AT42QT1110 Automotive - Complete

Atmel AT42QT1110-MZ
AT42QT1110-AZ
11-key QTouch® Touch Sensor IC
DATASHEET
Features
 Sensor Keys:

Up to 11 QTouch® channels
 Data Acquisition:

Measurement of keys triggered either by a signal applied to the SYNC pin or
at regular intervals timed by the AT42QT1110 internal clock
 Keys measured sequentially for better performance, or in parallel groups for
faster operation
 Raw data for key touches can be read as a report over the SPI interface
 Discrete Outputs:

Configurable “Detect” outputs indicating individual key touch (7-key mode)
 Device Setup:

Device configuration can be stored in EEPROM
 Technology:

Patented spread-spectrum charge-transfer (direct mode)
 Key Outline Sizes:

6 mm × 6 mm or larger (panel thickness dependent); widely different sizes and
shapes possible, including solid or ring shapes
 Key Spacings:

7 mm center-to-center or more (panel thickness dependent)
 Layers Required:

One
 Electrode Materials:

Etched copper, silver, carbon, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)
 Electrode Substrates:

PCB, FPCB, plastic films, glass
 Panel Materials:

Plastic, glass, composites, painted surfaces (low particle density metallic
paints possible)
 Panel Thickness:

Up to 10 mm glass, 5 mm plastic (electrode size dependent)
 Key Sensitivity:

Individually settable via simple commands over serial interface
 Adjacent Key Suppression® (AKS®)

Patented AKS technology to enable accurate key detection
 Interface:

Full-duplex SPI slave mode (1.5 MHz), CHANGE pin, discrete detection
outputs
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 Moisture Tolerance

Increased moisture tolerance based on hardware design and firmware tuning
 Power:

3 V – 5.5 V
 Package:


32-pin 5 × 5 mm MLF RoHS compliant
32-pin 7 × 7 mm TQFP RoHS compliant
 Signal Processing:

Self-calibration, auto drift compensation, noise filtering, AKS technology
 Applications:

Specific package qualified for automotive applications, such as radio, keyless entry, electric windows and satellite
navigation
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SNS0K
1.2
SNS9/DETECT4
SNS8K/DETECT3
SNS9K/DETECT5
CHANGE
RESET
Pinout Configuration
SNS10K/SYNC
1.1
SNS10/DETECT6
Pinout and Schematic
SNS0
1.
1
32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25
24
SNS8/DETECT2
SNS1
2
23
SNS7/DETECT1
SNS1K
3
22
SNS7K/DETECT0
VDD
4
VSS
5
QT1110
QT1110
21
VSS
20
SNS6
SNS6K
18
VDD
SNS3
8
SCK
MOSI
MISO
SS
SNS5K
10
SNS5
9
17
11 12 13 14 15 16
SNS4
19
7
SNS4K
6
SNS2
SNS3K
SNS2K
Pin Descriptions
Table 1-1.
Pin Listing
Pin
Name
Type
Comments
If Unused, Connect To...
1
SNS0K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
2
SNS1
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
3
SNS1K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
4
Vdd
P
Power
–
5
Vss
P
Supply Ground
–
6
SNS2K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
7
SNS2
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
8
SNS3
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
9
SNS3K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
10
SNS4
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
11
SNS4K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
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Table 1-1.
I
O
Pin Listing (Continued)
Pin
Name
Type
Comments
If Unused, Connect To...
12
SNS5
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
13
SNS5K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
14
SS
I
Enable SPI
15
MOSI
I
SPI Data In
Leave open
16
MISO
O
SPI Data Out
Leave open
17
SCK
I
SPI Clock
Leave open
18
Vdd
P
Power
–
19
SNS6K
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
20
SNS6
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
21
Vss
P
Supply Ground
–
22
SNS7K/DETECT0
I/O
Sense Pin/Key Status Indicator
Leave open
23
SNS7/DETECT1
I/O
Sense Pin/Key Status Indicator
Leave open
24
SNS8/DETECT2
I/O
Sense Pin / Key Status Indicator
Leave open
25
SNS8K/DETECT3
I/O
Sense Pin / Key Status Indicator
Leave open
26
SNS9/DETECT4
I/O
Sense Pin / Key Status Indicator
Leave open
27
SNS9K/DETECT5
I/O
Sense Pin / Key Status Indicator
Leave open
28
CHANGE
OD
Touch Event Indicator
Leave open
29
RESET
I
Reset
Vdd
30
SNS10/DETECT6
I/O
Sense Pin / Key Status Indicator
Leave open
31
SNS10K/SYNC
I/O
Sense Pin / Synchronization Input
Vdd or Vss via 100 k resistor
32
SNS0
I/O
Sense Pin
Leave open
Input and output
Open drain output
P
Input only
Output only, push-pull
I/O
OD
Vss via 100 k resistor to enable SPI
Vdd via 100 k resistor to disable SPI
Ground or power
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Schematics
VREG
QT1110
Figure 1-1. Typical Circuit: 7 keys With Detect Outputs and No External Trigger
Vunreg
1.3
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Figure 1-2. Typical Circuit: 11 Keys With No External Trigger
Vunreg
VREG
QT1110
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Figure 1-3. Typical Circuit: 10 Keys With External Trigger (SYNC Mode)
Vunreg
VREG
QT1110
For component values in Figure 1-1, Figure 1-2 and Figure 1-3, check the following sections:

Section 3.1 on page 9: Cs capacitors (Cs0 – Cs10)

Section 3.2 on page 9: Sample resistors (Rs0 – Rs10)

Section 3.5 on page 10: Voltage levels

Section 3.3 on page 9: LED traces
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2.
Overview of the AT42QT1110
2.1
Introduction
The AT42QT1110 (QT1110) is a digital burst mode charge-transfer (QT™) capacitive sensor driver designed for any
touch-key applications.
The keys can be constructed in different shapes and sizes. Refer to the Touch Sensors Design Guide and
Application Note QTAN0002, Secrets of a Successful QTouch Design, for more information on construction and
design methods (both downloadable from the Atmel website).
The device includes all signal processing functions necessary to provide stable sensing under a wide variety of
changing conditions, and the outputs are fully debounced. Only a few external parts are required for operation.
The QT1110 modulates its bursts in a spread-spectrum fashion in order to suppress heavily the effects of external
noise, and to suppress RF emissions.
2.2
Configurations
The QT1110 is designed as a versatile device, capable of various configurations. There are two basic configurations
for the QT1110:

11-key QTouch. The device can sense up to 11 keys.

7-key QTouch with individual outputs for each key. The device can sense up to 7 keys and drive the matching
Detect outputs to a user-configurable PWM.
Both configurations allow for a choice of acquisition modes, thus providing a variety of possibilities that will satisfy
most applications (see the following sections for more information).
Additionally, the SYNC line can be used as an external trigger input. Note that in 11-key mode the SYNC line
replaces one key, thus allowing only 10 keys.
See Section 4.7 on page 18 for more information.
2.3
Guard Channel
The device has a guard channel option (available in all key modes), which allows one key to be configured as a
guard channel to help prevent false detection. See Section 4.9 on page 20 for more information.
2.4
Self-test Functions
The QT1110 has two types of self-test functions:

Internal Hardware tests – check for hardware failures in the device internal memory.

