Communications Module Manual (573KB)

MJ-4TM Communications Module
Fiber Optic and RS-232/485
Installation Manual for MJ-4ATM, MJ-XL TM and MJ-XTM Control Panels
RS - 232 / 485
G R
N T
D N
Communications Module
POWER
Watchdog
Communications
IN
-
+
R
x
d
T
x
d
OUT
Rxd
MJ-4 Communications Module
Manual No. 21-115-527-024 rev01
Data
Txd
C
T
S
R
T
S
!
DANGER
Hazardous Voltage.
Will cause death, serious injury, or equipment damage.
De-energize and
maintenance.
ground
the
equipment
before
Only qualified personnel should work on this equipment
after becoming thoroughly familiar with all warnings, safety
notices, instructions and maintenance procedures
contained herein. The successful and safe operation of this
equipment Is dependent upon proper handling, installation,
operation and maintenance.
The information contained herein is general in nature and not intended for specific application purposes. It does not relieve the user
of responsibility to use sound practices in application, installation, operation, and maintenance of the equipment purchased.
Siemens reserves the right to make changes in the specifications shown herein or to make improvements at any time without notice
or obligations. Should a conflict arise between the general information contained in this publication and the contents of drawings or
supplementary material or both, the latter shall take precedence.
NOTE
Authorized and qualified Personnel
For the purpose of this manual a qualified person is one who is familiar with the installation, construction or operation of the
equipment and the hazards involved. In addition, he has the following qualifications:
(a)
Is trained and authorized to de-energize, clear, ground, and tag circuits and equipment in accordance with established
safety practices.
(b)
Is trained in the proper care and use of protective equipment such as rubber gloves, hard hat, safety glasses or face
shields, flash clothing, etc., in accordance with established safety practices.
(c)
Is trained in rendering first aid.
SUMMARY
These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment, nor to provide for every possible contingency to be
met in connection with installation, operation, or maintenance. Should further information be desired or should particular problems
arise which are not covered sufficiently for the purchaser's purposes, the matter should be referred to the local sales office, listed on
the back of this instruction guide.
The contents of this instruction manual should not become part of or modify any prior or existing agreement, commitment or
relationship. The sales contract contains the entire obligation of Siemens Power Transmission & Distribution Inc. The warranty
contained in the contract between the parties is the sole warranty of Siemens Power Transmission & Distribution Inc. Any
statements contained herein do not create new warranties or modify the existing warranty.
DANGER
Indicates an imminently hazardous situation which, if not avoided, will result in death or serious injury.
WARNING
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, could result in death or serious injury.
CAUTION
Indicates a potentially hazardous situation which, if not avoided, may result in minor or moderate injury.
Table of Contents
1
INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................................................1
1.1
DESCRIPTION ..................................................................................................................................................1
1.2
LED INDICATORS ...........................................................................................................................................1
2 TRANSMISSION METHODS ...........................................................................................................................1
2.1
FIBER OPTIC TRANSMISSION ..........................................................................................................................2
2.2
WIRE TRANSMISSION......................................................................................................................................2
2.2.1
RS-232 ...................................................................................................................................................2
2.2.2
RS-485 ...................................................................................................................................................3
3 COMMUNICATION PROTOCOLS ................................................................................................................4
4
5
6
7
8
INSTALLING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE IN MJ- 4 CONTROL PANELS ...........................4
4.1
REMOVING THE MJ-4 REAR COVER................................................................................................................4
4.2
MOUNTING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE.................................................................................................5
4.3
SETTING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE JUMPERS ......................................................................................6
4.3.1
Fiber Optic Interface .............................................................................................................................6
4.3.2
RS-232/485 Interface .............................................................................................................................6
4.4
REPLACING THE MJ-4 REAR COVER ...............................................................................................................7
4.5
MOUNTING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE LABEL .....................................................................................7
INSTALLING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE IN MJ-X CONTROL PANELS............................8
5.1
SETTING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE JUMPERS ......................................................................................8
5.2
MOUNTING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE IN MJ-X CONTROL PANELS .....................................................8
VERIFYING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE INSTALLATION ..................................................10
6.1
PERFORMING THE INITIAL DIAGNOSTIC CHECKOUT .....................................................................................11
6.2
PERFORMING THE LOOPBACK DIAGNOSTIC TEST .........................................................................................11
CABLING THE COMMUNICATIONS MODULE TO THE POWER SYSTEM.....................................12
7.1
FIBER OPTIC CABLE TYPE ............................................................................................................................12
7.1.1
Fiber Optic Cable Lengths ..................................................................................................................12
7.1.2
Fiber Optic Connector.........................................................................................................................12
7.1.3
Fiber Optic Connections......................................................................................................................13
7.2
RS-485 TWISTED-PAIR CABLE .....................................................................................................................13
7.2.1
RS-485 Cable Type ..............................................................................................................................13
7.2.2
RS-485 Cable Grounding ....................................................................................................................13
7.2.3
RS-485 Connector................................................................................................................................14
7.2.4
RS-485 Cabling Considerations ..........................................................................................................14
7.3
RS-232 CONNECTIONS .................................................................................................................................15
7.3.1
RS-232 Multi-drop Wiring...................................................................................................................16
7.4
RS-232/485 CONNECTIONS ..........................................................................................................................17
7.5
COMMUNICATIONS MODULE CONFIGURATION .............................................................................................17
7.5.1
Communications Menu Item Descriptions...........................................................................................18
7.6
TROUBLESHOOTING COMMUNICATIONS PROBLEMS .....................................................................................19
7.6.1
Using LEDs to Help Diagnose Communications Problems ................................................................20
7.6.2
Using MJXplorer to Troubleshoot Communications Problems...........................................................20
SETTING THE DNP POINTS .........................................................................................................................21
8.1
USING THE DNP CONFIGURE PROGRAM FOR A CUSTOM DNP POINT SET ......................................................21
8.2
SELECTING A PREDEFINED DNP POINT SET ...................................................................................................21
8.2.1
DNP point set for MJ-4A or MJ-4B.....................................................................................................21
8.2.2
DNP Point set for other Control Panels..............................................................................................21
8.2.3
2.x4 ......................................................................................................................................................22
8.2.4
Small 2.x3 ............................................................................................................................................23
8.2.5
Simple ..................................................................................................................................................24
8.2.6
Metering...............................................................................................................................................24
Manual No. 21-115-527-024 rev01
8.2.7
Active ...................................................................................................................................................26
8.2.8
Set 7 .....................................................................................................................................................27
8.2.9
2.x3 ......................................................................................................................................................27
9 COMMUNICATIONS MODULE FIRMWARE VERSIONS......................................................................34
9.1
MJ-4 COMMUNICATIONS MODULE FIRMWARE VERSION ...............................................................................34
9.2
MJ-XL COMMUNICATIONS MODULE FIRMWARE VERSIONS..........................................................................34
10 SPECIFICATIONS ...........................................................................................................................................35
10.1 PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS ................................................................................................................................35
10.2 FIBER OPTIC LINK INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS ...........................................................................................35
10.3 RS-232/RS-485 INTERFACE SPECIFICATIONS ...............................................................................................35
Figures
FIGURE 1-1 MJ-4 COMMUNICATIONS MODULE. .............................................................................................................1
FIGURE 2-1 FIBER OPTIC NETWORK. ..............................................................................................................................2
FIGURE 2-2 RS-232 CONNECTION. .................................................................................................................................2
FIGURE 2-3 MODEM CONNECTION. ................................................................................................................................2
FIGURE 2-4 RS-485 CONFIGURATION – LOOP NETWORK. ..............................................................................................3
FIGURE 2-5 RS-485 CONFIGURATION – STAR NETWORK. ..............................................................................................3
FIGURE 4-1 MJ-4 REAR COVER. .....................................................................................................................................5
FIGURE 4-2 COMMUNICATIONS MODULE INSTALLATION. ..............................................................................................5
FIGURE 4-3 FIBER OPTIC INTERFACE JUMPER LOCATIONS. ............................................................................................6
FIGURE 4-4 RS-232/485 INTERFACE JUMPER LOCATIONS. .............................................................................................6
FIGURE 4-5 MJ-4 WITH MJ-4 COMMUNICATIONS MODULE LABEL INSTALLED. .............................................................7
FIGURE 5-1 MJ-X CONTROL PANEL REAR COVER. ........................................................................................................8
FIGURE 5-2 COMMUNICATIONS MODULE INSTALLATION IN MJ-X. ................................................................................9
FIGURE 5-3 MEMBRANE SWITCH CABLE ROUTING (TOP DOWN VIEW). ..........................................................................9
FIGURE 5-4 MJ-X COMMUNICATIONS MODULE CABLE ROUTING. ...............................................................................10
FIGURE 7-1 FIBER OPTIC CONNECTIONS.......................................................................................................................13
FIGURE 7-2 RS-485 CONNECTION ................................................................................................................................13
FIGURE 7-3 SCREW TERMINAL BLOCK CONNECTOR ....................................................................................................14
FIGURE 7-4 RS-485 LOOP TOPOLOGY ..........................................................................................................................14
FIGURE 7-5 COMMUNICATION CABLE ROUTING ...........................................................................................................15
FIGURE 7-6 RS-232 MULTI-DROP CONFIGURATION .....................................................................................................16
FIGURE 7-7 RS-232 CONNECTOR PINOUT ....................................................................................................................17
FIGURE 7-8 SCREW TERMINAL CONNECTION ...............................................................................................................17
FIGURE 7-9 MJXPLORER TROUBLESHOOTING CONNECTIONS ......................................................................................20
Tables
TABLE 4-1 FIBER OPTIC INTERFACE JUMPER SETTINGS..................................................................................................6
TABLE 4-2 RS-232/485 INTERFACE JUMPER SETTINGS ..................................................................................................7
TABLE 7-1 RS-485 CABLE SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................................................................13
TABLE 7-2 RS-232 INTELLIGENT ELECTRONIC DEVICE WIRING ..................................................................................16
TABLE 7-3 MODEM WIRING .........................................................................................................................................16
TABLE 7-4 COMMUNICATIONS MENU ITEMS ................................................................................................................17
MJ-4A, MJ-4B, MJ-XL, MJ-X, MJXtra, and MJXplorer are trademarks of Siemens Energy, Inc.
