AT32UC3L0 Series - Summary

Features
• High-performance, Low-power 32-bit Atmel® AVR® Microcontroller
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– Compact Single-cycle RISC Instruction Set Including DSP Instructions
– Read-modify-write Instructions and Atomic Bit Manipulation
– Performance
• Up to 64DMIPS Running at 50MHz from Flash (1 Flash Wait State)
• Up to 36DMIPS Running at 25MHz from Flash (0 Flash Wait State)
– Memory Protection Unit (MPU)
• Secure Access Unit (SAU) providing User-defined Peripheral Protection
picoPower® Technology for Ultra-low Power Consumption
Multi-hierarchy Bus System
– High-performance Data Transfers on Separate Buses for Increased Performance
– 12 Peripheral DMA Channels Improve Speed for Peripheral Communication
Internal High-speed Flash
– 256Kbytes and 128Kbytes Versions
– Single-cycle Access up to 25MHz
– FlashVault Technology Allows Pre-programmed Secure Library Support for End
User Applications
– Prefetch Buffer Optimizing Instruction Execution at Maximum Speed
– 100,000 Write Cycles, 15-year Data Retention Capability
– Flash Security Locks and User-defined Configuration Area
Internal High-speed SRAM, Single-cycle Access at Full Speed
– 32Kbytes
Interrupt Controller (INTC)
– Autovectored Low-latency Interrupt Service with Programmable Priority
External Interrupt Controller (EIC)
Peripheral Event System for Direct Peripheral to Peripheral Communication
System Functions
– Power and Clock Manager
– SleepWalking Power Saving Control
– Internal System RC Oscillator (RCSYS)
– 32 KHz Oscillator
– Multipurpose Oscillator, Phase Locked Loop (PLL), and Digital Frequency Locked
Loop (DFLL)
Windowed Watchdog Timer (WDT)
Asynchronous Timer (AST) with Real-time Clock Capability
– Counter or Calendar Mode Supported
Frequency Meter (FREQM) for Accurate Measuring of Clock Frequency
Six 16-bit Timer/Counter (TC) Channels
– External Clock Inputs, PWM, Capture, and Various Counting Capabilities
PWM Channels on All I/O Pins (PWMA)
– 8-bit PWM with a Source Clock up to 150MHz
Four Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitters (USART)
– Independent Baudrate Generator, Support for SPI
– Support for Hardware Handshaking
One Master/Slave Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) with Chip Select Signals
– Up to 15 SPI Slaves can be Addressed
32-bit Atmel
AVR
Microcontroller
AT32UC3L0256
AT32UC3L0128
Summary
32145CS–06/2013
AT32UC3L0128/256
• Two Master and Two Slave Two-wire Interfaces (TWI), 400kbit/s I2C-compatible
• One 8-channel Analog-to-digital Converter (ADC) with up to 12 Bits Resolution
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– Internal Temperature Sensor
Eight Analog Comparators (AC) with Optional Window Detection
Capacitive Touch (CAT) Module
– Hardware-assisted Atmel® AVR® QTouch® and Atmel® AVR® QMatrix Touch Acquisition
– Supports QTouch and QMatrix Capture from Capacitive Touch Sensors
QTouch Library Support
– Capacitive Touch Buttons, Sliders, and Wheels
– QTouch and QMatrix Acquisition
On-chip Non-intrusive Debug System
– Nexus Class 2+, Runtime Control, Non-intrusive Data and Program Trace
– aWire Single-pin Programming Trace and Debug Interface Muxed with Reset Pin
– NanoTrace Provides Trace Capabilities through JTAG or aWire Interface
48-pin TQFP/QFN/TLLGA (36 GPIO Pins)
Five High-drive I/O Pins
Single 1.62-3.6 V Power Supply
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1. Description
The Atmel® AVR® AT32UC3L0128/256 is a complete system-on-chip microcontroller based on
the AVR32 UC RISC processor running at frequencies up to 50MHz. AVR32 UC is a high-performance 32-bit RISC microprocessor core, designed for cost-sensitive embedded applications,
with particular emphasis on low power consumption, high code density, and high performance.
The processor implements a Memory Protection Unit (MPU) and a fast and flexible interrupt controller for supporting modern and real-time operating systems. The Secure Access Unit (SAU) is
used together with the MPU to provide the required security and integrity.
Higher computation capability is achieved using a rich set of DSP instructions.
The AT32UC3L0128/256 embeds state-of-the-art picoPower technology for ultra-low power consumption. Combined power control techniques are used to bring active current consumption
down to 174µA/MHz, and leakage down to 220nA while still retaining a bank of backup registers. The device allows a wide range of trade-offs between functionality and power consumption,
giving the user the ability to reach the lowest possible power consumption with the feature set
required for the application.
The Peripheral Direct Memory Access (DMA) controller enables data transfers between peripherals and memories without processor involvement. The Peripheral DMA controller drastically
reduces processing overhead when transferring continuous and large data streams.
The AT32UC3L0128/256 incorporates on-chip Flash and SRAM memories for secure and fast
access. The FlashVault technology allows secure libraries to be programmed into the device.
The secure libraries can be executed while the CPU is in Secure State, but not read by nonsecure software in the device. The device can thus be shipped to end customers, who will be
able to program their own code into the device to access the secure libraries, but without risk of
compromising the proprietary secure code.
The External Interrupt Controller (EIC) allows pins to be configured as external interrupts. Each
external interrupt has its own interrupt request and can be individually masked.
The Peripheral Event System allows peripherals to receive, react to, and send peripheral events
without CPU intervention. Asynchronous interrupts allow advanced peripheral operation in low
power sleep modes.
The Power Manager (PM) improves design flexibility and security. The Power Manager supports
SleepWalking functionality, by which a module can be selectively activated based on peripheral
events, even in sleep modes where the module clock is stopped. Power monitoring is supported
by on-chip Power-on Reset (POR), Brown-out Detector (BOD), and Supply Monitor (SM). The
device features several oscillators, such as Phase Locked Loop (PLL), Digital Frequency
Locked Loop (DFLL), Oscillator 0 (OSC0), and system RC oscillator (RCSYS). Either of these
oscillators can be used as source for the system clock. The DFLL is a programmable internal
oscillator from 20 to 150MHz. It can be tuned to a high accuracy if an accurate reference clock is
running, e.g. the 32KHz crystal oscillator.
The Watchdog Timer (WDT) will reset the device unless it is periodically serviced by the software. This allows the device to recover from a condition that has caused the system to be
unstable.
The Asynchronous Timer (AST) combined with the 32KHz crystal oscillator supports powerful
real-time clock capabilities, with a maximum timeout of up to 136 years. The AST can operate in
counter mode or calendar mode.
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The Frequency Meter (FREQM) allows accurate measuring of a clock frequency by comparing it
to a known reference clock.
The device includes six identical 16-bit Timer/Counter (TC) channels. Each channel can be independently programmed to perform frequency measurement, event counting, interval
measurement, pulse generation, delay timing, and pulse width modulation.
The Pulse Width Modulation controller (PWMA) provides 8-bit PWM channels which can be synchronized and controlled from a common timer. One PWM channel is available for each I/O pin
on the device, enabling applications that require multiple PWM outputs, such as LCD backlight
control. The PWM channels can operate independently, with duty cycles set individually, or in
interlinked mode, with multiple channels changed at the same time.
The AT32UC3L0128/256 also features many communication interfaces, like USART, SPI, and
TWI, for communication intensive applications. The USART supports different communication
modes, like SPI Mode and LIN Mode.
A general purpose 8-channel ADC is provided, as well as eight analog comparators (AC). The
ADC can operate in 10-bit mode at full speed or in enhanced mode at reduced speed, offering
up to 12-bit resolution. The ADC also provides an internal temperature sensor input channel.
The analog comparators can be paired to detect when the sensing voltage is within or outside
the defined reference window.
The Capacitive Touch (CAT) module senses touch on external capacitive touch sensors, using
the QTouch technology. Capacitive touch sensors use no external mechanical components,
unlike normal push buttons, and therefore demand less maintenance in the user application.
The CAT module allows up to 17 touch sensors, or up to 16 by 8 matrix sensors to be interfaced.
All touch sensors can be configured to operate autonomously without software interaction,
allowing wakeup from sleep modes when activated.
Atmel offers the QTouch library for embedding capacitive touch buttons, sliders, and wheels
functionality into AVR microcontrollers. The patented charge-transfer signal acquisition offers
robust sensing and includes fully debounced reporting of touch keys as well as Adjacent Key
Suppression® (AKS®) technology for unambiguous detection of key events. The easy-to-use
QTouch Suite toolchain allows you to explore, develop, and debug your own touch applications.
The AT32UC3L0128/256 integrates a class 2+ Nexus 2.0 On-chip Debug (OCD) System, with
non-intrusive real-time trace and full-speed read/write memory access, in addition to basic runtime control. The NanoTrace interface enables trace feature for aWire- or JTAG-based
debuggers. The single-pin aWire interface allows all features available through the JTAG interface to be accessed through the RESET pin, allowing the JTAG pins to be used for GPIO or
peripherals.