Functional checks – confirm that the device is operating within expected parameters.
See Section 4.10 on page 20 for more information.
2.5
Moisture Tolerance
The presence of water (condensation, sweat, spilt water, and so on) on a sensor can alter the signal values
measured and thereby affect the performance of any capacitive device. The moisture tolerance of QTouch devices
can be improved by designing the hardware and fine-tuning the firmware following the recommendations in the
application note Atmel AVR3002: Moisture Tolerant QTouch Design (www.atmel.com/Images/doc42017.pdf).
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3.
Wiring and Parts
3.1
Cs Sample Capacitors
Cs0 – Cs10 are the charge sensing sample capacitors. Normally they are identical in nominal value. The optimal Cs
values depend on the thickness of the panel and its dielectric constant. Thicker panels require larger values of Cs.
Values can be in the range 2.2 nF (for faster operation) to 33 nF (for best sensitivity); typical values are 4.7 nF to
10 nF.
The value of Cs should be chosen so that a light touch on a key produces a reduction of ~20 to 30 in the key signal
value (see Section 6.8 on page 27). The chosen Cs value should never be so large that the key signals exceed
~1000, as reported by the chip in the debug data.
The Cs capacitors must be X7R or PPS film type, for stability. For consistent sensitivity, they should have a 10
percent tolerance. Twenty percent tolerance may cause small differences in sensitivity from key to key and unit to
unit. If a key is not used, the Cs capacitor may be omitted.
3.2
Rs Resistors
The series resistors Rs0 – Rs10 are inline with the electrode connections and should be used to limit electrostatic
discharge (ESD) currents and to suppress radio frequency (RF) interference. Values should be approximately 2 k
to 20 k each; a typical value is 4.7 k.
Although these resistors may be omitted, the device may become susceptible to external noise or radio frequency
interference (RFI). For details of how to select these resistors see the Application Note QTAN0002, Secrets of a
Successful QTouch Design, downloadable from the Touch Technology area of the Atmel website, www.atmel.com.
3.3
LED Traces and Other Switching Signals
Digital switching signals near the sense lines can induce transients into the acquired signals, deteriorating the SNR
performance of the device. Such signals should be routed away from the sensing traces and electrodes, or the
design should be such that these lines are not switched during the course of signal acquisition (bursts).
LED terminals which are multiplexed or switched into a floating state, and which are within, or physically very near, a
key (even if on another nearby PCB) should be bypassed to either Vss or Vdd with at least a 1 nF capacitor. This is
to suppress capacitive coupling effects which can induce false signal shifts. The bypass capacitor does not need to
be next to the LED, in fact it can be quite distant. The bypass capacitor is noncritical and can be of any type.
LED terminals which are constantly connected to Vss or Vdd do not need further bypassing.
3.4
PCB Cleanliness
Modern no-clean flux is generally compatible with capacitive sensing circuits.
CAUTION: If a PCB is reworked to correct soldering faults relating to the QT1110, or to any
associated traces or components, be sure that you fully understand the nature of the flux used
during the rework process. Leakage currents from hygroscopic ionic residues can stop capacitive
sensors from functioning. If you have any doubts, a thorough cleaning after rework may be the
only safe option.
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3.5
Power Supply
3.5.1
General Considerations
See Section 8.2 on page 39 for the power supply range. If the power supply fluctuates slowly with temperature, the
device tracks and compensates for these changes automatically with only minor changes in sensitivity. If the supply
voltage drifts or shifts quickly, the drift compensation mechanism is not able to keep up, causing sensitivity
anomalies or false detections.
The usual power supply considerations with QT parts apply to the device. The power should be clean and come from
a separate regulator if possible. However, this device is designed to minimize the effects of unstable power, and,
except in extreme conditions, should not require a separate Low Dropout (LDO) regulator.
See underneath Figure 1.3 on page 5 for suggested regulator manufacturers.
Caution: A regulator IC shared with other logic can result in erratic operation and is not
advised.
A single ceramic 0.1 µF bypass capacitor, with short traces, should be placed very close to the
power pins of the IC. Failure to do so can result in device oscillation, high current
consumption, or erratic operation.
It is assumed that a larger bypass capacitor (like1 µF) is somewhere else in the power circuit; for example, near the
regulator.
3.5.2
Brownout Detection
The QT1110 includes a power supply monitoring circuit that detects if Vdd drops below a safe operating voltage.
When this occurs, the device goes into a Reset state, where no acquisition or processing is carried out. The device
remains in this state until Vdd returns to the specified voltage range.
Once a safe operating voltage is detected, the QT1110 behaves as per normal power-on/reset conditions; that is,
any saved settings are restored from EEPROM, the internal self-tests are run and all channels are calibrated.
The Brown-out detector threshold is 2.7 V ±10%.
3.6
MLF Package Restrictions
The central pad on the underside of the MLF chip should be connected to ground. Do not run any tracks underneath
the body of the chip, only ground. Figure 3-1 shows examples of good and bad tracking.
Figure 3-1. Examples of Good and Bad Tracking
Example of GOOD tracking
Example of BAD tracking
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4.
Detailed Operations
4.1
Communications
4.1.1
Introduction
All communication with the device is carried out over the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI). This is a synchronous
serial data link that operates in full-duplex mode. The host communicates with the QT controller over the SPI using a
master-slave relationship, with the QT1110 acting in slave mode.
4.1.2
SPI Operation
The SPI uses four logic signals:

Serial Clock (SCK) – output from the host.

Master Output, Slave Input (MOSI) – output from the host, input to the QT controller. Used by the host to send
data to the QT controller.

Master Input, Slave Output (MISO) – input to the host, output from the QT controller. Used by the QT device to
send data to the host.

Slave Select (SS) – active low output from the host.
At each byte, the master pulls SS low and generates 8 clock pulses on SCK. With these 8 clock pulses, a byte of
data is transmitted from the master to the slave over MOSI, most significant bit (msb) first.
Simultaneously a byte of data is transmitted from the slave to the master over MISO, also most significant bit first.
The slave reads the status of MOSI at the leading edge of each clock pulse, and the master reads the slave data
from MISO at the trailing edge.
The QT1110 requires that the clock idles “high”, meaning that the data on MOSI and MISO pins are set at the falling
edges and sampled at the rising edges.
That is:
Clock polarity CPOL = 1
Clock phase CPHA = 1
The QT1110 SPI interface can operate at any SCK frequency up to 1.5 MHz.
In multibyte communications, the master must pause for a minimum delay of 150 µs between the completion of one
byte exchange and the beginning of the next.
Note that the number of bytes to be transmitted depends on the initial command sent by the host. This sets the mode
on the QT1110 so that the QT1110 knows how to respond to, or how to interpret, the following bytes. If there is a
delay of >100 ms between bytes while the QT1110 is waiting for data, or waiting to send data, then the incomplete
transmission is discarded and the device resets its SPI state machine. It will then interpret the next byte it receives as
a fresh command.
When the QT1110 SPI interface is receiving a new command, it returns the Idle status code (0x55) on MISO during
the first byte exchange to indicate to the master that it is in the correct state for receiving instructions.
4.1.3
CRC Bytes
If enabled, a CRC checking procedure is implemented on all communications between the SPI master and the
QT1110. In this case, each command or report request sent by the master must have a byte appended containing
the CRC checksum of the data sent. The QT1110 will not respond to commands until the CRC byte has been
received and verified.
Sample C code showing the algorithm for calculating the CRC of the data can be found in Appendix A..
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When the QT1110 is expecting a CRC byte, it returns (on MISO) the calculated CRC byte which it expects to
receive. This is sent simultaneously with the QT1110 receiving the CRC byte from the master (that is, during the
same byte exchange). This allows both devices to confirm that the data was sent correctly.
All data returned by the QT1110 is also be followed by a CRC byte, allowing the master to confirm the integrity of the
data transmission.
4.1.4
SPI Commands
There are three types of communication between the SPI master and the QT1110:

Control commands (see Section 5. on page 22)

To send control instructions to the QT1110

Report requests (see Section 6. on page 25)

Setup commands (see Section 7. on page 29)

To reading status information from the QT1110

To set configuration options (“Set” instructions)

