AN4074, Auto-Wake/Sleep Using the MMA8451, 2, 3Q - Application Notes

Freescale Semiconductor
Application Note
Document Number: AN4074
Rev 1, 03/2012
Auto-Wake/Sleep Using the MMA8451, 2, 3Q
by: Kimberly Tuck
Applications Engineer
1.0
Introduction
Accelerometers are commonly used in hand-held
electronics and/or battery operated electronic devices.
Consumption of current in the entire system is a critical feature
of the product design. Users do not want to be inconvenienced
by continually recharging or changing out batteries. When
designing in the accelerometer, battery power usage is often
a critical feature which concerns many designers.
Therefore, current consumption of the sensor as well as of
the entire system should be paramount design considerations.
If the system processor is used often only for processing data
from the accelerometer, then it is ideal to embed the
intelligence in the sensor to avoid burdening the system
processor from running continually. The flexibility of
embedded interrupt driven functions and selectable data rates
with trade-offs for resolution, response time, and current are
the types of intelligent features in the MMA8451, 2, 3Q.
This application note will explain the following:
• The Auto-Wake/Sleep feature
• Description of the configuration procedure with
example register settings and code.
1.1
Key Words
Accelerometer, Output Data Rate (ODR), Current, Standby
Current, Power Down Mode Current, Low Power Mode,
Noise, Auto-Wake/Sleep, Sleep Timer, Sensor.
© 2010, 2012 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. All rights reserved.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1.0 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 Key Words . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.2 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.0 MMA8451, 2, 3Q Consumer 3-axis Accelerometer 3 by 3 by 1 mm . . . . . 2
2.1 Output Data, Sample Rates and Dynamic Ranges of all Three Products . . . 2
2.1.1 MMA8451Q . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.1.2 MMA8452Q . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
2.1.3 MMA8453Q Note: No HPF Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
3.0 Configuring the MMA8451, 2, 3Q into Auto-Wake/Sleep Mode . . . . . . . . 3
3.1 Set the Sleep Enable Bit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.2 Set the Sleep Mode and Wake Mode Oversampling Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
3.3 Configure the Sleep Sample Rate and Wake Sample Rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.4 Set the Timeout Counter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3.5 Enable the Interrupts to be used in the System and Route to INT1 or INT2
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6
3.6 Enable the Interrupt Sources that Wake the Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
4.0 Example Configuration for the Auto-Wake/Sleep Function . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Table 14.Registers used for Auto-Wake/Sleep Functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
4.1 Example Procedure for Configuring the Auto-Wake/Sleep Function Conditions
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8
1.2
Summary
The MMA845xQ can be used to cycle between different ODRs, which results in overall lower current consumption of the
device. This can be achieved from several programmable functions.
2.0
MMA8451, 2, 3Q Consumer 3-axis Accelerometer 3 by 3 by 1 mm
2
NC
3
SCL
4
GND
5
NC
VDD
15
14
MMA845xQ
16-Pin QFN
(Top View)
6
7
8
NC
BYP
16
SA0
1
SDA
VDDIO
NC
The MMA8451, 2, 3Q has a selectable dynamic range of ±2g, ±4g, ±8g. The device has 8 different output data rates, selectable
high pass filter cut-off frequencies, and high pass filtered data. The available resolution of the data and the embedded features
is dependant on the specific device.
Note: The MMA8450Q has a different memory map and has a slightly different pinout configuration.