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2. Overview
Block Diagram
aWire
DATA
INTERFACE
M
M
S
MEMORY PROTECTION UNIT
M
SAU
HIGH SPEED
BUS MATRIX
S/M
S
PA
PB
GENERALPURPOSE I/Os
HSB-PB
BRIDGE B
POWER MANAGER
CLOCK
CONTROLLER
SLEEP
CONTROLLER
RESET
CONTROLLER
128/256 KB
FLASH
M
REGISTERS BUS
PERIPHERAL
DMA
CONTROLLER
HSB-PB
BRIDGE A
CAPACITIVE TOUCH
MODULE
USART0
USART1
USART2
USART3
SPI
TWI MASTER 0
TWI MASTER 1
DIS
VDIVEN
CSA[16:0]
CSB[16:0]
SMP
SYNC
RXD
TXD
CLK
RTS, CTS
SCK
GCLK_IN[1..0]
GCLK[4..0]
RCSYS
RC32OUT
32 KB
SRAM
S
S
CONFIGURATION
LOCAL BUS
MISO, MOSI
NPCS[3..0]
RC32K
TWCK
XIN32
XOUT32
OSC32K
XIN0
XOUT0
OSC0
SYSTEM CONTROL
INTERFACE
DFLL
TWI SLAVE 0
TWI SLAVE 1
INTERRUPT
CONTROLLER
NMI
PWMA[35..0]
DMA
PLL
EXTINT[5..1]
TWD
TWALM
TWCK
DMA
RC120M
8-CHANNEL ADC
INTERFACE
FREQUENCY METER
TWALM
ADP[1..0]
TRIGGER
AD[8..0]
A[2..0]
TIMER/COUNTER 0
TIMER/COUNTER 1
B[2..0]
CLK[2..0]
ASYNCHRONOUS
TIMER
WATCHDOG
TIMER
PA
PB
ADVREFP
EXTERNAL INTERRUPT
CONTROLLER
PWM CONTROLLER
TWD
GENERAL PURPOSE I/Os
DATAOUT
RESET_N
INSTR
INTERFACE
NEXUS
CLASS 2+
OCD
FLASH
CONTROLLER
JTAG
INTERFACE
LOCAL BUS
INTERFACE
DMA
TCK
TDO
TDI
TMS
AVR32UC CPU
DMA
MCKO
MDO[5..0]
MSEO[1..0]
EVTI_N
EVTO_N
MEMORY INTERFACE
Block Diagram
DMA
Figure 2-1.
DMA
2.1
AC INTERFACE
ACBP[3..0]
ACBN[3..0]
ACAP[3..0]
ACAN[3..0]
ACREFN
GLUE LOGIC
CONTROLLER
OUT[1:0]
IN[7..0]
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2.2
Configuration Summary
Table 2-1.
Configuration Summary
Feature
Flash
AT32UC3L0256
AT32UC3L0128
256KB
128KB
SRAM
32KB
GPIO
36
High-drive pins
5
External Interrupts
6
TWI
2
USART
4
Peripheral DMA Channels
12
Peripheral Event System
1
SPI
1
Asynchronous Timers
1
Timer/Counter Channels
6
PWM channels
36
Frequency Meter
1
Watchdog Timer
1
Power Manager
1
Secure Access Unit
1
Glue Logic Controller
1
Oscillators
ADC
Digital Frequency Locked Loop 20-150 MHz (DFLL)
Phase Locked Loop 40-240 MHz (PLL)
Crystal Oscillator 0.45-16 MHz (OSC0)
Crystal Oscillator 32 KHz (OSC32K)
RC Oscillator 120MHz (RC120M)
RC Oscillator 115 kHz (RCSYS)
RC Oscillator 32 kHz (RC32K)
8-channel 12-bit
Temperature Sensor
1
Analog Comparators
8
Capacitive Touch Module
1
JTAG
1
aWire
1
Max Frequency
Packages
50 MHz
TQFP48/QFN48/TLLGA48
6
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3. Package and Pinout
3.1
Package
The device pins are multiplexed with peripheral functions as described in Section 3.2.1.
TQFP48/QFN48 Pinout
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
PA14
VDDANA
ADVREFP
GNDANA
PB08
PB07
PB06
PB09
PA04
PA11
PA13
PA20
Figure 3-1.
PA15
PA16
PA17
PA19
PA18
VDDIO
GND
PB11
GND
PA10
PA12
VDDIO
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
PA21
PB10
RESET_N
PB04
PB05
GND
VDDCORE
VDDIN
PB01
PA07
PA01
PA02
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
PA05
PA00
PA06
PA22
PB03
PB02
PB00
PB12
PA03
PA08
PA09
GND
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TLLGA48 Pinout
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
PA15
PA14
VDDANA
ADVREFP
GNDANA
PB08
PB07
PB06
PB09
PA04
PA11
PA13
PA20
Figure 3-2.
PA16
PA17
PA19
PA18
VDDIO
GND
PB11
GND
PA10
PA12
VDDIO
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
PA21
PB10
RESET_N
PB04
PB05
GND
VDDCORE
VDDIN
PB01
PA07
PA01
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
PA02
PA05
PA00
PA06
PA22
PB03
PB02
PB00
PB12
PA03
PA08
PA09
GND
3.2
Peripheral Multiplexing on I/O Lines
3.2.1
Multiplexed Signals
Each GPIO line can be assigned to one of the peripheral functions. The following table
describes the peripheral signals multiplexed to the GPIO lines.
Table 3-1.
GPIO Controller Function Multiplexing
48pin
PIN
G
P
I
O
11
PA00
0
14
PA01
1
GPIO Function
Pin
Type
A
B
C
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART0
TXD
USART1
RTS
SPI
NPCS[2]
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART0
RXD
USART1
CTS
SPI
NPCS[3]
Supply
D
E
F
PWMA
PWMA[0]
USART1
CLK
PWMA
PWMA[1]
ACIFB
ACAP[0]
G
H
SCIF
GCLK[0]
CAT
CSA[2]
TWIMS0
TWALM
CAT
CSA[1]
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AT32UC3L0128/256
Table 3-1.
GPIO Controller Function Multiplexing
13
PA02
2
VDDIO
Highdrive I/O
USART0
RTS
ADCIFB
TRIGGER
USART2
TXD
TC0
A0
PWMA
PWMA[2]
ACIFB
ACBP[0]
USART0
CLK
CAT
CSA[3]
4
PA03
3
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART0
CTS
SPI
NPCS[1]
USART2
TXD
TC0
B0
PWMA
PWMA[3]
ACIFB
ACBN[3]
USART0
CLK
CAT
CSB[3]
28
PA04
4
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
SPI
MISO
TWIMS0
TWCK
USART1
RXD
TC0
B1
PWMA
PWMA[4]
ACIFB
ACBP[1]
12
PA05
5
VDDIO
Normal
I/O (TWI)
SPI
MOSI
TWIMS1
TWCK
USART1
TXD
TC0
A1
PWMA
PWMA[5]
ACIFB
ACBN[0]
TWIMS0
TWD
CAT
CSB[7]
SPI
SCK
USART2
TXD
USART1
CLK
TC0
B0
PWMA
PWMA[6]
EIC
EXTINT[2]
SCIF
GCLK[1]
CAT
CSB[1]
ACIFB
ACAN[0]
EIC
NMI
(EXTINT[0])
CAT
CSB[2]
CAT
CSA[7]
10
PA06
6
VDDIO
Highdrive I/O,
5V
tolerant
15
PA07
7
VDDIO
Normal
I/O (TWI)
SPI
NPCS[0]
USART2
RXD
TWIMS1
TWALM
TWIMS0
TWCK
PWMA
PWMA[7]
3
PA08
8
VDDIO
Highdrive I/O
USART1
TXD
SPI
NPCS[2]
TC0
A2
ADCIFB
ADP[0]
PWMA
PWMA[8]
2
PA09
9
VDDIO
Highdrive I/O
USART1
RXD
SPI
NPCS[3]
TC0
B2
ADCIFB
ADP[1]
PWMA
PWMA[9]
SCIF
GCLK[2]
EIC
EXTINT[1]
CAT
CSB[4]
46
PA10
10
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TWIMS0
TWD
PWMA
PWMA[10]
ACIFB
ACAP[1]
SCIF
GCLK[2]
CAT
CSA[5]
27
PA11
11
VDDIN
Normal
I/O
47
PA12
12
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
26
PA13
13
VDDIN
Normal
I/O
36
PA14
14
VDDIO
37
PA15
15
38
PA16
39
TC0
A0
CAT
CSA[4]
PWMA
PWMA[11]
USART2
CLK
TC0
CLK1
CAT
SMP
PWMA
PWMA[12]
ACIFB
ACAN[1]
SCIF
GCLK[3]
CAT
CSB[5]
GLOC
OUT[0]
GLOC
IN[7]
TC0
A0
SCIF
GCLK[2]
PWMA
PWMA[13]
CAT
SMP
EIC
EXTINT[2]
CAT
CSA[0]
Normal
I/O
ADCIFB
AD[0]
TC0
CLK2
USART2
RTS
CAT
SMP
PWMA
PWMA[14]
SCIF
GCLK[4]
CAT
CSA[6]
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
ADCIFB
AD[1]
TC0
CLK1
GLOC
IN[6]
PWMA
PWMA[15]
CAT
SYNC
EIC
EXTINT[3]
CAT
CSB[6]
16
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
ADCIFB
AD[2]
TC0
CLK0
GLOC
IN[5]
PWMA
PWMA[16]
ACIFB
ACREFN
EIC
EXTINT[4]
CAT
CSA[8]
PA17
17
VDDIO
Normal
I/O (TWI)
TWIMS1
TWD
PWMA
PWMA[17]
CAT
SMP
CAT
DIS
CAT
CSB[8]
41
PA18
18
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
ADCIFB
AD[4]
GLOC
IN[4]
PWMA
PWMA[18]
CAT
SYNC
EIC
EXTINT[5]
CAT
CSB[0]
40
PA19
19
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
ADCIFB
AD[5]
TC0
A2
TWIMS1
TWALM
PWMA
PWMA[19]
SCIF
GCLK_IN[0]
CAT
SYNC
CAT
CSA[10]
25
PA20
20
VDDIN
Normal
I/O
USART2
TXD
TC0
A1
GLOC
IN[3]
PWMA
PWMA[20]
SCIF
RC32OUT
USART2
RXD
TWIMS0
TWD
TC0
B1
ADCIFB
TRIGGER
PWMA
PWMA[21]
PWMA
PWMAOD[21]
TC0
A1
USART2
CTS
TC0
B1
24
PA21
21
VDDIN
Normal
I/O (TWI,
5V
tolerant,
SMBus)
9
PA22
22
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART0
CTS
USART2
CLK
TC0
B2
CAT
SMP
PWMA
PWMA[22]
ACIFB
ACBN[2]
6
PB00
32
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART3
TXD
ADCIFB
ADP[0]
SPI
NPCS[0]
TC0
A1
PWMA
PWMA[23]
ACIFB
ACAP[2]
16
PB01
33
VDDIO
Highdrive I/O
USART3
RXD
ADCIFB
ADP[1]
SPI
SCK
TC0
B1
PWMA
PWMA[24]
7
PB02
34
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART3
RTS
USART3
CLK
SPI
MISO
TC0
A2
PWMA
PWMA[25]
ACIFB
ACAN[2]
CAT
CSA[12]
SCIF
GCLK[0]
CAT
SMP
CAT
CSB[10]
TC1
A0
CAT
CSA[9]
TC1
A1
CAT
CSB[9]
SCIF
GCLK[1]
CAT
CSB[11]
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Table 3-1.