To read configuration options (“Get” instructions)
Additionally the NULL command (0x00) is transmitted by the host device as it is receiving data from the QT1110.
4.1.4.1 Control Commands
A control command is an instruction sent to the QT1110 that controls operations of the device, and for which no
response is required. Examples of control commands are: Reset, Calibrate, Send Setups.
With the exception of Send Setups, control commands normally require a single byte exchange, unless CRC
checking is enabled, in which case a second byte must be transmitted by the host with the calculated CRC of the
command byte.
Figure 4-1. Sleep Command – CRC Disabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0x05
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
Figure 4-2. Sleep Command – CRC Enabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0x05
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
Command CRC: 0x3F
Response: 0x3F (Expected Command CRC)
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When the Send Setups command is received, the QT1110 stops measurement of QTouch sensors and waits for 42
bytes of data to be sent. Only when all 42 bytes have been received (and the CRC byte, if CRC is enabled), the
QT1110 applies all the settings to RAM and resumes measurement. In this case, if CRC is enabled, the CRC byte is
calculated for all the data sent by the host, including the command byte 0x01.
Control Commands are specified in detail in Section 5. on page 22.
4.1.5
Report Requests
Report Requests are sent by the Host to instruct the QT1110 to return status information. The host sends the
appropriate Report Request command, then transmits Null bytes on MOSI while the QT1110 returns the report data
on MISO.
Figure 4-3. All Keys Report – CRC Disabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0xC1
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
Null: 0x00
Key Status Report Byte 0
Null: 0x00
Key Status Report Byte 1
For example, Figure 4-3 shows the exchange that takes place to read the 2-byte All Keys report. In this exchange,
the host sends:
0xC1 — 0x00 — 0x00
and the QT1110 returns (simultaneously):
0x55 — Report Byte 0 — Report Byte 1
If CRC is enabled, this exchange is extended to 5 bytes, as shown in Figure 4-4 on page 14.
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Figure 4-4. All Keys Report – CRC Enabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0xC1
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
Command CRC: 0x94
Response: 0x94 (Expected Command CRC)
Null: 0x00
Key Status Report Byte 0
Null: 0x00
Key Status Report Byte 1
Null: 0x00
Report CRC: 0x??
4.1.5.1 Set Instructions
Set Instructions are 2-byte transmissions by the host that are used to send settings to individual locations in the
device memory map.
At the first byte, the QT1110 returns 0x55 (Idle) to confirm that it will interpret the byte as a new command. At the
second byte, the QT1110 returns the Set command it has just received.
For example, to set the Positive Recalibration Delay to 1920 ms, address 5 in the memory map is set to 12 (0x0C).
This is done with the Set command for address 5 (command code 0x95), as shown in Figure 4-5.
Figure 4-5. Positive Recalibration Delay Set Instruction – CRC Disabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0x95
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
“Set” Data: 0x0C
Response: 0x95 (Command Just Received)
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With CRC Enabled, a CRC byte is also required (Figure 4-6). This is calculated for the two transmitted bytes (that is,
the Set command and the data byte).
For example, for the sequence shown in Figure 4-5 (0x95 — 0x0C), the CRC Byte is 0x9F. As is the case with the
other command types, when the QT1110 is expecting a CRC byte from the host, it calculates that byte in advance
and returns the expected value to the host in the same transmission as the host sends the CRC byte.
The sent data is not applied to the memory location until the CRC byte has been received and verified.
Figure 4-6. Positive Recalibration Delay Set Instruction – CRC Enabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0x95
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
“Set” Data: 0x0C
Response: 0x95 (Command Just Received)
Command CRC: 0x9F
Response: 0x9F (Expected CRC)
4.1.5.2 Get Instructions
Get instructions are instructions that read the data from a location in the QT1110 memory map.
Figure 4-7. Positive Recalibration Delay Get Instruction – CRC Disabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0xD5
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Simultaneous
Transmission
Null: 0x00
“Get” Data: 0x0C (Positive Recalibration Delay)
The host sends the appropriate Get command, followed by a Null byte. The QT1110 returns the contents of the
addressed memory location.
Figure 4-7 shows the exchange for a report on the positive recalibration delay (assuming that the data byte is 0x0C).
With CRC Enabled, this exchange takes 4 bytes, with a command CRC transmitted by the host and a report CRC
returned by the QT1110 (see Figure 4-8 on page 16).
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Figure 4-8. Positive Recalibration Delay Get Instruction – CRC Enabled
Host (Sends on MOSI)
Device (Responds on MISO)
Command: 0xD5
Simultaneous
Transmission
Response: 0x55 (“Idle” – Fresh Command)
Command CRC: 0x68
Response: 0x68 (Expected Command CRC)
Null: 0x00
“Get” Data: 0x0C (Positive Recalibration Delay)
Null: 0x00
“Get” CRC: 0xA3
4.1.6
Quick SPI Mode
4.1.6.1 Introduction
In Quick SPI Mode, the QT1110 sends a 7-byte key report at each exchange. No host commands are required over
SPI in this mode; the host clocks the data bytes out in sequence. Quick SPI mode is enabled by setting the SPI_EN
bit in the Comms Options setup byte (see Section 7.5 on page 31).
4.1.6.2 Quick SPI Report
The 7 report bytes are in the format given in Table 4-1.
Table 4-1.
Byte
Device Status Report Format
Description
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
0
Counter
Counter – increments from 0 to 255
1
Detect status, channels 0 – 3
Channel 3
Channel 2
Channel 1
Channel 0
2
Detect status, channels 4 – 7
Channel 7
Channel 6
Channel 5
Channel 4
3
Detect status, channels 8 – 10
Reserved
Channel 10
Channel 9
Channel 8
4
Error status, channels 0 – 3
Channel 3
Channel 2
Channel 1
Channel 0
5
Error status, channels 4 – 7
Channel 7
Channel 6
Channel 5
Channel 4
6
Error status, channels 8 – 10
Reserved
Channel 10
Channel 9
Channel 8
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where:

Byte 0 is a counter that increments from 0 to 254 on successive exchanges to confirm that firmware is
operating correctly.

Bytes 1 – 3 indicate the detect status of channels 0 – 3, 4 – 7 and 8 – 10 respectively (two bits per channel),
as follows:


00 = Channel not in detect

01 = Channel in detect

10 = Not Allowed

11 = Invalid Signal (Channel disabled)
Bytes 4 – 6 indicate the error status of channels 0 – 3, 4 – 7 and 8 – 10 respectively (two bits per channel), as
follows:

00 = No error

01 = Not allowed

10 = Error on channel

11 = Invalid signal (channel disabled)
Successive byte exchanges in Quick SPI mode cycle through the 7 bytes of status information. If synchronization is
lost, the host must either re-synchronize by identifying the incrementing counter byte (byte 0) or pausing
communications for at least 100 ms so the QT1110 will reset its SPI state.
4.1.6.3 Commands in Quick SPI Mode
Only two host commands are recognized under Quick SPI mode. These are shown in Table 4-2.
Table 4-2.
Host Commands in Quick SPI Mode
Command
Code
Purpose
Store to EEPROM
0x0A
Allows for “Quick SPI mode” to be stored as the default start-up mode
Enable Full SPI
0x36
Enables full SPI mode
CRC checking is not implemented in Quick SPI mode for host commands or return data.
4.1.6.4 Quick SPI Mode timing
In Quick SPI mode, the minimum time between byte exchanges is reduced to 50 µS.
If a pause in communications of 100 ms is detected during reading of the 7-byte report, the QT1110 resets the
exchange, and on the next byte read it returns byte 0 of the report.
4.2
Reset
The QT1110 can be reset using one of two methods:

Hardware reset: An external reset logic line can be used if desired, fed into the RESET pin. However, under
most conditions it is acceptable to tie RESET to Vdd.

Software reset: A software reset can be forced using the “Reset” control command.
For both methods, the device will follow the same initialization sequence. If there any saved settings in the
EEPROM, these are loaded into RAM. Otherwise the default settings are applied.
Note:
The SPI interface becomes active after the QT1110 has completed its startup sequence, taking
approximately 160 ms after power on/reset.
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4.3
Sleep Mode
The QT1110 can be put into a very low power sleep mode (typically < 2 µA). During sleep mode, no keys are
measured and the DETECT outputs are all put into high impedance mode to minimize current consumption. The
device remains in sleep mode until a falling edge is detected on either the SS pin or the CHANGE pin. When the
QT1110 wakes from sleep mode, it continues to operate as it was before it was put into sleep mode. The QT1110
requires approximately 100 µs to wake from sleep mode and will not respond correctly to SPI communications until
the wake-up procedure is complete. The low level on the SS or CHANGE pin that is used to wake the device must be
maintained for 100 µs to ensure correct operation.
Note:
4.4
If the device is set to sleep mode for an extended period, the host should initiate a recalibration immediately
after waking the QT1110.
Calibration
The device can be forced to recalibrate the sensor keys at any time. This can be useful where, for example, a
portable device is plugged into mains power, or during product development when settings are being tuned.
The QT1110 can also be configured to automatically recalibrate if it remains in detection for too long. This avoids
keys becoming “stuck” after a prolonged period of uninterrupted detection. See Section 7.18 on page 38 for details.
4.5
CHANGE Pin
The CHANGE pin can be configured using the Comms Options setup byte (see Section 7.5 on page 31) to act in one
of two modes:


4.6
Data mode

The CHANGE pin is asserted (pulled low) when the detection status of a key changes from that last
sent to the host; that is when a key-touch or key-release event occurs.

The CHANGE pin is pulled low when a key status changes and is only released when the “Send All
keys” report is requested (0xC1), or the key status information bytes are read in Quick SPI mode (see
Section 7.5 on page 31).
Touch mode

The CHANGE pin is pulled low when one or more keys are in detect. The CHANGE pin remains low as
long as there is a key in detect, regardless of communications.