13
NC
12
GND
11
INT1
10
GND
9
INT2
Figure 1. MMA8451, 2, 3Q Consumer 3-axis Accelerometer 3 by 3 by 1 mm
2.1
Output Data, Sample Rates and Dynamic Ranges of all Three Products
2.1.1
MMA8451Q
1. 14-bit data
2g (4096 counts/g = 0.25 mg/LSB) 4g (2048 counts/g = 0.5 mg/LSB) 8g (1024 counts/g = 1 mg/LSB)
2. 8-bit data
2g (64 counts/g = 15.6 mg/LSB) 4g (32 counts/g = 31.25 mg/LSB) 8g (16 counts/g = 62.5 mg/LSB)
3. Embedded 32 sample FIFO (MMA8451Q)
2.1.2
MMA8452Q
1. 12-bit data
2g (1024 counts/g = 1 mg/LSB) 4g (512 counts/g = 2 mg/LSB) 8g (256 counts/g = 3.9 mg/LSB)
2. 8-bit data
2g (64 counts/g = 15.6 mg/LSB) 4g (32 counts/g = 31.25 mg/LSB) 8g (16 counts/g = 62.5 mg/LSB)
2.1.3
MMA8453Q Note: No HPF Data
1. 10-bit data
2g (256 counts/g = 3.9 mg/LSB) 4g (128 counts/g = 7.8 mg/LSB) 8g (64 counts/g = 15.6 mg/LSB)
2. 8-bit data
2g (64 counts/g = 15.6 mg/LSB) 4g (32 counts/g = 31.25 mg/LSB) 8g (16 counts/g = 62.5 mg/LSB)
AN4074
2
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
3.0
Configuring the MMA8451, 2, 3Q into Auto-Wake/Sleep Mode
The MMA8451, 2, 3Q can be configured to transition between different sample rates (different current consumption) based on
different selected events. Enabling this feature can be accomplished by enabling the Sleep Mode and setting a timeout period.
Then the functions of interest must be set to trigger the device to wake. Both Wake and Sleep are considered “Active” Modes
because data and interrupts are available. The difference between the modes is that the sample rate in Sleep Mode is limited to
a maximum of 50 Hz. The advantage of using the Auto-Wake/Sleep is that the system can automatically transition to a higher
sample rate (higher current consumption) when needed but spends the majority of the time in the Sleep Mode (lower current)
when the device does not require higher sampling rates. This can all be triggered on selected events. The Low Noise bit (Register
0x2A bit 2) can be used as well with this feature. Be aware that using the Low Noise bit will limit the dynamic range to 4g,
regardless of the set range of the full scale value. The oversampling mode can also be changed from Active Sleep Mode to
Active Wake Mode. The Sleep Mode oversampling option is set in Register 0x2B using bit 3 and bit 4 SMODS0 and SMODS1.
The Active Wake Mode oversampling option is set in Register 0x2B using bit 0 and bit 1 MODS0 and MODS1. For example the
device can be configured to be in Low Power Mode when asleep at 1.56 Hz to be in the lowest current consumption configuration.
Then the device can be set for High Resolution Mode at 6.25 Hz when awake to be prepared to take higher resolution data for a
tilt application.
Figure 2 shows transition states from the Wake, Sleep and Standby modes.
Wake
SYSMOD[1:0] = 01
<DR>
In
tri terr
gg up
er ts
ed
Standby
SYSMOD[1:0] = 00
Sleep
If Time > ASLP_COUNT[7:0] and
no Interrupts triggered
SYSMOD[1:0] = 10
ASLP_RATE[1:0]
Figure 2. Mode Transitions
Table 1 compares how the current consumption changes with the data rate and with the oversampling mode chosen. The oversampling modes are “Normal”, “Low Noise and Low Power”, “High Resolution” and “Low Power”. The oversampling ratios are
given at each data rate along with the current consumption values for each. The more averaging done internally results in higher
current consumption. Note the Low Power Mode has the least amount of averaging and the lowest current consumption.