8
21
GPIO Controller Function Multiplexing
PB03
PB04
35
36
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
USART3
CTS
USART3
CLK
SPI
MOSI
TC0
B2
PWMA
PWMA[26]
ACIFB
ACBP[2]
TC1
A2
CAT
CSA[11]
VDDIN
Normal
I/O (TWI,
5V
tolerant,
SMBus)
TC1
A0
USART1
RTS
USART1
CLK
TWIMS0
TWALM
PWMA
PWMA[27]
PWMA
PWMAOD[27]
TWIMS1
TWCK
CAT
CSA[14]
TC1
B0
USART1
CTS
USART1
CLK
TWIMS0
TWCK
PWMA
PWMA[28]
PWMA
PWMAOD[28]
SCIF
GCLK[3]
CAT
CSB[14]
20
PB05
37
VDDIN
Normal
I/O (TWI,
5V
tolerant,
SMBus)
30
PB06
38
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TC1
A1
USART3
TXD
ADCIFB
AD[6]
GLOC
IN[2]
PWMA
PWMA[29]
ACIFB
ACAN[3]
EIC
NMI
(EXTINT[0])
CAT
CSB[13]
31
PB07
39
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TC1
B1
USART3
RXD
ADCIFB
AD[7]
GLOC
IN[1]
PWMA
PWMA[30]
ACIFB
ACAP[3]
EIC
EXTINT[1]
CAT
CSA[13]
32
PB08
40
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TC1
A2
USART3
RTS
ADCIFB
AD[8]
GLOC
IN[0]
PWMA
PWMA[31]
CAT
SYNC
EIC
EXTINT[2]
CAT
CSB[12]
29
PB09
41
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TC1
B2
USART3
CTS
USART3
CLK
PWMA
PWMA[32]
ACIFB
ACBN[1]
EIC
EXTINT[3]
CAT
CSB[15]
23
PB10
42
VDDIN
Normal
I/O
TC1
CLK0
USART1
TXD
USART3
CLK
GLOC
OUT[1]
PWMA
PWMA[33]
SCIF
GCLK_IN[1]
EIC
EXTINT[4]
CAT
CSB[16]
44
PB11
43
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TC1
CLK1
USART1
RXD
ADCIFB
TRIGGER
PWMA
PWMA[34]
CAT
VDIVEN
EIC
EXTINT[5]
CAT
CSA[16]
5
PB12
44
VDDIO
Normal
I/O
TC1
CLK2
CAT
SYNC
PWMA
PWMA[35]
ACIFB
ACBP[3]
SCIF
GCLK[4]
CAT
CSA[15]
TWIMS1
TWALM
See Section 3.3 for a description of the various peripheral signals.
Refer to ”Electrical Characteristics” on page 791 for a description of the electrical properties of
the pin types used.
3.2.2
TWI, 5V Tolerant, and SMBUS Pins
Some normal I/O pins offer TWI, 5V tolerance, and SMBUS features. These features are only
available when either of the TWI functions or the PWMAOD function in the PWMA are selected
for these pins.
Refer to the ”TWI Pin Characteristics(1)” on page 798 for a description of the electrical properties of the TWI, 5V tolerance, and SMBUS pins.
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3.2.3
Peripheral Functions
Each GPIO line can be assigned to one of several peripheral functions. The following table
describes how the various peripheral functions are selected. The last listed function has priority
in case multiple functions are enabled on the same pin.
Table 3-2.
3.2.4
Function
Description
GPIO Controller Function multiplexing
GPIO and GPIO peripheral selection A to H
Nexus OCD AUX port connections
OCD trace system
aWire DATAOUT
aWire output in two-pin mode
JTAG port connections
JTAG debug port
Oscillators
OSC0, OSC32
JTAG Port Connections
If the JTAG is enabled, the JTAG will take control over a number of pins, irrespectively of the I/O
Controller configuration.
Table 3-3.
3.2.5
Peripheral Functions
JTAG Pinout
48-pin
Pin name
JTAG pin
11
PA00
TCK
14
PA01
TMS
13
PA02
TDO
4
PA03
TDI
Nexus OCD AUX Port Connections
If the OCD trace system is enabled, the trace system will take control over a number of pins, irrespectively of the I/O Controller configuration. Two different OCD trace pin mappings are
possible, depending on the configuration of the OCD AXS register. For details, see the AVR32
UC Technical Reference Manual.
Table 3-4.
Nexus OCD AUX Port Connections
Pin
AXS=1
AXS=0
EVTI_N
PA05
PB08
MDO[5]
PA10
PB00
MDO[4]
PA18
PB04
MDO[3]
PA17
PB05
MDO[2]
PA16
PB03
MDO[1]
PA15
PB02
MDO[0]
PA14
PB09
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Table 3-4.
3.2.6
Pin
AXS=1
AXS=0
EVTO_N
PA04
PA04
MCKO
PA06
PB01
MSEO[1]
PA07
PB11
MSEO[0]
PA11
PB12
Oscillator Pinout
The oscillators are not mapped to the normal GPIO functions and their muxings are controlled
by registers in the System Control Interface (SCIF). Please refer to the SCIF chapter for more
information about this.
Table 3-5.
3.2.7
Nexus OCD AUX Port Connections
Oscillator Pinout
48-pin
Pin Name
Oscillator Pin
3
PA08
XIN0
46
PA10
XIN32
26
PA13
XIN32_2
2
PA09
XOUT0
47
PA12
XOUT32
25
PA20
XOUT32_2
Other Functions
The functions listed in Table 3-6 are not mapped to the normal GPIO functions. The aWire DATA
pin will only be active after the aWire is enabled. The aWire DATAOUT pin will only be active
after the aWire is enabled and the 2_PIN_MODE command has been sent. The WAKE_N pin is
always enabled. Please refer to Section 6.1.4 on page 40 for constraints on the WAKE_N pin.
Table 3-6.
Other Functions
48-pin
Pin
Function
27
PA11
WAKE_N
22
RESET_N
aWire DATA
11
PA00
aWire DATAOUT
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3.3
Signal Descriptions
The following table gives details on signal names classified by peripheral.
Table 3-7.
