2007 12 december

sign here please
australia signs the kyoto protocol
alcoa anglesea
2007
environment report
december
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT DECEMBER 2007
air
Air Monitoring
Stack Monitors
Average
Maximum
Opacity g/m3 10-minute average
0.065
0.193
Stack SO2 kg/min 1-hour average Licence limit 100kg/min
75.25
87.51
SO2 1 hour ppb
Average
Maximum
Community Centre
2
46
Primary School
3
143
Mt Ingoldsby
1
71
Scout Camp
3
96
Camp Wilkin
1
120
Camp Road
2
150
Ambient Monitors
Ambient Monitors
SO2 Maximum 1 hour averages (ppb)
Date
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Community Centre 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 46 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 3 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Primary School
0 127 9
0
0
1
Mt Ingoldsby
1
0
4
0
0
54 13 48 0
Scout Camp
0
9
43 77 0
3
9
Camp Wilkin
0
0
7
0
0
2
34 10 0
Camp Road
1 115 9
0
0
3
3
EPA Intervention Level
210
EPA Air Quality Objective
200
Alcoa Local Standard
170
1
2
-
2
18 0
0
0
2
90 0
0
0 143 21 57 1
1
1
1
25 13 0
0
1
0
96 -
-
-
45 2
0
0
1
0
0
0
31 120 0
0
33 1
1
1
4
0
67 1
0
0
0
0
5
48 0
71 0
1
1
2
2
3
70 84 2
0
1
56 1
0
0
1
2
3
18 0
0
2
0
88 5
0
4
56 0
0
0
10
12 0
6
19 54 0
5
0
0
0
34 0
2
0
12
0
0
0
4
0 14951 0
45
0
3
1
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT DECEMBER 2007
water
Water Storage
Barwon Water storage levels for the Geelong system at 36.5% capacity. Stage 4 restrictions apply with a
Daylight Savings exemption to permit limited residential garden watering.
Water Discharge
ML
December
Total
Ashponds (SP1)
133*
1598
Mine (SP4)
0
0
* average value based upon data from year to date. December data not available due to equipment error.
Water Monitoring
SP1
SP4
SP3
17/12/2007
Ashpond
Mine
Final
EPA limit
Lab Result
EPA limit
Lab Result
EPA limit
Lab Result
pH
4-10
7.9
3-9
-
5-9
6.1
Susp. Solids
100
<2
100
-
30
2
Colour
50
5
50
-
50
10
Aluminium
10.00
0.05
10.0
-
5.500
0.260
Iron
10.00
0.06
20.0
-
4.000
0.072
Zinc
0.400
0.015
2.000
-
0.300
0.100
WATER WATER USAGE PER MONTH (ML)
Date
JAN
FEB MAR APR
MAY JUNE JULY AUG
SEPT OCT
NOV
DEC
TOTAL
Town Water
0.7
0.7
0.9
1.1
0.9
2.3
1.7
1.9
1.4
0.8
0.9
1.0
14.3
Bore Water
274
253
280
241
246
182
205
227
221
252
274
299
2954
Mine Water
81
71
76
83
80
86
98
87
87
77
57
43
926
300.0
3000
250.0
2500
200.0
2000
150.0
1500
100.0
1000
50.0
0.0
500
0
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT DECEMBER 2007
kyoto protocol
During December the United Nations hosted a
climate change conference in Bali, Indonesia. It
was here that Australia signed the ratification
documents for the Kyoto protocol, ending the
Australian Government’s long-held opposition to
the global climate agreement. So what is the
Kyoto protocol?
What is the Kyoto protocol?
The Kyoto protocol is an international and legally
binding agreement to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions worldwide. It came into force in
February 2005 after being agreed at a 1997 UN
conference in Kyoto, Japan. A total of 174 nations
ratified the pact to reduce the greenhouse gases
emitted by developed countries to at least 5%
below 1990 levels by 2008-12.
Is everyone signed up to the pact?
No. The United States, the world’s biggest carbon
emitter, opposed the Kyoto protocol in 2001,
saying it would be too expensive and should
include targets for developing nations.
Following Australia’s ratification, the United States
is now the only developed nation outside the pact.
Australia had previously steadfastly refused to
ratify Kyoto, arguing that Australia would not
agree to a pact setting greenhouse gas emission
targets unless the big polluters among developing
countries, such as China and India, were also
subject to binding targets.
Why are developed nations expected to
cut their carbon?
Climate change will hit the poorest and most
vulnerable the hardest, according to the
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
(ICPP), but it will affect everyone. With their greater
economic and technological resources,
industrialised countries are considered to be
equipped to do the most to reduce greenhouse
gas emissions.
What happens after Kyoto?
Delegates from over 180 nations, together with
observers from intergovernmental and nongovernmental organisations met this month to
negotiate a new pact to succeed the Kyoto
protocol, which expires in 2012.
Parties need to agree on the key areas which the
new climate agreement should cover, such as
mitigation (including avoided deforestation, where
industrialised nations pay rainforest-rich nations to
protect their forests to offset greenhouse gas
emissions), adaptation, technology and financing.
They also need to agree on when the talks and
negotiations will conclude so that the new climate
change deal can be ratified by national
governments before the end of 2012.
Other important issues under negotiation in Bali,
included adaptation to climate change, the launch
of a fund for adaptation, reducing emissions from
deforestation, issues relating to the carbon
market, and arrangements for a review of the
Kyoto protocol.
