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8
Data
Sheet
December 27, 2004
8
1-8
Microprocessor CORE Voltage Regulator
Multi-Phase Buck PWM Controller
The HIP6311 multi-phase PWM control IC together with its
companion gate drivers, the HIP6601, HIP6602 or HIP6603
and internal MOSFETs provides a precision voltage
regulation system for advanced microprocessors.
Multiphase power conversion is a marked departure from
earlier single phase converter configurations previously
employed to satisfy the ever increasing current demands of
modern microprocessors. Multi-phase convertors, by
distributing the power and load current results in smaller and
lower cost transistors with fewer input and output capacitors.
These reductions accrue from the higher effective
conversion frequency with higher frequency ripple current
due to the phase interleaving process of this topology. For
example, a three phase convertor operating at 350kHz will
have a ripple frequency of 1.05MHz. Moreover, greater
convertor bandwidth of this design results in faster response
to load transients.
Outstanding features of this controller IC include
programmable VID codes from the microprocessor that
range from 1.100V to 1.850V with a system accuracy of
0.8%. Pull up currents on these VID pins eliminates the
need for external pull up resistors. In addition “droop”
compensation, used to reduce the overshoot or undershoot
of the CORE voltage, is easily programmed with a single
resistor.
Another feature of this controller IC is the PGOOD monitor
circuit which is held low until the CORE voltage increases,
during its Soft-Start sequence, to within 10% of the
programmed voltage. Over-voltage, 15% above
programmed CORE voltage, results in the converter shutting
down and turning the lower MOSFETs ON to clamp and
protect the microprocessor. Under voltage is also detected
and results in PGOOD low if the CORE voltage falls 10%
below the programmed level. Over-current protection
reduces the regulator current to less than 25% of the
programmed trip value. These features provide monitoring
and protection for the microprocessor and power system.
1
HIP6311
FN4817.3
Features
• Multi-Phase Power Conversion
• Precision Channel Current Sharing
- Loss Less Current Sampling - Uses rDS(ON)
• Precision CORE Voltage Regulation
- 0.8% System Accuracy Over Temperature
• Microprocessor Voltage Identification Input
- 5-Bit VID Input
- 1.100V to 1.850V in 25mV Steps
- Programmable “Droop” Voltage
• Fast Transient Recovery Time
• Over Current Protection
• Automatic Selection of 2, 3, or 4 Phase Operation
• High Ripple Frequency, (Channel Frequency) Times
Number Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .100kHz to 6MHz
• Pb-Free Available (RoHS Compliant)
Ordering Information
PART NUMBER
TEMP. (°C)
PKG.
DWG. #
PACKAGE
HIP6311CB
0 to 70
20 Ld SOIC
HIP6311CBZ (Note)
0 to 70
20 Ld SOIC (Pb-free) M20.3
HIP6311CBZA (Note)
0 to 70
20 Ld SOIC (Pb-free) M20.3
HIP6301EVAL1
M20.3
Evaluation Platform
*Add “-T” suffix to part number for tape and reel packaging.
NOTE: Intersil Pb-free products employ special Pb-free material
sets; molding compounds/die attach materials and 100% matte tin
plate termination finish, which are RoHS compliant and compatible
with both SnPb and Pb-free soldering operations. Intersil Pb-free
products are MSL classified at Pb-free peak reflow temperatures that
meet or exceed the Pb-free requirements of IPC/JEDEC J STD-020.
Pinout
HIP6311 (SOIC)
TOP VIEW
VID4 1
20 VCC
VID3 2
19 PGOOD
VID2 3
18 PWM4
VID1 4
17 ISEN4
VID0 5
16 ISEN1
COMP 6
15 PWM1
FB 7
14 PWM2
FS/DIS 8
13 ISEN2
GND 9
12 ISEN3
VSEN 10
11 PWM3
CAUTION: These devices are sensitive to electrostatic discharge; follow proper IC Handling Procedures.
1-888-INTERSIL or 321-724-7143 | Intersil (and design) is a registered trademark of Intersil Americas Inc.
Copyright © Intersil Americas Inc. 2000, 2004. All Rights Reserved
All other trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners.
HIP6311
Block Diagram
VCC
PGOOD
POWER-ON
RESET (POR)
+
VSEN
THREE
STATE
UV
-
X 0.9
OV
LATCH
CLOCK AND
SAWTOOTH
GENERATOR
S
+
OVP

+
-
X1.15
+
+
PWM1
PWM
-
SOFTSTART
AND FAULT
LOGIC
FS/EN
-

+
PWM2
PWM
-
-
COMP
+

+
PWM
-
VID0
PWM3
-
VID1
VID2
+
D/A
VID3
+
VID4
-

-
E/A
CURRENT
FB
CORRECTION
+
PWM4
PWM
-
PHASE
NUMBER
CHANNEL
DETECTOR
ISEN1
I_TOT
+
+

OC
I_TRIP
+
ISEN2
+
+
ISEN3
ISEN4
GND
2
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Simplified Power System Diagram
SYNCHRONOUS
RECTIFIED BUCK
CHANNEL
VSEN
PWM 1
PWM 2
SYNCHRONOUS
RECTIFIED BUCK
CHANNEL
MICROPROCESSOR
HIP6311
PWM 3
PWM 4
VID
SYNCHRONOUS
RECTIFIED BUCK
CHANNEL
SYNCHRONOUS
RECTIFIED BUCK
CHANNEL
Functional Pin Description
converter. Pulling this pin to ground disables the converter
and three states the PWM outputs. See Figure 10.
VID4 1
20 VCC
VID3 2
19 PGOOD
VID2 3
18 PWM4
VID1 4
17 ISEN4
VID0 5
16 ISEN1
VSEN (Pin 10)
COMP 6
15 PWM1
Power good monitor input. Connect to the microprocessorCORE voltage.