Signal Descriptions List
Signal Name
Function
Type
Active
Level
Comments
Analog Comparator Interface - ACIFB
ACAN3 - ACAN0
Negative inputs for comparators "A"
Analog
ACAP3 - ACAP0
Positive inputs for comparators "A"
Analog
ACBN3 - ACBN0
Negative inputs for comparators "B"
Analog
ACBP3 - ACBP0
Positive inputs for comparators "B"
Analog
ACREFN
Common negative reference
Analog
ADC Interface - ADCIFB
AD8 - AD0
Analog Signal
Analog
ADP1 - ADP0
Drive Pin for resistive touch screen
Output
TRIGGER
External trigger
Input
aWire - AW
DATA
aWire data
I/O
DATAOUT
aWire data output for 2-pin mode
I/O
Capacitive Touch Module - CAT
CSA16 - CSA0
Capacitive Sense A
I/O
CSB16 - CSB0
Capacitive Sense B
I/O
DIS
Discharge current control
Analog
SMP
SMP signal
Output
SYNC
Synchronize signal
VDIVEN
Voltage divider enable
Input
Output
External Interrupt Controller - EIC
NMI (EXTINT0)
Non-Maskable Interrupt
Input
EXTINT5 - EXTINT1
External interrupt
Input
Glue Logic Controller - GLOC
IN7 - IN0
Inputs to lookup tables
OUT1 - OUT0
Outputs from lookup tables
Input
Output
JTAG module - JTAG
TCK
Test Clock
Input
TDI
Test Data In
Input
TDO
Test Data Out
TMS
Test Mode Select
Output
Input
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Table 3-7.
Signal Descriptions List
Power Manager - PM
RESET_N
Reset
Input
Low
Pulse Width Modulation Controller - PWMA
PWMA35 - PWMA0
PWMA channel waveforms
Output
PWMAOD35 PWMAOD0
PWMA channel waveforms, open drain
mode
Output
Not all channels support open
drain mode
System Control Interface - SCIF
GCLK4 - GCLK0
Generic Clock Output
Output
GCLK_IN1 - GCLK_IN0
Generic Clock Input
RC32OUT
RC32K output at startup
Output
XIN0
Crystal 0 Input
Analog/
Digital
XIN32
Crystal 32 Input (primary location)
Analog/
Digital
XIN32_2
Crystal 32 Input (secondary location)
Analog/
Digital
XOUT0
Crystal 0 Output
Analog
XOUT32
Crystal 32 Output (primary location)
Analog
XOUT32_2
Crystal 32 Output (secondary location)
Analog
Input
Serial Peripheral Interface - SPI
MISO
Master In Slave Out
I/O
MOSI
Master Out Slave In
I/O
NPCS3 - NPCS0
SPI Peripheral Chip Select
I/O
SCK
Clock
I/O
Low
Timer/Counter - TC0, TC1
A0
Channel 0 Line A
I/O
A1
Channel 1 Line A
I/O
A2
Channel 2 Line A
I/O
B0
Channel 0 Line B
I/O
B1
Channel 1 Line B
I/O
B2
Channel 2 Line B
I/O
CLK0
Channel 0 External Clock Input
Input
CLK1
Channel 1 External Clock Input
Input
CLK2
Channel 2 External Clock Input
Input
Two-wire Interface - TWIMS0, TWIMS1
TWALM
SMBus SMBALERT
I/O
TWCK
Two-wire Serial Clock
I/O
TWD
Two-wire Serial Data
I/O
Low
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Table 3-7.
Signal Descriptions List
Universal Synchronous Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter - USART0, USART1, USART2, USART3
CLK
Clock
CTS
Clear To Send
RTS
Request To Send
RXD
Receive Data
Input
TXD
Transmit Data
Output
Note:
I/O
Input
Low
Output
Low
1. ADCIFB: AD3 does not exist.
Table 3-8.
Signal Description List, Continued
Signal Name
Function
Type
Active
Level
Comments
Power
VDDCORE
Core Power Supply / Voltage Regulator Output
Power
Input/Output
1.62V to 1.98V
VDDIO
I/O Power Supply
Power Input
1.62V to 3.6V. VDDIO should
always be equal to or lower than
VDDIN.
VDDANA
Analog Power Supply
Power Input
1.62V to 1.98V
ADVREFP
Analog Reference Voltage
Power Input
1.62V to 1.98V
VDDIN
Voltage Regulator Input
Power Input
1.62V to 3.6V (1)
GNDANA
Analog Ground
Ground
GND
Ground
Ground
Auxiliary Port - AUX
MCKO
Trace Data Output Clock
Output
MDO5 - MDO0
Trace Data Output
Output
MSEO1 - MSEO0
Trace Frame Control
Output
EVTI_N
Event In
EVTO_N
Event Out
Input
Low
Output
Low
General Purpose I/O pin
PA22 - PA00
Parallel I/O Controller I/O Port 0
I/O
PB12 - PB00
Parallel I/O Controller I/O Port 1
I/O
1.
See Section 6.1 on page 36
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3.4
3.4.1
I/O Line Considerations
JTAG Pins
The JTAG is enabled if TCK is low while the RESET_N pin is released. The TCK, TMS, and TDI
pins have pull-up resistors when JTAG is enabled. The TCK pin always has pull-up enabled during reset. The TDO pin is an output, driven at VDDIO, and has no pull-up resistor. The JTAG
pins can be used as GPIO pins and multiplexed with peripherals when the JTAG is disabled.
Please refer to Section 3.2.4 on page 11 for the JTAG port connections.
3.4.2
PA00
Note that PA00 is multiplexed with TCK. PA00 GPIO function must only be used as output in the
application.
3.4.3
RESET_N Pin
The RESET_N pin is a schmitt input and integrates a permanent pull-up resistor to VDDIN. As
the product integrates a power-on reset detector, the RESET_N pin can be left unconnected in
case no reset from the system needs to be applied to the product.
The RESET_N pin is also used for the aWire debug protocol. When the pin is used for debugging, it must not be driven by external circuitry.
3.4.4
TWI Pins PA21/PB04/PB05
When these pins are used for TWI, the pins are open-drain outputs with slew-rate limitation and
inputs with spike filtering. When used as GPIO pins or used for other peripherals, the pins have
the same characteristics as other GPIO pins. Selected pins are also SMBus compliant (refer to
Section 3.2.1 on page 8). As required by the SMBus specification, these pins provide no leakage
path to ground when the AT32UC3L0128/256 is powered down. This allows other devices on
the SMBus to continue communicating even though the AT32UC3L0128/256 is not powered.
After reset a TWI function is selected on these pins instead of the GPIO. Please refer to the
GPIO Module Configuration chapter for details.
3.4.5
TWI Pins PA05/PA07/PA17
When these pins are used for TWI, the pins are open-drain outputs with slew-rate limitation and
inputs with spike filtering. When used as GPIO pins or used for other peripherals, the pins have
the same characteristics as other GPIO pins.
After reset a TWI function is selected on these pins instead of the GPIO. Please refer to the
GPIO Module Configuration chapter for details.
3.4.6
GPIO Pins
All the I/O lines integrate a pull-up resistor Programming of this pull-up resistor is performed
independently for each I/O line through the GPIO Controllers. After reset, I/O lines default as
inputs with pull-up resistors disabled, except PA00 which has the pull-up resistor enabled. PA20
selects SCIF-RC32OUT (GPIO Function F) as default enabled after reset.
3.4.7
High-drive Pins
The five pins PA02, PA06, PA08, PA09, and PB01 have high-drive output capabilities. Refer to
Section 32. on page 791 for electrical characteristics.
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3.4.8
RC32OUT Pin
3.4.8.1
Clock output at startup
After power-up, the clock generated by the 32kHz RC oscillator (RC32K) will be output on PA20,
even when the device is still reset by the Power-On Reset Circuitry. This clock can be used by
the system to start other devices or to clock a switching regulator to rise the power supply voltage up to an acceptable value.
The clock will be available on PA20, but will be disabled if one of the following conditions are
true:
• PA20 is configured to use a GPIO function other than F (SCIF-RC32OUT)
• PA20 is configured as a General Purpose Input/Output (GPIO)
• The bit FRC32 in the Power Manager PPCR register is written to zero (refer to the Power
Manager chapter)
The maximum amplitude of the clock signal will be defined by VDDIN.
Once the RC32K output on PA20 is disabled it can never be enabled again.
3.4.8.2
3.4.9
XOUT32_2 function
PA20 selects RC32OUT as default enabled after reset. This function is not automatically disabled when the user enables the XOUT32_2 function on PA20. This disturbs the oscillator and
may result in the wrong frequency. To avoid this, RC32OUT must be disabled when XOUT32_2
is enabled.
ADC Input Pins
These pins are regular I/O pins powered from the VDDIO. However, when these pins are used
for ADC inputs, the voltage applied to the pin must not exceed 1.98V. Internal circuitry ensures
that the pin cannot be used as an analog input pin when the I/O drives to VDD. When the pins
are not used for ADC inputs, the pins may be driven to the full I/O voltage range.
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4. Mechanical Characteristics
4.1
4.1.1
Thermal Considerations
Thermal Data
Table 4-1 summarizes the thermal resistance data depending on the package.
Table 4-1.