The CHANGE pin is released when there are no keys in detect. No host communications are required to
release the CHANGE pin.
Stand-alone Mode
The QT1110 can operate in a stand-alone mode without the use of the SPI interface. The settings are loaded from
EEPROM and the device operates in 7-key mode using the Detect outputs.
4.7
Key Modes
4.7.1
11-key Mode
In 11-key mode, the device can sense up to 11 keys. Alternatively, one key can be replaced by the SYNC line as an
external trigger input (see Section 4.8.2 on page 19).
11-key mode is configured by setting the MODE bit in the Device Mode setup byte (see Section 7.4 on page 30).
Key acquisition can be triggered in one of two ways: using the internal clock to trigger acquisition either at a fixed
repetition period or in a continuous “free run” mode (see Section 4.8.1), or using the SYNC pin to provide an external
trigger (see Section 4.8.2 on page 19),
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4.7.2
7-key Mode
In 7-key mode, the detect outputs DETECT0 to DETECT6 become active on pins 22 – 27 and 30. These outputs
provide configurable PWM signals that indicate when each of the keys is touched.
7-key mode is configured by clearing the MODE bit in the Device Mode setup byte (see Section 7.4 on page 30).
Each DETECT output can be individually configured to output a PWM signal while the matching key is in detect or
out of detect. This signal can be one of nine levels, ranging from low (PWM = 0%) to high (PWM = 100%). This
allows for the use of an indicating LED. This is achieved by enabling the appropriate bit in the Key to LED setup byte
(see Section 7.14 on page 36), and setting the desired outputs levels or PWMs in setup addresses 9 to 15 (see
Section 7.12 on page 34).
4.8
Trigger Modes
4.8.1
Timed Trigger
In 11-key mode, The QT1110 can be configured to use the internal clock as a timed trigger. In this case, the QT1110
is configured with a cycle period, such that each acquisition cycle starts a specified length of time after the start of
the previous cycle. If the cycle period is set to 0, each acquisition cycle starts as soon as the previous one has
finished, resulting in the acquisition cycles running back-to-back in a “free run” mode.
The use of a timed trigger, and the cycle period to be used, is set in the Device Mode setup byte (see Section 7.4 on
page 30).
4.8.2
Synchronized Trigger
In 11-key mode, if a time trigger is not enabled, the QT1110 operates in “synchronized” mode. In this mode, SNS10K
is used as a SYNC pin to trigger key acquisition, rather than using the device internal clock. In this case the
maximum number of keys is reduced to 10.
The SYNC pin can use one of two methods to trigger key measurements, selectable via bit 4 of the Device Mode
setup byte (see Section 7.4 on page 30): Low Level and Rising Edge.
With the Low Level method the QT1110 operates in “free run” mode for as long as the SYNC pin is read as a logical
0. When the SYNC pin goes high, the current measurement cycle will be finished and no more key measurements
will be taken until the SYNC pin goes low again. The low level trigger should be a minimum of 1 ms so that there is
sufficient time for the device to detect the low level.
With the Rising Edge method all enabled keys are measured once when a rising edge is detected on the SYNC pin.
This allows key measurements to be synchronized to an external event or condition.
For example, the SYNC pin can be used by the host to synchronize several devices to each other. This would ensure
that only one of the devices outputs pulses at any given time and signals from one QT1110 do not interfere with the
measurements from another.
Another use for synchronizing to the rising edge is to steady the signals when the device is running off a mains
transformer with insufficient mains frequency filtering that is causing a 50 Hz or 60 Hz ripple on Vdd. If the mains
voltage is scaled down with a simple voltage divider and connected to the SYNC pin, then the key measurement can
be triggered by the rising edge detected at a positive going zero-crossing. Note that in this case, each key signal will
be taken at the same point in the cycle, so Vdd will be the same at each measurement for a given key and the
signals will be steadier.
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4.9
Guard Channel Option
The device has a guard channel option (available in all key modes), which allows one key to be configured as a
guard channel to help prevent false detection (see Figure 4-9 on page 20). Guard channel keys should be more
sensitive than the other keys (physically bigger or larger Cs), subject to burst length limitations (see Section 4.11.2
on page 21).
With guard channel enabled, the designated key is connected to a sensor pad which detects the presence of touch
and overrides any output from the other keys using the chip AKS feature. The guard channel option is enabled by the
Guard Key setup byte (see Section 7.5 on page 31).
With the guard channel not enabled, all the keys work normally.
Note:
If a key is already “in detect” when the guard channel becomes active, that key will remain in detect and the
guard key will not activate until the active key goes out of detect.
Figure 4-9. Guard Channel Example
Key Pad Formed
of Six Keys
Guard Channel
Formed of One Key
4.10
Self-test Functions
4.10.1 Internal Hardware Tests
Internal hardware tests check for hardware failure in the device internal memory areas and data paths. Any failure
detected in the function or contents of application ROM, RAM or registers causes the device to reset itself.
The application code is scanned with a CRC check routine to confirm that the application data is all correct.
The RAM and registers are checked periodically (every 10 seconds) for dynamic and static failures.
4.10.2 Functional Checks
Functional checks confirm that the device is operating within expected parameters; any failure detected in these
tests is notified to the system host. The device will continue to operate in the event that such functional failures are
detected.
The functional tests are:

Check that the channel-measurement signals are within the defined range.