FB 7
14 PWM2
FS/DIS 8
13 ISEN2
GND 9
12 ISEN3
VSEN 10
11 PWM3
VID4 (Pin 1), VID3 (Pin 2), VID2 (Pin 3), VID1 (Pin 4)
and VID0 (Pin 5)
Voltage Identification inputs from microprocessor. These pins
respond to TTL and 3.3V logic signals. The HIP6311 decodes
VID bits to establish the output voltage. See Table 1.
COMP (Pin 6)
Output of the internal error amplifier. Connect this pin to the
external feedback and compensation network.
FB (Pin 7)
Inverting input of the internal error amplifier.
GND (Pin 9)
Bias and reference ground. All signals are referenced to this
pin.
PWM1 (Pin 15), PWM2 (Pin 14), PWM3 (Pin 11) and
PWM4 (Pin 18)
PWM outputs for each driven channel in use. Connect these
pins to the PWM input of a HIP6601/2/3 driver. For systems
which use 3 channels, connect PWM4 high. Two channel
systems connect PWM3 and PWM4 high.
ISEN1 (Pin 16), ISEN2 (Pin 13), ISEN3 (Pin 12) and
ISEN4 (Pin 17)
Current sense inputs from the individual converter channel’s
phase nodes. Unused sense lines MUST be left open.
PGOOD (Pin 19)
Power good. This pin provides a logic-high signal when the
microprocessor CORE voltage (VSEN pin) is within specified
limits and Soft-Start has timed out.
VCC (Pin 20)
FS/DIS (Pin 8)
Channel frequency, FSW, select and disable. A resistor from
this pin to ground sets the switching frequency of the
3
Bias supply. Connect this pin to a 5V supply.
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Typical Application - 2 Phase Converter Using HIP6601 Gate Drivers
+12V
BOOT
VIN = +5V
PVCC
UGATE
+5V
VCC
PWM
PHASE
DRIVER
HIP6601
COMP
FB
LGATE
GND
VCC
VSEN
+VCORE
PWM4
PGOOD
PWM3
VID4
PWM2
VID3
PWM1
VID2
VID1
+12V
BOOT
VIN = +5V
PVCC
UGATE
MAIN
CONTROL
HIP6311
PHASE
VCC
VID0
FS/DIS
ISEN4
NC
ISEN3
NC
PWM
DRIVER
HIP6601
LGATE
GND
ISEN2
GND
ISEN1
4
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Typical Application - 4 Phase Converter Using HIP6602 Gate Drivers
BOOT1
+12V
VIN = +12V
UGATE1
L01
VCC
PHASE1
LGATE1
+5V
DUAL
DRIVER
HIP6602
FB
PVCC
BOOT2
COMP
+5V
VIN +12V
VCC
VSEN
UGATE2
L02
ISEN1
PGOOD
PWM1
VID4
PWM2
VID3
ISEN2
VID2
VID1
PHASE2
PWM1
PWM2
LGATE2
GND
MAIN
CONTROL
HIP6311
+VCORE
VID0
ISEN3
FS/DIS
PWM3
PWM4
GND
+12V
BOOT3
VIN+12V
ISEN4
UGATE3
L03
VCC
PHASE3
LGATE3
DUAL
DRIVER
HIP6602
PVCC
BOOT4
UGATE4
PWM3
+5V
VIN +12V
L04
PHASE4
PWM4
LGATE4
GND
5
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Thermal Information
Supply Voltage, VCC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .+7V
Input, Output, or I/O Voltage . . . . . . . . . . GND -0.3V to VCC + 0.3V
ESD Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5KV
Thermal Resistance (Typical, Note 1)
JA (°C/W)
SOIC Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65
Maximum Junction Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150°C
Maximum Storage Temperature Range . . . . . . . . . . . -65°C to 150°C
Maximum Lead Temperature (Soldering 10s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300°C
(SOIC - Lead Tips Only)
Recommended Operating Conditions
Supply Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . +5V 5%
Ambient Temperature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0°C to 70°C
CAUTION: Stress above those listed in “Absolute Maximum Ratings” may cause permanent damage to the device. This is a stress only rating and operation of the
device at these or any other conditions above those indicated in the operational section of this specification is not implied.
NOTE:
1. JA is measured with the component mounted on a high effective thermal conductivity test board in free air. See Tech Brief 379 for details.
Electrical Specifications
Operating Conditions: VCC = 5V, TA = 0°C to 70°C, Unless Otherwise Specified
PARAMETER
TEST CONDITIONS
MIN
TYP
MAX
UNITS
-
10
15
mA
INPUT SUPPLY POWER
Input Supply Current
RT = 100k, Active and Disabled Maximum Limit
POR (Power-On Reset) Threshold
VCC Rising
4.25
4.38
4.5
V
VCC Falling
3.75
3.88
4.00
V
System Accuracy
Percent system deviation from programmed VID Codes
-0.8
-
0.8
%
DAC (VID0 - VID4) Input Low Voltage
DAC Programming Input Low Threshold Voltage
-
-
0.8
V
DAC (VID0 - VID4) Input High Voltage
DAC Programming Input High Threshold Voltage
2.0
-
-
V
VID Pull-Up
VIDx = 0V or VIDx = 3V
10
20
40
A
Frequency, FSW
RT = 100k, 1%
245
275
305
kHz
Adjustment Range
See Figure 10
0.05
-
1.5
MHz
Disable Voltage
Maximum voltage at FS/DIS to disable controller. IFS/DIS = 1mA.