4.1.2
Thermal Resistance Data
Symbol
Parameter
Condition
Package
Typ
JA
Junction-to-ambient thermal resistance
Still Air
TQFP48
54.4
JC
Junction-to-case thermal resistance
TQFP48
15.7
JA
Junction-to-ambient thermal resistance
QFN48
26.0
JC
Junction-to-case thermal resistance
QFN48
1.6
JA
Junction-to-ambient thermal resistance
TLLGA48
25.4
JC
Junction-to-case thermal resistance
TLLGA48
12.7
Still Air
Still Air
Unit
C/W
C/W
C/W
Junction Temperature
The average chip-junction temperature, TJ, in °C can be obtained from the following:
1.
T J = T A +  P D   JA 
2.
T J = T A +  P D    HEATSINK +  JC  
where:
• JA = package thermal resistance, Junction-to-ambient (°C/W), provided in Table 4-1.
• JC = package thermal resistance, Junction-to-case thermal resistance (°C/W), provided in
Table 4-1.
• HEAT SINK = cooling device thermal resistance (°C/W), provided in the device datasheet.
• PD = device power consumption (W) estimated from data provided in Section 32.4 on page
792.
• TA = ambient temperature (°C).
From the first equation, the user can derive the estimated lifetime of the chip and decide if a
cooling device is necessary or not. If a cooling device is to be fitted on the chip, the second
equation should be used to compute the resulting average chip-junction temperature TJ in °C.
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4.2
Package Drawings
Figure 4-1.
TQFP-48 Package Drawing
Table 4-2.
Device and Package Maximum Weight
140
Table 4-3.
mg
Package Characteristics
Moisture Sensitivity Level
Table 4-4.
MSL3
Package Reference
JEDEC Drawing Reference
MS-026
JESD97 Classification
E3
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Figure 4-2.
Note:
QFN-48 Package Drawing
The exposed pad is not connected to anything internally, but should be soldered to ground to increase board level reliability.
Table 4-5.
Device and Package Maximum Weight
140
Table 4-6.
mg
Package Characteristics
Moisture Sensitivity Level
Table 4-7.
MSL3
Package Reference
JEDEC Drawing Reference
M0-220
JESD97 Classification
E3
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Figure 4-3.
TLLGA-48 Package Drawing
Table 4-8.
Device and Package Maximum Weight
39.3
Table 4-9.
mg
Package Characteristics
Moisture Sensitivity Level
Table 4-10.
MSL3
Package Reference
JEDEC Drawing Reference
N/A
JESD97 Classification
E4
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4.3
Soldering Profile
Table 4-11 gives the recommended soldering profile from J-STD-20.
Table 4-11.
Soldering Profile
Profile Feature
Green Package
Average Ramp-up Rate (217°C to Peak)
3°C/s max
Preheat Temperature 175°C ±25°C
150-200°C
Time Maintained Above 217°C
60-150 s
Time within 5C of Actual Peak Temperature
30 s
Peak Temperature Range
260°C
Ramp-down Rate
6°C/s max
Time 25C to Peak Temperature
8 minutes max
A maximum of three reflow passes is allowed per component.
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5. Ordering Information
Table 5-1.
Ordering Information
Device
Ordering Code
Carrier Type
AT32UC3L0256-AUTES
ES
AT32UC3L0256-AUT
Tray
AT32UC3L0256-AUR
Tape & Reel
Package
Package Type
Temperature Operating
Range
TQFP 48
JESD97 Classification E3
AT32UC3L0256
AT32UC3L0256-ZAUTES
ES
AT32UC3L0256-ZAUT
Tray
AT32UC3L0256-ZAUR
Tape & Reel
AT32UC3L0256-D3HES
ES
AT32UC3L0256-D3HT
Tray
AT32UC3L0256-D3HR
Tape & Reel
AT32UC3L0128-AUT
Tray
AT32UC3L0128-AUR
Tape & Reel
AT32UC3L0128-ZAUT
Tray
AT32UC3L0128-ZAUR
Tape & Reel
AT32UC3L0128-D3HT
Tray
AT32UC3L0128-D3HR
Tape & Reel
QFN 48
TLLGA 48
JESD97 Classification E4
Industrial (-40C to 85C)
TQFP 48
JESD97 Classification E3
AT32UC3L0128
QFN 48
TLLGA 48
JESD97 Classification E4
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6. Errata
6.1
6.1.1
Rev. C
SCIF
1. The RC32K output on PA20 is not always permanently disabled
The RC32K output on PA20 may sometimes re-appear.
Fix/Workaround
Before using RC32K for other purposes, the following procedure has to be followed in order
to properly disable it:
- Run the CPU on RCSYS
- Disable the output to PA20 by writing a zero to PM.PPCR.RC32OUT
- Enable RC32K by writing a one to SCIF.RC32KCR.EN, and wait for this bit to be read as
one
- Disable RC32K by writing a zero to SCIF.RC32KCR.EN, and wait for this bit to be read as
zero.
2. PLLCOUNT value larger than zero can cause PLLEN glitch
Initializing the PLLCOUNT with a value greater than zero creates a glitch on the PLLEN signal during asynchronous wake up.
Fix/Workaround
The lock-masking mechanism for the PLL should not be used.
The PLLCOUNT field of the PLL Control Register should always be written to zero.
3. Writing 0x5A5A5A5A to the SCIF memory range will enable the SCIF UNLOCK feature
The SCIF UNLOCK feature will be enabled if the value 0x5A5A5A5A is written to any location in the SCIF memory range.
Fix/Workaround
None.
6.1.2
SPI
1. SPI data transfer hangs with CSR0.CSAAT==1 and MR.MODFDIS==0
When CSR0.CSAAT==1 and mode fault detection is enabled (MR.MODFDIS==0), the SPI
module will not start a data transfer.
Fix/Workaround
Disable mode fault detection by writing a one to MR.MODFDIS.
2. Disabling SPI has no effect on the SR.TDRE bit
Disabling SPI has no effect on the SR.TDRE bit whereas the write data command is filtered
when SPI is disabled. Writing to TDR when SPI is disabled will not clear SR.TDRE. If SPI is
disabled during a PDCA transfer, the PDCA will continue to write data to TDR until its buffer
is empty, and this data will be lost.
Fix/Workaround
Disable the PDCA, add two NOPs, and disable the SPI. To continue the transfer, enable the
SPI and PDCA.
3. SPI disable does not work in SLAVE mode
SPI disable does not work in SLAVE mode.
Fix/Workaround
Read the last received data, then perform a software reset by writing a one to the Software
Reset bit in the Control Register (CR.SWRST).
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4. SPI bad serial clock generation on 2nd chip_select when SCBR=1, CPOL=1, and
NCPHA=0
When multiple chip selects (CS) are in use, if one of the baudrates equal 1 while one
(CSRn.SCBR=1) of the others do not equal 1, and CSRn.CPOL=1 and CSRn.NCPHA=0,
then an additional pulse will be generated on SCK.
Fix/Workaround
When multiple CS are in use, if one of the baudrates equals 1, the others must also equal 1
if CSRn.CPOL=1 and CSRn.NCPHA=0.
5. SPI mode fault detection enable causes incorrect behavior
When mode fault detection is enabled (MR.MODFDIS==0), the SPI module may not operate
properly.
Fix/Workaround
Always disable mode fault detection before using the SPI by writing a one to MR.MODFDIS.
6. SPI RDR.PCS is not correct
The PCS (Peripheral Chip Select) field in the SPI RDR (Receive Data Register) does not
correctly indicate the value on the NPCS pins at the end of a transfer.
Fix/Workaround
Do not use the PCS field of the SPI RDR.
6.1.3
TWI
1. SMBALERT bit may be set after reset
The SMBus Alert (SMBALERT) bit in the Status Register (SR) might be erroneously set after
system reset.
Fix/Workaround
After system reset, clear the SR.SMBALERT bit before commencing any TWI transfer.
2. Clearing the NAK bit before the BTF bit is set locks up the TWI bus
When the TWIS is in transmit mode, clearing the NAK Received (NAK) bit of the Status Register (SR) before the end of the Acknowledge/Not Acknowledge cycle will cause the TWIS to
attempt to continue transmitting data, thus locking up the bus.
Fix/Workaround
Clear SR.NAK only after the Byte Transfer Finished (BTF) bit of the same register has been
set.
6.1.4
TC
1. Channel chaining skips first pulse for upper channel
When chaining two channels using the Block Mode Register, the first pulse of the clock
between the channels is skipped.
Fix/Workaround
Configure the lower channel with RA = 0x1 and RC = 0x2 to produce a dummy clock cycle
for the upper channel. After the dummy cycle has been generated, indicated by the
SR.CPCS bit, reconfigure the RA and RC registers for the lower channel with the real
values.
6.1.5
CAT
1. CAT QMatrix sense capacitors discharged prematurely
At the end of a QMatrix burst charging sequence that uses different burst count values for
different Y lines, the Y lines may be incorrectly grounded for up to n-1 periods of the periph25
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eral bus clock, where n is the ratio of the PB clock frequency to the GCLK_CAT frequency.
This results in premature loss of charge from the sense capacitors and thus increased variability of the acquired count values.
Fix/Workaround
Enable the 1kOhm drive resistors on all implemented QMatrix Y lines (CSA 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11,
13, and/or 15) by writing ones to the corresponding odd bits of the CSARES register.
