AN 21.4

AN 21.4
CAP1188 Family LED Configuration Options
Author:
Burke Davison
Microchip Technology Inc.
INTRODUCTION
This application note contains guidelines for the successful implementation of LEDs using the following RightTouch™
capacitive sensors: CAP1188, CAP1166, CAP1133, CAP1128, and CAP1126.
References
Data Sheet for the RightTouch device of interest
Note:
It is important to always refer to the Microchip Data Sheets and the Reference Design Schematics for complete and current information regarding any Capacitive Sensor designs. Additionally, the circuit examples
shown in this document are for illustrative purposes only.
Document and Device Differences
In this document, the CAP1188 is used to illustrate various LED configurations. The CAP1166, CAP1133, CAP1128,
and CAP1126 devices are similar with the exception of the number of capacitive sensors and LED drivers. Consult the
device data sheet for specifics regarding the device you are using.
CONFIGURING LEDS TO MATCH BOARD DESIGN
In a board design, there’s flexibility in how LEDs are connected. Two common methods of using LEDs include 1) using
an external voltage source to generate the current needed to light the LED, and 2) using the RightTouch device to source
the current needed. In addition, in some designs, button presses actuate the LEDs; in others, LEDs are controlled by
the host. The RightTouch devices can be configured to accommodate these variations.
Output Type
The LED pins can be connected as open-drain or push-pull.
The LED Output Type Register (71h) controls the type of output for the LED pins, with each bit corresponding to an LED.
For example, bit 0 corresponds with LED1 output type, bit 1 corresponds with LED2 output type, etc. A ‘0’ in the bit position configures the associated pin as open-drain. A ‘1’ in the bit position configures the associated pin as push-pull. The
default for this register is 00h, which configures the pins as open-drain.
Polarity
LEDs can be configured such that if the LED pin is driven to a logic ‘0’, the LED will be on and the CAP11xx LED pin is
sinking the LED current. Conversely, if the LED pin is driven to a logic ‘1’, the LED will be off and there is no current flow
(see External Voltage Source on page 2). Because LEDs can also be installed in an opposite configuration (see RightTouch Device Sourcing Current on page 3), the RightTouch devices have a control to determine the logical polarity.
The LED Polarity Register (73h) determines the polarity of the LED pins, with each bit corresponding to an LED. A ‘0’
in the bit position inverts the signal on the associated LED pin. A ‘1’ in the bit position leaves the signal as it is. The
default for these registers is 00h, which configures the pins as inverted.
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LED Actuation Control
LEDs can be linked to their corresponding capacitive sensor input so that LED actuation is controlled by capacitive sensor touches and releases, or LED actuation can be controlled by the host.
Sensor LED Linking Register (72h) determines whether the LED is linked to its corresponding sensor input, with each
bit corresponding to an LED. A ‘0’ in the bit position indicates the LED is not linked to the sensor. It is controlled via the
LED Output Control Register. A ‘1’ in the bit position indicates the LED is linked to the sensor. The default for this register
is 00h, which configures the LEDs so they are not linked to sensors.
Note:
When an LED is linked to a sensor, the corresponding bit in the LED Output Control register is ignored (i.e.
the linked LED cannot be controlled via the host).
For LEDs that are not linked to sensors, the LED Output Control Register (74h) determines whether the LED is actuated
or not. A ‘0’ in the bit position indicates the LED is not actuated. A ‘1’ in the bit position indicates the LED is actuated.
The default for these registers is 00h, which configures the LEDs so they are not actuated.
CONFIGURATION FOR HARDWARE EXAMPLES
External Voltage Source
Figure 1 is a circuit example using an external voltage source.
FIGURE 1:
CAP1188 LED External Voltage Source Example
The typical CAP1114 configuration for the circuit in Figure 1 is shown in Table 1.
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TABLE 1:
CAP1188 EXTERNAL VOLTAGE SOURCE EXAMPLE CONFIGURATION
LED1
Configuration
Register
ADDR
Value
Comments
LED1 pin is opendrain.
LED Output Type Register
71h
00h
default
LED1 pin has
inverted polarity.
LED Polarity Register
73h
00h
This will permit a ‘1’ (actuate)
written to the LED Output
Control register to illuminate
the LED.
