dm00116372

UM1763
User manual
Description of STLUX385A examples kit
Introduction
This user manual provides complete information for SW developers about a set of guide
examples useful to get familiar developing applications for the STLUX385A digital controller
and its peripherals.
The STLUX385A is an STMicroelectronics® digital device tailored for lighting applications.
The heart of the STLUX is the SMED (“State Machine Event Driven”) technology which
allows the device to operate several independently configurable PWM clocks with up to
1.3 ns resolution. An SMED is a powerful autonomous state machine which is programmed
to react to both external and internal events and may evolve without any software
intervention. The examples provided by this document will help you to understand the
SMEDs and how to program them in your applications. All the examples have been
developed and tested on an STEVAL-ILL068V1 evaluation board.
SMEDs are configured and programmed via the STLUX internal low-power microcontroller
(STM8). This manual describes the whole set of examples provided in this kit.
Reference documents
 For hardware information on the STLUX385A controller and product specific SMED
configuration, please refer to the STLUX385A product datasheet.
 For information on programming, erasing and protection of the internal Flash memory
please refer to the STM8 Flash programming manual (PM0047).
 For information about the debug and SWIM (single-wire interface module) refer to the
STM8 SWIM communication protocol and debug module user manual (UM0470).
 For information on the STM8 core and assembler instruction please refer to the STM8
CPU programming manual (PM0044).
 For information on the SMED configurator please refer to the UM1760 “STLUX™ SMED
configurator 1.0" user manual.
 For information on the STLUX385A peripheral library please refer to the STLUX™
peripheral library user manual (UM1753).
 For information on the STEVAL-ILL068V1 evaluation board please refer to “Design
resources” tab of the STEVAL-ILL068V1 product folder on www.st.com.
June 2014
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Contents
UM1763
Contents
1
Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
2
Examples kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3
Example I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4
Example II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
5
Example III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
6
Example IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
7
Example V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
8
Revision history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
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List of figures
List of figures
Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5.
Figure 6.
Figure 7.
Figure 8.
SMED 0 state machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Example 02 application scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Example 03 application scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
PWM0 constant frequency with variable duty cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
SMED 0 state machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Example 04 application scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
PWM5 variable frequency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
SMED 5 state machine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
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Acronyms
1
UM1763
Acronyms
A list of acronyms used in this document:
Table 1. List of acronyms
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Acronym
Description
ACU
Analog comparator unit
ADC
Analog-to-digital converter
ATM
Auxiliary timer
AWU
Auto wake-up unit
BL
Bootloader - used to load the user program without the emulator
CCO
Configurable clock output
CKC
Clock control unit
CKM
Clock master
CPU
Central processing unit
CSS
Clock security system
DAC
Digital-to-analog converter
DALI
Digital addressable lighting interface
ECC
Error Correction Code
FSM
Finite state machine
FW
Firmware loaded and running on the CPU
GPIO
General purpose input/output
HSE
High-speed external crystal - ceramic resonator
HSI
High-speed internal RC oscillator
I2C
Inter-integrated circuit interface
IAP
In-application programming
ICP
In-circuit programming
ITC
Interrupt controller
IWDG
Independent watchdog
LSI
Low-speed Internal RC oscillator
MCU
Microprocessor central unit
MSC
Miscellaneous
PM
Power management
RFU
Reserved for future use
ROP
Read-out protection
RST
Reset control unit
RTC
Real-time clock
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Acronyms
Table 1. List of acronyms (continued)
Acronym
Description
SMED
State machine event driven
STMR
System timer
SW
Software, is the firmware loaded and running on the CPU (synonymous of FW)
SWI
Clock switch interrupt
SWIM
Single-wire interface module
UART
Universal asynchronous receiver/transmitter
WWDG
Window watchdog
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Examples kit
2
UM1763
Examples kit
This examples kit is composed of five guide examples. These examples are incrementally
built and are thought to be a starting point to get in touch with the STLUX toolset and
libraries for handling the STM8 core, peripherals and SMEDs. All the guide examples can
be tested on the STEVAL-ILL068V1 evaluation board.
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Example I
Example I
This is the first and the simplest example. The aim of the code is to build an equivalent
“Hello World!” application for the STLUX but trying to use also its strength point, the SMEDs.
In a few words the goal of the application is to configure the SMED 0 in order to drive the
output pin toggling at a fixed frequency and fixed duty cycle. As a results on the pin 1, there
will be an output signal toggling with a 50% duty cycle at a 48 KHz frequency.
The aim of the example is also to try to get familiar with the firmware development for the
STLUX and STM8 and learning how to drive peripherals through the APIs included in the
STLUX libraries. For this example in particular, the stlux_clk library APIs are used to
properly configure the SMED clock to the maximum frequency of 96 MHz. The stlux_smed
library APIs are used to start the SMED 0.
Another key component of the STLUX toolset, the STLUX SMED configurator GUI is used
here to set the SMEDs configuration. The designed SMED configuration can also be saved
in a *.prj format file. In particular in this example only the SMED 0 is used and it is
configured according to the scheme in Figure 1 generated using the tool and saved in the
PWM_Smed0.prj file.
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Example I
UM1763
Figure 1. SMED 0 state machine
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4
Example II
Example II
In order to guide you step by step to a more realistic application, we extended the first
example by introducing the use of the system timer and the ADC peripherals in the second
example.