Siemens is a registered trademark of Siemens AG.
© 1994 - 2008 Siemens Energy, Inc.
ii
MJ-4 Communications Module
1 Introduction
This manual describes the installation and connection procedures for the MJ-4ATM & MJ-4BTM (here after referred
to collectively as MJ-4 TM) Communications Module which has the Fiber Optic and the RS-232/485 interfaces
combined in one single printed circuit board. The operation and functionality of the Fiber Optic and the RS-232/485 interfaces are quite similar, only one of the interfaces can be used at a time. The manual covers the procedures
for connecting the module to a system of networked MJ-4 Tap Changer Control Panels.
1.1
Description
The Siemens MJ-4 Communications Module is the communication interface used to connect the MJ-4 Control Panel
to a network of regulator controllers, control devices, and supervisory equipment. Figure 1-1 illustrates the MJ4
Communications Module.
The fiber optic interface enables connection of the tap changer control panel to the supervisory equipment via
multimode fiber optic cable. The RS-232/485 interface enables connection of the tap changer control panel to the
supervisory equipment via electrical wire.
The MJ-4 Communications Module is installed in MJ-4 Tap Changer Control Panels. This allows you to easily
network the control panels and other field devices to a remote terminal unit (RTU) or other supervisory device. An
adapter kit is available for mounting MJ-4 Communications Modules in MJ-X Control Panels.
RS - 232 / 485
G R
N T
D N
Communications Module
POWER
Watchdog
Communications
IN
Data
-
+
R
x
d
T
x
d
C
T
S
R
T
S
OUT
Rxd
Txd
Figure 1-1 MJ-4 Communications Module.
1.2
LED Indicators
The MJ-4 Communications Module has five LED indicators.
•
Power indicates the MJ-4 Communications Module is powered on.
•
Watchdog when blinking steadily, indicates the MJ-4 Communications Module microprocessor and software
are functioning properly.
•
Communications indicates communications activity with this module. (The Communications Module turns on
this indicator when it receives a valid message with a valid address.)
•
Rxd indicates the communications module is receiving data.
•
Txd indicates the communications module is transmitting data.
2 Transmission Methods
There are two transmission mediums available for sending data to the RTU:
•
fiber optic
•
wire
1
2.1
Fiber Optic Transmission
The primary benefits of fiber optic communications are its immunity to induced electrical interference and relatively
low signal loss. Electrical noise cannot be induced into the cable to generate transient spikes that disrupt data
communications.
The Fiber Optic interface on the Communications Module uses multi-mode fiber optic cable. The electrical signals
are converted to optical signals by the communication unit. The optical signals are then transmitted via the fiber
optic cable to the RTU. Communications modules in the path between the transmitting communications module and
the RTU act as repeaters and simply regenerate the signals and forward them to the next device, Figure 2-1.
MJ-4
In
MJ-4
Out
In
MJ- 4
Out
In
Out
Out
RTU
Fiber Optic Cables
In
Figure 2-1 Fiber Optic Network.
2.2
Wire Transmission
The advantage of wire transmission is simple installation. The MJ-4 supports two popular wire interfaces: RS-232
and RS-485. The screw terminal block connector supplied with the module can be wired for either interface.
Connection to the supervisory device is typically accomplished using either a DB-9 or DB-25 connector for RS-232,
while the connector used for RS-485 will vary with the application.
2.2.1
RS-232
Direct RS-232 connections are limited to a maximum distance of 50 feet, Figure 2-2. The RS-232/485 interface on
the MJ-4 Communications Module supports RS-232 multi-drop configurations.
The distance between devices may be extended with modems, Figure 2-3. Modem connections are either dial-up,
short-haul, or radio-based. Dial-up modems are typically deployed when there is easy access to the telephone
connections, while short-haul modems are useful within a facility where there is access to the wiring. Consider
using a radio modem when laying cable for a land-line modem is impractical.
RS-232 Cable 50 ft Max.
RTU
MJ- 4
MJ-4
50 Feet
Figure 2-2 RS-232 Connection.
RS-232 Cable 50 ft Max.
RS-232 Cable 50 ft Max.
RTU
MJ- 4
Modem
Modem
Figure 2-3 Modem Connection.
2
MJ-4 Communications Module
2.2.2
RS-485
The maximum distance for RS-485 is 4000 feet, either from device to device or for an entire loop. The
recommended cable for RS-485 is shielded, two twisted-pair, 22 AWG. This type of cable consists of jacketed wire
that is twisted together and wrapped in a shield to prevent electromagnetic interference from affecting the data
signal. A maximum of 32 devices can be connected to an RS-485 network. Typical network configurations are loop,
star, and open-ended. These are shown in Figures 2-4 to 2-6. The recommended network configuration is a loop.
This will ensure that all devices remain connected to the master unit in the event of a line break. If the loop
configuration does not allow you to place the equipment in the desired location, connect the network open ended.
If either the star or open-ended configurations are used, termination resistors must be installed at the end devices.
For more information on installing RS-485 networks, refer to Section 7.2 RS-485 Twisted-pair Cable. The
following characteristics determine the maximum length and data rate of an RS-485 network.
Impedance: The maximum transfer of energy occurs when the cable’s terminating impedance matches the
characteristic impedance of the cable. If the cable’s characteristic impedance is 120 ohms, use a 120 ohm
terminating resistor.
Capacitance: Wire capacitance affects the rise and fall times of a transmitted signal and, as a result, limits the
signaling (baud) rate of the data. The higher the capacitance, the lower the maximum baud rate. Additionally,
higher capacitance requires higher output current to drive the line. Since capacitance is proportional to wire
length, it can limit the maximum cable length for a given baud rate.
Cable Size: Cable size along with capacitance and DC resistance determine whether the cable is suitable for the
application. A 22-gauge cable will provide a proper balance of capacitance and resistance.
DC Resistance: DC resistance determines the maximum length of wire allowed for an application. The
maximum length is determined by the resistance of each twisted pair along with the device termination
resistance. The use of surge protectors with series resistance also contributes to loop resistance.
Twisted-pair
Cabling
4000 ft max. total
MJ- 4
RTU
MJ- 4
MJ- 4
Figure 2-4 RS-485 Configuration – Loop Network.
Twisted-pair
Cabling
4000 ft max. total
MJ- 4
RTU
MJ- 4
MJ- 4
Figure 2-5 RS-485 Configuration – Star Network.
Twisted-pair
Cabling
4000 ft max. total
MJ- 4
RTU
MJ- 4
MJ- 4
Figure 2-6 RS-485 Configuration – Open-Ended Network.
3
3 Communication Protocols
The MJ-4 Control Panel is designed to be used in a network of intelligent power control devices communicating
with a supervisory device or remote terminal unit (RTU). Each device on the network has a specific
communications address assigned to allow messages to be directed to and from the device. Messages are transmitted
from the RTU to all devices and only the device with the specified address will respond. The MJ-4 Communications
Module supports the following protocols. Refer to the documents listed for details about the protocols.
•
Distributed Network Protocol (DNP 3.0). (See User’s Group website: www.dnp.org)
•
The Cooper 2200 Protocol (with or without address byte)
•
The 2179 Protocol ( Based on the PG&E Protocol)
•
MJ-3A Format “A”, “B1”, and “B2”
4 Installing the Communications Module in MJ- 4 Control Panels
The MJ-4 Communications Module is mounted directly on the MJ-4 Main Processor Board. Follow these steps to
install the communications module. Details are provided in the sections below.
1.
Turn off power to the MJ-4.
2.
If in a regulating device, then disconnect the polarized disconnect switch (PDS).
3.
Remove the MJ-4 rear cover.
4.
Install the communications module.
5.
Set the communications module jumpers.
6.
Remount the MJ-4 rear cover.
7.
Install the communications module label.
WARNING
120 volts on terminal block, leads, and
inside control panel housing.
May result in death or serious injury
from electric shock including equipment
damage.
Disconnect all power sources before
opening the control panel.
4.1
Removing the MJ-4 Rear Cover
Turn off the power to the MJ-4 and remove the four screws holding the rear cover to the case, see Figure 4-1 below.
Uncurl the cable clamp at the center of the rear cover and slide the cable out.
4
MJ-4 Communications Module
Remove 4
Case
Screws
Uncurl cable-clamp
and slide cable out
Figure 4-1 MJ-4 Rear Cover.
4.2
Mounting the Communications Module
Hold the communications module in place over the five standoffs on the main PCB and insert the 24-pin connector
on the ribbon cable into the 24-pin connector (P8) on the main PCB. See Figure 4-2 below. Mount the
communications module on the threaded standoffs on the main PCB using the five screws provided.
6-32 x 3/8" Screw (5)
Ribbon Cable with 24-Pin Connector
Comm Mod PCB
24-Pin Connector
P8
P9
MJ-4Main
MainPCB
PCB
MJ-XL
Figure 4-2 Communications Module Installation.
5
4.3
Setting the Communications Module Jumpers
Prior to installing the Communications Module into the MJ-4 Control Panel, ensure that the jumpers are properly
installed on the printed circuit board. Jumper selections for the Fiber Optic interface and RS232/485 interface are
described in separate sections below.
4.3.1
Fiber Optic Interface
The jumper locations for the fiber optic interface are shown in Figure 4-3. The view of the module is from the
component side. The fiber optic receiver (RX) and transmitter (TX) are shown for reference. The jumper settings
are listed in Table 4-1.
Set Auto Repeat to “No Repeat” when only one unit is installed in the network.
J10
J12
J14
J11
2
1
1
2
3
Figure 4-3 Fiber Optic Interface Jumper Locations.
Table 4-1 Fiber Optic Interface Jumper Settings
Jumper
Name
Position Function Selected
J14
Auto Repeat 1-2
Auto Repeat
J12
Range
2-3
Out
No Repeat
No Repeat
Out
In
Normal
Long
State Description
Repeat message from Host and any responses from
other IEDs (Auto repeat for mark 0 or mark 1)
Transmit continuously ON (for testing) (Force 0)
Only transmit a response if being addressed by Host
(no jumper installed at 1-2 or 2-3) (Force 1)
Set Low Power Transmitter Output
Set High Power Transmitter Output (See Note 2)
Note 1: Default pin settings are shown in bold text.