Using the circuit in Figure 1 and the configuration in Table 1, LED1 can be illuminated by writing 01h to the LED Output
Control Register 74h. Writing 00h to register 74h will turn off LED1.
RightTouch Device Sourcing Current
Figure 2 is a circuit example using the CAP1114 to source current for LED1.
FIGURE 2:
CAP1188 Sourcing LED Current Example
The typical CAP1114 configuration for the circuit in Figure 2 is shown in Table 2.
TABLE 2:
RIGHTTOUCH CURRENT SOURCE EXAMPLE CONFIGURATION
LED1
Configuration
Register
ADDR
Value
LED1 pin is pushpull.
LED Output Type Register
71h
01h
LED1 pin has noninverted polarity.
LED Polarity Register
73h
01h
Comments
This will permit a ‘1’ (actuate)
written to the LED Output
Control register to illuminate
the LED.
Using the circuit in Figure 2 and the configuration in Table 2, LED1 can be illuminated by writing 01h to the LED Output
Control Register 74h. Writing 00h to register 74h will turn off LED1.
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AN 21.4
CONFIGURING LED OPERATION
The RightTouch LED drivers have four LED behaviors which can be used to control LED operation, whether the LED is
actuated by the host or through a touch / release to a linked sensor. Brightness of the LEDs, as well as the transition
rate from on to off, can be programmed for each behavior.
LED Behavior
Each LED can be assigned one of the following four behaviors:
• Direct: The LED is driven on or off.
• Pulse 1: The LED is configured to pulse (fade ON-OFF-ON) a programmable number of times.
• Pulse 2: The LED is configured to pulse while actively being driven, and then pulse a programmable number of
times when the driving condition is removed.
• Breathe: The LED is configured to fade ON-OFF-ON continuously while actively being driven.
The LED Behavior Registers (81h - 82h of the CAP1188 and CAP1166, and 81h for the CAP1133, CAP1128, and
CAP1126) control the type of behavior assigned to an LED, with every 2 bits corresponding to an LED. For example,
bits 1-0 correspond with LED1 behavior type, bits 3-2 correspond with LED2 behavior type, etc. The bits are decoded
to determine the behavior type, as shown in Table 3. The default for these registers is 00h, which configures each LED
to use Direct behavior.
TABLE 3:
LED BEHAVIOR REGISTER BIT DECODE
LEDX_CTL
[1:0]
Behavior
Description
Start Trigger
Stop Trigger
1
0
0
0
Direct
The LED is driven to the programmed state (active Touch Detected or
or inactive).
LED Output Control bit set
Release
Detected or
LED Output
Control bit
cleared
0
1
Pulse 1
Touch or Release
The LED will pulse a programmed number of
times. During each pulse the LED will breathe up Detected or LED
to the maximum brightness and back down to the Output Control bit
set or cleared
minimum brightness so that the total pulse period
(see Pulse 1 Start
matches the programmed value.
Trigger on page
5)
n/a
1
0
Pulse 2
Touch Detected or
The LED will pulse when the start trigger is
detected. When the stop trigger is detected, it will LED Output Control bit set
pulse a programmable number of times then
return to its minimum brightness.
Release
Detected or
LED Output
Control bit
cleared
1
1
Breathe
The LED will breathe. It will be driven with a duty Touch Detected or
cycle that ramps up from the programmed mini- LED Output Control bit set
mum duty cycle (default 0%) to the programmed
maximum duty cycle (default 100%) and then
back down. Each ramp takes up 50% of the programmed period.
Release
Detected or
LED Output
Control bit
cleared
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PULSE 1 START TRIGGER
For Pulse 1 behavior, the pulses can be triggered to start when the LED is actuated (a touch is detected or the host sets
the LED Output Control bit) or when the LED is de-actuated (a release is detected or the host clears the LED Output
Control bit).
The LED Pulse 1 Period Register (84h) bit 7 (ST_TRIG) controls the Pulse 1 start trigger. The default for this bit is 0,
which configures Pulse 1 behavior to start pulsing when a touch is detected or the drive bit is set. If the bit is set to 1,
Pulse 1 behavior starts pulsing when a release is detected or the drive bit is cleared.