The system timer (STMR) consists of a 16-bit autoreload upcounter driven by
a programmable prescaler. Specific APIs have been created and integrated in the
stlux_stmr library to configure and pilot this timer. Here it is used as a time base to generate
data sampling at a given frequency. The timer clock is prescaled by 4 and an interrupt is
raised each time 200 tics the period event and therefore input data are sampled through the
ADC at a 20 KHz frequency .
The ADC is a 10 bit successive approximation analog-to-digital converter. In this example
four of the possible eight channels (channel 0 to channel 3) are used to sample input data
amplified by a 1.0 gain factor (the other possible value is 4.0). The ADC clock is set to
6 MHz frequency.
The main code properly initializes all the peripherals and clocks and then starts the system
timer and the ADC sampling. It tests the x0 input variable and when it becomes greater then
a given threshold, it starts the SMED 0.
Figure 2. Example 02 application scheme
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Example III
5
UM1763
Example III
The third example furtherly extends the small application described in the second example
adding another timer among the STLUX specific features, the auxiliary timer (AUXTIM).
The auxiliary timer is not a real peripheral but can be considered as a virtual peripheral
that's physically build grouping some functionality already existing in the silicon device and
spread on different IPs to optimize the silicon cost.
Basically it works as a light timer that can be configured to generate interrupts at a set
frequency derived by the system clock. In order to make this functionality easily usable and
configurable, a set of APIs has been built and collected in the stlux_atm library.
The main code properly configures the auxiliary timer to work at a frequency that's
a fraction of the HSI system clock (16 MHz). In particular a frequency of
[16/(8 + 1)] = 1.78 MHz has been chosen to generate interrupts. The interrupt handler only
clears the interrupt status flag and could be a starting point to develop applications where
a specific routine must be performed at a given frequency.
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Example IV
6
Example IV
Figure 3. Example 03 application scheme
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The example IV aims to create an application generating a PWM signal as a function of the
analog input voltage. As shown in Figure 3, the PWM0 will have a fixed frequency of
50 KHz but a variable duty cycle according to the sensed input signal.
In order to dime the input voltage, the shown analog circuit must be implemented and
plugged to the evaluation board.
Figure 4. PWM0 constant frequency with variable duty cycle
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When the input voltage is below the lower threshold set to 200 mV, the PWM0 is OFF. If the
input voltage Vin ranges from 200 mV to 1 V, the PWM0 toggles at a fixed frequency of
50 KHz, but its duty cycle ranges from 2.5% to 97.5% with a 10 ns step leaving, so
a minimum off-time equals to 500 ns. When Vin overcomes the upper threshold set to 1 V,
the PWM0 is OFF. The implemented FSM is shown in Figure 4.
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Example IV
UM1763
Figure 5. SMED 0 state machine
The input voltage measure is performed by the ADC at a given frequency set by the system
timer. The STMR interrupt handler performs the regulation loop reading the Vin sampled
value and computing the PWM0 according to the behavior described above.
The main code properly configures the I/O pins, the ADC, the SMED 0. It also sets the
STMR to work at a frequency that's a fraction of the HSI (16 MHz). In particular a frequency
of 10 KHz has been chosen to generate interrupts. Nothing more is needed as the SMED 0
will autonomously regulate the PWM0 to follow the behavior specified above.
Now when the input voltage falls off of the [200 mV; 1 V] range, the SMED 0 stops. Possible
evolution of this example could be modifying the firmware so that outcoming 1 V, the SMED
0 keeps going on keeping the PWM duty cycle constant. This “protection” is handled using
the same loop regulation or use the input event (CP0 and DAC0 for example) directly on the
SMED.
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Example V
Example V
Figure 6. Example 04 application scheme
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The goal of the fifth example is to learn how to generate a PWM signal as a function of two
comparators. In this case we want to control the PWM5 variable frequency so to keep an
analog output voltage between a high threshold and a low threshold respectively set to
410 mV and 246 mV by CPP2 and CPP3 references.
Figure 7. PWM5 variable frequency
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As shown in Figure 6, in order to keep Vout over 246 mV, PWM5 is turned on when voltage
reaches the low threshold reference sensed by the DAC3 and CPP3. Also keeping Vout
under 410 mV requires the PWM5 to be turned off when voltage hits the high threshold
reference sensed by the DAC2 and CPP2. No more firmware interaction is needed as the
output control is automatically handled by the SMED 5 FSM described in Figure 7.
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Example V
UM1763
Figure 8. SMED 5 state machine
The main code simply takes care of initializing the I/O pins, it also enables the PLL
generating the 96 MHz clock for the SMEDs. Then it properly sets the DAC, the CPP2 and
CPP3 analog comparators so to configure them according to the high and low threshold
values. Finally it enables the SMED 5. As everything is set and since now everything will be
controlled by the SMED 5, the STM8 processor is halted to reduce power consumption.
Let's note that actually the SMED 5 is configured in a way that feedback from comparators
makes the PWM5 toggle. If the comparator feedback is missing, it gets stuck. Possible
evolution of this exercise can be to try modifying the finite state machine, so that the PWM5
restarts toggling after a max_time the SMED 5 gets stuck in a state.
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Revision history
Revision history
Table 2. Document revision history
Date
Revision
13-Jun-2014
1
Changes
Initial release.
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UM1763
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