on a pin. Refer to the corresponding
device datasheet for the serial debug data format. Along with rawcount, baseline, and signal (difference
count), CY8CMBR20xx devices also transmit the following information:




5.4.3
Firmware revision
CapSense button touch status
GPO output status
Parasitic capacitance of each CapSense sensor
Reading Data from CY8CMBR2044
CY8CMBR2044 transmits CapSense data in RS232 format (at a baud rate of 117.6 kbps) from the sensor
pin, which is pulled LOW to GND with a 5.6-kΩ resistor. Refer to the device datasheet for the tolerance
value of the resistor. Figure 19 shows how to configure CY8CMBR2044 to send CapSense data.
Figure 19. CY8CMBR2044 Hardware Setup
Sensor
Sensor
RS232
CY8CMBR2044
Sensor
Sensor
UART to USB
Bridge
USB
Bridge
Control
Panel
5.6 kΩ
a
This requirement is optional if the UART-to-USB bridge is used for reading serial (RS232) data.
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1.
To read data from a CY8CMBR2044 device, use a UART-to-USB bridge programmed to read RS232
data at a baud rate of 117.6 kbps. For details, see Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB
Bridge.
2.
Connect the CY8CMBR2044 sensor pin that is pulled low to GND to the I2C_SDA pin of the CY3240I2USB Bridge. Wire the GND terminal of CY8CMBR2044 to the GND pin of the CY3240-I2USB Bridge.
See the CY3240-I2USB Bridge user guide for details about the CY3240-I2USB pinouts.
3.
Refer to Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data Using BCP to configure Bridge Control Panel for UART
data monitoring.
4.
Load the command file CY8CMBR2044.iic and the variable settings file CY8CMBR2044.ini provided
with this application note into Bridge Control Panel.
5.
Select the entire command and click the Repeat button to read the data. Now, go to the chart tab to
monitor the required variable. Figure 20 shows monitoring the different count of CS0.
Note that each bit in the sensor status and GPO status variables indicate the status of the corresponding
sensor or the GPO. For example, the sensor status 0x08 indicates that a finger is detected on CS3;
similarly the GPO status 0x04 indicates that GPO2 is asserted (active LOW).
Figure 20. Monitoring Difference Count of CS0 for CY8CMBR2044
5.4.4
Reading Data from CY8CMBR2010
CY8CMBR2010 transmits CapSense data in RS232 format (at a baud rate of 115.2 kbps) from the “Delay”
pin, which is pulled LOW to GND with a 12-kΩ resistor. Refer to the device datasheet for the tolerance value
of the resistor. Figure 21 shows how to configure CY8CMBR2010 to send out CapSense data.
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Figure 21. CY8CMBR2010 Hardware Setup
CY8CMBR2010
Delay Pin
UART to USB
Bridge
RS232
Bridge
Control
Panel
USB
12 kΩ
1.
To read data from a CY8CMBR2010 device, use a UART-to-USB bridge programmed to read RS232
data at a baud rate of 115.2 kbps. For details, see Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB
Bridge.
2.
Connect the Delay pin of the CY8CMBR2010 to the I2C_SDA pin of the CY3240-I2USB Bridge. Wire the
GND terminal of CY8CMBR2010 to the GND pin of the CY3240-I2USB Bridge. See the CY3240-I2USB
Bridge user guide for details about the CY3240-I2USB pinouts.
3.
Refer to Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data Using BCP to configure Bridge Control Panel for UART
data monitoring.
4.
Load the required command file CY8CMBR2010_xxxx.iic and the variable settings file
CY8CMBR2010_xxxx.ini provided with this application note into Bridge Control Panel. All the data sent
by CY8CMBR2010 cannot be monitored simultaneously using Bridge Control Panel because it can
monitor only up to 32 named variables. However, any number of bytes can be read from the command
window. Therefore, multiple command and variable setting files are provided for this device to selectively
monitor the data. The following is the list of command files provided for this device. Each command file
has a corresponding variable setting file.

CY8CMBR2010_SensorData.iic – To monitor sensor status, GPO status, and CapSense scan data
(Rawcount, Baseline, Difference count) of all 10 buttons.