Confirm that data stored in the EEPROM is valid.
These tests are carried out as the particular functions are used. For example, the EEPROM is checked when the
device attempts to load data from EEPROM, and the channel signals are checked when a measurement is carried
out.
Note:
If a particular channel is unused, the threshold of that channel should be set to 0 to prevent the incorrect
reporting of the unused channel as being in an error state.
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4.11
Signal Processing
4.11.1 Detection Integrator
The device features a detection integration mechanism, which acts to confirm a detection in a robust fashion. A perkey counter is incremented each time the key has exceeded its threshold. When this counter reaches a preset limit
the key is finally declared to be touched. For example, if the DI limit is set to 10, then a key signal must fall by more
than the key threshold, and remain below that level for 10 acquisitions, before the key is declared to be touched.
Similarly, the DI is applied to a key that is going out of detect: it must take 10 acquisitions where the signal has not
exceeded its detect threshold before it is declared to leave touch.
4.11.2 Burst Length Limitations
The maximum burst length is 2048 pulses. The recommended design is to use a capacitor that gives a signal of
<1000 pulses.
The number of pulses in the burst can be obtained by reading the key signal (that is, the number of pulses to
complete measurement of the key signal) over the SPI interface (see Section 6.8 on page 27). Alternatively, a scope
can be used to measure the entire burst, and then the burst length divided by the time for a single pulse.
Note that the keys are independent of each other. It is therefore possible, for example, to have a signal of 100 on one
key and a signal of 1000 on another.
4.11.3 Adjacent Key Suppression Technology
The device includes the Atmel patented Adjacent Key Suppression (AKS) technology to allow the use of tightly
spaced keys on a keypad with no loss of selectability by the user.
AKS is enabled or disabled for each key individually; only one key out of those enabled for AKS may be reported as
touched at any one time. The first key touched dominates and stays in detect until it is released, even if another
stronger key is reported. Once it is released, the next strongest key is reported. If two keys are simultaneously
detected, the strongest key is reported, allowing a user to slide a finger across multiple keys with only the dominant
key reporting touch.
Each key can be enabled for AKS processing via the AKS mask (see Section 7.11 on page 34). Keys outside the
group of enabled keys may be in detect simultaneously.
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5.
Control Commands
5.1
Introduction
The QT1110 control commands are those commands that affect the device operation.
The control commands are listed in Table 5-1 and are described individually in the following sections.
Table 5-1.
Note:
5.2
Control Commands
Command
Code
Note
Send Setups
0x01
Configures the device to receive setup data
Calibrate All
0x03
Calibrates all keys
Reset
0x04
Resets the device
Sleep
0x05
Sleep (dead) mode
Store to EEPROM
0x0A
Stores RAM setups to EEPROM
Restore from EEPROM
0x0B
Copies EEPROM setups to RAM (automatically done at startup)
Erase EEPROM
0x0C
Erases EEPROM setups
Recover EEPROM
0x0D
Restores last EEPROM settings (after erase)
Calibrate Key k
0x1k
Calibrates one key (key k)
Commands are implemented immediately upon reception, so a suitable delay is required for the operation to
be completed before communications can be re-established.
Send Setups (0x01)
This command initiates the upload of the full settings table to the QT1110 (see Section 7. on page 29).
When this command is received, the QT1110 stops key measurement and waits until 42 bytes of setup data have
been received. Key acquisition will restart after all the setup data has been received.
If enabled, a CRC check byte is transmitted (both ways) after the 42 bytes to confirm that they have been received
correctly.
If CRC checking is not enabled, it is recommended that the host request a dump of setup data from the QT1110, and
confirms that the data correctly matches the data sent.
The host must wait for at least 150 µs for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
5.3
Calibrate All (0x03)
This command initiates the recalibration of all sensor keys.
The host must wait for at least 150 µs for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
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5.4
Reset (0x04)
The Reset command forces the QT1110 to reset. If the setups data is present in the EEPROM, the setups are
loaded into the device. Otherwise default settings are applied.
The host must wait for at least 160 ms for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
5.5
Sleep (0x05)
The Sleep command puts the device into sleep mode (see Section 4.3 on page 18).
The host must wait for at least 150 µs after a low signal is applied to the SS or CHANGE pin to wake the device
before communications can be re-established.
5.6
Store to EEPROM (0x0A)
Stores the current RAM contents to the QT1110 internal EEPROM. When the device is reset, it will automatically
reload these settings.
The host must wait for at least 200 ms for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
5.7
Restore from EEPROM (0x0B)
Settings stored in EEPROM are automatically loaded into RAM when the device is reset. If desired, these settings
can be re-loaded into RAM using the Restore from EEPROM command.
The host must wait for at least 150 ms for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
5.8
Erase EEPROM (0x0C)
This command erases the settings stored in EEPROM and then resets the QT1110. This causes the QT1110 to
revert to its default settings.
The host must wait for at least 50 ms for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
5.9
Recover EEPROM (0x0D)
This command “undeletes” the setup data that was previously stored in the device EEPROM and has been erased
using the “Erase EEPROM” command.
Note:
If valid settings have not previously been stored in the device EEPROM, the QT1110 continues to operate
under the default settings.
The host must wait for at least 50 ms for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
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5.10
Calibrate Key (0x1k)
This command recalibrates the key specified by k. For example, to calibrate key 4, the host sends 0x14; to calibrate
key 10, the host sends 0x1A.
The host must wait for at least 150 µs for the operation to be completed before communications can be
re-established.
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6.
Report Requests
6.1
Introduction
The host can request reports from the QT1110, as summarized in Table 6-1.
Table 6-1.
Report Requests
Command
Code
Note
Data Returned
Send First Key
0xC0
Returns the first detected key
Send All keys
0xC1
Returns all keys
2-byte bitfield
Device Status
0xC2
Returns the device status
1-byte bitfield
EEPROM CRC
0xC3
Returns the EEPROM CRC
1 byte
RAM CRC
0xC4
Returns the RAM CRC
1 byte
Error Keys
0xC5
Returns the error keys
2-byte bitfield
Signal for Key k
0x2k
Returns the signal for key k
2-byte number
Reference for Key k
0x4k
Returns the reference for key k
2-byte number
Status for Key k
0x8k
Returns error conditions/touch indication for key k
1 byte
Detect Output States
0xC6
Returns the detect output states
1 byte
Last Command
0xC7
Returns the last command sent to QT1110
1 byte
Setups
0xC8
Returns the setup data
42 bytes
Device ID
0xC9
Returns the device ID
1 byte
Firmware Version
0xCA
Returns the firmware version
1 byte
1 byte
Note that SPI communications are full-duplex, so the host must transmit on the MOSI pin to keep the
communications active, while reading data from the QT1110 on the MOSI pin. Failure to do this within 100 ms will
cause the device to assume that the exchange has been abandoned and reset the SPI interface. The host should
therefore send one or two “NULL” bytes, as appropriate, on the MOSI line as it receives the 1- or 2-byte report data
from the device.
6.2
First Key (0xC0)
This command returns 1-byte report in the format shown in Table 6-2.
Table 6-2.
Byte 0
Send First Key Report Format
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
DETECT
NUMKEY
ERROR
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
KEY_NUM
DETECT: 0 = no key in detect; 1 = there is a key in detect.
NUMKEY: indicates the number of keys in detect:
0 = only one key is in detect (specified by “KEY_NUM”)
1 = more than one key in detect.
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ERROR: 0 = there are no keys in an error state; 1 = at least one key is in error state.
KEY_NUM: the key number (0 to 10) of the key in detect (if there is only one), or the number of the first key to go into
detection when there are more than one.
6.3
All Keys (0xC1)
Returns a 2-byte bit-field report indicating the detection status of all 11 keys.
Table 6-3.
Send All Keys Report Format
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Byte 0
Byte 1
KEY_7
KEY_6
KEY_5
KEY_4
KEY_3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
KEY_10
KEY_9
KEY_8
KEY_2
KEY_1
KEY_0
KEY_n: 0 = key n out of detect, 1 = key n in detect (where n is 0 – 10).
6.4
Device Status (0xC2)
This command returns a 1-byte bit-field report indicating the overall status of the QT1110.
Table 6-4.
Device Status Report Format
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
1
DETECT
CYCLE
ERROR
CHANGE
EEPROM
RESET
GUARD
Byte 0
Bits 7 is always 1; the other bits are as follows:
DETECT: 0 = no key in detect, 1 = at least 1 key in detect.
CYCLE: 0 = cycle time is good, 1 = cycle time over-run. A cycle time over-run occurs when it takes longer to
measure and process all the keys than the assigned cycle time.
ERROR: 0 = no key in error state, 1 = at least 1 key in error.
CHANGE: 0 = CHANGE pin is asserted, 1 = CHANGE pin is floating.
EEPROM: 0 = EEPROM is good, 1 = EEPROM has an error. If there are no settings stored in EEPROM, the
EEPROM error bit is set and a zero EEPROM CRC is returned.
RESET: set to 1 after power-on or reset, cleared when “Device Status” is read.
GUARD: 0 = guard channel is not in detect, 1 = guard channel is active or in detect. This bit will be zero if the guard
channel is not enabled.
6.5
EEPROM CRC (0xC3)
This command returns a 1-byte CRC checksum for the setup data in EEPROM.
6.6
RAM CRC (0xC4)
This command returns a 1-byte CRC checksum for the setup data in RAM.
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6.7
Error Keys (0xC5)
This command returns a 2-byte bit-field report indicating the error status of all 11 keys. Note that disabled keys do
not report errors.
Table 6-5.
Send All Keys Report Format
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Byte 0
Byte 1
KEY_7
KEY_6
KEY_5
KEY_4
KEY_3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
KEY_10
KEY_9
KEY_8
KEY_2
KEY_1
KEY_0
KEY_n: 0 = key n status good, 1 = key n in error (where n is 0–10).
6.8
Signal for Key k (0x2k)
This command returns a 2-byte report containing the most recent measured signal for key k. The signal is returned
as a 16-bit number, MSB first.
Table 6-6.
Signal for Key k Report Format
Bit 7
6.9
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Byte 0
Signal MSB
Byte 1
Signal LSB
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Reference for Key k (0x4k)
This command returns a 2-byte report containing the reference signal for key k. The reference is returned as a 16-bit
number, MSB first.
Table 6-7.
Reference for Key k Report Format
Bit 7
6.10
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Byte 0
Reference MSB
Byte 1
Reference LSB
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
AKS_EN
CAL
KEY_EN
Status for Key k (0x8k)
This command returns a 1-byte report containing the status for key k.
Table 6-8.
Byte 0
Status for Key k Report Format
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
DETECT
LBL
MBL
Bit 4
Bit 3