Note 2: If 50/125 µm cable is used, J12 must be jumpered (In).
4.3.2
RS-232/485 Interface
Figure 4-4 shows the jumper locations for the RS-232/485 interface, viewed from the component side. Jumpers and
their default settings are listed in Table 4-2.
2 1
J10
1
2
3
J11
J12
J14
Figure 4-4 RS-232/485 Interface Jumper Locations.
6
MJ-4 Communications Module
In an RS-485 application, connect Signal Return (RTN) between the communication devices when there is a ground
potential rise between the connected devices. When the device RTN pins are connected, jumper J11 should be Out
(unless required by safety codes) to prevent ground loop currents. (If it is necessary to connect the RTN to GND
after the Communications Module is installed, you can make this connection at the 8-pin terminal block connector
with a wire jumper.)
Table 4-2 RS-232/485 Interface Jumper Settings
Jumper
Name
J10
RS-485
RCV EN
Position Function Selected
1-2
Receive Enable
Auto Enable
2-3
J11
Safety
Not grounded
Out
Ground Strap In
Grounded
Note: Default pin settings are shown in bold text.
State Description
RS-485 receiver is always enabled
RS-485 receiver is automatically enabled by MJ-X
Communications Module microprocessor control.
Signal Return not connected to frame ground
Signal Return connected to frame ground
The Jumpers for the Fiber Optic and RS-232/485 interfaces are specific to their operation or functionality, i.e. J14
and J12 (Fiber Optic interface Jumpers) will not affect the working of the RS-232/485 interface and J10 and J11
(RS-232/485 Jumpers will not affect the working of the Fiber Optic interface. Though the jumpers J14 & J12 and
J10 & J11 may be placed in the required operational position, only one interface can be used at a time.
4.4
Replacing the MJ-4 Rear Cover
Remove the adhesive strip covering the rectangular opening for the RS-232/485 Connector, and remove the two
plastic caps covering the holes for the Fiber Optic "In" and "Out" connectors. Make sure that all of the cables and
wires are inside the enclosure and carefully place the rear cover over the communications module and main PCB
and fasten with the four case screws. Uncurl the cable clamp and slide the cable into place.
4.5
Mounting the Communications Module Label
Remove the backing from the label and place it on the rear cover. Make sure that the holes in the label are lined up
with the indicator and connector holes on the rear cover. When the label is in place, rub the label to secure it in
position. The rear cover with labels installed is shown in Figures 4-5 below.
RS - 232 / 485
G
N
D
Communications Module
POWER
Watchdog
Communications
IN
R
T
N
Data
l
-
l
+
R
x
d
T
x
d
C
T
S
R
T
S
OUT
Rxd
Txd
Figure 4-5 MJ-4 with MJ-4 Communications Module Label Installed.
7
5 Installing the Communications Module in MJ-X Control Panels
The MJ-4 Communications Module is installed in the Accessory Section on the back of the MJ-X Control Panel.
Before installing the communications module, set the jumpers on the communications module printed circuit board
for proper operation. Install the communications module in the MJ-X, connect the cables, and test the unit. Once
these tasks have been performed the system is ready for operation. The following sections describe how to set the
jumpers and install the communications module.
5.1
Setting the Communications Module Jumpers
Prior to installing the Communications Module into the MJ-X Control Panel, ensure that the jumpers are properly
installed on the printed circuit board. Jumper selections for the Fiber Optic interface and RS232/485 interface are
described in Section 4.3.1 and Section 4.3.2 respectively.
5.2
Mounting the Communications Module in MJ-X Control Panels
Follow these steps to install the communications module in the MJ-X Control Panel.
1.
If the control panel is installed on a Siemens regulating device, first turn off the power to the MJ-X, then
disconnect the polarized disconnect switch (PDS) terminal block and remove the control panel from the control
box.
WARNING
120 volts on leads and inside control
panel housing.
May result in death or serious injury
from electric shock including equipment
damage.
Disconnect all power sources before
opening the control panel.
2.
Loosen the PDS cable strain relief on the rear cover and rotate the strain relief plate to the open position,
Figure 5-1.
Accessory Cover Plate
PDS Strain
Relief Plate
Figure 5-1 MJ-X Control Panel Rear Cover.
3.
8
Remove the six screws on the side of the rear cover that hold it to the control panel.
MJ-4 Communications Module
4.
Feed the PDS cable harness through the strain relief cutout while removing the rear cover.
5.
Remove the accessory cover plate from the rear cover. Discard the accessory cover plate and mounting
hardware. If an Expansion Rack is installed in the accessory area, remove the rack and discard.
6.
Mount the communications module printed circuit board to the MJ-X base with six 6-32 x 7/16” standoffs,
Figure 5-2. Ensure that the membrane switch cable is folded over itself and under the communications module
printed circuit board as shown in Figure 5-3.
6-32 x 3/8" Screw (
Hexnuts (5)
Cover Pan
Cover Pan
Cover Pan
Spacers(5)
Mal
6-32
x 7/16" Male/F
Standoff (6)
e/Fem
Standoff
PCB (6)
PCB
Threaded Studs(5)
MJ-X Base
MJ-X Base
MJ-X Base
Figure 5-2 Communications Module Installation in MJ-X.
MJ-X Control Panel
Processor Board
Communications
Module
Membrane Switch Cable
Figure 5-3 Membrane Switch Cable Routing (top down view).
9
7.
Mount the communications module pan cover (if provided) with six 6-32 x 3/8” screws as shown in Figure 5-2.
8.
Plug the ribbon connector into J105 on the MJ-X Processor Board as shown in Figure 5-4.
POWER
W dog
Com m
Connector J105
GND
RTN
Membrane Switch Cable
Txd
Rxd
Data
Rxd
Tx d
CTS
RTS
Processor Board
Connector J411
Power Board
Figure 5-4 MJ-X Communications Module Cable Routing.
9.
Feed the PDS cable through the PDS strain relief opening in the rear cover.
10. Reinstall the rear cover of the control panel, attaching it using the six screws.
11. Rotate the PDS strain relief plate to the closed position and tighten the screws for the strain relief plate.
12. Follow the procedure in section 6 to test the communications module.
6 Verifying the Communications Module Installation
Once the MJ-4 Communications Module is installed in the MJ-4 control panel, test the module as follows to ensure
proper operation and performance.
1.
Visually inspect the MJ-4 Communications Module for proper mechanical assembly and cable connections.
2.
Apply power to the MJ-4 Control Panel and observe the LEDs on the communications module. The Power
LED should light immediately and stay lit. After 10 to 15 seconds, the Watchdog LED should start flashing
without a long pause between flashes, that is, about twice per second.
If this does not occur, check for the following:
3.
10
ƒ
The MJ-4 Control Panel is receiving power. Check that the front panel display is active.
ƒ
The communications module is installed properly. Connections between the MJ-4 and the Communications
Module are correct. Disassemble, inspect, and reassemble the unit as required.
After verifying that the communications module is receiving power, perform the diagnostic tests described in
Section 6.1 and 6.2.
MJ-4 Communications Module
6.1
Performing the Initial Diagnostic Checkout
Prior to performing these tests, become familiar with operating and configuring the MJ-4 Control Panel. See the
MJ-4A & MJ-4B Voltage Regulator Control Panel Installation and Operations Manual (Siemens manual no. 21115527-023).
1.
On the MJ-4 Control Panel, under the < DIAGNOSTICS > menu, go to the “CM Test?:” screen.
2.
Press the Change key and toggle from “OFF” to “INTERN,” and then press the Save key. (If the password is
requested, enter the password as described in the note below and proceed.) The “CM Test:?” screen should
display “INTERN” for several seconds before changing to “OFF.” If the display does not change to “OFF,”
then check the physical installation of the communications module before proceeding.
Note: When you try to change the “CM Test?:” value, the MJ-4 Control Panel may request that the password be
entered. If the default passwords are in effect, then the password for the Diagnostics menu is “3333.” For more
information refer to the MJ-4A & MJ-4B Installation and Operations Manual.
3.
Once the “CM Test?:” screen value has returned to “OFF,” press the down arrow key to display the next data
item, “CM TestStat.” This screen indicates the status of the Communications Module test. The possible test
value results are shown below. A value of xxx2 (where x may be 0-9 or a-f), indicates that the test passed.
A value of xxx0 or xxx1indicates a failure. (Note that in firmware versions of 2.xx (e.g., 2.13, 2.44, etc) xxx3
indicates the test passed and xxx2 indicates an internal problem.)
•
xxx0 indicates the test did not run at all. Run the test again, allowing extra time for the communications
module to power up. This should take about 15 seconds. The Watchdog LED will blink after the module
successfully completes self test and initialization.
•
xxx1 indicates an internal problem with the MJ-4 Communications Module. Contact Siemens for
assistance.
6.2
Performing the Loopback Diagnostic Test
The loopback test evaluates the MJ-4 for communications readiness. For this test, connect the transmit output to the
receive input of the communications module. When testing the fiber optic interface, ensure that the cable used meets
the requirements outlined in section 7.1. When testing the RS-232/485 interface, only the RS-232 portion of the
circuit can be tested by connecting a wire from the transmit pin (Txd) to the receive pin (Rxd) of the screw terminal
block connector.
1.
Scroll to the “CM Test?:” data item in the <DIAGNOSTICS> menu on the MJ-4 Control Panel display.
2.
Press the Change key, then the up arrow key to select “LOOPBK.” If the password is requested, enter the
password and proceed.
3.
Press the Save key. “LOOPBK” will display for several seconds before changing automatically to “OFF.” If
this does not occur, then recheck the physical installation of the communications module and retry.
4.
Once the “CM Test?:” screen displays “OFF,” press the down arrow key to display the “CM TestStat” data
item. This screen gives the status of the communications module test. A value of xxx6 (where x may be 0-9 or
a-f), indicates that the loopback test passed. A value of xxx0 – xxx5 indicates a failure. (Note that in
firmware versions of 2.xx (e.g., 2.13, 2.44, etc) xxx7 indicates the test passed, xxx3 indicates failure, and xxx6
is a communication problem.)