5.
5.4.5
CY8CMBR2010_DiagData.iic – To monitor the remaining data: Firmware revision, Cp, SNR, and
System diagnostics results
Select the entire command and click the Repeat button to read the data. Now, go to the chart tab to
monitor the required variable.
Reading Data from CY8CMBR2016
CY8CMBR2016 transmits CapSense data in RS232 format (at a baud rate of 115.2 kbps) from the “Debug”
pin, which is pulled low to GND with a 5.6-kΩ resistor. Refer to the device datasheet for the tolerance value
of the resistor. Figure 22 shows how to configure CY8CMBR2016 to send CapSense data.
Figure 22. CY8CMBR2016 Hardware Setup
CY8CMBR2016
Debug Pin
RS232
UART to USB
Bridge
USB
Bridge
Control
Panel
5.6 kΩ
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Notes
1.
To read data from a CY8CMBR2016 device, use a UART-to-USB bridge programmed to read RS232
data at a baud rate of 115.2 kbps. For details, see Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB
Bridge.
2.
Connect the Debug pin of the CY8CMBR2016 to the I2C_SDA pin of the CY3240-I2USB Bridge. Wire
the GND terminal of CY8CMBR2016 to the GND pin of the CY3240-I2USB Bridge. See the CY3240I2USB Bridge user guide for details about the CY3240-I2USB pinouts.
3.
Refer to Step D: Read CapSense Sensor Data Using BCP to configure Bridge Control Panel for UART
data monitoring.
4.
Load the required command file CY8CMBR2016_xxxx.iic and the variable settings file
CY8CMBR2016_xxxx.ini provided with this application note into Bridge Control Panel. All the data sent
by CY8CMBR2016 cannot be monitored simultaneously using Bridge Control Panel because it can
monitor only up to 32 named variables. However, any number of bytes can be read from the command
window. Therefore, multiple command and variable setting files are provided for this device to selectively
monitor the data. The following is the list of command files provided for this device. Each command file
has a corresponding variable setting file.


CY8CMBR2016_SensorData_CS0toCS9.iic – To monitor sensor status and CapSense scan data
(Rawcount, Baseline, Difference count) for the sensors CS0 to CS9.
CY8CMBR2016_SensorData_CS10toCS15.iic – To monitor sensor status and CapSense scan data
(Rawcount, Baseline, Difference count) for the sensors CS10 to CS15.

5.
6
CY8CMBR2016_CpData.iic – To monitor the firmware revision and Cp of all the sensors.
Select the entire command and click the Repeat button to read the data. Now go to the chart tab to
monitor the required variable.
Enabling UART-to-USB Bridge Using CY3240-I2USB Bridge
This section covers the following two topics:
6.1

How to convert CY3240-I2USB Bridge hardware to work as a UART-to-USB bridge to read RS232 data
clocked out at 117.6 kbps and 115.2 kbps

Step-by-step instructions for installing the UART–to-USB driver
Converting CY3240-I2USB to UART-to-USB Bridge
Program the CY3240-I2USB Bridge hardware with the USB_UART_Bridge.hex file.

Get this file from the BaudRate117.6_UART_TO_USB.zip file for reading RS232 data clocked at 117.6
kbps.