2. Autonomous CAT acquisition must be longer than AST source clock period
When using the AST to trigger CAT autonomous touch acquisition in sleep modes where the
CAT bus clock is turned off, the CAT will start several acquisitions if the period of the AST
source clock is larger than one CAT acquisition. One AST clock period after the AST trigger,
the CAT clock will automatically stop and the CAT acquisition can be stopped prematurely,
ruining the result.
Fix/Workaround
Always ensure that the ATCFG1.max field is set so that the duration of the autonomous
touch acquisition is greater than one clock period of the AST source clock.
6.1.6
aWire
1. aWire MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command does not return correct CV
The aWire MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command does not return a CV corresponding to
the formula in the aWire Debug Interface chapter.
Fix/Workaround
Issue a dummy read to address 0x100000000 before issuing the
MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command and use this formula instead:
7f aw
f sab = ---------------CV – 3
6.1.7
Flash
1. Corrupted data in flash may happen after flash page write operations
After a flash page write operation from an external in situ programmer, reading (data read or
code fetch) in flash may fail. This may lead to an exception or to others errors derived from
this corrupted read access.
Fix/Workaround
Before any flash page write operation, each write in the page buffer must preceded by a
write in the page buffer with 0xFFFF_FFFF content at any address in the page.
6.2
6.2.1
Rev. B
SCIF
1. The RC32K output on PA20 is not always permanently disabled
The RC32K output on PA20 may sometimes re-appear.
Fix/Workaround
Before using RC32K for other purposes, the following procedure has to be followed in order
to properly disable it:
- Run the CPU on RCSYS
- Disable the output to PA20 by writing a zero to PM.PPCR.RC32OUT
- Enable RC32K by writing a one to SCIF.RC32KCR.EN, and wait for this bit to be read as
one
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- Disable RC32K by writing a zero to SCIF.RC32KCR.EN, and wait for this bit to be read as
zero.
2. PLLCOUNT value larger than zero can cause PLLEN glitch
Initializing the PLLCOUNT with a value greater than zero creates a glitch on the PLLEN signal during asynchronous wake up.
Fix/Workaround
The lock-masking mechanism for the PLL should not be used.
The PLLCOUNT field of the PLL Control Register should always be written to zero.
3. Writing 0x5A5A5A5A to the SCIF memory range will enable the SCIF UNLOCK feature
The SCIF UNLOCK feature will be enabled if the value 0x5A5A5A5A is written to any location in the SCIF memory range.
Fix/Workaround
None.
6.2.2
WDT
1. WDT Control Register does not have synchronization feedback
When writing to the Timeout Prescale Select (PSEL), Time Ban Prescale Select (TBAN),
Enable (EN), or WDT Mode (MODE) fieldss of the WDT Control Register (CTRL), a synchronizer is started to propagate the values to the WDT clcok domain. This synchronization
takes a finite amount of time, but only the status of the synchronization of the EN bit is
reflected back to the user. Writing to the synchronized fields during synchronization can lead
to undefined behavior.
Fix/Workaround
-When writing to the affected fields, the user must ensure a wait corresponding to 2 clock
cycles of both the WDT peripheral bus clock and the selected WDT clock source.
-When doing writes that changes the EN bit, the EN bit can be read back until it reflects the
written value.
6.2.3
SPI
1. SPI data transfer hangs with CSR0.CSAAT==1 and MR.MODFDIS==0
When CSR0.CSAAT==1 and mode fault detection is enabled (MR.MODFDIS==0), the SPI
module will not start a data transfer.
Fix/Workaround
Disable mode fault detection by writing a one to MR.MODFDIS.
2. Disabling SPI has no effect on the SR.TDRE bit
Disabling SPI has no effect on the SR.TDRE bit whereas the write data command is filtered
when SPI is disabled. Writing to TDR when SPI is disabled will not clear SR.TDRE. If SPI is
disabled during a PDCA transfer, the PDCA will continue to write data to TDR until its buffer
is empty, and this data will be lost.
Fix/Workaround
Disable the PDCA, add two NOPs, and disable the SPI. To continue the transfer, enable the
SPI and PDCA.
3. SPI disable does not work in SLAVE mode
SPI disable does not work in SLAVE mode.
Fix/Workaround
Read the last received data, then perform a software reset by writing a one to the Software
Reset bit in the Control Register (CR.SWRST).
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4. SPI bad serial clock generation on 2nd chip_select when SCBR=1, CPOL=1, and
NCPHA=0
When multiple chip selects (CS) are in use, if one of the baudrates equal 1 while one
(CSRn.SCBR=1) of the others do not equal 1, and CSRn.CPOL=1 and CSRn.NCPHA=0,
then an additional pulse will be generated on SCK.
Fix/Workaround
When multiple CS are in use, if one of the baudrates equals 1, the others must also equal 1
if CSRn.CPOL=1 and CSRn.NCPHA=0.
5. SPI mode fault detection enable causes incorrect behavior
When mode fault detection is enabled (MR.MODFDIS==0), the SPI module may not operate
properly.
Fix/Workaround
Always disable mode fault detection before using the SPI by writing a one to MR.MODFDIS.
6. SPI RDR.PCS is not correct
The PCS (Peripheral Chip Select) field in the SPI RDR (Receive Data Register) does not
correctly indicate the value on the NPCS pins at the end of a transfer.
Fix/Workaround
Do not use the PCS field of the SPI RDR.
6.2.4
TWI
1. TWIS may not wake the device from sleep mode
If the CPU is put to a sleep mode (except Idle and Frozen) directly after a TWI Start condition, the CPU may not wake upon a TWIS address match. The request is NACKed.
Fix/Workaround
When using the TWI address match to wake the device from sleep, do not switch to sleep
modes deeper than Frozen. Another solution is to enable asynchronous EIC wake on the
TWIS clock (TWCK) or TWIS data (TWD) pins, in order to wake the system up on bus
events.
2. SMBALERT bit may be set after reset
The SMBus Alert (SMBALERT) bit in the Status Register (SR) might be erroneously set after
system reset.
Fix/Workaround
After system reset, clear the SR.SMBALERT bit before commencing any TWI transfer.
3. Clearing the NAK bit before the BTF bit is set locks up the TWI bus
When the TWIS is in transmit mode, clearing the NAK Received (NAK) bit of the Status Register (SR) before the end of the Acknowledge/Not Acknowledge cycle will cause the TWIS to
attempt to continue transmitting data, thus locking up the bus.
Fix/Workaround
Clear SR.NAK only after the Byte Transfer Finished (BTF) bit of the same register has been
set.
6.2.5
PWMA
1. The SR.READY bit cannot be cleared by writing to SCR.READY
The Ready bit in the Status Register will not be cleared when writing a one to the corresponding bit in the Status Clear register. The Ready bit will be cleared when the Busy bit is
set.
Fix/Workaround
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Disable the Ready interrupt in the interrupt handler when receiving the interrupt. When an
operation that triggers the Busy/Ready bit is started, wait until the ready bit is low in the Status Register before enabling the interrupt.
6.2.6
TC
1. Channel chaining skips first pulse for upper channel
When chaining two channels using the Block Mode Register, the first pulse of the clock
between the channels is skipped.
Fix/Workaround
Configure the lower channel with RA = 0x1 and RC = 0x2 to produce a dummy clock cycle
for the upper channel. After the dummy cycle has been generated, indicated by the
SR.CPCS bit, reconfigure the RA and RC registers for the lower channel with the real
values.
6.2.7
CAT
1. CAT QMatrix sense capacitors discharged prematurely
At the end of a QMatrix burst charging sequence that uses different burst count values for
different Y lines, the Y lines may be incorrectly grounded for up to n-1 periods of the peripheral bus clock, where n is the ratio of the PB clock frequency to the GCLK_CAT frequency.
This results in premature loss of charge from the sense capacitors and thus increased variability of the acquired count values.
Fix/Workaround
Enable the 1kOhm drive resistors on all implemented QMatrix Y lines (CSA 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11,
13, and/or 15) by writing ones to the corresponding odd bits of the CSARES register.
2. Autonomous CAT acquisition must be longer than AST source clock period
When using the AST to trigger CAT autonomous touch acquisition in sleep modes where the
CAT bus clock is turned off, the CAT will start several acquisitions if the period of the AST
source clock is larger than one CAT acquisition. One AST clock period after the AST trigger,
the CAT clock will automatically stop and the CAT acquisition can be stopped prematurely,
ruining the result.
Fix/Workaround
Always ensure that the ATCFG1.max field is set so that the duration of the autonomous
touch acquisition is greater than one clock period of the AST source clock.
3. CAT consumes unnecessary power when disabled or when autonomous touch not
used
A CAT prescaler controlled by the ATCFG0.DIV field will be active even when the CAT module is disabled or when the autonomous touch feature is not used, thereby causing
unnecessary power consumption.
Fix/Workaround
If the CAT module is not used, disable the CLK_CAT clock in the PM module. If the CAT
module is used but the autonomous touch feature is not used, the power consumption of the
CAT module may be reduced by writing 0xFFFF to the ATCFG0.DIV field.