•
xxx0 indicates the test did not run at all. Run the test again, allowing extra time for the communications
module to power up. This should take about 15 seconds. The Watchdog LED will blink after the module
successfully completes self test and initialization.
•
xxx1 indicates an internal problem with the MJ-4 Communications Module. Contact Siemens for
assistance.
•
xxx2 indicates the loopback test failed. Check the loopback connectors and repeat the test.
•
xxx3, xxx4, or xxx5 indicate a communication problem. Contact Siemens for assistance.
11
7 Cabling the Communications Module to the Power System
Connect the communications modules using the recommended cable as described in sections 7.1 to 7.3 below. The
following sections provide some general guidelines for cable selection and explain the different cable parameters.
Make connections between the device and the communications unit with the appropriate connector.
Typically, RS-485 requires custom wiring to the other devices. Consult the device’s pin assignments to determine
the applicable connections. Typically, a DB-9 or DB-25 will be needed for making RS-232 connections to the RTU,
personal computer, or other device. Use the supplied Phoenix Contact Screw Terminal Block (MSTBT 2, 5/8-ST-5,
08) for connections to the RS-232/485 interface. Use an ST optical connector when making connections to the fiber
optic interface.
Though the cabling for the Fiber Optic and the RS-232-/485 interfaces may be done and either interface may be
made available for communication, only one of the interfaces may be used at a time.
7.1
Fiber Optic Cable Type
The recommended cable is 62.5/125 µm diameter fiber optic cable with a maximum attenuation of 5dB/km at a
wavelength of 820-850 nm. If this is not available use 50/125 µm diameter glass cable, but only for cable lengths
less than 1500 feet. Use of 50/125 µm diameter cable requires that the range jumper J12 be set for long range. This
will provide protection against under driving the receiver. When using 50/125 µm cable, install the long range
jumper (J12) even for very short cable lengths.
A 100/140 µm diameter cable can also be used for cable lengths less than 1500 feet. Use of this cable requires that
the range jumper J12 be set to normal. This setting will provide protection against overdriving the receiver.
Plastic cable is not recommended due to the coupling efficiency of the cable, which at short lengths will overload
the optical receiver. In addition, the large cable attenuation normally associated with plastic cable limits the useful
link lengths to a fraction of that achievable with glass cable.
7.1.1
Fiber Optic Cable Lengths
Calculate cable length by determining the output power of the transmitter (PTX) and the input receive level (Peak
Input Power Logic Level Low Receiver Sensitivity, PRX). The difference between the two numbers is the optical
power budget (PB’).
PB’ = PTX – PRX
For example, if transmitter output power is -16 dBm and the input receive level is -24 dBm, the optical power
budget is then 8 dBm. Subtract from this value the fixed losses (i.e. connector losses, splice losses, PLoss) to obtain
the real power budget (PB).
PB = PB’ – PLoss
Divide the result by the cable attenuation (Att) in dB/km to arrive at the maximum cable length. Note that the
transmitter output power data given in the specifications already includes connector loss when using precision
ceramic ST connectors.
Length = PB / Att
7.1.2
Fiber Optic Connector
The fiber optic cables (or “patch cords”) used with the MJ-4 Fiber Optic Communications Module must be
terminated with ST style connectors and have a numerical aperture of 0.275 ± 0.015.
(If pre-terminated cables are not used, follow the instructions supplied by the manufacturer to attach the connector
to the fiber cable using the cable type recommended in section 7.1.)
12
MJ-4 Communications Module
7.1.3
Fiber Optic Connections
When making connections to the transmitter and receiver inputs/outputs, ensure that the transmit output from one
device is connected to the receive input of the next device. Figure 7-1 shows how to insert the connector. The tip of
the cable on the ST connector must be clean and free of dust. Dust on the tip of the cable will cause signal
attenuation.
Use care when handling the fiber optic connector, especially the exposed ceramic ferrule.
Figure 7-1 Fiber Optic Connections
7.2
RS-485 Twisted-pair Cable
The following sections provide the information necessary to select and install cable between an MJ-4 Control Panel,
RTU, and other field devices in an RS-485 network.
7.2.1
RS-485 Cable Type
Listed in Table 7-1 are the cable characteristics necessary for proper electrical performance in an RS-485
communications network. Use cable with a shield that provides 100 percent RFI/EMI coverage.
Table 7-1 RS-485 Cable Specifications
Characteristic
Impedance
Capacitance (pF/ft)
Cable Size
DC Resistance
Velocity of Propagation
7.2.2
Value
120 ohms
35
22 AWG
17 ohms/1000 ft
80%
Maximum/Typical
Typical
Maximum
Typical
Maximum
Maximum
RS-485 Cable Grounding
Ground the cable shield for all devices on the network. Ground the cable shield at only one end to prevent induced
interference that may result from circulating ground currents. If a cable shield is grounded at both ends, a ground
loop can exist between the components. This ground loop can cause induced interferences that result in signal
distortion. If there is a ground potential rise between the connected devices, connect the Signal Return (RTN)
between the communication devices. Figure 7-2 illustrates the preferred field device connection method. See section
4.3.2 for jumper considerations.
MJ-4 Communications Module
Data
RTN GND
Shield attached
at this end only
Shield grounded
At other end only
RS-485 Twisted-Pair Cable
RS-485 Twisted-Pair Cable
From RTU or other device
To next device
Figure 7-2 RS-485 Connection
13
7.2.3
RS-485 Connector
The required connector for connecting to the MJ-4 RS-232/485 Interface is the Weidmuller Contact Screw Terminal
Block BLT 5.08/8/180 or equivalent. Wire the connector as shown in Figure 7-2. This connector is supplied with
the communications module and is shown in Figure 7-3.
.3”
Weidmuller Terminal Block
BT 5.08/8/180
12 Gauge Wire (maximum)
Figure 7-3 Screw Terminal Block Connector
7.2.4
RS-485 Cabling Considerations
The cable used for connecting the Communications Module to other communication devices is a twisted pair of
insulated conductors. The pair is twisted to minimize pickup of random signals between the conductors, particularly
those signals induced by electromagnetic interference (EMI).
To further protect against external electrical interference, the pair is shielded by a grounded outer covering. The
shield conducts radio frequency interference (RFI) to the ground, thus reducing its effect on the twisted pair.
Concern over RFI and EMI is important given the high electrical current and electrically noisy environment through
which the communication wires are routed.
Follow the rules below to properly install the RS-485 cables.
1. Connect all field devices in a loop technology so that all devices are connected to the master in case of a line
break. The basic loop topology is shown below.
MJ- 4
RTU
Twisted-pair
Cabling
4000 ft max. total
MJ- 4
MJ- 4
Figure 7-4 RS-485 Loop Topology
One of the advantages of the loop topology is that if a line is cut, communication is not interrupted. By
completing the loop in the RS-485 cable, one break can be made anywhere in the line without compromising
communication with the master device (RTU). To maintain redundancy, avoid open ended runs of the bus.
Each installation method (see Figures 2-4 to 2-6) has advantages and disadvantages. The loop method requires
more cable than does the single-ended run method. This extra cable is needed to run from the last device on the
run to the master device (RTU). The additional cable adds expense and shortens the total distance the farthest
device can be located from the master device. The advantage of the loop method is in the ability to
communicate with all devices when there is a break in the loop.
The single-ended run allows larger distances between the master device and the farthest slave device, but it
does not allow the master device to communicate with devices on the far side of a break. This method also
requires the use of terminating resistors.
2.
A maximum of 32 devices may be connected in a single RS-485 bus with a total cable run no longer than 4000
feet.
3.
Always ground the shield at only one end of a cable segment. For all devices, ground the cable shield at one
end only to prevent induced interference that may result from circulating ground currents. If a cable’s shield is
grounded at both ends, a ground lop can exist between the components. This ground loop can result in induced
interference that causes signal distortion. Figure 7-2 shows the proper method for terminating the shield at the
Communications Module connector.
14
MJ-4 Communications Module
4.
When the Communications Module is mounted in the MJ-4 Control Panel, it is grounded internally through the
MJ-4 to the equipment ground. A separate connection to the equipment ground is not required.
5.
The recommended twisted-pair cable for an RS-485 bus has a characteristic impedance of 120 ohms. Any
change in the type of cable, or an open-ended length of cable, creates a discontinuity in the impedance and
causes a reflection. Placing resistors that match the characteristic impedance of the cable at the open end of a
twisted-pair stub eliminates reflection.
For long, single-ended runs (over 1000 Forwarding ft.), you may need to install a 120 ohm terminating resistor
between the data (+) and (-) terminals of the farthest device from the RTU or master end. Adding the
terminating resistor is not an absolute requirement, but using it minimizes reflected interference on the
communication cable.
6.
Do not route signal cabling parallel to power conductors. Wherever possible, place the communication cable
perpendicular to the power conductor as shown below. Power conductors are any cables or bus conductors
carrying currents greater than 20 amperes.
Magnetic Field
Around Conductor
Current
Flow
Electric Power
Conductor
Communication Cable
Figure 7-5 Communication Cable Routing
Electrical current flowing through a conductor forms a magnetic field around the wire as shown above.
Interference is coupled into the wires in the cable through electromagnetic fields. Just as current through a wire
causes a magnetic field to form around it, a magnetic field can cause current to flow in a wire. This induction of
current is a function of the geometry or orientation of the wires. If the communication cable is at a right angle
with the power conductor, it is aligned with the direction of the magnetic field and no current is induced.
7.
7.3
Follow these guidelines when you route communications cables between electrical equipment:
•
Run communications cables in the same cable raceways (cable routes, cable trays, or cable gutters) as
unshielded digital and analog signal cables up to 60 V.
•
Run communications cables in the same cable raceway with shielded signal and supply cables up to 230 V.
•
Run communications cables 4 inches away from unshielded signal and supply cables of up to 230 V.
•
Run cables with voltages greater than 230 V in separate ducts (routes, conduits).
RS-232 Connections
The following section describes the connection requirements for RS-232 cable. This cable will allow you to connect
the MJ-4 Control Panel to an RTU or personal computer.
Five of the standard RS-232 wires are used for this application.
