201007 ANG july env report

ripped and ready to grow
Anglesea’s mine rehabilitation for 2010 is complete
alcoa anglesea
2010
environment report
july
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT JULY 2010
air
Air Monitoring
Stack Monitors
Average
Maximum
Opacity g/min 10-minute average
0.063
0.162
70.12
77.26
Ambient Monitors
SO2 1 hour ppb
Average
Maximum
Community Centre
4
62
Primary School
1
71
Mt Ingoldsby
1
155
Scout Camp
3
130
Camp Wilkin
2
158
Camp Road
1
83
Stack SO2 kg/min 1-hour average
Licence limit 100kg/min
Ambient Monitors
SO2 Maximum 1 hour averages (ppb)
Date
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Comm Centre
4
4
3
4
3
3
3
13
20
54
49
13
6
4
3
6
18
4
4
4
4
3
4
4
16
8
4
4
9
14
62
Primary School
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
3
71
0
0
0
0
5
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
1
1
2
19
48
Mt Ingoldsby
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
42
155
6
1
8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
25
1
0
1
2
0
0
Scout Camp
2
25
1
21
3
19
50
4
9
0
80
0
102
130
0
43
71
43
10
74
0
0
0
0
8
11
1
1
1
0
81
Camp Wilkin
0
0
0
0
3
0
2
1
48
93
6
2
158
4
2
0
1
0
0
2
1
3
1
0
7
3
2
0
1
2
1
Camp Road
1
10
0
0
15
0
0
3
1
31
79
36
0
1
0
0
8
83
1
1
0
0
48
0
3
8
2
2
4
22
7
EPA Air Quality Objective 200
Alcoa Local Standard 170
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT JULY 2010
water
Water Storage
Barwon Water storage levels for the Geelong system are at a five year high - 45.4% capacity. Stage 3 water restrictions apply.
Water discharge
ML
July
Total
Ashponds (SP1)
91
798
Mine (SP4)
0
0
Water Monitoring
16/07/2010
SP1
Ashpond
SP4
Mine
Lab Result
Final
EPA Limit
Lab Result
4 - 10
7.3
3
Susp Solids
100
<4
100
discharge
30
<4
Colour
50
3
50
at
50
3
Aluminium
10
0.23
10
time
5.5
0.10
Iron
10
0.18
20
of
4.0
0.068
Zinc
0.4
0.32
2.0
sampling
0.3
0.084
pH
EPA Limit
SP3
9
EPA Limit
No
5
Lab Result
9
7.3
WATER WATER USE PER MONTH (ML)
please note: mine water use is not metered, these values are estimated.
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUNE
JULY
Town Water
1.2
1.0
2.7
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
Bore Water
284
258
283
244
237
210
203
Mine Water
112
52
98
72
102
76
85
AUG
SEPT
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT JULY 2010
mine rehabilitation
With the mine rehabilitation off to a late start this year, it was a
winter really set in.
The introduction of new State Government legislation in 2007
made the Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) and previous
procedures we had in place for locating and protecting
aboriginal artefacts redundant. The legislative changes meant
the development of a new document called a Cultural Heritage
Management Plan (CHMP) was required for the current
mine plan. The CHMP is a way of protecting and managing the
Aboriginal cultural heritage of the area, whilst also allowing
mining production to proceed. Whilst this process began in
March 2009, it took some time to complete the necessary field
work, write the CHMP and ensure adequate consultation and
approval from the Wadawurrung, the Registered Aboriginal
Party (RAP) for our area, and Aboriginal Affairs Victoria (AAV)
before any clearing could take place.
With the CHMP waiting for approval, we started up the mulcher
to get the practical works underway. Harvesting the
understorey for mulch to use in revegetation basically involves
slashing the understorey with a mulcher and then collecting the
material in a trailer. As this process did not involve any
disturbance to the soil, it was approved to proceed prior to the
CHMP being signed off. The harvest was substantial as this
-tree. In the end the
mulch storage shed was overflowing.
In early June, Alcoa received approval for the CHMP. Wasting
no time, our operators were out on site the very next day
clearing the strip area of the larger vegetation that makes up
the overstorey. At the other end of the works, the crews were
ANIMALS OF THE ANGLESEA HEATH
MASKED LAPWING (Vanellus miles)
Size:
Description:
Voice:
Distribution:
Habitat:
Food:
Did you know:
36cm
white below, with brown wings and
back, and black flight feathers and
crown. Birds have large yellow
wattles covering their face.