This setting will apply to all LEDs which have their behavior set to Pulse 1.
Pulse Count
The number of pulses (breaths) performed for the Pulse 1 and Pulse 2 behaviors are controlled by bits in the LED Configuration Register (88h). Bits 5-3 are decoded to determine the Pulse 2 count and bits 2-0 are decoded to determine
Pulse 1 count. The decode and defaults are shown in Table 4.
TABLE 4:
PULSEx_CNT DECODE
PULSEx_CNT[2:0]
2
1
0
Number of Pulses /
Breaths
0
0
0
1
0
0
1
2
0
1
0
3
0
1
1
4
1
0
0
5
1
0
1
6
1
1
0
7
1
1
1
8
Default for Behavior
Pulse 2 default
Pulse 1 default
LED Brightness
LED brightness is determined by duty cycles. An LED can either be on or off. To make an LED appear less bright, pulse
width modulation (PWM) is used. The less time an LED is on, the dimmer it appears.
Each of the four behavior types has its own settings for minimum and maximum duty cycles, as shown in Table 5. The
defaults set the maximum duty cycle to 100% and the minimum duty cycle to 0% for all behaviors.
TABLE 5:
LED BEHAVIOR DUTY CYCLE REGISTERS
ADDR
Register
B7
B6
B5
B4
B3
B2
B1
B0
Default
90h
LED Pulse 1
Duty Cycle
LED_P1_MAX_DUTY[3:0]
LED_P1_MIN_DUTY[3:0]
F0h
91h
LED Pulse 2
Duty cycle
LED_P2_MAX_DUTY[3:0]
LED_P2_MIN_DUTY[3:0]
F0h
92h
LED Breathe
Duty Cycle
LED_BR_MAX_DUTY[3:0]
LED_BR_MIN_DUTY[3:0]
F0h
93h
Direct Duty
Cycle
LED_DR_MAX_DUTY[3:0]
LED_DR_MIN_DUTY[3:0]
F0h
The bits are decoded as shown in Table 6 to determine the duty cycle settings.
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AN 21.4
TABLE 6:
LED DUTY CYCLE DECODE
x_MAX/MIN_DUTy [3:0]
Maximum Duty Cycle
Minimum Duty Cycle
0
7%
0%
1
9%
7%
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
11%
9%
0
0
1
1
14%
11%
0
1
0
0
17%
14%
0
1
0
1
20%
17%
0
1
1
0
23%
20%
0
1
1
1
26%
23%
1
0
0
0
30%
26%
1
0
0
1
35%
30%
1
0
1
0
40%
35%
1
0
1
1
46%
40%
1
1
0
0
53%
46%
1
1
0
1
63%
53%
1
1
1
0
77%
63%
1
1
1
1
100%
77%
LED Transition Rate (Pulse, Breathe, and Ramp)
Transition rate refers to how fast the LED changes from on to off to on. For Pulse 1 and Pulse 2 behaviors, the transition
rate for each pulse is controlled by the Pulse 1 Period and the Pulse 2 Period respectively. For Breathe behavior, the
transition rate is controlled by the Breathe Period. For Direct behavior, transition rate is determined by the rise rate, fall
rate, and off delay.
PULSE AND BREATHE PERIODS
The following registers are used to set Pulse 1, Pulse 2, and Breathe periods:
TABLE 7:
LED PERIOD REGISTERS
Register
Address
Default Register Value
Default Period (ms)
Pulse 1 Period
84h
20h
1024
Pulse 2 Period
85h
20h
1024
Breathe Period
86h
5Dh
2976
In each period register, each LSB represents 32ms. To determine the total breathe period (from low duty cycle to high
duty cycle and back to low), multiply the decimal value of the register setting by 32 (see Note 1:). For example, a setting
of 18h (24d) would represent a period of 768ms. The total range is from 32ms to 4.064 seconds. Table 8 shows some
examples. The defaults for the Pulse 1 Period and Pulse 2 Period registers are both 20h (32d), which sets the periods
at 1024ms for any LEDs which have their behavior set to Pulse 1 or Pulse 2. The default for the Breathe Period is 5Dh
(93d), which sets the period at 2976ms for any LEDs which have their behavior set to Breathe.