-
-
1.0
V
DC Gain
RL = 10K to ground
-
72
-
dB
Gain-Bandwidth Product
CL = 100pF, RL = 10K to ground
-
18
-
MHz
Slew Rate
CL = 100pF, Load = 400A
-
5.3
-
V/s
Maximum Output Voltage
Load = 400A
3.6
4.1
-
V
Minimum Output Voltage
Load = -400A
-
0.16
0.5
V
Full Scale Input Current
-
50
-
A
Over-Current Trip Level
-
82.5
-
A
REFERENCE AND DAC
CHANNEL GENERATOR
ERROR AMPLIFIER
ISEN
POWER GOOD MONITOR
Under-Voltage Threshold
VSEN Rising
-
0.92
-
VDAC
Under-Voltage Threshold
VSEN Falling
-
0.90
-
VDAC
PGOOD Low Output Voltage
IPGOOD = 4mA
-
0.18
0.4
V
1.12
1.15
1.2
VDAC
-
2
-
%
PROTECTION
Over-Voltage Threshold
VSEN Rising
Percent Over-Voltage Hysteresis
VSEN Falling after Over-Voltage
6
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
RIN
FB
VIN
HIP6311
ERROR
AMPLIFIER
+
COMPARATOR
CORRECTION

+
-
Q1
PWM
CIRCUIT
+
L01
PWM1
HIP6601
IL1
-
Q2
PHASE
PROGRAMMABLE
REFERENCE
DAC
+

CURRENT
ISEN1
SENSING
I AVERAGE
CURRENT
AVERAGING
VCORE
+

+
RISEN1
CURRENT
ISEN2
SENSING
CORRECTION
RLOAD
VIN
PHASE
-

COUT
RISEN2
COMPARATOR
+
-
Q3
PWM
CIRCUIT
L02
PWM2
HIP6601
IL2
Q4
FIGURE 1. SIMPLIFIED BLOCK DIAGRAM OF THE HIP6311 VOLTAGE AND CURRENT CONTROL LOOPS FOR A TWO POWER
CHANNEL REGULATOR
Operation
Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the voltage regulation
and current control loops. Both voltage and current feedback
are used to precisely regulate voltage and tightly control
output currents, IL1 and IL2, of the two power channels. The
voltage loop comprises the Error Amplifier, Comparators,
gate drivers and output MOSFETS. The Error Amplifier is
essentially connected as a voltage follower that has as an
input, the Programmable Reference DAC and an output that
is the CORE voltage.
Voltage Loop
Feedback from the CORE voltage is applied via resistor RIN
to the inverting input of the Error Amplifier. This signal can
drive the Error Amplifier output either high or low, depending
upon the CORE voltage. Low CORE voltage makes the
amplifier output move towards a higher output voltage level.
Amplifier output voltage is applied to the positive inputs of
the Comparators via the Correction summing networks. Outof-phase sawtooth signals are applied to the two
Comparators inverting inputs. Increasing Error Amplifier
7
voltage results in increased Comparator output duty cycle.
This increased duty cycle signal is passed through the PWM
CIRCUIT with no phase reversal and on to the HIP6601,
again with no phase reversal for gate drive to the upper
MOSFETs, Q1 and Q3. Increased duty cycle or ON time for
the MOSFET transistors results in increased output voltage
to compensate for the low output voltage sensed.
Current Loop
The current control loop works in a similar fashion to the
voltage control loop, but with current control information
applied individually to each channel’s Comparator. The
information used for this control is the voltage that is
developed across rDS(ON) of each lower MOSFET, Q2 and
Q4, when they are conducting. A single resistor converts and
scales the voltage across the MOSFETs to a current that is
applied to the Current Sensing circuit within the HIP6311.
Output from these sensing circuits is applied to the current
averaging circuit. Each PWM channel receives the
difference current signal from the summing circuit that
compares the average sensed current to the individual
channel current. When a power channel’s current is greater
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
than the average current, the signal applied via the summing
Correction circuit to the Comparator, reduces the output
pulse width of the Comparator to compensate for the
detected “above average” current in that channel.
Droop Compensation
In addition to control of each power channel’s output current,
the average channel current is also used to provide CORE
voltage “droop” compensation. Average full channel current
is defined as 50A. By selecting an input resistor, RIN, the
amount of voltage droop required at full load current can be
programmed. The average current driven into the FB pin
results in a voltage increase across resistor RIN that is in the
direction to make the Error Amplifier “see” a higher voltage
at the inverting input, resulting in the Error Amplifier
adjusting the output voltage lower. The voltage developed
across RIN is equal to the “droop” voltage. See the “Current
Sensing and Balancing” section for more details.
Applications and Convertor Start-Up
Each PWM power channel’s current is regulated. This
enables the PWM channels to accurately share the load
current for enhanced reliability. The HIP6601, HIP6602 or
HIP6603 MOSFET driver interfaces with the HIP6311. For
more information, see the HIP6601, HIP6602 or HIP6603
data sheets.
The HIP6311 is capable of controlling up to 4 PWM power
channels. Connecting unused PWM outputs to VCC
automatically sets the number of channels. The phase
relationship between the channels is 360o/number of active
PWM channels. For example, for three channel operation,
the PWM outputs are separated by 120o . Figure 2 shows the
PWM output signals for a four channel system.
PWM 1
PWM 2
PWM 3
PWM 4
FIGURE 2. FOUR PHASE PWM OUTPUT AT 500kHz
Power supply ripple frequency is determined by the channel
frequency, FSW, multiplied by the number of active channels.
8
For example, if the channel frequency is set to 250kHz and
there are three phases, the ripple frequency is 750kHz.
The IC monitors and precisely regulates the CORE voltage
of a microprocessor. After initial start-up, the controller also
provides protection for the load and the power supply. The
following section discusses these features.
Initialization
The HIP6311 usually operates from an ATX power supply.
Many functions are initiated by the rising supply voltage to the
VCC pin of the HIP6311. Oscillator, Sawtooth Generator, SoftStart and other functions are initialized during this interval.
These circuits are controlled by POR, Power-On Reset. During
this interval, the PWM outputs are driven to a three state
condition that makes these outputs essentially open. This state
results in no gate drive to the output MOSFETs.