6.2.8
aWire
1. aWire MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command does not return correct CV
The aWire MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command does not return a CV corresponding to
the formula in the aWire Debug Interface chapter.
Fix/Workaround
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Issue a dummy read to address 0x100000000 before
MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command and use this formula instead:
issuing
the
7f aw
f sab = ---------------CV – 3
6.2.9
Flash
1. Corrupted data in flash may happen after flash page write operations
After a flash page write operation from an external in situ programmer, reading (data read or
code fetch) in flash may fail. This may lead to an exception or to others errors derived from
this corrupted read access.
Fix/Workaround
Before any flash page write operation, each write in the page buffer must preceded by a
write in the page buffer with 0xFFFF_FFFF content at any address in the page.
6.3
6.3.1
Rev. A
Device
1. JTAGID is wrong
The JTAGID is 0x021DF03F.
Fix/Workaround
None.
6.3.2
FLASHCDW
1. General-purpose fuse programming does not work
The general-purpose fuses cannot be programmed and are stuck at 1. Please refer to the
Fuse Settings chapter in the FLASHCDW for more information about what functions are
affected.
Fix/Workaround
None.
2. Set Security Bit command does not work
The Set Security Bit (SSB) command of the FLASHCDW does not work. The device cannot
be locked from external JTAG, aWire, or other debug accesses.
Fix/Workaround
None.
3. Flash programming time is longer than specified
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The flash programming time is now:
Table 6-1.
Flash Characteristics
Symbol
Parameter
TFPP
Page programming time
TFPE
Page erase time
TFFP
Fuse programming time
TFEA
Full chip erase time (EA)
TFCE
JTAG chip erase time
(CHIP_ERASE)
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
7.5
7.5
fCLK_HSB= 50MHz
1
ms
9
fCLK_HSB= 115kHz
250
Fix/Workaround
None.
4. Power Manager
5. Clock Failure Detector (CFD) can be issued while turning off the CFD
While turning off the CFD, the CFD bit in the Status Register (SR) can be set. This will
change the main clock source to RCSYS.
Fix/Workaround
Solution 1: Enable CFD interrupt. If CFD interrupt is issues after turning off the CFD, switch
back to original main clock source.
Solution 2: Only turn off the CFD while running the main clock on RCSYS.
6. Sleepwalking in idle and frozen sleep mode will mask all other PB clocks
If the CPU is in idle or frozen sleep mode and a module is in a state that triggers sleep walking, all PB clocks will be masked except the PB clock to the sleepwalking module.
Fix/Workaround
Mask all clock requests in the PM.PPCR register before going into idle or frozen mode.
2. Unused PB clocks are running
Three unused PBA clocks are enabled by default and will cause increased active power
consumption.
Fix/Workaround
Disable the clocks by writing zeroes to bits [27:25] in the PBA clock mask register.
6.3.3
SCIF
1. The RC32K output on PA20 is not always permanently disabled
The RC32K output on PA20 may sometimes re-appear.
Fix/Workaround
Before using RC32K for other purposes, the following procedure has to be followed in order
to properly disable it:
- Run the CPU on RCSYS
- Disable the output to PA20 by writing a zero to PM.PPCR.RC32OUT
- Enable RC32K by writing a one to SCIF.RC32KCR.EN, and wait for this bit to be read as
one
- Disable RC32K by writing a zero to SCIF.RC32KCR.EN, and wait for this bit to be read as
zero.
2. PLL lock might not clear after disable
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Under certain circumstances, the lock signal from the Phase Locked Loop (PLL) oscillator
may not go back to zero after the PLL oscillator has been disabled. This can cause the propagation of clock signals with the wrong frequency to parts of the system that use the PLL
clock.
Fix/Workaround
PLL must be turned off before entering STOP, DEEPSTOP or STATIC sleep modes. If PLL
has been turned off, a delay of 30us must be observed after the PLL has been enabled
again before the SCIF.PLL0LOCK bit can be used as a valid indication that the PLL is
locked.
3. PLLCOUNT value larger than zero can cause PLLEN glitch
Initializing the PLLCOUNT with a value greater than zero creates a glitch on the PLLEN signal during asynchronous wake up.
Fix/Workaround
The lock-masking mechanism for the PLL should not be used.
The PLLCOUNT field of the PLL Control Register should always be written to zero.
4. RCSYS is not calibrated
The RCSYS is not calibrated and will run faster than 115.2kHz. Frequencies around 150kHz
can be expected.
Fix/Workaround
If a known clock source is available the RCSYS can be runtime calibrated by using the frequency meter (FREQM) and tuning the RCSYS by writing to the RCCR register in SCIF.
5. Writing 0x5A5A5A5A to the SCIF memory range will enable the SCIF UNLOCK feature
The SCIF UNLOCK feature will be enabled if the value 0x5A5A5A5A is written to any location in the SCIF memory range.
Fix/Workaround
None.
6.3.4
WDT
1. Clearing the Watchdog Timer (WDT) counter in second half of timeout period will
issue a Watchdog reset
If the WDT counter is cleared in the second half of the timeout period, the WDT will immediately issue a Watchdog reset.
Fix/Workaround
Use twice as long timeout period as needed and clear the WDT counter within the first half
of the timeout period. If the WDT counter is cleared after the first half of the timeout period,
you will get a Watchdog reset immediately. If the WDT counter is not cleared at all, the time
before the reset will be twice as long as needed.
2. WDT Control Register does not have synchronization feedback
When writing to the Timeout Prescale Select (PSEL), Time Ban Prescale Select (TBAN),
Enable (EN), or WDT Mode (MODE) fieldss of the WDT Control Register (CTRL), a synchronizer is started to propagate the values to the WDT clcok domain. This synchronization
takes a finite amount of time, but only the status of the synchronization of the EN bit is
reflected back to the user. Writing to the synchronized fields during synchronization can lead
to undefined behavior.
Fix/Workaround
-When writing to the affected fields, the user must ensure a wait corresponding to 2 clock
cycles of both the WDT peripheral bus clock and the selected WDT clock source.
-When doing writes that changes the EN bit, the EN bit can be read back until it reflects the
written value.
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6.3.5
GPIO
1. Clearing Interrupt flags can mask other interrupts
When clearing interrupt flags in a GPIO port, interrupts on other pins of that port, happening
in the same clock cycle will not be registered.
Fix/Workaround
Read the PVR register of the port before and after clearing the interrupt to see if any pin
change has happened while clearing the interrupt. If any change occurred in the PVR
between the reads, they must be treated as an interrupt.
6.3.6
SPI
1. SPI data transfer hangs with CSR0.CSAAT==1 and MR.MODFDIS==0
When CSR0.CSAAT==1 and mode fault detection is enabled (MR.MODFDIS==0), the SPI
module will not start a data transfer.
Fix/Workaround
Disable mode fault detection by writing a one to MR.MODFDIS.
2. Disabling SPI has no effect on the SR.TDRE bit
Disabling SPI has no effect on the SR.TDRE bit whereas the write data command is filtered
when SPI is disabled. Writing to TDR when SPI is disabled will not clear SR.TDRE. If SPI is
disabled during a PDCA transfer, the PDCA will continue to write data to TDR until its buffer
is empty, and this data will be lost.
Fix/Workaround
Disable the PDCA, add two NOPs, and disable the SPI. To continue the transfer, enable the
SPI and PDCA.
3. SPI disable does not work in SLAVE mode
SPI disable does not work in SLAVE mode.
Fix/Workaround
Read the last received data, then perform a software reset by writing a one to the Software
Reset bit in the Control Register (CR.SWRST).
4. SPI bad serial clock generation on 2nd chip_select when SCBR=1, CPOL=1, and
NCPHA=0
When multiple chip selects (CS) are in use, if one of the baudrates equal 1 while one
(CSRn.SCBR=1) of the others do not equal 1, and CSRn.CPOL=1 and CSRn.NCPHA=0,
then an additional pulse will be generated on SCK.
Fix/Workaround
When multiple CS are in use, if one of the baudrates equals 1, the others must also equal 1
if CSRn.CPOL=1 and CSRn.NCPHA=0.
5. SPI mode fault detection enable causes incorrect behavior
When mode fault detection is enabled (MR.MODFDIS==0), the SPI module may not operate
properly.
Fix/Workaround
Always disable mode fault detection before using the SPI by writing a one to MR.MODFDIS.
6. SPI RDR.PCS is not correct
The PCS (Peripheral Chip Select) field in the SPI RDR (Receive Data Register) does not
correctly indicate the value on the NPCS pins at the end of a transfer.
Fix/Workaround
Do not use the PCS field of the SPI RDR.
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6.3.7
TWI
1. TWIS may not wake the device from sleep mode
If the CPU is put to a sleep mode (except Idle and Frozen) directly after a TWI Start condition, the CPU may not wake upon a TWIS address match. The request is NACKed.
Fix/Workaround
When using the TWI address match to wake the device from sleep, do not switch to sleep
modes deeper than Frozen. Another solution is to enable asynchronous EIC wake on the
TWIS clock (TWCK) or TWIS data (TWD) pins, in order to wake the system up on bus
events.