DETECT: 0ut of detect, 1 = in detect.
LBL: 0 = lower burst limit is good, 1 = lower burst limit has error.
MBL: 0 = maximum burst limit is good, 1 = maximum burst limit has error. The maximum burst limit is fixed at 2048
pulses.
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AKS_EN: 0 = AKS is disabled, 1 = AKS is enabled.
CAL: 0 = normal, 1 = calibrating.
KEY_EN: 0 = key is disabled, 1 = key is enabled.
6.11
Detect Output States (0xC6)
This command returns a byte that indicates which PWM signal is applied to each DETECT pin.
Table 6-9.
Detect Output States
Bit 7
Byte 0
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
DET_6
DET_5
DET_4
DET_3
DET_2
DET_1
DET_0
DET_n: 0 = “Out of Detect” PWM is output, 1 = the “In Detect” PWM is output.
Note:
6.12
Note: During “LED Detect Hold Time” or “LED Fade”, the report indicates the new state of the DETECT pin.
For example, if the DETECT output is in “LED Detect Hold Time” before switching to “Out of Detect” PWM,
the reported state is “0”.
Last Command (0xC7)
This command returns the previous 1-byte command that was received from the host. Note that this command does
not return itself.
Table 6-10. Last Command
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Byte 0
6.13
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Last Command
Setups (0xC8)
This command returns the 42 bytes of the setups table, starting with address 0, with the most significant bit first.
6.14
Device ID (0xC9)
This command returns 1 byte containing the device ID (0x57).
Table 6-11. Device ID Report Format
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Byte 0
6.15
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Device ID = 0x57
Firmware Version (0xCA)
Returns 1 byte containing the firmware version.
Table 6-12. Firmware Version Report Format
Bit 7
Byte 0
Bit 6
Bit 5
Major Version
Bit 4
Bit 3
Minor Version
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7.
Setups and Status Information
7.1
Introduction
The bytes of the setup table can be written to or read from individually. The setup table and the corresponding Set
and Get commands are listed in Table 7-1. Note that there is a discontinuity in the Set and Get commands; 0xAF
and 0xEF are not implemented.
Table 7-1.
Address
Memory Map
Function
Set
Command
Get
Command
0
Device Mode
0x90
0xD0
1
Guard Key/Comms Options
0x91
0xD1
2
Detect Integrator (DI)/Drift Hold Time (DHT)
0x92
0xD2
3
Positive Threshold (PTHR)/Positive Hysterisis (PHYST)
0x93
0xD3
4
Positive Drift Compensation (PDRIFT)
0x94
0xD4
5
Positive Recalibration Delay (PRD)
0x95
0xD5
6
Lower Burst Limit (LBL)
0x96
0xD6
7
AKS Mask: Keys 8–10
0x97
0xD7
8
AKS Mask: Keys 0–7
0x98
0xD8
9
Detect0 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x99
0xD9
10
Detect1 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x9A
0xDA
11
Detect2 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x9B
0xDB
12
Detect3 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x9C
0xDC
13
Detect4 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x9D
0xDD
14
Detect5 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x9E
0xDE
15
Detect6 PWM “Detect”/PWM “No Detect”
0x9F
0xDF
16
LED Detect Hold Time
0xA0
0xE0
17
LED Fade/Key to LED
0xA1
0xE1
18
LED Latch
0xA2
0xE2
19
Key0 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA3
0xE3
20
Key1 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA4
0xE4
21
Key2 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA5
0xE5
22
Key3 Negative Threshold (NTHR /Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA6
0xE6
23
Key4 Negative Threshold (NTHR /Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA7
0xE7
24
Key5 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA8
0xE8
25
Key6 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xA9
0xE9
26
Key7 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xAA
0xEA
27
Key8 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xAB
0xEB
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Table 7-1.
Address
7.2
Memory Map (Continued)
Function
Set
Command
Get
Command
28
Key9 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xAC
0xEC
29
Key10 Negative Threshold (NTHR)/Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
0xAD
0xED
30
Extend Pulse Time
0xAE
0xEE
31
Key0 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB0
0xF0
32
Key1 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB1
0xF1
33
Key2 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB2
0xF2
34
Key3 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB3
0xF3
35
Key4 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB4
0xF4
36
Key5 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB5
0xF5
37
Key6 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB6
0xF6
38
Key7 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB7
0xF7
39
Key8 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB8
0xF8
40
Key9 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xB9
0xF9
41
Key10 Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT)/Negative Recalibration Delay (NRD)
0xBA
0xFA
Setting Individual Settings
To set up an individual setup value, the host sends the command listed under the “Set Command” column in Table 71, followed by a byte of data.
For details of the communication flow, see Section 4.1 on page 11.
7.3
Setting All the Setups
The host can send all 42 bytes of setup data to the QT1110 as a block using the Send Setups command. See
Section 5.2 on page 22 for details.
7.4
Address 0: Device Mode
The Device Mode controls the overall operation of the device: number of keys, acquisition method, timing and trigger
mechanism.
Table 7-2.
Device Mode
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
0
KEY_AC
MODE
SIGNAL
SYNC
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
REPEAT_TIME
KEY_AC: selects the trigger source to start key acquisition; 0 = SYNC pin, 1 = timed.
MODE: selects 7-key or 11-key mode; 0 = default 7-key mode, 1 = 11-key mode.
SIGNAL: selects serial or parallel acquisition of keys signals; 0 = serial, 1 = parallel.
SYNC: selects the trigger type when SYNC Pin is selected as the trigger to start key acquisition.
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0 = Level
Acquisition starts when a 0 is read at the SYNC pin. If the pin is held
low, the QT1110 operates in Free run mode (that is, it will not sleep in
between acquisitions, but start again immediately).
1 = Edge
Acquisition starts when a rising edge is detected at the SYNC pin.
When acquisition and post-processing are completed, the device
sleeps until another rising edge is detected at the SYNC pin.
REPEAT_TIME: selects the “repeat” time when “Timed” is selected as the trigger to start key acquisition. The
number entered is a multiple of 16 ms. If 0 is entered, the device will operate in a continuous free run mode; that is,
the QT1110 will not sleep after its cycle is completed but will begin the next key acquisition cycle immediately.
Default KEY_AC value:
Default MODE value:
Default SIGNAL value:
Default SYNC value:
Default REPEAT_TIME value:
7.5
1 (timed)
0 (7-key mode)
1 (parallel)
1 (edge)
2 (32 ms cycle)
Address 1: Guard Key/Comms Options
Table 7-3.
Address
Guard Key/Comms Options
Bit 7
1
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
GUARD_KEY
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
GD_EN
SPI_EN
CHG
CRC
GUARD_KEY: specifies the key (0 to 10) to be used as a guard channel (see Section 2.3 on page 8) .
GD_EN: enables the use of a guard key; 0 = disable, 1 = enable.
SPI_EN: enables the Quick SPI interface; 0 = disable, 1 = enable.
See Section 4.1.6 on page 16 for details of the Quick SPI Mode report.
To exit this mode (and clear the SPI_EN bit), the command 0x36 should be sent. To save the settings to EEPROM
and make Quick SPI mode active on startup, send the Store to EEPROM command (0x0A). Any other data sent is
ignored in Quick SPI mode.
CHG: the CHANGE pin mode (see Section 4.5 on page 18):
0 = Data mode. In this mode the CHANGE pin is asserted to indicate unread data.
1 = Touch mode. In this mode the CHANGE pin is asserted when a key is being touched
or is in detect.
CRC: enables or disables CRC; 0 = disable, 1 = enable. When this option is enabled, each data exchange must
have a CRC byte appended.
When report or setup data is being returned by the QT1110, a 1-byte checksum is returned. The host should confirm
that this checksum is correct and, if not, should request the report again.
Where data is being sent by the host, a 1-byte CRC should be sent. The QT1110 returns the expected CRC byte in
the same transaction the CRC byte is sent. In this way, the host can immediately determine whether the setup data
bytes were received correctly.
Default GUARD_KEY value:
Default GD_EN value:
Default CHG value:
Default CRC value:
0 (Key 0)
0 (disabled)
0 (data mode)
0 (disabled)
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7.6
Address 2: Detect Integrator Limit (DIL)/Drift Hold Time (DHT)
Table 7-4.
Address
Detect Integrator/Drift Hold Time
Bit 7
Bit 6
2
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
DIL
Bit 1
Bit 0
DHT
DIL: the detection integrator (DI) limit. To suppress false detections caused by spurious events like electrical noise,
the device incorporates a DI counter mechanism. A per-key counter is incremented each time the channel has
exceeded its threshold and stayed there for a number of acquisitions in succession, without going below the
threshold level. When this counter reaches a preset limit the channel is finally declared to be touched. If on any
acquisition the delta is not seen to exceed the threshold level, the counter is cleared and the process has to start
from the beginning.
Note:
A setting of 0 for DI is invalid; the valid range is 1 to 15.
DHT: the drift hold time. After a key-touch has been removed, the QT1110 pauses in the implementation of its “Drift”
compensation for a time. After this time has expired, drift compensation continues as normal. The Drift Hold Time is
a multiple of 160 ms, providing options from 0 to 2400 ms.
Default DIL value:
Default DHT value:
7.7
3
8 (1280 ms)
Address 3: Positive Threshold (PTHR)/Positive Hysteresis (PHYST)
Table 7-5.
Address
Positive Threshold (THR)/Positive Hystereis (HYST)
Bit 7
Bit 6
3
Bit 5
Bit 4
PTHR
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
PHYST
PTHR: the positive threshold for the signal. If a key signal is significantly higher than the reference signal, this
typically indicates that the calibration data is no longer valid. In other words, some factor has changed since the
calibration was carried out, thus rendering it invalid. Generally this is compensated for by the drift, but the greater the
difference the longer this will take. In order to speed up this correction, the positive threshold is used: if the positive
threshold is exceeded, the QT1110 (that is, all keys) is recalibrated.
PHYST: positive hysteresis. This setting provides a greater degree of control over the implementation of the positive
threshold recalibration. The positive hysteresis operates as a “modifier” for the positive threshold. When a key signal
is detected as being over the positive threshold, the positive threshold is reduced by a factor corresponding to the
positive hysteresis so that the key will not go in and out of positive detection when the signal is on the borderline
between drift-compensation of a positive error or recalibration.
The settings for positive hysteresis are:
00 = No change to positive threshold
01 = 12.5% reduction in positive-detect threshold
10 = 25% reduction in positive-detect threshold
11 = 37.5% reduction in positive-detect threshold
Default PTHR value:
Default PHYST value:
4 (4 counts above reference)
2 (25% positive hysteresis)
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7.8
Address 4: Positive Drift Compensation (PDRIFT)
Table 7-6.
Positive Drift Compensation
Address
Bit 7
4
0
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
PDRIFT
When changing ambient conditions cause a change in the key signal, the QT1110 will compensate through its drift