Once the VCC voltage reaches 4.375V (+125mV), a voltage
level to insure proper internal function, the PWM outputs are
enabled and the Soft-Start sequence is initiated. If for any
reason, the VCC voltage drops below 3.875V (+125mV). the
POR circuit shuts the converter down and again three states
the PWM outputs.
Soft-Start
After the POR function is completed with VCC reaching
4.375V, the Soft-Start sequence is initiated. Soft-Start, by its
slow rise in CORE voltage from zero, avoids an over-current
condition by slowly charging the discharged output
capacitors. This voltage rise is initiated by an internal DAC
that slowly raises the reference voltage to the error amplifier
input. The voltage rise is controlled by the oscillator
frequency and the DAC within the HIP6311, therefore, the
output voltage is effectively regulated as it rises to the final
programmed CORE voltage value.
For the first 32 PWM switching cycles, the DAC output
remains inhibited and the PWM outputs remain three stated.
From the 33rd cycle and for another, approximately 150
cycles the PWM output remains low, clamping the lower
output MOSFETs to ground, see Figure 3. The time variability
is due to the Error Amplifier, Sawtooth Generator and
Comparators moving into their active regions. After this short
interval, the PWM outputs are enabled and increment the
PWM pulse width from zero duty cycle to operational pulse
width, thus allowing the output voltage to slowly reach the
CORE voltage. The CORE voltage will reach its programmed
value before the 2048 cycles, but the PGOOD output will not
be initiated until the 2048th PWM switching cycle.
The Soft-Start time or delay time, DT = 2048/FSW. For an
oscillator frequency, FSW, of 200kHz, the first 32 cycles or
160s, the PWM outputs are held in a three state level as
explained above. After this period and a short interval
described above, the PWM outputs are initiated and the
voltage rises in 10.08ms, for a total delay time DT of
10.24ms.
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Figure 3 shows the start-up sequence as initiated by a fast
rising 5V supply, VCC, applied to the HIP6311. Note the short
rise to the three state level in PWM 1 output during first 32
PWM cycles.
12V ATX
SUPPLY
PGOOD
PWM 1
OUTPUT
VCORE
DELAY TIME
PGOOD
VCORE
5V
VCC
VIN = 12V
FIGURE 3. START-UP OF 4 PHASE SYSTEM OPERATING AT
500kHz
Figure 4 shows the waveforms when the regulator is
operating at 200kHz. Note that the Soft-Start duration is a
function of the Channel Frequency as explained previously.
Also note the pulses on the COMP terminal. These pulses
are the current correction signal feeding into the comparator
input (see the Block Diagram on page 2.)
V COMP
DELAY TIME
PGOOD
VCORE
5V
VCC
VIN = 12V
FIGURE 4. START-UP OF 4 PHASE SYSTEM OPERATING AT
200kHz
Figure 5 shows the regulator operating from an ATX supply.
In this figure, note the slight rise in PGOOD as the 5V supply
rises.The PGOOD output stage is made up of NMOS and
PMOS transistors. On the rising VCC, the PMOS device
becomes active slightly before the NMOS transistor pulls
“down”, generating the slight rise in the PGOOD voltage.
9
5 V ATX
SUPPLY
VIN = 5V, CORE LOAD CURRENT = 31A
FREQUENCY 200kHz
ATX SUPPLY ACTIVATED BY ATX “PS-ON PIN”
FIGURE 5. SUPPLY POWERED BY ATX SUPPLY
Note that Figure 5 shows the 12V gate driver voltage
available before the 5V supply to the HIP6311 has reached
its threshold level. If conditions were reversed and the 5V
supply was to rise first, the start-up sequence would be
different. In this case the HIP6303 will sense an over-current
condition due to charging the output capacitors. The supply
will then restart and go through the normal Soft-Start cycle.
Fault Protection
The HIP6311 protects the microprocessor and the entire
power system from damaging stress levels. Within the
HIP6311 both Over-Voltage and Over-Current circuits are
incorporated to protect the load and regulator.
Over-Voltage
The VSEN pin is connected to the microprocessor CORE
voltage. A CORE over-voltage condition is detected when
the VSEN pin goes more than 15% above the programmed
VID level.
The over-voltage condition is latched, disabling normal PWM
operation, and causing PGOOD to go low. The latch can
only be reset by lowering and returning VCC high to initiate a
POR and Soft-Start sequence.
During a latched over-voltage, the PWM outputs will be
driven either low or three state, depending upon the VSEN
input. PWM outputs are driven low when the VSEN pin
detects that the CORE voltage is 15% above the
programmed VID level. This condition drives the PWM
outputs low, resulting in the lower or synchronous rectifier
MOSFETS to conduct and shunt the CORE voltage to
ground to protect the load.
If after this event, the CORE voltage falls below the overvoltage limit (plus some hysteresis), the PWM outputs will
three state. The HIP6601 family drivers pass the three state
information along, and shuts off both upper and lower
MOSFETs. This prevents “dumping” of the output capacitors
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
back through the lower MOSFETs, avoiding a possibly
destructive ringing of the capacitors and output inductors. If
the conditions that caused the over-voltage still persist, the
PWM outputs will be cycled between three state and VCORE
clamped to ground, as a hysteretic shunt regulator.
Under-Voltage
The VSEN pin also detects when the CORE voltage falls more
than 10% below the VID programmed level. This causes
PGOOD to go low, but has no other effect on operation and is
not latched. There is also hysteresis in this detection point.
CORE Voltage Programming
The voltage identification pins (VID0, VID1, VID3, and VID4)
set the CORE output voltage. Each VID pin is pulled to VCC
by an internal 20A current source and accepts opencollector/open-drain/open-switch-to-ground or standard lowvoltage TTL or CMOS signals.
Table 1 shows the nominal DAC voltage as a function of the
VID codes. The power supply system is 0.8% accurate over
the operating temperature and voltage range.