Table 1. (S)MODS Oversampling Options with Current Consumption Values
Normal
Low Noise and Low Power
High Resolution
Low Power
Mode
ODR
Current μA
OS Ratio
Current μA
OS Ratio
Current μA
OS Ratio
Current μA
OS Ratio
800
165
2
165
2
165
2
165
2
400
165
4
165
4
165
4
85
2
200
85
4
85
4
165
8
44
2
100
44
4
44
4
165
16
24
2
50
24
4
24
4
165
32
14
2
12.5
24
16
8
4
165
128
6
2
6.25
24
32
8
8
165
256
6
4
1.5625
24
128
8
32
165
1024
6
16
Table 2 shows the list of functions that will delay the device from returning to sleep and waking from sleep. Note that the
MMA8451Q is the only device that contains the FIFO. The FIFO can delay the device from going to sleep but it is not capable of
waking the device from sleep. The transient, portrait/landscape, tap, and motion/freefall functions can all delay the device from
sleep by servicing the interrupt before the timeout period. They can also wake the device from sleep. The Auto-Sleep interrupt
indicates when the device changes modes from Wake to Sleep or Sleep to Wake but the interrupt does not affect the state
change. Also the data ready interrupt does not affect the state change from the Wake to Sleep or Sleep to Wake state.
AN4074
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
3
Table 2. Interrupt Sources and the effects on the state change from Wake to Sleep and Sleep to Wake Modes
Interrupt Source
Event Restarts Timer
and Delays Return-to-Sleep
Event will
Wake-from-Sleep
FIFO_GATE
Yes
No
SRC_TRANS
Yes
Yes
SRC_LNDPRT
Yes
Yes
SRC_PULSE
Yes
Yes
SRC_FF_MT
Yes
Yes
SRC_ASLP
No
No
SRC_DRDY
No
No
Note that to configure the Auto-Wake/Sleep functionality, the selected embedded functions must be enabled (Register 0x2D)
and the same corresponding functions must be set to “Wake-from-Sleep” (Register 0x2C) if they are to be used to wake the device.
All enabled functions will still function in Sleep Mode at the sleep ODR. Only the functions that have been selected for “Wakefrom-Sleep” will wake the device. If nothing is selected to Wake-from-Sleep then the device will remain in Sleep Mode and will
never wake up.
This section reviews the different registers involved in configuring the device for auto-wake/sleep.
1. Register 0x2B bit 2 – SLPE Enable Sleep bit
2. Register 0x2B Set the Sleep Mode Oversampling Rate
3. Register 0x2A Sleep Sample Rate and Wake Sample Rate
4. Register 0x29 Timeout Counter
5. Register 0x2D Enable the Interrupts for the Selected Functions
6. Register 0x2E Route the Interrupts to INT1 or INT2
7. Register 0x2C Enable the Wake-from-Sleep Interrupts
3.1
Set the Sleep Enable Bit
If the Sleep Enable bit (Register 0x2B bit 2) is NOT enabled then the device can only toggle between Standby and Wake Mode
by writing to the Active bit in Register 0x2A. When the Sleep Enable bit is enabled the device can transition between Standby,
Wake, and Sleep. The SLPE bit is shown as bit 2 in Table 4.
3.2
Set the Sleep Mode and Wake Mode Oversampling Mode
There are four different oversampling modes described in Table 3 They are “Normal”, “Low Noise and Low Power”, “High Resolution” and “Low Power”. The oversampling mode changes the current consumption, resolution and also the debounce counter
timers in the part. The device can be configured to be in Low Power Mode while in Sleep and then to Normal Mode when awake
or any of the other fifteen combinations. This allows for further current savings in the Sleep Mode. The different bit settings are
shown in Table 3. The Wake oversampling modes configured from bit 0 and bit 1 in Register 0x2B. The Sleep oversampling
modes are configured from bit 3 and bit 4 in SMODS in Register 0x2B.
Table 3. Settings for Oversampling Modes
(S)MODS1
(S)MODS0
Power Mode
0
0
Normal
0
1
Low Noise and Low Power
1
0
High Resolution
1
1
Low Power
Table 4. 0x2B CTRL_REG2 Register (Read/Write) and Description
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
ST
RST
0
SMODS1
SMODS0
SLPE
MODS1
MODS0
AN4074
4
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
3.3
Configure the Sleep Sample Rate and Wake Sample Rate
It is important to note that when the device is in Sleep Mode, the system ODR is overwritten by the data rate set by the
ASLP_RATE field in the CTRL_REG1 Register (0x2A). The Sleep Sample Rate (ASLP_RATE[0:1]) and the Wake Mode Sample
Rate (DR[0:3]) are found in Table 5. The different bit settings for the Sleep Mode Sample Rate can be found in Table 6. The bit
settings for the Wake Mode Sample Rates are found in Table 7.