PLANTS OF THE ANGLESEA HEATH
SCENTED PAPERBARK (Melaleuca squarrosa)
Melaleuca
Melaleuca...from Greek melas; black and leukos; white,
referring to black marks on the white trunks of some
species due to fire
squarrosa
squarrosa... having scales or scale-like overlapping leaves,
referring to the shape of the leaf
Size:
Form:
Foliage:
Flowers:
Habitat:
2 - 5m H x 1- 2 m W
erect, open to compact large shrub or
rarely, a small tree to 10m high
stiff dark green ovate to triangular leaves to
18mm long; crowded in pairs and distinctly
decussate (each pair at right angles to the
pair below)
profuse terminal spikes of scented cream to
yellow flowers
September to February
damp and valley sclerophyll forests, swamp
and wattle tea-tree scrub; must be in moist
to wet soils
MELALEUCA SQUARROSA
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT DECEMBER 2007
LAND
RAINFALL (mm)
Month
JAN
FEB MAR APR
MAY JUNE JULY AUG
SEPT OCT
NOV
DEC
TOTAL
2007 Rainfall
40.0
20.2 25.6
7.3
31.0
37.1
129.4
52.8 17.0
69.2
40.8 43.6
124.0
26.0
47.2
31.6
100.4 67.8
653.4
1968-2006 Average
44.6
43.3 41.5
42.5
53.1
53.5
61.2 60.8
59.6
59.3
61.1
60.6
68.3
72.0
53.1
666.9
67.0
65.8
43.8
130
70 0.00
120
60 0.00
110
100
50 0.00
90
80
40 0.00
70
60
30 0.00
50
40
20 0.00
30
20
10 0.00
10
0
0.00
WATER
TOWN WATER USE (ML)
FEB
MAR APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
Process
23.9
2000 2006 2007 JAN
11.0
1 2 . 8 0.6
0.6
0.8
1.0
1.1
0.8
0.9
0.6
2.2
0.6
1.5
0.7
1.7
1.2
0.7
0.8
0.9
2 .5
Amenity
11.6
3.8
1.5
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.1
0.7
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.2
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
4 0 .0
3 5 .0
2 .0
3 0 .0
2 5 .0
1 .5
2 0 .0
1 .0
1 5 .0
1 0 .0
0 .5
5 .0
0 .0
0 .0
2000
2006
2007
JA N
F E B
M A R
A P R
M A Y
JUN
JUL
A UG
S E P
O C T
NO V
D E C
AIR
GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) TOTAL (Mt) & GHG EMISSION EFFICENCY (t/MWh)
GHG Mt
‹ GHG
t/MWh
1990
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
1.42
1.23
1.27
1.50
1.45
1.47
1.31
1.49
1.40
1.34
1.24
1.19
1.21
1.21
1.20
1.21
1.20
1.18
2
1600000
1 .8
1400000
1 .6
1 .4
1 .2
1200000
1000000
1
800000
0 .8
600000
0 .6
400000
0 .4
200000
0 .2
0
0
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT DECEMBER 2007
environmental improvement
Environmental Management Targets
December
2007 Total
Forecast
2007 Target
Reportable Environmental Incidents
0
3
-
0
Monthly EHS ASAT Audit Completion (%)
100
100
-
90
Air Emission Targets
December
2007 Total
Forecast
2007 Target
Ambient SO2 ( no. readings > 210ppb)
0
3
-
0
Ambient SO2 ( no. readings > 200ppb)
0
4
-
0
Stack SO2 (no. hrs > 100kg/min)
0
0
-
0
SO2 Load Reductions (lost MWh)
713
24601
-
N/A
GHG Efficiency (t CO2 e/MWh)
1.18
1.18
-
1.20
Opacity (10 min av > 0.25g/m3 normal operation)
0
0
-
0
Water Targets
December
2007 Total
Forecast
2007 Target
Town Water (ML)
1.0
14.3
-
14.2
Bore Water (ML)
299
2955
-
2667
Waste Targets
December
2007 Total
Forecast
2007 Target
Waste to Landfill (t)
0.0
3.8
-
9.0
Solid Prescribed Waste to Landfill (t)
0.0
0.0
-
0.0
Mine Rehabilitation Targets
2007 Total
2007 Target
2007 Area Cleared (ha)
2.9
3.5
2007 Area Rehabilitated (ha)
5.0
> 3.5
2005 Mine Rehabilitation Species Richness (%)
103
100
OUR ENVIRONMENT AND OUR EMPLOYEES..
Tony - we hear ther
e’
s been an energy makeover at
there’
e’s
your place - what’
s been going on? With the Federal
what’s
Government solar rebate on offer, we’ve just installed sixteen solar
panels on our roof which will satisfy all our power requirements.
This is in addition to the existing solar hot water service.
And what are the benefits? On an average day we consume
15 kW a day, but now with the solar panels we can actually
generate over 20 kW per day during the summer months. So the
excess power is being fed straight back into the grid, which I can
verify by watching my meter going backwards. Obviously this latest
installation has significant greenhouse gas savings making us a
carbon neutral household.
And the dollar benefits have got to be good? Our power
bills are non existent. On current power prices, we’ve calculated
that it should take roughly 14 years for a complete payback, but
we expect it will take less than this with the future cost-of-power
projections. Plus we were also eligible for a carbon credits once-off
payment! There’s also the potential of it increasing the value of our
house as the next owner will benefit from our capital outlay.
Any other plans T
ony? Due to the capacity of the inverter, we
Tony?
can’t put any more panels in place, but we are certainly looking
forward to the next power outage!
...TONY FRANKEN
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