TABLE 1. VOLTAGE IDENTIFICATION CODES
Over-Current
In the event of an over-current condition, the over-current
protection circuit reduces the average current delivered to
less than 25% of the current limit. When an over-current
condition is detected, the controller forces all PWM outputs
into a three state mode. This condition results in the gate
driver removing drive to the output stages.The HIP6311 goes
into a wait delay timing cycle that is equal to the Soft-Start
ramp time. PGOOD also goes “low” during this time due to
VSEN going below its threshold voltage.To lower the
average output dissipation, the Soft-Start initial wait time is
increased from 32 to 2048 cycles, then the Soft-Start ramp is
initiated. At a PWM frequency of 200kHz, for instance, an
over-current detection would cause a dead time of 10.24ms,
then a ramp of 10.08ms.
At the end of the delay, PWM outputs are restarted and the
Soft-Start ramp is initiated. If a short is present at that time,
the cycle is repeated. This is the hiccup mode.
Figure 6 shows the supply shorted under operation and the
hiccup operating mode described above. Note that due to
the high short circuit current, over-current is detected before
completion of the start-up sequence so the delay is not quite
as long as the normal Soft-Start cycle.
SHORT APPLIED HERE
PGOOD
SHORT
CURRENT
50A/Div
HICCUP MODE. SUPPLY POWERED BY ATX SUPPLY
CORE LOAD CURRENT = 31A, 5V LOAD = 5A
SUPPLY FREQUENCY = 200kHz, V IN = 12V
ATX SUPPLY ACTIVATED BY ATX “PS-ON PIN”
FIGURE 6. SHORT APPLIED TO SUPPLY AFTER POWER-UP
10
VID4
VID3
VID2
VID1
VID0
VDAC
1
1
1
1
1
Off
1
1
1
1
0
1.100
1
1
1
0
1
1.125
1
1
1
0
0
1.150
1
1
0
1
1
1.175
1
1
0
1
0
1.200
1
1
0
0
1
1.225
1
1
0
0
0
1.250
1
0
1
1
1
1.275
1
0
1
1
0
1.300
1
0
1
0
1
1.325
1
0
1
0
0
1.350
1
0
0
1
1
1.375
1
0
0
1
0
1.400
1
0
0
0
1
1.425
1
0
0
0
0
1.450
0
1
1
1
1
1.475
0
1
1
1
0
1.500
0
1
1
0
1
1.525
0
1
1
0
0
1.550
0
1
0
1
1
1.575
0
1
0
1
0
1.600
0
1
0
0
1
1.625
0
1
0
0
0
1.650
0
0
1
1
1
1.675
0
0
1
1
0
1.700
0
0
1
0
1
1.725
0
0
1
0
0
1.750
0
0
0
1
1
1.775
0
0
0
1
0
1.800
0
0
0
0
1
1.825
0
0
0
0
0
1.850
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
RIN
RFB
Cc
COMP
FB
VIN
HIP6311
+
CORRECTION
+
-
L01
Q1
PWM
CIRCUIT
PWM
HIP6601
IL
Q2
+
-
PHASE
DIFFERENCE
+
REFERENCE
DAC
VCORE
RLOAD
COMPARATOR
GENERATOR
COUT
SAWTOOTH
ERROR
AMPLIFIER
ISEN
CURRENT
RISEN
SENSING
CURRENT
SENSING
FROM
OTHER
CHANNELS
TO OTHER
CHANNELS
AVERAGING
TO OVER
CURRENT
TRIP
+
ONLY ONE OUTPUT
STAGE SHOWN
INDUCTOR
CURRENT(S)
FROM
OTHER
CHANNELS
COMPARATOR
REFERENCE
FIGURE 7. SIMPLIFIED FUNCTIONAL BLOCK DIAGRAM SHOWING CURRENT AND VOLTAGE SAMPLING
Current Sensing and Balancing
Overview
The HIP6311 samples the on-state voltage drop across each
synchronous rectifier FET, Q2, as an indication of the
inductor current in that phase, see Figure 7. Neglecting AC
effects (to be discussed later), the voltage drop across Q2 is
simply rDS(ON)(Q2) x inductor current (IL). Note that IL, the
inductor current, is either 1/2, 1/3, or 1/4 of the total current
(ILT), depending on how many phases are in use.
The voltage at Q2’s drain, the PHASE node, is applied to the
RISEN resistor to develop the IISEN current to the HIP6311
ISEN pin. This pin is held at virtual ground, so the current
through RISEN is IL x rDS(ON)(Q2) / RISEN.
The IISEN current provides information to perform the
following functions:
1. Detection of an over-current condition
2. Reduce the regulator output voltage with increasing load
current (droop)
3. Balance the IL currents in multiple channels
11
Over-Current, Selecting RISEN
The current detected through the RISEN resistor is averaged
with the current(s) detected in the other 1, 2, or 3 channels.
The averaged current is compared with a trimmed, internally
generated current, and used to detect an over-current
condition.
The nominal current through the RISEN resistor should be
50A at full output load current, and the nominal trip point for
over-current detection is 165% of that value, or 82.5A.
Therefore, RISEN = IL x rDS(ON) (Q2) / 50A.
For a full load of 25A per phase, and an rDS(ON) (Q2) of
4m, RISEN = 2k.
The over-current trip point would be 165% of 25A, or ~ 41A
per phase. The RISEN value can be adjusted to change the
over-current trip point, but it is suggested to stay within
25%of nominal.
Droop, Selection of RIN
The average of the currents detected through the RISEN
resistors is also steered to the FB pin. There is no DC return
path connected to the FB pin except for RIN, so the average
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
With a high dv/dt load transient, typical of high performance
microprocessors, the largest deviations in output voltage
occur at the leading and trailing edges of the load transient.
In order to fully utilize the output-voltage tolerance range, the
output voltage is positioned in the upper half of the range
when the output is unloaded and in the lower half of the
range when the controller is under full load. This droop
compensation allows larger transient voltage deviations and
thus reduces the size and cost of the output filter
components.