Note 1: In the Pulse 1 Period Register (84h), bit 7 is used to indicate when the behavior should begin (see Pulse 1
Start Trigger on page 5). The default is 0. If the bit is set to 1, it should not be included when calculating the
period time. Only bits 6-0 are used to calculate the time. For example, if the bit 7 is set to 1 and register 84h
is set to 58h, use 18h (24d) to determine the period.
2: Due to constraints on the LED Drive PWM operation, any period less than 160ms (05h) may not be achievable. The device will breathe at the minimum period possible as determined by the period and min / max
duty cycle settings.
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TABLE 8:
LED PULSE / BREATHE PERIOD EXAMPLES
Setting (HEX)
Setting (Decimal)
Total Pulse / Breathe Period (ms)
00h
0
32
01h
1
32
02h
2
64
03h
3
96
...
...
...
7Dh
125
4000
7Eh
126
4032
7Fh
127
4064
DIRECT RAMPS
The following registers are used to set Direct behavior rates:
TABLE 9:
LED DIRECT BEHAVIOR RATE REGISTERS
Register
Address
Default Register Value
Default Rates
LED Direct Ramp Rates
94h
00h
no rise or fall ramps
LED Off Delay
95h
00h
no off delay
Rise rate, fall rate, and off delay each have 3-bit settings. Changes to these rates take effect immediately.
The rise and fall rate bits and off delay bits are decoded, as shown in Table 10, to determine the rate. The defaults for
these registers are 00h, which sets no on/off ramps or off delay for any LEDs which have their behavior set to Direct.
TABLE 10:
RISE / FALL / DELAY RATE CYCLE DECODE
RISE_RATE / FALL_RATE / DIR_OFF_DLY[2:0]
Rise / Fall / OFF DELAY Time
2
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
250ms
0
1
0
500ms
0
1
1
750ms
1
0
0
1s
1
0
1
1.25s
1
1
0
1.5s
1
1
1
2s
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AN 21.4
CONFIGURATION FOR LED OPERATION EXAMPLES
Pulse 2 Behavior Example
This example assumes a system configured as shown in External Voltage Source on page 2.
FIGURE 3:
CAP1114 Pulse 2 Behavior Example
The configuration for the Pulse 2 behavior for shown in Figure 3 for LED 1 is shown in Table 11.
TABLE 11:
CAP1188 PULSE 2 BEHAVIOR EXAMPLE CONFIGURATION
LED1 Configuration
Register
ADDR
Value
LED1 is linked to sensor CS1. Sensor LED Linking
72h
01h
Pulse 2 Count is set to 3.
LED Configuration Register
88h
08h
Bits 5-3 set to 010 (decoded
to 3 pulses).
Pulse 2 Period is set to 4s.
Pulse 2 Period
85h
40h
Bits 6-0 set to 40h (64d)
(decoded to 2048ms).
Pulse 2 Min Duty Cycle is set Pulse 2 Duty Cycle
to 7% and Max Duty Cycle is
set to 77%.
91h
E1h
Bits 7-4 set to 1110 (decoded
to 77% max) and bits 3-0 set
to 0001 (decoded to 7% min).
LED1 Behavior is Pulse 2.
81h
02h
Bits 1-0 set to 10 (decoded to
Pulse 2).
LED Behavior
Comments
Using the example in Figure 3 and the configuration in Table 11, LED1 will be illuminated at 7% duty cycle when no touch
is detected. When a touch on LED1 is detected, the LED will breathe from 7% duty cycle to 77% duty cycle and back
to 7% duty cycle in 250ms. When a release on LED1 is detected, LED1 will breathe 3 times.
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Direct Behavior Example
This example assumes a system configured as shown in External Voltage Source on page 2.
FIGURE 4:
CAP1188 Direct Behavior Example
The configuration for the Direct behavior for shown in Figure 4 for LED 1 is shown in Table 12.
TABLE 12:
CAP1188 DIRECT BEHAVIOR EXAMPLE CONFIGURATION
LED1 Configuration
Register
ADDR
Value
Comments
LED1 is linked to sensor CS1.