Table 5. 0x2A CTRL_REG1 Register (Read/Write) and Description
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
ASLP_RATE1
ASLP_RATE0
DR2
DR1
DR0
LNOISE
F_READ
ACTIVE
Table 6. Sleep Mode Sample Rate Description
ASLP_RATE1
ASLP_RATE0
ODR
Period
0
0
50 Hz
20 ms
0
1
12.5 Hz
80 ms
1
0
6.25 Hz
160 ms
1
1
1.56 Hz
640 ms
Table 7. Wake Mode Sample Rate Description
3.4
DR2
DR1
DR0
ODR
Period
0
0
0
800.0 Hz
1.25 ms
0
0
1
400.0 Hz
2.5 ms
0
1
0
200.0 Hz
5 ms
0
1
1
100.0 Hz
10 ms
1
0
0
50.0 Hz
20 ms
1
0
1
12.5 Hz
80 ms
1
1
0
6.25 Hz
160 ms
1
1
1
1.56 Hz
640 ms
Set the Timeout Counter
The ASLP_COUNT Register 0x29 shown in Table 8 sets the minimum time period of inactivity required to change the current
ODR value from the value specified in the DR[2:0] to that in the ASLP_RATE[1:0] (Register 0x2A). Of course this only occurs
provided the SLPE bit is set.
Table 8. 0x29 ASLP_COUNT Register (Read/Write) and Description
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
D7-D0 defines the minimum duration time to change current ODR value from DR to ASLP_RATE. Time step and maximum
value depend on the ODR chosen. See Table 9.
Table 9. ASLP_COUNT Relationship with ODR
Output Data Rate (ODR)
Duration
ODR Time Step
ASLP_COUNT Step
800
0 to 81s
1.25 ms
320 ms
400
0 to 81s
2.5 ms
320 ms
200
0 to 81s
5 ms
320 ms
100
0 to 81s
10 ms
320 ms
50
0 to 81s
20 ms
320 ms
12.5
0 to 81s
80 ms
320 ms
6.25
0 to 81s
160 ms
320 ms
1.56
0 to 162s
640 ms
640 ms
AN4074
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
5
3.5
Enable the Interrupts to be used in the System and Route to INT1 or INT2
The interrupt functions must be enabled in Register 0x2D per Table 10 for the event to trigger the Auto-Wake/Sleep. The functions must also be configured with the appropriate thresholds and timing values to detect the events.
Table 10. Register 0x2D CTRL_REG4 Register (Read/Write) and Description
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
INT_EN_ASLP
INT_EN_FIFO
INT_EN_TRANS
INT_EN_LNDPRT
INT_EN_PULSE
INT_EN_FF_MT
—
INT_EN_DRDY
The corresponding interrupt enable bit allows the function to route its event detection flag to the interrupt controller. The interrupt controller routes the enabled interrupt to the INT1 or INT2 pin. By default all interrupts are routed to INT2 and the corresponding configuration register bit value is 0. To route a functional block to INT1 instead of the default, set the corresponding
configuration register bit to 1. The configuration register bit settings are shown in Table 11.
Table 11. Register 0x2E CTRL_REG5 Register (Read/Write) and Description
Bit 7
Bit 6
INT_CFG_ASLP
INT_CFG_FIFO
3.6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
INT_CFG_TRANS INT_CFG_LNDPRT INT_CFG_PULSE INT_CFG_FF_MT
Bit 1
Bit 0
—
INT_CFG_DRDY
Enable the Interrupt Sources that Wake the Device
The register to control which interrupts will wake the device are configured in Register 0x2C shown in Table 12. There are five
(5) functions that can be used to keep the sensor from falling asleep if they are enabled. These are the Transient, Orientation, Tap, Motion/FF and the FIFO. There are only four (4) functions used to wake the device. The FIFO will not wake the
device from sleep. Also note the Auto-Wake/Sleep interrupt and the data ready interrupt do not affect the Wake/Sleep. Note that
the FIFO is only available in the MMA8451Q device.