RIN should be selected to give the desired “droop” voltage at
the normal full load current 50A applied through the RISEN
resistor (or at a different full load current if adjusted as under
“Over-Current, Selecting RISEN” above).
iPK-PK = (VIN x VCORE - VCORE2) / (L x FSW x VIN)
Where: VCORE
VIN
L
FSW
= DC value of the output or VID voltage
= DC value of the input or supply voltage
= value of the inductor
= switching frequency
Example: For VCORE = 1.6V,
VIN = 12V,
L = 1.3H,
FSW = 250kHz,
Then iPK-PK = 4.3A
25
20
AMPERES
current creates a voltage drop across RIN. This drop
increases the apparent VCORE voltage with increasing load
current, causing the system to decrease VCORE to maintain
balance at the FB pin. This is the desired “droop” voltage
used to maintain VCORE within limits under transient
conditions.
15
10
RIN = Vdroop/50A
5
For a Vdroop of 80mV, RIN = 1.6k
0
The AC feedback components, RFB and Cc, are scaled in
relation to RIN.
Current Balancing
The detected currents are also used to balance the phase
currents.
FIGURE 8. TWO CHANNEL MULTIPHASE SYSTEM WITH
CURRENT BALANCING DISABLED
Each phase’s current is compared to the average of all
phase currents, and the difference is used to create an offset
in that phase’s PWM comparator. The offset is in a direction
to reduce the imbalance.
Figures 8 and 9 show the inductor current of a two phase
system without and with current balancing.
20
AMPERES
The balancing circuit can not make up for a difference in
rDS(ON) between synchronous rectifiers. If a FET has a
higher rDS(ON), the current through that phase will be
reduced.
25
15
10
5
0
Inductor Current
The inductor current in each phase of a multi-phase Buck
converter has two components. There is a current equal to
the load current divided by the number of phases (ILT / n),
and a sawtooth current, (iPK-PK) due to switching. The
sawtooth component is dependent on the size of the
inductors, the switching frequency of each phase, and the
values of the input and output voltage. Ignoring secondary
effects, such as series resistance, the peak to peak value of
the sawtooth current can be described by:
12
FIGURE 9. TWO CHANNEL MULTIPHASE SYSTEM WITH
CURRENT BALANCING ENABLED
The inductor, or load current, flows alternately from VIN
through Q1 and from ground through Q2. The HIP6311
samples the on-state voltage drop across each Q2 transistor
to indicate the inductor current in that phase. The voltage
drop is sampled 1/3 of a switching period, 1/FSW, after Q1 is
turned OFF and Q2 is turned on. Because of the sawtooth
current component, the sampled current is different from the
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
ISAMPLE = ILT / n + (VINVCORE - 3VCORE2) / (6L x FSW x
VIN)
Where: ILT = total load current
n = the number of channels
Example: Using the previously given conditions, and
For ILT = 100A,
n =4
Then ISAMPLE = 25.49A
500
200
100
50
20
10
As discussed previously, the voltage drop across each Q2
transistor at the point in time when current is sampled is
rDSON (Q2) x ISAMPLE. The voltage at Q2’s drain, the
PHASE node, is applied through the RISEN resistor to the
HIP6311 ISEN pin. This pin is held at virtual ground, so the
current into ISEN is:
ISENSE = ISAMPLE x rDS(ON) (Q2) / RISEN.
RIsen
1,000
RT (k)
average current per phase. Neglecting secondary effects,
the sampled current (ISAMPLE) can be related to the load
current (ILT) by:
= ISAMPLE x rDS(ON) (Q2) / 50A
5
2
1
10
20
50
100
200
500 1,000 2,000 5,000 10,000
CHANNEL OSCILLATOR FREQUENCY, FSW (kHz)
FIGURE 10. RESISTANCE RT vs FREQUENCY
Example: From the previous conditions,
Layout Considerations
where ILT
= 100A,
ISAMPLE
= 25.49A,
rDS(ON) (Q2)
= 4m
Then: RISEN
= 2.04K and
ICURRENT TRIP
= 165%
Short circuit ILT
= 165A.
MOSFETs switch very fast and efficiently. The speed with
which the current transitions from one device to another
causes voltage spikes across the interconnecting
impedances and parasitic circuit elements. These voltage
spikes can degrade efficiency, radiate noise into the circuit
and lead to device over-voltage stress. Careful component
layout and printed circuit design minimizes the voltage
spikes in the converter. Consider, as an example, the turnoff
transition of the upper PWM MOSFET. Prior to turnoff, the
upper MOSFET was carrying channel current. During the
turnoff, current stops flowing in the upper MOSFET and is
picked up by the lower MOSFET. Any inductance in the
switched current path generates a large voltage spike during
the switching interval. Careful component selection, tight
layout of the critical components, and short, wide circuit
traces minimize the magnitude of voltage spikes. Contact
Intersil for evaluation board drawings of the component
placement and printed circuit board.
Channel Frequency Oscillator
The channel oscillator frequency is set by placing a resistor,
RT, to ground from the FS/DIS pin. Figure 10 is a curve
showing the relationship between frequency, FSW, and
resistor RT. To avoid pickup by the FS/DIS pin, it is important
to place this resistor next to the pin. If this pin is also used to
disable the converter, it is also important to locate the pulldown device next to this pin.
There are two sets of critical components in a DC-DC
converter using a HIP6311 controller and a HIP6601 gate
driver. The power components are the most critical because
they switch large amounts of energy. Next are small signal
components that connect to sensitive nodes or supply critical
bypassing current and signal coupling.
The power components should be placed first. Locate the
input capacitors close to the power switches. Minimize the
length of the connections between the input capacitors, CIN,
and the power switches. Locate the output inductors and
output capacitors between the MOSFETs and the load.
Locate the gate driver close to the MOSFETs.
13
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
multiple high quality capacitors of different size and dielectric
are paralleled to meet the design constraints.