•
Signal Return (RTN)
•
RXD
•
TXD
•
CTS
•
RTS
15
Table 7-2 lists the connections that must be made to connect the RS232/485 interface to a personal computer, RTU,
or other supervisory device. The MJ-4 Communications Module defaults to no-handshaking-required mode.
However, the communications module asserts RTS while it transmits data, but the module will ignore the CTS input
signal.
Table 7-2 RS-232 Intelligent Electronic Device Wiring
MJ-4 RS-232/485
Communications Interface
RTN
RXD
TXD
Personal computer, supervisory
device, or other network device
Signal Ground
TXD
RXD
Table 7-3 lists the connections that must be made to connect the RS232/485 interface to a modem.
Table 7-3 Modem Wiring
MJ-4 RS-232/485
Communications Interface
RTN
RXD
TXD
RTS
CTS
Modem
Signal Return
RXD
TXD
RTS
CTS
“RXD” is an input for Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) and an output for Data Communications Equipment (DCE).
“TXD” is an output for the DTE and an input for the DCE. Personal computer serial ports are configured as DTE
and the modems are configured as DCE. The communications module RS-232 connections implement DTE.
7.3.1
RS-232 Multi-drop Wiring
Multi-drop configurations require that the respective pins of the DTE devices be connected in parallel, Figure 7-6.
The standard pin assignments for RS-232 connectors are shown in Figure 7-7.
Note: For Figure 7-6, the RTU port is wired as “DTE”. When networking devices together, make sure the RTU
“data out” connects to the communications module Rxd, and the RTU “data in” connects to the communications
module Txd.
RTU
MJ-4
MJ-4
MJ-4
Signal
Return
Signal
Return
Signal
Return
Signal
Return
TX
RX
RX
RX
RX
TX
TX
TX
Figure 7-6 RS-232 Multi-drop Configuration
16
MJ-4 Communications Module
DE9
1
5
6
9
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
*
Signal
DCD
Rxd
Txd
DTR
Ground (Signal)
DSR
RTS
CTS
RI
Shell (Frame Ground)
DB25
1
13
14
25
* For Shielded Cable Connectors
Pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
20
22
*
Signal
Ground (Frame)
Txd
Rxd
RTS
CTS
DSR
Ground (Signal)
DCD
DTR
RI
Shell (Frame Ground)
Figure 7-7 RS-232 Connector Pinout
7.4
RS-232/485 Connections
RTS
CTS
Txd
Rxd
Data
RTN
GND
The screw terminal block connector is keyed for proper insertion. Figure 7-8 shows the proper connector
orientation. Align the keys and insert the connector to interface to the RS-232/485 interface.
Figure 7-8 Screw Terminal Connection
7.5
Communications Module Configuration
Prior to using the MJ-4 Communications Module in the network, the communications module needs to be
configured properly for communications. The < COMMUNICATIONS > menu of the MJ-4 Control Panel provides
all the required communications configuration items for the communications module. Table 7-4 lists the
communications menu items in the order in which they appear on the MJ-4 Control Panel; default settings are in
bold.
1.
Program the communications parameters of the MJ-4 Communications Module by pressing the Menu key twice
to display the < METER > menu.
2.
Then press the left arrow key until the < COMMUNICATIONS > menu appears. Use the up and down arrow
keys to access the individual menu items.
3.
To change the value of the parameter, press the Change key, and then use the arrow keys to toggle the choices
or set the value for the parameter. Press the Save key after changing the value of a menu item to enter the
changes, or press the Cancel Reset key to cancel the change.
Each time a configuration menu item is changed, the communications module is reset by the main MJ-4 Control
Panel. This reset is part of the process of updating the communications module with the new configuration.
Table 7-4 Communications Menu Items
Menu Item
Data Stat =
XXXXX
DatPortBaud
Data Parity
DataPortAddr
Reg Id
Description
Data Port status
Selections
Not Applicable (This is a Status Item)
Data Port baud (in bits/second)
Data Port parity
Data Port address enable
Regulator Identification
300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200
None, Even
OFF, ON
0 - 32,766
17
Protocol
Communications Module protocol
Comm Baud
Communications Module baud
(transmission rate)
Communications Module parity
Communications Module address
Communications Module resync time
(in characters)
Communications Module Transmit
Enable Delay (in milliseconds)
Confirm DNP Data Link
Enable software auto-repeat in Comm
Module
Host Address of RTU for unsolicited
responses
Comm Module can send unsolicited
response
Require Auto Inhibit to be active
before a remote raise or lower request
is acknowledged
Choose to set up your own DNP points
or use a preconfigured set
Comm Parity
Comm Addr
Resync Time
Tx En Delay
DNP dl Confirm
CM SW Repeat
En
Host Addr
CM Unsolicited
AutoInhEnRemRL
DNPset
CM Vers
Communications Module software
version
DNP3.0, 2200, 2200NOA, MJ3A A,
MJ3A B1, MJ3A B2, 2179, 2179 MJX, 2179 5A, SPECIAL
300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200
None, Odd, Even
0 – 65,535
0-250
0-250
No, Yes
No, Yes
0 – 65,535
No, Yes
No, Yes
DNPcfg, 2.x4, 2.x3, small2.x3, Simple,
Metering, Active, set7, set8, set9,
set10, set11, set12, set13, set14, set15
X.XX
7.5.1 Communications Menu Item Descriptions
Data Stat, DatPortBaud, Data Parity, and DataPortAddr
These menu items apply only to the Data Port located on the front of the MJ-4 Control Panel, and do not require
modification.
Reg Id (Regulator Identification)
This item allows you to uniquely identify each regulator in the system. The Regulator Id is accessible as a data item
via the communications module for most of the protocol selections.
Protocol
This item defines the protocol selection for the MJ-4 Communications Module. The selections are listed in Table
7-4.
2200NOA is a variation of the 2200 protocol with the address field suppressed. It is provided for testing the MJ-4
Communications Module with the MJXplorer™ software. The SPECIAL item allows a new protocol handler to be
included in the Communications Module code without forcing a modification to the Main Processor code (for the
protocol selection front panel screen).
Comm Baud
This menu item defines the data rate for the MJ-4 Communications Module. The standard asynchronous
communications data rates are available for selection. For proper communications, the Comm Baud setting must
match the baud setting of the other communicating device(s) in the network.
Comm Parity
This configuration item defines the parity selection for the communications module. For proper communications,
the Comm Parity setting must match the parity setting of the other communicating device(s) in the system.
18
MJ-4 Communications Module
This parity selection will override any default or inherent parity defined in the selected protocol. [For example, the
2200 protocol specification document defines the parity as even. The Comm Parity configuration item allows even
parity to be selected, but it also permits the system designer/installer to use an alternate parity selection if desired.]
Comm Address
This configuration item defines the communications address for the communications module. Each device
connected on the communications link must have a unique communications address. The Comm Address setting
must correspond with the address programmed into the RTU or other supervisory device so that it can request
information from and write data to a particular MJ-4 Control Panel.
Resync Time
This configuration item defines the Communications Module resync time (in characters). This item is used for
Communications Module protocols 2200 and 2179 to determine when one message ends and another message
begins. If a new character is not received within the period specified by this parameter, the control panel assumes
that the next received character is the start of a new message.
Tx En Delay
This configuration item defines the Communications Module Transmit Enable Delay (in milliseconds), specifies the
amount of time between the RTS output being activated and the start of transmit (output) data.
DNP dl Confirm
This configuration item defines whether or not to request confirmation from the master station for all responses for
the DNP3.0 protocol
CM SW RepeatEn
This configuration item controls whether software repeat is used for the MJ3A A, B1, and B2 protocols.
Host Addr
This configuration item defines the communications address for the RTU or other supervisory device to which
unsolicited responses are sent.
CM Unsolicited
This configuration item defines whether or not the communications module should send unsolicited responses.
Note that if this parameter is “Y”, an “enable unsolicited responses” message must also be sent from the master
station to start them.
AutoInhEnRemRL
This configuration item controls whether the auto inhibit must be active before a remote raise or lower request will
be followed. Setting “Y” prevents accidental fighting against the automatic tap changes with remote commands.
DNPset
This configuration item selects what DNP points will be used. Choose “DNPcfg” to configure your own points
with the DNP Configure program or choose from the preconfigured DNP point sets. See Section 8.
7.6
Troubleshooting Communications Problems
This section explains how to troubleshoot the MJ-4 Communications Module using the front panel LED indicators
and the MJXplorer software. The MJXplorer software allows you to access the communications module parameters
via the MJ-4 Control Panel.
19
7.6.1
Using LEDs to Help Diagnose Communications Problems
The communications module’s Txd and Rxd LEDs can be useful indicators to help isolate system communications
problems. The LEDs are directly activated by the transmit and receive signals and provide an immediate indication
of line activity. If the Rxd LED is not illuminated, then no receive signal activity is being detected at the
communications module Terminal Block connector.
If the Txd LED is not illuminated but the Rxd LED is illuminated, then the communications module is not
responding to communication attempts. This may occur for a variety of reasons, including: 1) the communications
module and/or MJ-4 Control Panel has not been configured properly, and 2) the unit is not being addressed.
If the Comm LED is not illuminated, then the communications module is not being addressed.
If the Rxd LED is illuminated but the Comm LED is not illuminated, this indicates that the module is receiving the
transmission but does not detect its address in the message. Recheck the communications address, because it may
not be set properly.
Verify that the MJ-4 communications configuration items have been set to match the system settings. (See section
7.5, Communications Module Configuration.)
7.6.2
Using MJXplorer to Troubleshoot Communications Problems
The MJXplorer software is a menu-driven application program that allows interfacing to the MJ-4 Communications
Module. Up to three MJ-4 units may be connected at a time. When connecting the Fiber Optic interface to
MJXplorer, the auto repeat function must match the setting in the ConfigureÆConfigure MJXplorer menu. See
section 4.3.1 for setting the Fiber Optic interface jumpers.
A Fiber Optic to RS-232 driver/receiver is required in order to perform these tests on the fiber optic interface. The
driver/receiver is an optical to electrical signal converter with an ST connector interface and an RS-232 interface.
Connect the optical side to the fiber optic interface via ST fiber optic patch cords. Connect the RS-232 interface to
the personal computer, Figure 7-9.