Table 12. Register 0x2C CTRL_REG3 Interrupt Control Register and Description
Bit 7
FIFO_GATE
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
WAKE_TRANS WAKE_LNDPRT WAKE_PULSE
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
WAKE_FF_MT
—
IPOL
PP_OD
Note: The FIFO is flushed whenever the system ODR changes in order to prevent mixing the FIFO data from different time
domains unless the FIFO_GATE (bit 7) is set. Also, the FIFO cannot wake the device from sleep but can prevent the device from
going to sleep. Details of the functionality of the FIFO is captured in Table 13.
Table 13. Behavior of FIFO under Wake/Sleep Conditions
FIFO INT
Enabled
Wake-from-Sleep
Enabled
Result
NO
FIFO will fall asleep when the sleep timer times out and no other interrupt wakes the system.
There is an AUTOMATIC flush and the FIFO starts refilling at the Sleep ODR from 0.
If another functional block causes the device to wake the FIFO will FLUSH itself again and start filling at
the Wake ODR.
YES
NO
With the interrupt enabled the FIFO can be read and flushed clearing the interrupt. The system is kept
from falling asleep by reading the status after the interrupt is set. The FIFO does not have to be flushed to
keep the device in Wake Mode- as long as the FIFO status is read continuously after the FIFO interrupt is
enabled. If the system falls asleep (and no new interrupts occur during the timeout period), the FIFO
AUTOMATICALLY flushes and starts refilling at the Sleep ODR from 0 and stores at the Wake ODR.
NO
YES
FIFO will fall asleep if no wake events occur within the timeout period.
Last data remains here in the FIFO until it is flushed.
Once the FIFO is flushed, it will start collecting the new data at the current ODR.
YES
With interrupt enabled, the FIFO can be read and flushed (clearing the interrupt) . Note: Reading the FIFO
status will keep the system from falling asleep.
If the system does fall asleep (and no interrupts occur during the timeout period) then the FIFO will stop
collecting any data. The last data will be held in the FIFO.
Once the FIFO is flushed, it will start collecting the new data at the current ODR.
NO
YES
AN4074
6
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
4.0
Example Configuration for the Auto-Wake/Sleep Function
The following are the steps to configure the Auto-Wake/Sleep function with the registers of importance in Table 14. In this example, the data rate will be set to 100 Hz in Wake Mode and 6.25 Hz in Sleep Mode. The Oversampling Mode will be set to High
Resolution in the Wake Mode and Low Power Mode in Sleep Mode. The timeout period will be set to 20 seconds. The wake
triggers will be tap and motion. There may be other interrupts that are enabled in the system including orientation detection, but
these will not wake the device in this example.