The critical small components include the bypass capacitors
for VCC and PVCC on the gate driver ICs. Locate the
bypass capacitor, CBP, for the HIP6311 controller close to
the device. It is especially important to locate the resistors
associated with the input to the amplifiers close to their
respective pins, since they represent the input to feedback
amplifiers. Resistor RT, that sets the oscillator frequency
should also be located next to the associated pin. It is
especially important to place the RSEN resistor(s) at the
respective terminals of the HIP6311.
Modern microprocessors produce severe transient load
rates. High frequency capacitors supply the initially transient
current and slow the load rate-of-change seen by the bulk
capacitors. The bulk filter capacitor values are generally
determined by the ESR (effective series resistance) and
voltage rating requirements rather than actual capacitance
requirements.
High frequency decoupling capacitors should be placed as
close to the power pins of the load as physically possible. Be
careful not to add inductance in the circuit board wiring that
could cancel the usefulness of these low inductance
components. Consult with the manufacturer of the load on
specific decoupling requirements.
A multi-layer printed circuit board is recommended. Figure 11
shows the connections of the critical components for one
output channel of the converter. Note that capacitors CIN and
COUT could each represent numerous physical capacitors.
Dedicate one solid layer, usually the middle layer of the PC
board, for a ground plane and make all critical component
ground connections with vias to this layer. Dedicate another
solid layer as a power plane and break this plane into smaller
islands of common voltage levels. Keep the metal runs from
the PHASE terminal to inductor LO1 short. The power plane
should support the input power and output power nodes. Use
copper filled polygons on the top and bottom circuit layers for
the phase nodes. Use the remaining printed circuit layers for
small signal wiring. The wiring traces from the driver IC to the
MOSFET gate and source should be sized to carry at least
one ampere of current.
Use only specialized low-ESR capacitors intended for
switching-regulator applications for the bulk capacitors. The
bulk capacitor’s ESR determines the output ripple voltage
and the initial voltage drop following a high slew-rate
transient’s edge. In most cases, multiple capacitors of small
case size perform better than a single large case capacitor.
Bulk capacitor choices include aluminum electrolytic, OSCon, Tantalum and even ceramic dielectrics. An aluminum
electrolytic capacitor’s ESR value is related to the case size
with lower ESR available in larger case sizes. However, the
equivalent series inductance (ESL) of these capacitors
increases with case size and can reduce the usefulness of
the capacitor to high slew-rate transient loading.
Unfortunately, ESL is not a specified parameter. Consult the
capacitor manufacturer and measure the capacitor’s
impedance with frequency to select a suitable component.
Component Selection Guidelines
Output Capacitor Selection
The output capacitor is selected to meet both the dynamic
load requirements and the voltage ripple requirements. The
load transient for the microprocessor CORE is characterized
by high slew rate (di/dt) current demands. In general,
+5VIN
USE INDIVIDUAL METAL RUNS
FOR EACH CHANNEL TO HELP
ISOLATE OUTPUT STAGES
+12V
CBP
LOCATE NEXT TO IC PIN(S)
VCC
CBP
PWM
VCC PVCC
CBOOT
HIP6311
RFB
LOCATE NEXT
TO FB PIN
LOCATE NEAR TRANSISTOR
LO1
HIP6601
VCORE
PHASE
COMP FS/DIS
CT
CIN
COUT
RT
FB
LOCATE NEXT TO IC PIN
RSEN
RIN
VSEN
ISEN
KEY
ISLAND ON POWER PLANE LAYER
ISLAND ON CIRCUIT PLANE LAYER
VIA CONNECTION TO GROUND PLANE
FIGURE 11. PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD POWER PLANES AND ISLANDS
14
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Output Inductor Selection
The output inductor of each power channel controls the
ripple current. The control IC is stable for channel ripple
current (peak-to-peak) up to twice the average current. A
single channel’s ripple current is approximately:
V IN – V OUT V OUT
I = --------------------------------  ---------------V IN
F SW  L
SINGLE
CHANNEL
0.8
VO / (LX FSW)
RIPPLE CURRENT (APEAK-PEAK)
1.0
2 CHANNEL
0.4
3 CHANNEL
0.2
4 CHANNEL
0.1
0.3
2 CHANNEL
0.2
3 CHANNEL
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
DUTY CYCLE (VO/VIN)
FIGURE 12. RIPPLE CURRENT vs DUTY CYCLE
Small values of output inductance can cause excessive
power dissipation. The HIP6303 is designed for stable
operation for ripple currents up to twice the load current.
However, for this condition, the RMS current is 115% above
the value shown in the following MOSFET Selection and
Considerations section. With all else fixed, decreasing the
inductance could increase the power dissipated in the
MOSFETs by 30%.
Input Capacitor Selection
The important parameters for the bulk input capacitors are
the voltage rating and the RMS current rating. For reliable
operation, select bulk input capacitors with voltage and
current ratings above the maximum input voltage and largest
RMS current required by the circuit. The capacitor voltage
rating should be at least 1.25 times greater than the
maximum input voltage and a voltage rating of 1.5 times is a
conservative guideline. The RMS current required for a
multi-phase converter can be approximated with the aid of
Figure 13.
15
4 CHANNEL
0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
DUTY CYCLE (VO/VIN)
FIGURE 13. CURRENT MULTIPLIER vs DUTY CYCLE
First determine the operating duty ratio as the ratio of the
output voltage divided by the input voltage. Find the Current
Multiplier from the curve with the appropriate power
channels. Multiply the current multiplier by the full load
output current. The resulting value is the RMS current rating
required by the input capacitor.
Use a mix of input bypass capacitors to control the voltage
overshoot across the MOSFETs. Use ceramic capacitance
for the high frequency decoupling and bulk capacitors to
supply the RMS current. Small ceramic capacitors should be
placed very close to the drain of the upper MOSFET to
suppress the voltage induced in the parasitic circuit
impedances.