Sensor LED Linking
72h
01h
Rise Rate is set to 250ms and
Fall Rate is set to 1s.
LED Direct Ramp Rates
94h
0Ch
Bits 5-3 set to 001 (decoded
to 250ms rise) and bits 2-0
set to 100 (decoded to 1s
fall).
Off Delay is set to 500ms.
LED Off Delay
95h
01h
Bits 2-0 set to 010 (decoded
to 500ms off delay).
Direct Min Duty Cycle is set to
Direct Duty Cycle
7% and Max Duty Cycle is set to
77%.
93h
E1h
Bits 7-4 set to 1110 (decoded
to 77% max) and bits 3-0 set
to 0001 (decoded to 7%
min).
LED1 Behavior is Direct.
81h
00h
Bits 1-0 set to 00 (decoded to
Direct).
LED Behavior
Using the example in Figure 4 and the configuration in Table 12, LED1 will be illuminated at 7% duty cycle when no
touch is detected. When a touch on LED1 is detected, the LED will ramp from 7% duty cycle to 77% duty cycle in 250ms.
When a release on LED1 is detected, LED1 will ramp from 77% duty cycle to 7% duty cycle in 1 second after a delay
of 500ms.
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ADVANCED TOPICS
Mirroring
The LED Mirror Control Registers determine the meaning of duty cycle settings when polarity is non-inverted for each
LED channel. When the polarity bit is set to ‘1’ (non-inverted), to obtain correct steps for LED ramping, pulse, and
breathe behaviors, the min and max duty cycles need to be relative to 100%, rather than the default, which is relative
to 0%. The algorithm automatically adjusts the logarithmic response so the steps are more even. The LED Mirror controls work with the polarity controls with respect to LED brightness but do not have a direct effect on the output pin drive.
Figure 5 shows PWM points generated for the same duty cycle settings, but with different polarity and mirroring settings.
With the polarity bit set to ‘1’, more points are generated at the lower PWM percents. The human eye can more easily
discern changes below 75% PWM, so this helps the eye see a smooth LED transition from minimum duty cycle to maximum duty cycle. When the polarity bit is cleared (‘0’) but is not mirrored, more points are generated above 75% PWM.
This causes the LED to appear stay on at 100% duty cycle and then suddenly ramp down.
FIGURE 5:
Representation of LED Response Non-Inverted, Not Mirrored
For systems configured as shown in External Voltage Source on page 2 or RightTouch Device Sourcing Current on page
3, mirror controls are automatically set as necessary by default. It is recommended that the default configuration is
retained, which is as follows:
1.
2.
3.
The BLK_POL_MIR bit is ‘0’ in the Configuration 2 Register (44h). This allows the device to update mirror controls
automatically.
When the Polarity bit for an LED is cleared (i.e. ‘0’) in the LED Polarity Register (73h), the LEDx_MIR_EN bit is
cleared in the LED Mirror Control Register (79h). The LED logarithmic response does not need to be adjusted.
When the Polarity bit for an LED is set (i.e. ‘1’), the LEDx_MIR_EN bit for the LED is set to ‘1’. The LED logarithmic response will be adjusted.
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Transitioning LEDs from Host Control to Linked
RightTouch devices contain controls to transition an LED from actuated host control to untouched linked sensor control
without a disruption in the appearance of the LED. Perform the steps below to transition an LED from host control to
linked:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Configure the LEDs for the system (see Configuring LEDs to Match Board Design on page 1) and desired operation (see Configuring LED Operation on page 4).
Set the LEDx_DR bit for the LED to ‘1’ in the LED Output Control Register (74h). This actuates the LED pin.
Set the INV_LINK_TRAN bit to ‘1’ in the Configuration 2 Register (44h). This will invert the touch signal.
Set the LEDx_TRAN bit to ‘1’ for the LED in the Linked LED Transition Control Register (77h). This will prevent
the LED from changing states when it changes from host control to linked. It will also permit the LED to change
states when the sensor is touched if the INV_LINK_TRAN bit is set.
Set the CSx_LEDx bit to ‘1’ in the Sensor LED Linking Register (72h). This links to LED to the sensor. The LED
pin will not change states when it’s linked.
Touch the sensor. The linked LED pin will change states.