Use MJXplorer to help pinpoint communications problems in a system. MJXplorer permits testing of the
MJ-4 communications functions independent of other system components.
Once the physical connections are complete, from the MJ-4 front panel select the “2200NOA” protocol for
connecting to only one panel or select “2200” protocol and set comm addresses for connections to multiple panels.
In addition, match the Comm Parity and Comm Baud with the MJXplorer settings. Use MJXplorer to verify that
data can be retrieved from as well as written to the MJ-4 Control Panel.
MJ-4 Fiber Optic Interface
In Out
RS-232
DB9
2
3
4
5
6
7
RS-232
DB9
2
3
7
RS-232 DB9
to
Fiber Optic
oTx / oRx
oTx
oRx
8
Personal Computer
Running MJXplorer
Power Supply
MJ-4 RS-232/485 Interface
RS-232
DB9
Txd Rxd RTN
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Personal Computer
Running MJXplorer
Figure 7-9 MJXplorer Troubleshooting Connections
20
MJ-4 Communications Module
8 Setting the DNP points
This section describes how to set the DNP points that will be used on the control panel, You can use the DNP
Configure program to customize your DNP point set or you can use one of the predefined point sets listed in section
8.2.
In order to use a customized point set, an MJ-XL must have version 3.06 and the MJ-X must have 2.52. In order to
use predefined point sets (except Set 7), an MJ-XL must have version 3.07 and a MJ-X must have 2.53. Set 7 is only
available on the MJ-4 Control.
It is recommended that a Latching Relay command be used for all Binary Outputs (e.g., remote raise/lower, auto
inhibit, etc.).
8.1
Using the DNP Configure program for a custom DNP point set
The DNP Configure program is used to place a custom set of user-defined DNP points on the control panel. You
can obtain this program free-of-charge from your Siemens representative. After installing the program, run it and
follow the steps below to set your DNP points.
1.
Connect your computer’s com port to the panel’s Data Port with a “straight-thru” male-female DB9
cable.
2.
If you already have a DNP points profile, open it and go to Step 8. To open an existing points profile, in
the menu bar: click File Æ Open and select your file. Otherwise go to Step 3 to create a points profile.
3.
Click the Class 0 button. Move between the tabs and checkmark the points you want. Click OK.
4.
If Class 1, 2, or 3 polls are desired, these can now be set the same way.
5.
Click the Send button. Drag and drop the points up and down in the list boxes to change their point
number if desired. The top point in each box is point # 0, the point below that is point # 1, etc. Click
the Cancel button after points are ordered as desired.
6.
In the menu bar: click File Æ Save and save your file as XXXX.dnp
7.
Click the Setting button.
8.
Match the baud rate and parity between the computer and the panel. Choose the COM port your
computer is using. Set Addressing to be Disabled (if MJ-4’s “DataPortAddr” setting is OFF). Click OK.
9.
Click the Send button.
10. Click the Send button on the bottom of the points list screen.
11. If successful, a window will pop up displaying “Send Communication Status: OK…” Click OK.
12. DNP Configure can be closed or you can use the same point set to configure other panels.
8.2
8.2.1
Selecting a predefined DNP point set
DNP point set for MJ-4A or MJ-4B
When the MJ-4 Communications Module with firmware version 3.10 (initial release) or higher is interfaced with a
MJ-4A or MJ-4B, you will be able to choose from a number of DNP point sets, including Set 7. Sets 8 through 15
are not defined at this time.
8.2.2
DNP Point set for other Control Panels
The MJ-4 Communications Module may be used with the MJ-XL or MJ-X control panels, but the DNP sets
available may be limited. The operation and functionality of the MJ-4 Communications Module is similar to older
versions of the Communications Module though either the Fiber Optic or the RS-232/485 interfaces may be used at
a time. If the control panel is an MJ-XL with firmware version 3.07 or higher (or an MJ-X with version 2.53 or
21
higher) and the Communications Module has firmware 3.07 or higher, you will be able to use predefined DNP point
sets. Go to the <COMMUNICATIONS> menu and scroll to “DNPset.” The complete list of points for each set is
listed below. Two of the most popular point sets are 2.x4 set and 2.x3 set. 2.x4 is backwards compatible with
versions 2.04, 2.14, 2.44, etc. Likewise, 2.x3 is backwards compatible with 2.03, 2.13, 2.43, etc. For more
information about the DNP3.0 Level 2 implementation, please contact your Siemens representative.
8.2.3
2.x4
Binary Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Pos Known
1
Power Flow Direction
2
Auto Inhibit Status
3
Remote Control occurring
4
Neutral (U12) Signal
5
VRC1 contacts
6
VRC2 contacts
7
Remote Switch position
8
Manual Switch position
Binary Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Raise
1
Tap Lower
2
Auto Inhibit (Latch On/Off)
Analog Inputs
Point #
Description
0
R/A/M switch position
1
Power Flow Direction Indicator
2
VRC contacts status
3
Tap Position
4
Load Current
5
Load Voltage
6
KW
7
Power Factor
8
KW Fwd Dmd
9
KW Rev Dmd
10
Vld Total Harm Distortion %
11
Ild Total Harm Distortion %
12
Vs Total Harm Distortion %
13
VRC Status
14
VLC Status
15
Band Status Indicators
16
Tap Control Mode
17
Op Count Last Month
18
Op Count Last 24 hrs
19
Op Count Last 30 days
20
Op Count Month-to-Date
21
Load Voltage Inst Fwd Min
22
Load Voltage Inst Fwd Max
23
Load Voltage Inst Rev Min
24
Load Voltage Inst Rev Max
25
Tap Position Min
26
Tap Position Max
Analog Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Upper Voltage Limit
22
MJ-4 Communications Module
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
8.2.4
Lower Voltage Limit
Local Voltage Reduction %
VRC Stage1
VRC Stage2
VRC Stage3
Auto VRC1 %I
Auto VRC2 %I
Auto VRC set1
Auto VRC set2
Rev Bandwidth Setting
Rev Reactive Compensation
Rev Resistive Compensation
Rev Voltage Level
Rev Time Delay
Fwd Bandwidth Setting
Fwd Reactive Compensation
Fwd Resistive Compensation
Fwd Voltage Level
Fwd Time Delay
Voltage Limit Control Enable
Voltage Reduction Control Mode
Log Setup
Alert Status part 1
Alert Status part 2
Small 2.x3
Binary Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Pos Known
1
Power Flow Direction
2
Auto Inhibit Status
3
Raise (J) Motor Signal
4
Lower (K) Motor Signal
5
Remote Control occurring
6
U2/P2 Switch Position
7
Neutral (U12) Signal
8
Operations Count (U10) Signal
9
Auto Inhibit Terminal Block Input
10
VRC1 contacts
11
VRC2 contacts
12
Remote Switch position
13
Manual Switch position
14
Auto Inhibit Out Status
Binary Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Raise
1
Tap Lower
2
Auto Inhibit (Latch On/Off)
Analog Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Op Count Last Year
1
N/A
2
R/A/M switch position
3
Power Flow Direction Indicator
4
VRC contacts status
23
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Band, VRC, VLC status
Tap Position
Load Current
Load Voltage
Load Voltage (primary)
Source Voltage
Source Voltage (primary)
KVA
KVAR
KW
Power Factor
Analog Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Op Count Total
8.2.5
Simple
Binary Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Auto Inhibit Status
1
Remote Switch position
2
Manual Switch position
Binary Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Raise
1
Tap Lower
2
Auto Inhibit (On/Off)
Analog Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Position
1
Load Voltage
2
Load Current
3
Source Voltage
Analog Outputs
No Analog Outputs in the Simple set currently.
8.2.6
Metering
Binary Inputs
Point #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
24
Description
LOW Voltage Limiting, [1=On]
HIGH Voltage Limiting, [1=On]
Automatic Operation, [1=Inhibited]
Power Flow Direction, [0=Fwd, 1=Rev]
R/A/M Switch, [0=Off/Manual, 1=Auto/Remote]
Voltage Reduction Input 1, [0=Open, 1=Closed]
Voltage Reduction Input 2, [0=Open, 1=Closed]
Supervisory Switch, [0=Off, 1=On (Remote)]
Neutral Position Status, [0=inactive, 1=active]
Low Battery Status, [0=inactive, 1=active]
Raise Limit Reached, [0=inactive, 1=active]
Lower Limit Reached, [0=inactive, 1=active]
MJ-4 Communications Module
Binary Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Control Raise (1=raise)
1
Control Lower (1=lower)
2
Remote Auto/Manual (1=block)
3
Fwd Voltage Level (+/-.1V) (0=dec, 1=inc)
4
Bandwidth Voltage (+/-.1V) (0=dec, 1=inc)
5
Fwd Time Delay (+/- 5s) (0=dec, 1=inc)
6
Fwd Reactive Comp (+/- 1V) (0=dec, 1=inc)
7
Local Voltage Reduct (1=Active)
8
Remote Volt Reduct (1=Active)
9
Local Volt Reduct % (+/-.5V) (0=dec, 1=inc)
10
Remote Volt Red. % (+/-.5V) (0=dec, 1=inc)
11
Fwd Resistive Comp (+/- 1V) (0=dec, 1=inc)
12
Reset Demands & min/max (AI 20-26)
13
Reset Energies (AI 27-28)
Analog Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Operations Counter (100's)
1
Operations Counter (10's and 1's)
2
kVA Load
3
kW Load
4
Hardware Status (0=All Good)
5
Primary Load Current in Amps
6
Secondary Load Voltage
7
Primary Load Voltage
8
Primary Source Voltage
9
kVAR Load
10
Power Factor
11
Compensated Voltage (Sec.)
12
% Voltage Reduction in Effect
13
Tap Position
14
Voltage Reduction Status
15
Voltage Limit Status
16
Tap Control Mode Status
17
R/A/M switch position
18
Load Voltage Harmonics %
19
Load Current Harmonics %
20
Fwd Voltage Level Setting
21
Fwd Bandwidth Setting
22
Fwd Time Delay Setting
23
Fwd Reactive Compensation
24
Local Voltage Reduction %
25
Remote Voltage Reduction %
26
Fwd Resistive Compensation
27
Load Current Demand (fwd. max.)
28
KVAR Load Demand (fwd. min.)
29
KVAR Load Demand (fwd. max.)