functions. Positive Drift refers to the case where the signal for a key is greater than the reference.
Drift compensation occurs at a rate of 1 count per drift compensation period.
PDRIFT: the drift compensation period, in multiples of 160 ms. The valid range is 0 to 127, where 0 disables positive
drift compensation.
Note:
Drift compensation timing is paused while Drift Hold is activated, and continued when Drift Hold has timed
out.
Default value:
7.9
6 (960 ms)
Address 5: Positive Recalibration Delay (PRD)
Table 7-7.
Address
Positive Recalibration Delay
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
5
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
PRD
If a key signal is determined to be above the positive threshold, the QT1110 will wait for this delay and confirm that
the error condition is still present before initiating a recalibration.
PRD: the positive recalibration delay, in multiples of 160 ms.
Note:
All keys are recalibrated in the case of a positive recalibration.
Default value:
7.10
6 (960 ms)
Address 6: Lower Burst Limit (LBL)
Table 7-8.
Address
Lower Burst Limit
Bit 7
Bit 6
6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
LBL
Normal QTouch signals are in the range of 100 to 1000 counts for each key. The lower burst limit determines the
minimum signal that is considered as a valid acquisition. If the count is lower than the lower burst limit, it is
considered not to be valid and the key is set to an Error state.
Note:
Where a key has a signal of less than the LBL, a detection is not reported on that key.
Default value:
18
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7.11
Addresses 7 – 8: AKS Mask
Table 7-9.
Address
AKS Mask
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
7
8
AKS_7
AKS_6
AKS_5
AKS_4
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
AKS_10
AKS_9
AKS_8
AKS_2
AKS_1
AKS_0
AKS_3
AKS_n (AKS Mask): 0 = key n AKS disabled, 1 = key n AKS enabled (where n is 0–10).
These bits control which keys have AKS enabled (see Section 3. on page 9). A “1” means the corresponding key has
AKS enabled; a 0 means that the corresponding key has AKS disabled.
Default AKS mask:
7.12
0x07 and 0xFF (all keys have AKS enabled)
Addresses 9 – 15: Detect0 – Detect6 PWM
Each of the 7 detect pins can be configured to output a PWM signal to indicate whether the key is touched (in detect)
or not touched (out of detect).
The Detect outputs must be enabled by selecting 7-key mode in the “Device Mode” setting (see Section 7.4 on page
30), and the corresponding “Key to LED” bits must be set to enable the individual Detect outputs for each key (see
Section 7.14 on page 36).
Table 7-10. Detect0 – Detect6 PWM
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
9
IN_DETECT0
OUT_DETECT0
10
IN_DETECT1
OUT_DETECT1
11
IN_DETECT2
OUT_DETECT2
12
IN_DETECT3
OUT_DETECT3
13
IN_DETECT4
OUT_DETECT4
14
IN_DETECT5
OUT_DETECT5
15
IN_DETECT6
OUT_DETECT6
Bit 0
IN_DETECTn: PWM to output when key n is “In Detect” (where n is 0–6).
OUT_DETECTn: PWM to output when key n is “Out of Detect” (where n is 0–7). This PWM is also output if the
DETECT output is “disconnected” from the key (that is, “LED_n” in address 17 is set to 0), allowing the host to
directly control the PWM output.
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The values for the “IN_DETECTn” and “OUT_DETECTn” nibbles are listed in Table 7-11.
Table 7-11. PWM Values
Default IN_DETECTn value:
Default OUT_DETECTn value:
7.13
Value
Meaning
0
0%
1
12.5%
2
25%
3
37.5%
4
50%
5
62.5%
6
75%
7
87.5%
8
100%
8 (100% PWM – on)
0 (0% PWM – off)
Address 16: LED Detect Hold Time
Table 7-12. LED Detect Hold Time
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
16
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
LED_DETECT_HOLD_TIME
When a key is touched, if the “Detect” outputs and “Key to LED” options are enabled (see Section 7.12 and Section
7.14), the corresponding “Detect” pin will output its “In-Detect” PWM signal.
After the key touch is removed, the “Detect” output can be held at the “In-Detect” PWM signal for a time before
returning to the “Out of Detect” PWM signal. This allows a reasonable length of time for an LED to be illuminated.
The length of this time is controlled by the LED Detect Hold Time. Valid values are in multiples of 16 ms.
Default value:
0 (0 ms)
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7.14
Address 17: LED Fade/Key to LED
Table 7-13. LED Fade/Key to LED
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
17
FADE
LED_6
LED_5
LED_4
LED_3
LED_2
LED_1
LED_0
FADE: enables/disables fading for all LEDs. This is a global setting; either all LEDs fade, or none of them.
0 = disable (no fade).
1 = enable fading on and off.
LED_n: activates the LED output for the corresponding key output DETECTn (where n is 0–6).
1 = enables the “Detect” output to follow the status of the corresponding key.
0 = disable this function, in which case the “Detect” pin will always output its “Out of Detect” PWM (see Section 7.12
on page 34).
Default FADE value:
Default LED_n value:
7.15
0 (disabled)
1 (enabled)
Address 18: LED Latch
Table 7-14. LED Latch
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
18
0
LATCH_6
LATCH_5
LATCH_4
LATCH_3
LATCH_2
LATCH_1
LATCH_0
LATCH_n: enables/disables latching of the LED for the corresponding key output DETECTn (where n is 0–6).
1 = enables latching. When latching is enabled for a given LED, the LED toggles its state each time the key is
touched.
0 = disables latching.
Note that bit 7 is reserved and should be set to zero.
Default LATCH_n value:
7.16
0x00 (latch disabled)
Addresses 19 – 29: Negative Threshold (NTHR) / Negative Hysteresis (NHYST)
Table 7-15. Negative Threshold / Negative Hysteresis
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
19
KEY_0_NTHR
KEY_0_NHSYT
20
KEY_1_NTHR
KEY_1_NHSYT
21
KEY_2_NTHR
KEY_2_NHSYT
22
KEY_3_NTHR
KEY_3_NHSYT
23
KEY_4_NTHR
KEY_4_NHSYT
24
KEY_5_NTHR
KEY_5_NHSYT
25
KEY_6_NTHR
KEY_6_NHSYT
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Table 7-15. Negative Threshold / Negative Hysteresis (Continued)
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
26
KEY_7_NTHR
KEY_7_NHSYT
27
KEY_8_NTHR
KEY_8_NHSYT
28
KEY_9_NTHR
KEY_9_NHSYT
29
KEY_10_NTHR
KEY_10_NHSYT
KEY_n_NTHR: the negative threshold for key n (where n is 0–10).
The negative threshold determines how much the signal must fall (compared to the reference) before a key is
considered to be “In Detect”. This level will generally need to be tuned individually for each key. To disable an
individual key, set the threshold for that key to 0.
KEY_n_NHYST: the negative hysteresis applied to key n detection threshold (where n is
0 – 10).
Negative Hysteresis operates as a “modifier” for the negative threshold in order to provide a greater degree of control
over the detection of a “Touch”. When a key signal is first detected as being under the negative threshold, the
threshold is reduced by a factor corresponding to the selected negative hysteresis. This means that the key will not
go in and out of detection when the signal is on the borderline between drift-compensation or touch detection.
The settings for negative hysteresis are:
00
No change to negative threshold
01
12.5% reduction in negative threshold
10
25% reduction in negative threshold
11
37.5% reduction in negative threshold
Default KEY_n_NTHR value:
Default KEY_n_NHYST value:
7.17
10 counts
2 (25 percent)
Address 30: Extend Pulse Time
Table 7-16. Extend Pulse Time
Address
30
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
HIGH_TIME
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
LOW_TIME
HIGH_TIME: Number of µs to extend the high pulse time.
LOW_TIME: Number of µs to extend the low pulse time.
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7.18
Addresses 31 – 41: Negative Drift Compensation (NDRIFT) / Negative Recalibration Delay
(NRD)
Table 7-17. Negative Drift Compensation / Negative Recalibration Delay
Address
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
31
KEY_0_NDRIFT
KEY_0_NRD
32
KEY_1_NDRIFT
KEY_1_NRD
33
KEY_2_NDRIFT
KEY_2_NRD
34
KEY_3_NDRIFT
KEY_3_NRD
35
KEY_4_NDRIFT
KEY_4_NRD
36
KEY_5_NDRIFT
KEY_5_NRD
37
KEY_6_NDRIFT
KEY_6_NRD
38
KEY_7_NDRIFT
KEY_7_NRD
39
KEY_8_NDRIFT
KEY_8_NRD
40
KEY_9_NDRIFT
KEY_9_NRD
41
KEY_10_NDRIFT
KEY_10_NRD
Bit 0
KEY_n_NDRIFT: the negative drift compensation for key n (where n is 0–10).
When changing ambient conditions cause a change in the key signal, the QT1110 will compensate through its drift
functions. “Negative Drift” refers to the case where the signal for a key is lower than the reference. Drift
compensation occurs at a rate of 1 count per drift compensation period. The entered number is a multiple of 320 ms.
Note that as a key touch, or an approaching touch, naturally causes a negative change in the signal, negative drift
should be carried out at a much slower rate than positive drift. Otherwise, a slowly approaching finger will not cause
a touch detection, as the falling signal could be compensated through the negative drift mechanism.
Note:
Drift compensation timing is paused while Drift Hold is activated, and continues when Drift Hold has timed
out.
KEY_n_NRD: the negative recalibration delay for key n (where n is 0 – 10).
In order to avoid a situation where a key remains “stuck” in detect due to, for example, changing environmental
conditions, the “Negative Recalibration Delay” sets an upper limit on how long a key can remain “touched”. When
this time is exceeded, the QT1110 (that is, all keys) is recalibrated, taking this key (and any others which are in
detect) out of detection. This delay is set in a multiple of 2560 ms.
Note:
A setting of “0” disables the NRD Timeout.
Default KEY_n_NDRIFT value:
Default KEY_n_NRD value:
7 (2240 ms)
10 (25.6 s)
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8.
Specifications
8.1
Absolute Maximum Specifications
Vdd
–0.5 V to +6 V
Max continuous pin current, any control or drive pin
±10 mA
Voltage forced onto any pin
–1.0 V to (Vdd + 0.5) V
EEPROM setups maximum writes
100,000 write cycles
CAUTION: Stresses beyond those listed under Absolute Maximum Specifications may cause permanent damage
to the device. This is a stress rating only and functional operation of the device at these or other conditions beyond
those indicated in the operational sections of this specification is not implied. Exposure to absolute maximum
specification conditions for extended periods may affect device reliability
8.2
Recommended Operating Conditions
Operating temperature
–40°C to +125°C
Storage temperature
–65°C to +150°C
Vdd
3 V to 5.5 V
Supply ripple + noise
±20 mV
Cx transverse load capacitance per key
2 pF to 20 pF
8.3
DC Specifications
Vdd = 5.0V, Cs = 4.7 nF, Rs = 1 M, Ta = recommended range, unless otherwise noted
Parameter
Iddr
Description
Average supply current, running
Min
Typ
Max
Units
–
–
12 at 5 V
8 at 3 V
mA
Notes
For typical values see
Section 8.8
Vil
Low input logic level
–0.5V
–
0.3 × Vdd
V
Vih
High input logic level
0.6 × Vdd
Vdd
Vdd + 0.5
V
Vol
Low output voltage
0
–
0.7
V
10 mA sink current
Voh
High output voltage
0.8 × Vdd
–
Vdd
V
10 mA source current
Input leakage current
–
<0.05
1
µA
Internal RST pull-up resistor
30
–
60
k
Iil
Rrst
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8.4
Timing Specifications
Parameter
Description
Min
Typ
Max
Units
TBS
Burst duration
–
5
–
ms
Fc
Burst center frequency
–
53
–
kHz
Fm
Burst modulation, percentage
–
18
–
%
TPW
Pulse width
–
6000
–
ns
Notes
4.7 nF Cs
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8.5
SPI Bus Specifications
8.5.1
General Specifications
Parameter
Specification
Address space
8-bit
Maximum clock rate
1.5 MHz
Minimum low clock period
333 ns
Minimum high clock period
333 ns
Clock idle
High
Setup on
Leading (falling) edge
Clock out on
Trailing (rising) edge
SPI Enable delay (SS low to SCK low)
1 µs minimum
8.5.2
Full SPI Mode
Parameter
Specification
Minimum time between bytes
150 µs
Generally 150 µs; longer delays required to implement some commands, as follows:
Minimum time between communications
8.5.3