Get this file from the BaudRate115.2_UART_TO_USB.zip file for reading RS232 data clocked at 115.2
kbps.
For details on how to program the bridge, see the CY3240-I2USB Bridge user guide, section 3.2.1,
“Program USB-I2C Bridge.”
6.2
UART-to-USB Driver Installation
1.
After you have finished programming, connect the CY3240-I2USB Bridge hardware to the PC USB port.
When the device is first connected to the PC, the new hardware wizard starts.
2.
Select No, not this time and click Next, as shown in Figure 23.
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Figure 23. New Hardware Wizard – Step 1
3.
Select Install from a list or specific location (Advanced) and click Next, as shown in Figure 24.
Figure 24. New Hardware Wizard – Step 2
4.
Select Search for the best driver in these locations, and Include this location in the search and set
the path to point to the folder containing the UART_TO_USB.hex file. Then click Next, as shown in
Figure 25.
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Figure 25. New Hardware Wizard – Step 3
5.
Click Continue Anyway, as shown in Figure 26.
Figure 26. New Hardware Wizard – Step 4
6.
Click Finish to complete the driver installation, as shown in Figure 27.
Figure 27. New Hardware Wizard – Step 5
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7
Glossary
AMUXBUS
Analog multiplexer bus available inside PSoC that helps to connect I/O pins with multiple internal analog
signals.
SmartSense™ Auto-Tuning
A CapSense algorithm that automatically sets sensing parameters for optimal performance after the design
phase and continuously compensates for system, manufacturing, and environmental changes.
Baseline
A value resulting from a firmware algorithm that estimates a trend in the Raw Count when there is no human
finger present on the sensor. The Baseline is less sensitive to sudden changes in the Raw Count and
provides a reference point for computing the Difference Count.
Button or Button Widget
A widget with an associated sensor that can report the active or inactive state (that is, only two states) of the
sensor. For example, it can detect the touch or no-touch state of a finger on the sensor.
Difference Count
The difference between Raw Count and Baseline. If the difference is negative, or if it is below Noise
Threshold, the Difference Count is always set to zero.
Capacitive Sensor
A conductor and substrate, such as a copper button on a printed circuit board (PCB), which reacts to a touch
or an approaching object with a change in capacitance.
CapSense®
Cypress’s touch-sensing user interface solution. The industry’s No. 1 solution in sales by 4x over No. 2.
CapSense Mechanical Button Replacement (MBR)
Cypress’s configurable solution to upgrade mechanical buttons to capacitive buttons, requires minimal
engineering effort to configure the sensor parameters and does not require firmware development. These
devices include the CY8CMBR3XXX and CY8CMBR2XXX families.
Centroid or Centroid Position
A number indicating the finger position on a slider within the range given by the Slider Resolution. This
number is calculated by the CapSense centroid calculation algorithm.
Compensation IDAC
A programmable constant current source, which is used by CSD to compensate for excess sensor C P. This
IDAC is not controlled by the Sigma-Delta Modulator in the CSD block unlike the Modulation IDAC.
CSD
CapSense Sigma Delta (CSD) is a Cypress-patented method of performing self-capacitance (also called
self-cap) measurements for capacitive sensing applications.
In CSD mode, the sensing system measures the self-capacitance of an electrode, and a change in the selfcapacitance is detected to identify the presence or absence of a finger.
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Debounce
A parameter that defines the number of consecutive scan samples for which the touch should be present for
it to become valid. This parameter helps to reject spurious touch signals.
A finger touch is reported only if the Difference Count is greater than Finger Threshold + Hysteresis for a
consecutive Debounce number of scan samples.
Driven-Shield
A technique used by CSD for enabling liquid tolerance in which the Shield Electrode is driven by a signal
that is equal to the sensor switching signal in phase and amplitude.
Electrode
A conductive material such as a pad or a layer on PCB, ITO, or FPCB. The electrode is connected to a port
pin on a CapSense device and is used as a CapSense sensor or to drive specific signals associated with
CapSense functionality.
Finger Threshold
A parameter used with Hysteresis to determine the state of the sensor. Sensor state is reported ON if the
Difference Count is higher than Finger Threshold + Hysteresis, and it is reported OFF if the Difference Count
is below Finger Threshold – Hysteresis.
Ganged Sensors
The method of connecting multiple sensors together and scanning them as a single sensor. Used for
increasing the sensor area for proximity sensing and to reduce power consumption.
To reduce power when the system is in low-power mode, all the sensors can be ganged together and
scanned as a single sensor taking less time instead of scanning all the sensors individually. When the user
touches any of the sensors, the system can transition into active mode where it scans all the sensors
individually to detect which sensor is activated.
PSoC supports sensor-ganging in firmware, that is, multiple sensors can be connected simultaneously to
AMUXBUS for scanning.
Gesture
Gesture is an action, such as swiping and pinch-zoom, performed by the user. CapSense has a gesture
detection feature that identifies the different gestures based on predefined touch patterns. In the CapSense
component, the Gesture feature is supported only by the Touchpad Widget.
Guard Sensor
Copper trace that surrounds all the sensors on the PCB, similar to a button sensor and is used to detect a