30
KW Load Demand (fwd. max.)
31
Load Voltage Inst. Fwd. Min
32
Load Voltage Inst. Fwd. Max
33
Load Current Inst. Fwd. Max
34
KWHR Forward (0-999)
35
MWHR Forward (0-999)
25
Analog Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Fwd Voltage Level
1
Fwd Bandwidth
2
Fwd Time Delay
3
Fwd Reactive Compensation
4
Local Voltage Reduction %
5
VRC Stage2
6
Fwd Resistive Compensation
8.2.7
Active
Binary Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Pos Known
1
Power Flow Direction
2
Auto Inhibit Status
3
Neutral (U12) Signal
4
Remote Switch position
5
Manual Switch position
Binary Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Raise
1
Tap Lower
2
Auto Inhibit (Latch On/Off)
3
Active Auto Inhibit
Analog Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Position
1
Load Current
2
Load Voltage
3
KVAR
4
KW
5
Power Factor
6
Band Status Indicators
7
Tap Control Mode
8
Op Count Elapsed
9
CM firmware version
Analog Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Fwd Bandwidth
1
Fwd Voltage Level
2
Fwd Time Delay
3
Fwd Resistive Compensation
4
Fwd Reactive Compensation
5
Active Bandwidth
6
Active Voltage Level
7
Active Time Delay
8
Active Resistive Compensation
9
Active Reactive Compensation
10
Active Timer (mins)
26
MJ-4 Communications Module
8.2.8
Set 7
Binary Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Raise
1
Tap Lower
2
Auto Inhibit (On/Off)
Binary Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Auto Inhibit Status
1
Remote Switch position
2
Manual Switch position
3
Neutral (U12) Signal
4
Power Flow Direction
Analog Inputs
Point #
Description
0
Tap Position
1
Load Voltage
2
Load Current
3
Source Voltage
4
kW Load
5
kVA Load
6
kVAR Load
7
Op Count Last Month
8
Op Count Month-to-Date
9
Maintain Records of Contacts
10
Tap Changer Type
11
Balance Winding
12
Range of Regulation
13
Lower Led Solid/Blink
14
U2-P2 Terminal Out
15
Fixed RL On time
16
Log Min Max
17
PT Calc Enable
Analog Outputs
Point #
Description
0
Fwd Voltage Level
1
Fwd Bandwidth
2
Fwd Time Delay
3
Clear Contact Statuses and Op Counters
4
Read Overall Status of Contacts
8.2.9
2.x3
Binary Inputs
Point #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Scale Factor
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
Description
Tap Pos Known
Power Flow Direction
Auto Inhibit Status
Raise (J) Motor Signal
Lower (K) Motor Signal
Remote Control occurring
U2/P2 Switch Position
Neutral (U12) Signal
Operations Count (U10) Signal
Auto Inhibit Terminal Block Input
27
10
11
12
13
14
Binary Outputs
Point #
0
1
2
Analog Inputs
Point #
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
28
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
VRC1 contacts
VRC2 contacts
Remote Switch position
Manual Switch position
Auto Inhibit Out Status
Scale Factor
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
Description
Tap Raise
Tap Lower
Auto Inhibit (Latch On/Off)
Scale Factor
Description
Op Count Last Year
N/A
R/A/M switch position
Power Flow Direction Indicator
VRC contacts status
Band, VRC, VLC status
Tap Position
Load Current
Load Voltage
Load Voltage (primary)
Source Voltage
Source Voltage (primary)
KVA
KVAR
KW
Power Factor
P2 Ratio
Ld Current Dmd (Fwd Present)
kVA Dmd (Fwd Present)
kVAR Dmd (Fwd Present)
kW Dmd (Fwd Present)
Load Volts Dmd (Fwd Present)
CompVolts Dmd (Fwd Present)
Load I Dmd (Rev Present) (Amps)
kVA Load Dmd (Rev Present)
kVAR Load Dmd (Rev Present)
kW Load Dmd (Rev Present)
Load Volts Dmd (Rev Present) (Volts)
Comp Volts Dmd (Rev Present)
Max % Boost or Min % Buck (%)
Max % Buck or Min % Boost (%)
Motor Voltage
Vsrc Fwd Dmd
Vsrc Rev Dmd
Vload dc offset
Vload fundamental, RMS
Vload 2nd harmonic, RMS
Vload 3rd harmonic, RMS
Vload 4th harmonic, RMS
Vload 5th harmonic, RMS
Vload 6th harmonic, RMS
Vload 7th harmonic, RMS
Vload 8th harmonic, RMS
Vload 9th harmonic, RMS
Vload 10th harmonic, RMS
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF= 10
SF= 0.1
SF= 10
SF= 0.1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF= 100
SF = 10
variable
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF= 10
SF= 10
variable
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
MJ-4 Communications Module
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
Vload 11th harmonic, RMS
Vload 12th harmonic, RMS
Vload 13th harmonic, RMS
Vload 14th harmonic, RMS
Vload 15th harmonic, RMS
Vload 16th harmonic, RMS
Vload 17th harmonic, RMS
Vload 18th harmonic, RMS
Vload 19th harmonic, RMS
Vload 20th harmonic, RMS
Vload 21st harmonic, RMS
Vload 22nd harmonic, RMS
Vload 23rd harmonic, RMS
Vload 24th harmonic, RMS
Vload 25th harmonic, RMS
Vload 26th harmonic, RMS
Vload 27th harmonic, RMS
Vload 28th harmonic, RMS
Vload 29th harmonic, RMS
Vload 30th harmonic, RMS
Vload 31st harmonic, RMS
Iload dc offset
Iload fundamental, RMS
Iload 2nd harmonic, RMS
Iload 3rd harmonic, RMS
Iload 4th harmonic, RMS
Iload 5th harmonic, RMS
Iload 6th harmonic, RMS
Iload 7th harmonic, RMS
Iload 8th harmonic, RMS
Iload 9th harmonic, RMS
Iload 10th harmonic, RMS
Iload 11th harmonic, RMS
Iload 12th harmonic, RMS
Iload 13th harmonic, RMS
Iload 14th harmonic, RMS
Iload 15th harmonic, RMS
Iload 16th harmonic, RMS
Iload 17th harmonic, RMS
Iload 18th harmonic, RMS
Iload 19th harmonic, RMS
Iload 20th harmonic, RMS
Iload 21st harmonic, RMS
Iload 22nd harmonic, RMS
Iload 23rd harmonic, RMS
Iload 24th harmonic, RMS
Iload 25th harmonic, RMS
Iload 26th harmonic, RMS
Iload 27th harmonic, RMS
Iload 28th harmonic, RMS
Iload 29th harmonic, RMS
Iload 30th harmonic, RMS
Iload 31st harmonic, RMS
Vsource dc offset
Vsource fundamental, RMS
Vsource 2nd harmonic, RMS
Vsource 3rd harmonic, RMS
Vsource 4th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 5th harmonic, RMS
29
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
30
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF= 10
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF=10
SF=10
SF=10
SF=10
SF = 1
SF=1000
SF = 10
SF=1000
SF = 10
SF=1000
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
Vsource 6th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 7th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 8th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 9th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 10th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 11th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 12th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 13th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 14th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 15th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 16th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 17th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 18th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 19th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 20th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 21st harmonic, RMS
Vsource 22nd harmonic, RMS
Vsource 23rd harmonic, RMS
Vsource 24th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 25th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 26th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 27th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 28th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 29th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 30th harmonic, RMS
Vsource 31st harmonic, RMS
MJ-X Main Proc. SW Version
Number of Resets
Compensated Voltage (Secondary)
Line Frequency
Percent Regulation
% Voltage Reduction in Effect
Number of Interval Logs Stored
Vld Total Harm. Distortion (%)
Vload Harmonics RMS value
Iload Total Harm. Distortion (%)
Iload Harmonics RMS value
Vsrc Total Harm. Distortion (%)
Vsource Harmonics RMS value
VRC Status
VLC Status
Auto Tap Command Status
Band Status
Tap Control Mode Status
R/A/M switch position
Alert Status
Time period for Interval Log (minutes)
Number of Event Logs Stored
MJX Reset Status Register
Diagnostics Results Register 1
Diagnostics Results Register 2
Previous Month Ops Count
MP Board Hardware version
Power Board HW version
MP HC16 Mask version
Elapsed Operations Count
Year-To-Date Ops Count
KWHR Forward
KVARHR fwd lead
MJ-4 Communications Module
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 100
SF = 100
SF = 100
SF = 100
variable
variable
SF =1
SF =1
SF =1
SF =1
SF =1
SF =1
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
variable
variable
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
variable
variable
variable
variable
SF = 100
SF = 100
SF = 1
SF = 1
KVARHR fwd lag
KWHR Reverse
KVARHR rev lead
KVARHR rev lag
Operations Count for last 24 hours
Operations Count for last 30 days
Month-To-Date Operations Count
PF at Min. kVA Dmd (Fwd)
PF at Max. kVA Dmd (Fwd)
PF at Min. kVA Dmd (Rev)
PF at Max. kVA Dmd (Rev)
Load Current Dmd (Fwd Min) (Amps)
Load Current Dmd (Fwd Max) (Amps)
kVA Load Dmd (Fwd Min)
kVA Load Dmd (Fwd Max)
kVAR Load Dmd (Fwd Min)
kVAR Load Dmd (Fwd Max)
kW Load Dmd (Fwd Min)
kW Load Dmd (Fwd Max)
Load Voltage Dmd (Fwd Min)
Load Voltage Dmd (Fwd Max)
Comp Voltage Dmd (Fwd Min) (Volts)
Comp Voltage Dmd (Fwd Max) (Volts)
Load Current Dmd (Rev Min) (Amps)
Load Current Dmd (Rev Max) (Amps)
kVA Load Dmd (Rev Min)
kVA Load Dmd (Rev Max)
kVAR Load Dmd (Rev Min)
kVAR Load Dmd (Rev Max)
kW Load Dmd (Rev Min)
kW Load Dmd (Rev Max)
Load Voltage Dmd (Rev Min) (Volts)
Load Voltage Dmd (Rev Max) (Volts)
Comp. Voltage Dmd (Rev Min) (Volts)
Comp. Voltage Dmd (Rev Max) (Volts)
Vsrc Dmd (Fwd Min)
Vsrc Dmd (Fwd Max)
Vsrc Dmd (Rev Min)
Vsrc Dmd (Rev Max)
Load Voltage Inst. Fwd Min
Load Voltage Inst. Fwd Max
Load Voltage Inst. Rev Min
Load Voltage Inst. Rev Max
Source Voltage Inst. Fwd
Source Voltage Inst. Fwd Max
Source Voltage Inst. Rev Min
Source Voltage Inst. Rev Max
Comp Volts Inst. Fwd Min
Comp Volts Inst. Fwd Max
Comp Volts Inst. Rev Min
Comp Volts Inst. Rev Max
Load Current Inst. Fwd Min (Amps)
Load Current Inst. Fwd Max (Amps)
Load Current Inst. Rev Min (Amps)
Load Current Inst. Rev Max (Amps)
PF Inst. Fwd Min
PF Inst. Fwd Max
KVA Inst. Fwd Min
KVA Inst. Fwd Max
31
222
223
224
225
226
227
228
229
230
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF =1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF =1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
Analog Outputs
Point #
Scale Factor
0
SF = 1
1
SF = 1
2
SF = 1
3
SF = 1
4
SF = 1
5
SF = 1
6
SF = 1
7
SF = 1
8
SF = 1
9
SF = 1
10
SF = 1
11
SF = 1
12
SF = 1
13
SF = 1
14
SF = 1
15
variable
16
SF = 1
17
SF = 10
18
SF = 10
19
SF = 10
20
SF = 10
21
SF = 10
22
SF = 10
23
SF = 1
24
SF = 1
32
KVA Inst. Rev Min
KVA Inst. Rev Max
KW Inst. Fwd Min
KW Inst. Fwd Max
KW Inst. Rev Min
KW Inst. Rev Max
KVAR Inst. Fwd Min
KVAR Inst. Fwd Max
KVAR Inst. Rev Min
KVAR Inst. Rev Max
Frequency Inst. Fwd Min (Hz)
Frequency Inst. Fwd Max (Hz)
Tap position Inst. Fwd Min
Tap position Inst. Fwd Max
CM self test result
Vref a/d value
Raise Limit Reached status
Lower Limit Reached status
CM Response (to Init) Status
CM Software Revision
CM Hardware Revision
CM microprocessor Mask rev.