Table 14. Registers used for Auto-Wake/Sleep Functionality
Reg
Name
Definition
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
0B
SYSMOD
System Mode
R
FGERR
FGT_4
FGT_3
FGT_2
FGT_1
FGT_0
SYSMOD1
SYSMOD0
0C
INT_SOURCE
Interrupt Status
R
SRC_ASLP
SRC_FIFO
SRC_TRANS
SRC_LNDPRT
SRC_PULSE
SRC_FF_MT
—
SRC_DRDY
29
ASLP_COUNT
Auto-Sleep Counter
R/W
D7
D6
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
2A
CTRL_REG1
Control Reg1
R/W
ASLP_RATE1
ASLP_RATE0
DR2
DR1
DR0
LNOISE
F_READ
ACTIVE
2B
CTRL_REG2
Control Reg2
R/W
ST
RST
0
SMODS1
SMODS0
SLPE
MODS1
MODS0
2C
CTRL_REG3
Control Reg3
R/W
(Wake Interrupts from
Sleep)
FIFO_GATE
WAKE_TRANS
WAKE_LNDPRT
WAKE_PULSE
WAKE_FF_MT
—
IPOL
PP_OD
2D
CTRL_REG4
Control Reg4
R/W
(Interrupt Enable Map)
INT_EN_ASLP
INT_EN_FIFO
INT_EN_TRANS
INT_EN_LNDPRT
INT_EN_PULSE
INT_EN_FF_MT
—
INT_EN_DRDY
2E
CTRL_REG5
Control Reg5
INT_CFG_ASLP INT_CFG_FIFO INT_CFG_TRANS INT_CFG_LNDPRT INT_CFG_PULSE INT_CFG_FF_MT
R/W
(Interrupt Configuration)
—
INT_CFG_DRDY
AN4074
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
7
4.1
Example Procedure for Configuring the Auto-Wake/Sleep Function Conditions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dynamic Range = 2g
Sleep Timeout period = 20 seconds
Wake Triggers = Tap and Motion
Wake Sample Rate = 100 Hz,
Wake Oversampling Mode = High Resolution
Sleep Sample Rate = 6.25 Hz
Sleep Oversampling Mode = Low Power
Step 1: Put the device in Standby Mode
Register 0x2A CTRL_REG1
CTRL_REG1_Data = IIC_RegRead(0x2A);
CTRL_REG1_Data& = 0xFE; //Clear Active Bit
IIC_RegWrite(0x2A,CTRL_REG1_Data);
Step 2: To enable the Auto-Wake/Sleep set bit 2 in Register 0x2B, the SLPE bit.
Register 0x2B CTRL_REG2
CTRL_REG2_Data = IIC_RegRead(0x2B); //Store value in the Register
CTRL_REG2_Data| = 0x04; //Set the Sleep Enable bit
IIC_RegWrite(0x2B, CTRL_REG2_Data); //Write the updated value into CTRL_REG2.
Step 3: The sleep sample rate must be chosen by writing in the corresponding sample rate value to bits
6 and 7 ASLP_RATE0 and ASLP_RATE1 (01) and the Wake Sample rate bits 5, 4 and 3 to DR
(011) in Register 0x2A.
Register 0x2A CTRL_REG1 ASLP_RATE = 01 (6.25 Hz), DR = 011(100 Hz)
CTRL_REG1_Data = IIC_RegRead(0x2A);
CTRL_REG1_Data& = 0x5E; //clear the bits that should be cleared for the sample rates
CTRL_REG1_Data| = 0x58; //Set ASLP = 6.25 Hz, DR = 100 Hz
IIC_RegWrite(0x2A,CTRL_REG1_Data);
Step 4: Set the Wake Oversampling Mode to High Resolution (10) and the Sleep Oversampling Mode to
Low Power (11)
CTRL_REG2_Data = IIC_RegRead(0x2B);
CTRL_REG2_Data& = 0xE4; //puts both Oversampling modes in Normal Mode
CTRL_REG2_Data| = 0x1A; //Wake High Res, Sleep Low Power
IIC_RegWrite(0x2B,CTRL_REG2_Data);
Step 5: The Interrupt for the event to trigger the device to wake up must be enabled by writing to
Register 0x2D, CTRL_Reg4. Bits 2 through 7 will affect the Auto-Wake/sleep. The data ready
interrupt doesn’t trigger the Auto-Wake/Sleep mechanism.
Example: Set Pulse and Orientation and Motion 1 and Auto-Wake/Sleep Interrupts
Enabled in the System
IIC_RegWrite(0x2D, 0x9C);
Step 6: Route the interrupt chosen and enabled to either INT1 or INT2 in Register 0x2E CTRL_REG5.
Example: Route Pulse, Motion1 and Orientation to INT2 and Auto-Sleep to INT1.
IIC_RegWrite(0x2E,0x80);
Step 7: Enable the interrupts that will wake the device from sleep. There can be more interrupts enabled
in Step 4 than in Step 6. Only interrupts that are Enabled in Step 4 and that have the “Wake-from
-Sleep” bit set in Register 0x2C will actually wake the device.