Send Setups: 150 µs after all setup bytes are returned

Calibrate All: 150 µs

Calibrate Key: 150 µs

Reset: 160 ms

Sleep: 150 µs after a low signal is applied to SS or CHANGE to wake the
device

Store to EEPROM: 200 ms

Restore from EEPROM: 150 ms

Erase EEPROM: 50 ms

Recover EEPROM: 50 ms
Quick SPI Mode
Parameter
Specification
Minimum time between bytes
50 µs
Generally 50 µs, except for the following:
Minimum time between communications

Store to EEPROM: 200 ms

Switch to Full SPI: 150 µs
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Figure 8-1. Data Byte Exchange
SCK
SAMPLE
MOSI/MISO
CHANGE
MOSI PIN
CHANGE
MISO PIN
SS
MSB
8.6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
LSB
External Reset
Parameter
8.7
Bit 6
Description
Operation
VRST
Threshold voltage low (Activate)
Threshold voltage high (Release)
0.2 × Vdd
0.9 × Vdd
Reset
Minimum length of Reset low
600 ns at 5 V
1100 ns at 3 V
Internal Resonator
Parameter
Operation
Internal RC oscillator
8 MHz with spread-spectrum modifier during measurement bursts
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8.8
Power Consumption
7-key Parallel
Vdd
(V)
Cycle Time
Actual
Cycle Time
(ms)
Idd (µA)
7-key Serial
Actual
Cycle Time
(ms)
11-key Parallel
Idd (µA)
Actual
Cycle Time
(ms)
11-key Serial,
1 key enabled
11-key Serial
Idd (µA)
Actual
Cycle Time
(ms)
Idd (µA)
Actual
Cycle Time
(ms)
Idd (µA)
4.7 nF Cs Capacitors
0 (Free Run)
13.2
2470
26.6
2350
15.3
2385
37.4
2420
2.15
2107
1 (16 ms Nominal)
17.2
2180
26.6
2350
17.3
2182
37.4
2420
16.5
950
2 (32 ms Nominal)
33.6
1470
34.4
1950
33.8
1435
37.4
2420
33
739
4 (64 ms Nominal)
66.4
1010
67.2
1325
66.4
1045
68.4
1587
66
691
8 (128 ms Nominal)
132
840
133
1025
132
840
134
1120
132
668
15 (240 ms Nominal)
248
815
250
850
250
810
250
1008
248
656
0 (Free Run)
15.1
5530
30.2
5405
17.3
5674
43.6
5425
2.15
4860
1 (16 ms Nominal)
17.2
5290
30.2
5405
17.3
5674
43.6
5425
16.3
2965
2 (32 ms Nominal)
33.4
4210
34.4
5350
33.6
4013
43.6
5425
32.6
2400
4 (64 ms Nominal)
65.6
3120
66.8
4015
65.6
3240
67.6
4130
64.8
2248
8 (128 ms Nominal)
130
2705
132
3225
130
2840
132
3530
129
2206
15 (240 ms Nominal)
244
2440
244
3035
246
2465
245
3015
244
2163
3.0
5.0
10 nF Cs Capacitors
0 (Free Run)
24.2
2375
48.4
2430
24.2
2434
63.6
2416
8.6
2130
1 (16 ms Nominal)
24.2
2375
48.4
2430
24.2
2434
63.6
2416
16.7
1422
2 (32 ms Nominal)
34.4
1860
48.4
2430
34
1945
63.6
2416
33
1065
4 (64 ms Nominal)
66.8
1285
68.4
1910
66.4
1290
69.6
2260
65
848
8 (128 ms Nominal)
131
995
133
1320
132
980
134
1485
130
766
15 (240 ms Nominal)
246
845
248
1030
246
824
248
1080
243
708
0 (Free Run)
26
5810
56.4
5510
28
5675
73.6
5596
8.6
5145
1 (16 ms Nominal)
26
5810
56.4
5510
28
5675
73.6
5596
16.6
3990
2 (32 ms Nominal)
34
5170
56.4
5510
34
5196
73.6
5596
32.6
3160
4 (64 ms Nominal)
66
3990
67.6
5120
66.4
3780
73.6
5596
64.8
2690
8 (128 ms Nominal)
131
3290
132
3850
130
2910
133
4055
129
2310
15 (240 ms Nominal)
244
2950
244
3310
242
2675
246
3170
241
2270
3.0
5.0
Note:
These values are for reference only; values are untested.
AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
43
8.9
Mechanical Dimensions
8.9.1
AT42QT1110-MZ – 32-pin 5 x 5 mm QFN
1
&
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1&C
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AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
44
8.9.2
AT42QT1110-AZ – 32-pin 7 x 7 mm TQFP
&
&
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AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
45
8.10
Marking
8.10.1 AT42QT1110-MZ – 32-pin 5 x 5 mm QFN
Pin 1 ID
32
1
ATMEL
QT1110
MZ 4R5
Date code Country Code
Abbreviation of
Part Number:
AT42QT1110-MZ
Datecode/
Lot Number
Code Revision:
4.5, Released
Lot number
8.10.2 AT42QT1110-AZ – 32-pin 7 x 7 mm TQFP
Pin 1 ID
32
1
Abbreviation of
Part Number:
AT42QT1110-AZ
ATMEL
QT1110AZ45
Code Revision:
4.5, Released
Date Code Lot Number
Datecode/
Lot Number
AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
46
8.11
Part Number
Part Number
8.12
Description
AT42QT1110-MZ
32-pin 5 x 5 mm QFN RoHS compliant (-40°C to +125°C)
AT42QT1110-AZ
32-pin 7 x 7 mm TQFP RoHS compliant (-40°C to +125°C)
Moisture Sensitivity Level (MSL)
MSL Rating
MSL3
Peak Body Temperature
o
260 C
Specifications
IPC/JEDEC J-STD-020
AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
47
Appendix A. CRC Calculation
If the use of a cyclic redundancy check (CRC) during data transmission is enabled, the host must generate a valid
CRC so that this can be correctly compared to the corresponding CRC generated by the QT1110. This appendix
gives example C code to show how the CRC can be generated by the host.
/*=======================================================================
unsigned char calc_crc(unsigned char crc, unsigned char data)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------Purpose: Calculate CRC for data packets
Input : CRC, Data
Output : Updated CRC
Notes : =========================================================================*/
unsigned char calc_crc(unsigned char crc, unsigned char data)
{
unsigned char index;
unsigned char fb;
index = 8;
do
{
fb = (crc ^ data) & 0x01u;
data >>= 1u;
crc >>= 1u;
if(fb)
{
crc ^= 0x8c;
}
} while(--index);
return crc;
}
/* Example Calling Routine */
unsigned char calculate_config_checksum(void)
{
int i;
unsigned char CRC_val = 0;
unsigned char setup_data[42] =
{
0xB2, 0x00, 0x38, 0x12, 0x06, 0x06, 0x12, 0x07, 0xFF, 0x80,
0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x32, 0xFF, 0x00, 0x29,
0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80,
0X00, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A, 0x7A,
0x7A, 0x7A
};
for(i = 0; i < sizeof(setup_data); i++)
{
CRC_val = calc_crc(CRC_val, setup_data[i]);
}
return(CRC_val);
}
AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
48
Revision History
Revision No.
History
Revision A – November 2008

Initial Release
Revision B – December 2008

Updated for chip revision 2.1
Revision C – December 2008

Updated SPI specifications
Revision D – February 2009

Updated for chip revision 3.1

Updated for chip revision 3.2:
added self-test function

Updated for chip revision 4.3:
added Quick SPI mode

Updated specifications

Erratum note added concerning CRC
calculations for chip revision 4.3

Updated for chip revision 4.4

CRC calculations updated

Updated for chip revision 4.5

General updates

Apply new template
Revision E – April 2009
Revision F – July 2009
Revision G – October 2009
Revision H – February 2010
Revision I – March 2010
Revision J – March 2013
AT42QT1110-MZ / AT42QT1110-AZ [DATASHEET]
9570J–AT42–05/2013
49
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