LED Ramp Alert
When an LED is not linked to a sensor, the RightTouch device can be configured to assert the ALERT# pin when an
LED that is actuated by the LED Output Control Register has finished its configured behavior.
This is controlled by bit 6 RAMP_ALERT in the LED Configuration Register (88h). The default setting (‘0’) is to not assert
the ALERT# pin.
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AN 21.4
APPENDIX A:
TABLE A-1:
APPLICATION NOTE REVISION HISTORY
REVISION HISTORY
Revision
REV A
Section/Figure/Entry
REV A replaces previous SMSC version Rev. 1.0 (11-05-12)
Rev. 1.0 (11-05-12)
Co-branded document
Rev. 1.0 (04-26-10)
Formal document release
 2014 Microchip Technology Inc.
Correction
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AN 21.4
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FilterLab, Hampshire, HI-TECH C, Linear Active Thermistor, MTP, SEEVAL and The Embedded Control Solutions Company are
registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A.
Silicon Storage Technology is a registered trademark of Microchip Technology Inc. in other countries.
Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Application Maestro, BodyCom, chipKIT, chipKIT logo, CodeGuard, dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net,
dsPICworks, dsSPEAK, ECAN, ECONOMONITOR, FanSense, HI-TIDE, In-Circuit Serial Programming, ICSP, Mindi, MiWi, MPASM,
MPF, MPLAB Certified logo, MPLIB, MPLINK, mTouch, Omniscient Code Generation, PICC, PICC-18, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit,
PICtail, REAL ICE, rfLAB, Select Mode, SQI, Serial Quad I/O, Total Endurance, TSHARC, UniWinDriver, WiperLock, ZENA and ZScale are trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other countries.
SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A.
GestIC and ULPP are registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Germany II GmbH & Co. KG, a subsidiary of Microchip
Technology Inc., in other countries.
A more complete list of registered trademarks and common law trademarks owned by Standard Microsystems Corporation (“SMSC”)
is available at: www.smsc.com. The absence of a trademark (name, logo, etc.) from the list does not constitute a waiver of any
intellectual property rights that SMSC has established in any of its trademarks.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their respective companies.
© 2014, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in the U.S.A., All Rights Reserved.
ISBN: 9781620779095
Microchip received ISO/TS-16949:2009 certification for its worldwide
headquarters, design and wafer fabrication facilities in Chandler and
Tempe, Arizona; Gresham, Oregon and design centers in California
and India. The Company’s quality system processes and procedures
are for its PIC® MCUs and dsPIC® DSCs, KEELOQ® code hopping
devices, Serial EEPROMs, microperipherals, nonvolatile memory and
analog products. In addition, Microchip’s quality system for the design
and manufacture of development systems is ISO 9001:2000 certified.