CM I/O Board Type
CM Options (to be defined)
CM I/O Board Revision
CM QSPI MP to CM Errors
CM QSPI no. of Failed Writes
CM QSPI no. of Xfer Cycles
CM DNP no. of requests for not supported items
CM RAM Error High Address
CM RAM Error Low Address
Description
Total Operations Count
Level 1 PW characters
Cfg. PW characters
Reg. PW characters
Meter PW characters
Dmd PW characters
Alert PW characters
Ops PW characters
LogSet PW characters
Event/Interval PW characters
Harm PW characters
Comm PW characters
Diag. PW characters
Syskey PW characters
Raise/Lower Operation
CT Primary Ratio (Amps)
System Line Voltage (Volts)
High Voltage Limit (Volts)
Low Voltage Limit (Volts)
Local Voltage Reduction (%)
VRC Remote Setting #1 (%)
VRC Remote Setting #2 (%)
VRC Remote Setting #3 (%)
Auto VRC #1 %Current (%)
Auto VRC #2 %Current (%)
MJ-4 Communications Module
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1000
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 10
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
Auto VRC #1 % Setting (%)
Auto VRC #2 % Setting (%)
P2 primary (from P2 PT ratio) (Volts)
P2 secondary (Volts)
CT secondary (Amps)
Current Shift (in º, relative to voltage)
U2 primary (Volts)
U2 secondary (from U2 PT ratio) (Volts) (Range: 100-150)
PT Threshold (Volts)
Date Format
Demand Subperiods
MJ3A remote mode %VRC
Min/Max Time-out(sec)
Screen Timeout(minutes)
Harm. Show as: RMS/%T/fund.
N/A
N/A
Dmd Time Interval (minutes)
Bandwidth (Reverse) (Volts)
Line Comp. React. (Rev) (Volts)
Line Comp. Resist. (Rev) (Volts)
Reverse Sensing Method
Set Voltage (Reverse) (Volts)
Time Delay (Reverse) (seconds)
Reverse Threshold Value (%)
Bandwidth (Forward) (Volts)
Line Comp. React. (Fwd) (Volts)
Line Comp. Resist. (Fwd) (Volts)
Control Operating Modes
Set Voltage (Forward) (Volts)
Time Delay (Forward)(seconds)
Control Communications Address
Comm Port Baud Rate
Comm Port Handshake Mode
Communications Port Re-Synch Time Characters (no. characters)
Communications Port-Transmit Enable Delay (msec)
Regulator Type
Utility Winding Polarity
Meter Display Volts
Demand Type
VRC Remote
Basis Voltage
Harm: Odd Only/Odd & Even
Regulator Configuration
Voltage Limiting Mode
Voltage Reduction Mode
Event/Interval Log Setup Status
Password Enables, Bit mapped
Alert Status word 1 (encoded)
Alert Status word 2 (encoded)
Memo1 - chars 1-2
Memo1 - chars 3-4
Memo1 - chars 5-6
Memo1 - chars 7-8
Memo1 - chars 9-10
Memo2 - chars 1-2
Memo2 - chars 3-4
Memo2 - chars 5-6
Memo2 - chars 7-8
33
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
SF = 1
Memo2 - chars 9-10
"NN" Raise/Lower Value
Regulator Id (Range: 0 - 32766)
Tap Changer Mechanism
Max. Load Current % (Range: 0-350)
Full Load Current (50-7200) (A)
CM Pre-tx delay for DNP
CM Post-tx delay for DNP
CM transmit delay for DNP
CM number of retries (DNP)
CM protocol
CM parity
CM self test request
Raise Limit % (0=10%, 1=8.75%, 2=7.5%, 3=6.25%, 4=5%)
Lower Limit % (0=10%, 1=8.75%, 2=7.5%, 3=6.25%, 4=5%)
Data Port Baud
9 Communications Module Firmware Versions
9.1
MJ-4 Communications Module firmware version
Version 3.10
9.2
: Supports all DNP points including Set 7, supports AMD Flash memory.
MJ-XL Communications Module firmware versions
The principle firmware version released for the MJ-4 Communications Module is the 3.10, an abbreviated list of the
principle firmware versions that have were released for use on the MJ-XL communications module follows. For
questions regarding firmware versions not included in this list, please contact your Siemens representative.
Version 2.13: Contains “full set” of 370 DNP3.0 points (see 2.x3 points list in Section 8.2.9).
Version 2.14: Contains “limited set” of 64 DNP3.0 points (see 2.x4 points list in Section 8.2.3).
Version 3.01: Level 2 implementation of DNP3.0, no DNP points by default; must use the DNP Configure program
to load the desired DNP points onto the control panel. Supports unsolicited responses.
Version 3.07: Level 2 implementation of DNP3.0, can use DNP Configure program to load user-defined DNP points
or choose to use one of the predefined DNP point sets (if used in conjunction with MJXL version 3.07
or higher).
Version 3.0701: Added short delay after CM initialization so all values are online before polling can start
Version 3.0702: Added full support for Trip/Close operations on Binary Outputs. If using a Trip/Close operation for
a tap raise or lower, the TRIP command should be used to activate. Also, a Trip to the Tap Raise
point will raise the tap one position; a Close to the Tap Raise point will lower the tap one position.
Version 3.0703: Added support for alternate AMD flash memory. Removed support for ATMEL Flash memory.
34
MJ-4 Communications Module
10 Specifications
This section contains the MJ-4 Communications Module specifications. Contained in this section are the parameters
for both the fiber optic and RS-232/485 interfaces. The data provided in the fiber optic section was obtained using
62.5/125 µm cable. Typical, maximum, and minimum lengths are given for normal and long range cable lengths.
Except for the maximum and minimum parameters, the numbers provided are for room temperature. The maximum
and minimum lengths are for temperature extremes.
10.1 Physical Dimensions
Height
Width
Depth
8.4 inches ( 21.34 cm )
2.89 inches ( 7.34 cm )
2.84 inches ( 7.21 cm )
10.2 Fiber Optic Link Interface Specifications
Transmitter
Maximum Output Power
Typical Output Power
Minimum Output Power
Numerical Aperture
Optical Port Diameter
Receiver
Peak Input Power Logic Level Low
Peak Input Power Logic Level High
System
Wavelength
Connector Type
Fiber Type
Data Rate
Maximum Optical Power Budget
Typical Optical Power Budget
Minimum Optical Power Budget
Link Lengths
Maximum Link Length
Typical Link Length
Minimum Link Length
Operating Temperature Range
Jumper J12 In
-13.0 dBm (Long Range)
-16.0 dBm (Long Range)
-20.0 dBm (Long Range)
0.49
290 µm
Jumper J12 Out
-16.0 dBm (Normal Range)
-19.0 dBm (Normal Range)
-23.0 dBm (Normal Range)
-24.0 dBm Min to -9.2 dBm Max
-40.0 dBm Max
820 nanometers (nominal)
ST
Glass 62.5/125 µm, 5dB/m
5 Mbaud (design)
11 dBm (Long Range)
8 dBm (Long Range)
4 dBm (Long Range)
19.2 Kbaud (tested)
8 dBm (Normal Range)
5 dBm (Normal Range)
1 dBm (Normal Range)
2.2 km (Long Range)
1.6 km (Long Range)
0.8 km (Long Range)
-40ºC to +85ºC (excluding cable)
1.6 km (Normal Range)
0.6 km (Normal Range)
0.2 km (Normal Range)
10.3 RS-232/RS-485 Interface Specifications
Parameter
Data Rate (maximum)
Distance (maximum)
Nodes (maximum)
Isolation
RS-232
19200 baud
50 ft
72
500 VAC, 1 minute
RS-485
19200 baud
4000 ft
32
500 VAC, 1 minute
35
Siemens Energy, Inc.
P.O. Box 6289
Jackson MS 39288
21-115527-024 rev01 Manual 10/08
©1994-2008 Siemens Energy, Inc.
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