0.6
0
SINGLE
CHANNEL
0.4
0
The current from multiple channels tend to cancel each other
and reduce the total ripple current. Figure 12 gives the total
ripple current as a function of duty cycle, normalized to the
parameter  Vo    LxF SW  at zero duty cycle. To determine
the total ripple current from the number of channels and the
duty cycle, multiply the y-axis value by  Vo    LxF SW  .
0
CURRENT MULTIPLIER
0.5
One of the parameters limiting the converter’s response to a
load transient is the time required to change the inductor
current. Small inductors in a multi-phase converter reduces
the response time without significant increases in total ripple
current.
For bulk capacitance, several electrolytic capacitors
(Panasonic HFQ series or Nichicon PL series or Sanyo
MV-GX or equivalent) may be needed. For surface mount
designs, solid tantalum capacitors can be used, but caution
must be exercised with regard to the capacitor surge current
rating. These capacitors must be capable of handling the
surge-current at power-up. The TPS series available from
AVX, and the 593D series from Sprague are both surge
current tested.
MOSFET Selection and Considerations
In high-current PWM applications, the MOSFET power
dissipation, package selection and heatsink are the
dominant design factors. The power dissipation includes two
loss components; conduction loss and switching loss. These
losses are distributed between the upper and lower
MOSFETs according to duty factor (see the following
equations). The conduction losses are the main component
of power dissipation for the lower MOSFETs, Q2 and Q4 of
Figure 1. Only the upper MOSFETs, Q1 and Q3 have
significant switching losses, since the lower device turns on
and off into near zero voltage.
The equations assume linear voltage-current transitions and
do not model power loss due to the reverse-recovery of the
lower MOSFETs body diode. The gate-charge losses are
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
dissipated by the Driver IC and don't heat the MOSFETs.
However, large gate-charge increases the switching time,
tSW which increases the upper MOSFET switching losses.
Ensure that both MOSFETs are within their maximum
junction temperature at high ambient temperature by
calculating the temperature rise according to package
thermal-resistance specifications. A separate heatsink may
be necessary depending upon MOSFET power, package
type, ambient temperature and air flow.
2
I O  r DS  ON   V OUT I O  V IN  t SW  F SW
P UPPER = ------------------------------------------------------------ + ---------------------------------------------------------V IN
2
2
I O  r DS  ON    V IN – V OUT 
P LOWER = --------------------------------------------------------------------------------V IN
A diode, anode to ground, may be placed across Q2 and Q4.
These diodes function as a clamp that catches the negative
inductor swing during the dead time between the turn off of
the lower MOSFETs and the turn on of the upper MOSFETs.
The diodes must be a Schottky type to prevent the lossy
parasitic MOSFET body diode from conducting. It is usually
acceptable to omit the diodes and let the body diodes of the
lower MOSFETs clamp the negative inductor swing, but
efficiency could drop one or two percent as a result. The
diode's rated reverse breakdown voltage must be greater
than the maximum input voltage.
16
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
HIP6311
Small Outline Plastic Packages (SOIC)
M20.3 (JEDEC MS-013-AC ISSUE C)
20 LEAD WIDE BODY SMALL OUTLINE PLASTIC PACKAGE
N
INDEX
AREA
INCHES
H
0.25(0.010) M
B M
E
-B-
1
2
3
L
SEATING PLANE
-A-
h x 45o
A
D
SYMBOL
MIN
MAX
MIN
MAX
NOTES
A
0.0926
0.1043
2.35
2.65
-
A1
0.0040
0.0118
0.10
0.30
-
B
0.014
0.019
0.35
0.49
9
C
0.0091
0.0125
0.23
0.32
-
D
0.4961
0.5118
12.60
13.00
3
E
0.2914
0.2992
7.40
7.60
4
e
-C-
e
µ
A1
B
0.25(0.010) M
C
0.10(0.004)
C A M
B S
MILLIMETERS
0.050 BSC
1.27 BSC
-
H
0.394
0.419
10.00
10.65
-
h
0.010
0.029
0.25
0.75
5
L
0.016
0.050
0.40
1.27
6
N

20
0o
20
8o
0o
7
8o
Rev. 1 1/02
NOTES:
1. Symbols are defined in the “MO Series Symbol List” in Section
2.2 of Publication Number 95.
2. Dimensioning and tolerancing per ANSI Y14.5M-1982.
3. Dimension “D” does not include mold flash, protrusions or gate
burrs. Mold flash, protrusion and gate burrs shall not exceed
0.15mm (0.006 inch) per side.
4. Dimension “E” does not include interlead flash or protrusions. Interlead flash and protrusions shall not exceed 0.25mm (0.010
inch) per side.
5. The chamfer on the body is optional. If it is not present, a visual
index feature must be located within the crosshatched area.
6. “L” is the length of terminal for soldering to a substrate.
7. “N” is the number of terminal positions.
8. Terminal numbers are shown for reference only.
9. The lead width “B”, as measured 0.36mm (0.014 inch) or greater
above the seating plane, shall not exceed a maximum value of
0.61mm (0.024 inch)
10. Controlling dimension: MILLIMETER. Converted inch dimensions are not necessarily exact.
All Intersil U.S. products are manufactured, assembled and tested utilizing ISO9001 quality systems.
Intersil Corporation’s quality certifications can be viewed at www.intersil.com/design/quality
Intersil products are sold by description only. Intersil Corporation reserves the right to make changes in circuit design, software and/or specifications at any time without
notice. Accordingly, the reader is cautioned to verify that data sheets are current before placing orders. Information furnished by Intersil is believed to be accurate and
reliable. However, no responsibility is assumed by Intersil or its subsidiaries for its use; nor for any infringements of patents or other rights of third parties which may result
from its use. No license is granted by implication or otherwise under any patent or patent rights of Intersil or its subsidiaries.
For information regarding Intersil Corporation and its products, see www.intersil.com
17
FN4817.3
December 27, 2004
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