liquid stream. When the Guard Sensor is triggered, firmware can disable scanning of all other sensors to
prevent false touches.
Hatch Fill or Hatch Ground or Hatched Ground
While designing a PCB for capacitive sensing, a grounded copper plane should be placed surrounding the
sensors for good noise immunity. But a solid ground increases the parasitic capacitance of the sensor which
is not desired. Therefore, the ground should be filled in a special hatch pattern. A hatch pattern has closelyplaced, crisscrossed lines looking like a mesh and the line width and the spacing between two lines
determine the fill percentage. In case of liquid tolerance, this hatch fill referred as a shield electrode is driven
with a shield signal instead of ground.
Hysteresis
A parameter used to prevent the sensor status output from random toggling due to system noise, used in
conjunction with the Finger Threshold to determine the sensor state. See Finger Threshold.
IDAC (Current-Output Digital-to-Analog Converter)
Programmable constant current source available inside PSoC, used for CapSense and ADC operations.
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Liquid Tolerance
The ability of a capacitive sensing system to work reliably in the presence of liquid droplets, streaming
liquids or mist.
Linear Slider
A widget consisting of more than one sensor arranged in a specific linear fashion to detect the physical
position (in single axis) of a finger.
Low Baseline Reset
A parameter that represents the maximum number of scan samples where the Raw Count is abnormally
below the Negative Noise Threshold. If the Low Baseline Reset value is exceeded, the Baseline is reset to
the current Raw Count.
Manual-Tuning
The manual process of setting (or tuning) the CapSense parameters.
Matrix Buttons
A widget consisting of more than two sensors arranged in a matrix fashion, used to detect the presence or
absence of a human finger (a touch) on the intersections of vertically and horizontally arranged sensors.
If M is the number of sensors on the horizontal axis and N is the number of sensors on the vertical axis, the
Matrix Buttons Widget can monitor a total of M x N intersections using ONLY M + N port pins.
When using the CSD sensing method (self-capacitance), this Widget can detect a valid touch on only one
intersection position at a time.
Modulation Capacitor (CMOD)
An external capacitor required for the operation of a CSD block in Self-Capacitance sensing mode.
Modulator Clock
A clock source that is used to sample the modulator output from a CSD block during a sensor scan. This
clock is also fed to the Raw Count counter. The scan time (excluding pre and post processing times) is given
by
(2N – 1)/Modulator Clock Frequency, where N is the Scan Resolution.
Modulation IDAC
Modulation IDAC is a programmable constant current source, whose output is controlled (ON/OFF) by the
sigma-delta modulator output in a CSD block to maintain the AMUXBUS voltage at VREF. The average
current supplied by this IDAC is equal to the average current drawn out by the sensor capacitor.
Mutual-Capacitance
Capacitance associated with an electrode (say TX) with respect to another electrode (say RX) is known as
mutual capacitance.
Negative Noise Threshold
A threshold used to differentiate usual noise from the spurious signals appearing in negative direction. This
parameter is used in conjunction with the Low Baseline Reset parameter.
Baseline is updated to track the change in the Raw Count as long as the Raw Count stays within Negative
Noise Threshold, that is, the difference between Baseline and Raw count (Baseline – Raw count) is less
than Negative Noise Threshold.
Scenarios that may trigger such spurious signals in a negative direction include: a finger on the sensor on
power-up, removal of a metal object placed near the sensor, removing a liquid-tolerant CapSense-enabled
product from the water; and other sudden environmental changes.
Noise (CapSense Noise)
The variation in the Raw Count when a sensor is in the OFF state (no touch), measured as peak-to-peak
counts.
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Noise Threshold
A parameter used to differentiate signal from noise for a sensor. If Raw Count – Baseline is greater than
Noise Threshold, it indicates a likely valid signal. If the difference is less than Noise Threshold, Raw Count
contains nothing but noise.
Overlay
A non-conductive material, such as plastic and glass, which covers the capacitive sensors and acts as a
touch-surface. The PCB with the sensors is directly placed under the overlay or is connected through
springs. The casing for a product often becomes the overlay.
Parasitic Capacitance (CP)
Parasitic capacitance is the intrinsic capacitance of the sensor electrode contributed by PCB trace, sensor
pad, vias, and air gap. It is unwanted because it reduces the sensitivity of CSD.
Proximity Sensor
A sensor that can detect the presence of nearby objects without any physical contact.
Radial Slider
A widget consisting of more than one sensor arranged in a specific circular fashion to detect the physical
position of a finger.
Raw Count
The unprocessed digital count output of the CapSense hardware block that represents the physical
capacitance of the sensor.
Refresh Interval
The time between two consecutive scans of a sensor.
Scan Resolution
Resolution (in bits) of the Raw Count produced by the CSD block.
Scan Time
Time taken for completing the scan of a sensor.
Self-Capacitance
The capacitance associated with an electrode with respect to circuit ground.
Sensitivity
The change in Raw Count corresponding to the change in sensor capacitance, expressed in counts/pF.
Sensitivity of a sensor is dependent on the board layout, overlay properties, sensing method, and tuning
parameters.
Sense Clock
A clock source used to implement a switched-capacitor front-end for the CSD sensing method.
Sensor
See Capacitive Sensor.
Sensor Auto Reset