 2014 Microchip Technology Inc.
DS00001685A-page 15
Worldwide Sales and Service
AMERICAS
ASIA/PACIFIC
ASIA/PACIFIC
EUROPE
Corporate Office
2355 West Chandler Blvd.
Chandler, AZ 85224-6199
Tel: 480-792-7200
Fax: 480-792-7277
Technical Support:
http://www.microchip.com/
support
Web Address:
www.microchip.com
Asia Pacific Office
Suites 3707-14, 37th Floor
Tower 6, The Gateway
Harbour City, Kowloon
Hong Kong
Tel: 852-2401-1200
Fax: 852-2401-3431
Australia - Sydney
Tel: 61-2-9868-6733
Fax: 61-2-9868-6755
India - Bangalore
Tel: 91-80-3090-4444
Fax: 91-80-3090-4123
Austria - Wels
Tel: 43-7242-2244-39
Fax: 43-7242-2244-393
Denmark - Copenhagen
Tel: 45-4450-2828
Fax: 45-4485-2829
Atlanta
Duluth, GA
Tel: 678-957-9614
Fax: 678-957-1455
China - Beijing
Tel: 86-10-8569-7000
Fax: 86-10-8528-2104
Austin, TX
Tel: 512-257-3370
China - Chengdu
Tel: 86-28-8665-5511
Fax: 86-28-8665-7889
Boston
Westborough, MA
Tel: 774-760-0087
Fax: 774-760-0088
Chicago
Itasca, IL
Tel: 630-285-0071
Fax: 630-285-0075
Cleveland
Independence, OH
Tel: 216-447-0464
Fax: 216-447-0643
Dallas
Addison, TX
Tel: 972-818-7423
Fax: 972-818-2924
China - Chongqing
Tel: 86-23-8980-9588
Fax: 86-23-8980-9500
China - Hangzhou
Tel: 86-571-2819-3187
Fax: 86-571-2819-3189
China - Hong Kong SAR
Tel: 852-2943-5100
Fax: 852-2401-3431
China - Nanjing
Tel: 86-25-8473-2460
Fax: 86-25-8473-2470
China - Qingdao
Tel: 86-532-8502-7355
Fax: 86-532-8502-7205
Detroit
Novi, MI
Tel: 248-848-4000
China - Shanghai
Tel: 86-21-5407-5533
Fax: 86-21-5407-5066
Houston, TX
Tel: 281-894-5983
China - Shenyang
Tel: 86-24-2334-2829
Fax: 86-24-2334-2393
Indianapolis
Noblesville, IN
Tel: 317-773-8323
Fax: 317-773-5453
Los Angeles
Mission Viejo, CA
Tel: 949-462-9523
Fax: 949-462-9608
New York, NY
Tel: 631-435-6000
San Jose, CA
Tel: 408-735-9110
Canada - Toronto
Tel: 905-673-0699
Fax: 905-673-6509
China - Shenzhen
Tel: 86-755-8864-2200
Fax: 86-755-8203-1760
China - Wuhan
Tel: 86-27-5980-5300
Fax: 86-27-5980-5118
China - Xian
Tel: 86-29-8833-7252
Fax: 86-29-8833-7256
India - New Delhi
Tel: 91-11-4160-8631
Fax: 91-11-4160-8632
India - Pune
Tel: 91-20-3019-1500
Japan - Osaka
Tel: 81-6-6152-7160
Fax: 81-6-6152-9310
France - Paris
Tel: 33-1-69-53-63-20
Fax: 33-1-69-30-90-79
Germany - Dusseldorf
Tel: 49-2129-3766400
Japan - Tokyo
Tel: 81-3-6880- 3770
Fax: 81-3-6880-3771
Germany - Munich
Tel: 49-89-627-144-0
Fax: 49-89-627-144-44
Korea - Daegu
Tel: 82-53-744-4301
Fax: 82-53-744-4302
Germany - Pforzheim
Tel: 49-7231-424750
Korea - Seoul
Tel: 82-2-554-7200
Fax: 82-2-558-5932 or
82-2-558-5934
Italy - Milan
Tel: 39-0331-742611
Fax: 39-0331-466781
Italy - Venice
Tel: 39-049-7625286
Malaysia - Kuala Lumpur
Tel: 60-3-6201-9857
Fax: 60-3-6201-9859
Netherlands - Drunen
Tel: 31-416-690399
Fax: 31-416-690340
Malaysia - Penang
Tel: 60-4-227-8870
Fax: 60-4-227-4068
Poland - Warsaw
Tel: 48-22-3325737
Philippines - Manila
Tel: 63-2-634-9065
Fax: 63-2-634-9069
Singapore
Tel: 65-6334-8870
Fax: 65-6334-8850
Taiwan - Hsin Chu
Tel: 886-3-5778-366
Fax: 886-3-5770-955
Spain - Madrid
Tel: 34-91-708-08-90
Fax: 34-91-708-08-91
Sweden - Stockholm
Tel: 46-8-5090-4654
UK - Wokingham
Tel: 44-118-921-5800
Fax: 44-118-921-5820
Taiwan - Kaohsiung
Tel: 886-7-213-7830
Taiwan - Taipei
Tel: 886-2-2508-8600
Fax: 886-2-2508-0102
Thailand - Bangkok
Tel: 66-2-694-1351
Fax: 66-2-694-1350
China - Xiamen
Tel: 86-592-2388138
Fax: 86-592-2388130
China - Zhuhai
Tel: 86-756-3210040
Fax: 86-756-3210049
 2014 Microchip Technology Inc.
10/28/13
DS00001685A-page 16
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