2. SMBALERT bit may be set after reset
The SMBus Alert (SMBALERT) bit in the Status Register (SR) might be erroneously set after
system reset.
Fix/Workaround
After system reset, clear the SR.SMBALERT bit before commencing any TWI transfer.
3. Clearing the NAK bit before the BTF bit is set locks up the TWI bus
When the TWIS is in transmit mode, clearing the NAK Received (NAK) bit of the Status Register (SR) before the end of the Acknowledge/Not Acknowledge cycle will cause the TWIS to
attempt to continue transmitting data, thus locking up the bus.
Fix/Workaround
Clear SR.NAK only after the Byte Transfer Finished (BTF) bit of the same register has been
set.
4. TWIS stretch on Address match error
When the TWIS stretches TWCK due to a slave address match, it also holds TWD low for
the same duration if it is to be receiving data. When TWIS releases TWCK, it releases TWD
at the same time. This can cause a TWI timing violation.
Fix/Workaround
None.
5. TWIM TWALM polarity is wrong
The TWALM signal in the TWIM is active high instead of active low.
Fix/Workaround
Use an external inverter to invert the signal going into the TWIM. When using both TWIM
and TWIS on the same pins, the TWALM cannot be used.
6.3.8
PWMA
1. The SR.READY bit cannot be cleared by writing to SCR.READY
The Ready bit in the Status Register will not be cleared when writing a one to the corresponding bit in the Status Clear register. The Ready bit will be cleared when the Busy bit is
set.
Fix/Workaround
Disable the Ready interrupt in the interrupt handler when receiving the interrupt. When an
operation that triggers the Busy/Ready bit is started, wait until the ready bit is low in the Status Register before enabling the interrupt.
6.3.9
TC
1. Channel chaining skips first pulse for upper channel
When chaining two channels using the Block Mode Register, the first pulse of the clock
between the channels is skipped.
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Fix/Workaround
Configure the lower channel with RA = 0x1 and RC = 0x2 to produce a dummy clock cycle
for the upper channel. After the dummy cycle has been generated, indicated by the
SR.CPCS bit, reconfigure the RA and RC registers for the lower channel with the real
values.
6.3.10
ADCIFB
1. ADCIFB DMA transfer does not work with divided PBA clock
DMA requests from the ADCIFB will not be performed when the PBA clock is slower than
the HSB clock.
Fix/Workaround
Do not use divided PBA clock when the PDCA transfers from the ADCIFB.
6.3.11
CAT
1. CAT QMatrix sense capacitors discharged prematurely
At the end of a QMatrix burst charging sequence that uses different burst count values for
different Y lines, the Y lines may be incorrectly grounded for up to n-1 periods of the peripheral bus clock, where n is the ratio of the PB clock frequency to the GCLK_CAT frequency.
This results in premature loss of charge from the sense capacitors and thus increased variability of the acquired count values.
Fix/Workaround
Enable the 1kOhm drive resistors on all implemented QMatrix Y lines (CSA 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11,
13, and/or 15) by writing ones to the corresponding odd bits of the CSARES register.
2. Autonomous CAT acquisition must be longer than AST source clock period
When using the AST to trigger CAT autonomous touch acquisition in sleep modes where the
CAT bus clock is turned off, the CAT will start several acquisitions if the period of the AST
source clock is larger than one CAT acquisition. One AST clock period after the AST trigger,
the CAT clock will automatically stop and the CAT acquisition can be stopped prematurely,
ruining the result.
Fix/Workaround
Always ensure that the ATCFG1.max field is set so that the duration of the autonomous
touch acquisition is greater than one clock period of the AST source clock.
3. CAT consumes unnecessary power when disabled or when autonomous touch not
used
A CAT prescaler controlled by the ATCFG0.DIV field will be active even when the CAT module is disabled or when the autonomous touch feature is not used, thereby causing
unnecessary power consumption.
Fix/Workaround
If the CAT module is not used, disable the CLK_CAT clock in the PM module. If the CAT
module is used but the autonomous touch feature is not used, the power consumption of the
CAT module may be reduced by writing 0xFFFF to the ATCFG0.DIV field.
4. CAT module does not terminate QTouch burst on detect
The CAT module does not terminate a QTouch burst when the detection voltage is
reached on the sense capacitor. This can cause the sense capacitor to be charged more
than necessary. Depending on the dielectric absorption characteristics of the capacitor, this
can lead to unstable measurements.
Fix/Workaround
Use the minimum possible value for the MAX field in the ATCFG1, TG0CFG1, and
TG1CFG1 registers.
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6.3.12
aWire
1. aWire MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command does not return correct CV
The aWire MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command does not return a CV corresponding to
the formula in the aWire Debug Interface chapter.
Fix/Workaround
Issue a dummy read to address 0x100000000 before issuing the
MEMORY_SPEED_REQUEST command and use this formula instead:
7f aw
f sab = ---------------CV – 3
6.3.13
Flash
1. Corrupted data in flash may happen after flash page write operations
After a flash page write operation from an external in situ programmer, reading (data read or
code fetch) in flash may fail. This may lead to an exception or to others errors derived from
this corrupted read access.
Fix/Workaround
Before any flash page write operation, each write in the page buffer must preceded by a
write in the page buffer with 0xFFFF_FFFF content at any address in the page.
6.3.14
I/O Pins
1. PA05 is not 3.3V tolerant.
PA05 should be grounded on the PCB and left unused if VDDIO is above 1.8V.
Fix/Workaround
None.
2. No pull-up on pins that are not bonded
PB13 to PB27 are not bonded on UC3L0256/128, but has no pull-up and can cause current
consumption on VDDIO/VDDIN if left undriven.
Fix/Workaround
Enable pull-ups on PB13 to PB27 by writing 0x0FFFE000 to the PUERS1 register in the
GPIO.
3. PA17 has low ESD tolerance
PA17 only tolerates 500V ESD pulses (Human Body Model).
Fix/Workaround
Care must be taken during manufacturing and PCB design.
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7. Datasheet Revision History
Please note that the referring page numbers in this section are referred to this document. The
referring revision in this section are referring to the document revision.
7.1
7.2
7.3
Rev. C – 06/2013
1.
Updated the datasheet with new Atmel blue logo and the last page.
2.
Added Flash errata.
Rev. B – 01/2012
1.
Description: DFLL frequency is 20 to 150MHz, not 40 to 150MHz.
2.
Description: “One touch sensor can be configured to operate autonomously...” replaced by “All
touch sensors can be configured to operate autonomously...”.
3.
Block Diagram: GCLK_IN is input, not output, and is 2 bits wide (GCLK_IN[1..0]). CAT SMP
corrected from I/O to output. SPI NPCS corrected from output to I/O.
4.
Package and Pinout: PRND signal removed from Signal Descriptions List table and GPIO
Controller Function Multiplexing table.
5.
Supply and Startup Considerations: In 1.8V single supply mode figure, the input voltage is
1.62-1.98V, not 1.98-3.6V. “On system start-up, the DFLL is disabled” is replaced by “On
system start-up, all high-speed clocks are disabled”.
6.
ADCIFB: PRND signal removed from block diagram.
7.
Electrical Characteristics: Added PLL source clock in the Clock Frequencies table in the
Maximum Clock Frequencies section. Removed 64-pin package information from I/O Pin
Characteristics tables and Digital Clock Characteristics table.
8.
Electrical Characteristics: Removed USB Transceiver Characteristics, as the device contains
no USB.
9.
Mechanical Characteristics: Added notes to package drawings.
10.
Summary: Removed Programming and Debugging chapter, added Processor and Architecture
chapter.
11.
Datasheet Revision History: Corrected release date for datasheet rev. A; the correct date is
12/2011.
Rev. A – 12/2011
1.
Initial revision.
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Table of Contents
Features ..................................................................................................... 1
1
Description ............................................................................................... 3
2
Overview ................................................................................................... 5
3
4
2.1
Block Diagram ...................................................................................................5
2.2
Configuration Summary .....................................................................................6
Package and Pinout ................................................................................. 7
3.1
Package .............................................................................................................7
3.2
Peripheral Multiplexing on I/O Lines ..................................................................8
3.3
Signal Descriptions ..........................................................................................13
3.4
I/O Line Considerations ...................................................................................16
Mechanical Characteristics ................................................................... 18
4.1
Thermal Considerations ..................................................................................18
4.2
Package Drawings ...........................................................................................19
4.3
Soldering Profile ..............................................................................................22
5
Ordering Information ............................................................................. 23
6
Errata ....................................................................................................... 24
7
6.1
Rev. C ..............................................................................................................24
6.2
Rev. B ..............................................................................................................26
6.3
Rev. A ..............................................................................................................30
Datasheet Revision History .................................................................. 37
7.1
Rev. C – 06/2013 .............................................................................................37
7.2
Rev. B – 01/2012 .............................................................................................37
7.3
Rev. A – 12/2011 .............................................................................................37
Table of Contents....................................................................................... i
i
32145CS–06/2013
Atmel Corporation
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