A setting to prevent a sensor from reporting false touch status indefinitely due to system failure, or when a
metal object is continuously present near the sensor.
When Sensor Auto Reset is enabled, the Baseline is always updated even if the Difference Count is greater
than the Noise Threshold. This prevents the sensor from reporting the ON status for an indefinite period of
time. When Sensor Auto Reset is disabled, the Baseline is updated only when the Difference Count is less
than the Noise Threshold.
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Sensor Ganging
See Ganged Sensors.
Shield Electrode
Copper fill around sensors to prevent false touches due to the presence of water or other liquids. Shield
Electrode is driven by the shield signal output from the CSD block. See Driven-Shield.
Shield Tank Capacitor (CSH)
An optional external capacitor (CSH Tank Capacitor) used to enhance the drive capability of the CSD shield,
when there is a large shield layer with high parasitic capacitance.
Signal (CapSense Signal)
Difference Count is also called Signal. See Difference Count.
Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR)
The ratio of the sensor signal, when touched, to the noise signal of an untouched sensor.
Slider Resolution
A parameter indicating the total number of finger positions to be resolved on a slider.
Touchpad
A Widget consisting of multiple sensors arranged in a specific horizontal and vertical fashion to detect the X
and Y position of a touch.
Trackpad
See Touchpad.
Tuning
The process of finding the optimum values for various hardware and software or threshold parameters
required for CapSense operation.
VREF
Programmable reference voltage block available inside PSoC used for CapSense and ADC operation.
Widget
A user-interface element in the CapSense component that consists of one sensor or a group of similar
sensors. Button, proximity sensor, linear slider, radial slider, matrix buttons, and touchpad are the supported
widgets.
8
Summary
This application note shows how to monitor CapSense debug data from Cypress CapSense controllers using the I2C
or UART interface. Detailed explanation is provided on how to monitor the CapSense data using Bridge Control Panel
and EZ-Click tools.
About the Author
Name:
Kurian Polachan
Title:
Sr. Applications Engineer
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Document History
Document Title: AN2397 - PSoC® 1 and CapSense® Controllers – CapSense Data Monitoring Tools
Document Number: 001-41446
Revision
ECN
Orig. of
Change
Submission
Date
Description of Change
**
1541809
KPOL
10/09/2007
New application note
*A
3124643
ARVM
01/03/2011
Included CY8C20xx6A in the "Associated Part Family".
Fixed the broken links.
Deleted references to CSR UM
*B
3404186
KPOL
10/14/2011
Complete rewrite
*C
3461633
KPOL
12/21/2011
Updated template to current Cypress standards.
Fixed typos.
*D
3804024
VAIR
11/06/2012
Added CY8C20xx7/S.
Updated links to code examples.
Added link to PSoC 3 and PSoC 5 Tuner GUI.
*E
3902185
VAIR
02/12/2013
Changed description of Figure 17.
*F
4096713
VAIR
08/15/2013
Added reference and link to datasheet.
*G
4478381
DCHE
08/20/2014
Added section I2C with EZ-Click
*H
4581694
DCHE
11/27/2014
Renamed CY3240-I2USB Kit as CY3240-I2USB Bridge.
Updated hyperlinks for CY3240-I2USB Bridge Guide.
*I
4787203
VAIR
06/24/2015
Major rewrite and Multichart is replaced with Bridge Control Panel for UART
based monitoring
Added section CapSense Resources
Updated to new template.
*J
5094088
www.cypress.com
VAIR
01/20/2016
Added Glossary.
Document No. 001-41446 Rev. *J
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PSoC® 1 and CapSense® Controllers – CapSense Data Monitoring Tools
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critical components in life-support systems where a malfunction or failure may reasonably be expected to result in significant injury to the user. The
inclusion of Cypress products in life-support systems application implies that the manufacturer assumes all risk of such use and in doing so indemnifies
Cypress against all charges.
This Source Code (software and/or firmware) is owned by Cypress Semiconductor Corporation (Cypress) and is protected by and subject to worldwide
patent protection (United States and foreign), United States copyright laws and international treaty provisions. Cypress hereby grants to licensee a
personal, non-exclusive, non-transferable license to copy, use, modify, create derivative works of, and compile the Cypress Source Code and derivative
works for the sole purpose of creating custom software and or firmware in support of licensee product to be used only in conjunction with a Cypress
integrated circuit as specified in the applicable agreement. Any reproduction, modification, translation, compilation, or representation of this Source
Code except as specified above is prohibited without the express written permission of Cypress.
Disclaimer: CYPRESS MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH REGARD TO THIS MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT
NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Cypress reserves the
right to make changes without further notice to the materials described herein. Cypress does not assume any liability arising out of the application or
use of any product or circuit described herein. Cypress does not authorize its products for use as critical components in life-support systems where a
malfunction or failure may reasonably be expected to result in significant injury to the user. The inclusion of Cypress’ product in a life-support systems
application implies that the manufacturer assumes all risk of such use and in doing so indemnifies Cypress against all charges.
Use may be limited by and subject to the applicable Cypress software license agreement.
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-41446 Rev. *J
30
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