A loud "kekekekekekekek"
common throughout northern, central
and eastern Australia. Also found in
Indonesia, New Guinea, New
Caledonia and New Zealand.
inhabits marshes, mudflats, beaches
and grasslands.
feed on insects, their larvae and
earthworms from just below the
surface of the ground
the Masked Lapwing is equipped
with a yellow thorny spur with a black
tip that projects from the wrist on
each wing - you can see it clearly on
the photo opposite.
busily preparing the rehabilitation area. The gully that was
once the coal haul road was filled and given a final capping of
clay to blend in with the surrounding topography.
Working on a rehabilitation site topped with clay in a winter
that has seen substantial rainfall was challenging for the mine
employees to say the least. The pre-ripping of the clay was
deferred until the scrapers had laid the first 100mm of
stockpiled subsoil due to the worry that broken clay + more
rain = difficult conditions! Our operators completed this task
with efficiency working in tandem with the circling scrapers.
From there it was left to the scrapers to run back and forth
picking up the next layers of fresh subsoil and topsoil and
transporting these from the cut to the rehabilitation area. These
layers were picked up at 100mm but then distributed at the
rehabilitation site at approximately half the depth. This allowed
us to rehabilitate over five hectares whilst only clearing three.
Finishing touches were done using an orbital muck spreader,
applying the mulch over the rehabilitation area. Finally, we did
a few quick laps on the dozer ripping up the ground ready for
some broadcast seeding and it was all done. The project took
seven weeks from beginning to end and was a great team
effort.
Update: Please note the proposed HiCAL40 Alternative Fuel
Trial we wrote about in our last edition has been cancelled.
During a management review of the project a data error was
discovered that indicated a range of design modifications would
be required for us to deliver the project as it was originally
intended. This change in project scope, combined with
community and stakeholder input from consultation activities
resulted in the trial being cancelled.
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT JULY 2010
LAND
RAINFALL (mm)
Long Term Average
2010 Rainfall
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUNE
JULY
42.9
41.6
40.2
51.9
59.9
59.1
63.0
5.0
67.0
63.0
57.0
30.2
71.8
47.4
AUG
SEPT
OCT
NOV
DEC
WATER
TOWN WATER USE (ML)
2000
2009
2010
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
Amenity Water Use
11.6
2.7
2.3
0.1
0.1
1.7
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Process Water use
23.9
13.5
5.9
1.1
0.9
1.1
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
AIR
GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) TOTAL (Mt) & GHG EMISSION EFFICIENCY (t/mwH)
GHG t
GHG t/MWh
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
f orecast
1227846
1265103
1504860
1448793
1468098
1309674
1491486
1396713
1452351
1361632
1479417
1.24
1.19
1.21
1.21
1.20
1.21
1.20
1.18
1.23
1.22
1.19
DEC
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT JULY 2010
environmental improvement
Environmental Management Targets
July
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Reportable Environmental Incidents
0
0
0
0
Env Near Miss vs Env Incident Run Rate (ratio)
1
4.4
4.4
2.5
Monthly EHS ASAT Audit Completion (%)
100
100
100
90
Air Emission Targets
July
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Ambient SO2 (no. readings > 200ppb)
0
0
0
0
Stack SO2 (no. hrs > 100kg/min)
0
0
0
0
SO2 Load Reductions (lost MWh)
20
98
168
NA
1.19
1.19
1.19
1.20
0
0
0
0
Water Targets
July
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Town Water (ML)
0.8
8.0
12.8
14.2
Bore Water (ML)
203
1719
2946
4000
Waste Targets
July
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Waste to Landfill (t)
3.3
3.3
5.7
8
0
0
0
0
GHG Efficiency (t CO2 e/MWh)
Opacity (10 min av > 0.25g/m3 norm ops)
Solid Prescribed Waste to Landfill (t)
Mine Rehabilitation Targets
2010 Total
2010 Area to Clear (ha)
3.1
2010 Area to Rehabilitate (ha)
5.4
OUR ENVIRONMENT AND OUR EMPLOYEE
Hi Wayne. Tell us a little about the role you played in the
2010 mine rehabilitation.
Every year I look forward to the harvesting of the mulch in
readiness for the new rehabilitation area and 2010 was no
different. This year’s crop was extremely heavy and I would
say the heaviest harvest I have done to date. Unfortunately
this season is well behind schedule and I have been a little
concerned. However due to favourable weather conditions and
the quality of the seed within the mulch I think 2010 will be
extremely successful.
Why did the rehabilitation occur so late this year?
It occurred due to the requirement for us to have an approved
Cultural Heritage Management Plan. The delay has been very
concerning to all team and staff members because it impacts
heavily on our production figures. Mine rehabilitation and the
environment is a very big part of our mining operation.
How did you fit this work into your normal production
workload?
This is part of our day to day duties and the team together plan
our day to day working role. The mine rehabilitation is not just
the role of individuals. It is a team effort no matter how big or
small a part you play in the activity.
Similar pages