Example: Choose Pulse and Motion to wake the device from sleep
IIC_RegWrite(0x2C,0x18);
AN4074
8
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Step 8: Set the Dynamic Range to 2g
Register 0x0E XYZ_DATA_CFG
XYZ_CFG_Data = IIC_RegRead(0x0E);
XYZ_CFG_Data & = 0xFC; //Clear the FS bits to 00 2g
IIC_RegWrite(0x0E, XYZ_CFG_Data);
Step 9: Write an Interrupt Service routine to monitor the Auto-Sleep Interrupt
Interrupt void isr_KBI (void)
{
//clear the interrupt flag
CLEAR_KBI_INTERRUPT;
//Determine the source of interrupt by reading the system interrupt register
Int_SourceSystem = IIC_RegRead(0x0C);
//Set up Case statement here to service all of the possible interrupts
if ((Int_SourceSystem &=0x80)==0x80)
{
//Perform an Action since Auto-Sleep Flag has been set
//Read the System Mode to clear the system interrupt
Int_SysMod = IIC_RegRead(0x0B);
if (Int_SysMod==0x02)
{//sleep mode
}
else if (Int_SysMod==0x01)
{//Wake Mode
}
else
{//Error
}
}
}
Related Documentation
The MMA845xQ device features and operations are described in a variety of reference manuals, user guides, and application
notes. To find the most-current versions of these documents:
1.
Go to the Freescale homepage at:
http://www.freescale.com/
2.
3.
In the Keyword search box at the top of the page, enter the device number MMA845xQ.
In the Refine Your Result pane on the left, click on the Documentation link.
AN4074
Sensors
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
9
How to Reach Us:
Home Page:
www.freescale.com
Web Support:
http://www.freescale.com/support
USA/Europe or Locations Not Listed:
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Technical Information Center, EL516
2100 East Elliot Road
Tempe, Arizona 85284
1-800-521-6274 or +1-480-768-2130
www.freescale.com/support
Europe, Middle East, and Africa:
Freescale Halbleiter Deutschland GmbH
Technical Information Center
Schatzbogen 7
81829 Muenchen, Germany
+44 1296 380 456 (English)
+46 8 52200080 (English)
+49 89 92103 559 (German)
+33 1 69 35 48 48 (French)
www.freescale.com/support
Japan:
Freescale Semiconductor Japan Ltd.
Headquarters
ARCO Tower 15F
1-8-1, Shimo-Meguro, Meguro-ku,
Tokyo 153-0064
Japan
0120 191014 or +81 3 5437 9125
[email protected]
Asia/Pacific:
Freescale Semiconductor China Ltd.
Exchange Building 23F
No. 118 Jianguo Road
Chaoyang District
Beijing 100022
China
+86 10 5879 8000
[email protected]
For Literature Requests Only:
Freescale Semiconductor Literature Distribution Center
1-800-441-2447 or +1-303-675-2140
Fax: +1-303-675-2150
[email protected]
AN4074
Rev. 1
03/2012
Information in this document is provided solely to enable system and software
implementers to use Freescale Semiconductor products. There are no express or
implied copyright licenses granted hereunder to design or fabricate any integrated
circuits or integrated circuits based on the information in this document.
Freescale Semiconductor reserves the right to make changes without further notice to
any products herein. Freescale Semiconductor makes no warranty, representation or
guarantee regarding the suitability of its products for any particular purpose, nor does
Freescale Semiconductor assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any
product or circuit, and specifically disclaims any and all liability, including without
limitation consequential or incidental damages. “Typical” parameters that may be
provided in Freescale Semiconductor data sheets and/or specifications can and do vary
in different applications and actual performance may vary over time. All operating
parameters, including “Typicals”, must be validated for each customer application by
customer’s technical experts. Freescale Semiconductor does not convey any license
under its patent rights nor the rights of others. Freescale Semiconductor products are
not designed, intended, or authorized for use as components in systems intended for
surgical implant into the body, or other applications intended to support or sustain life,
or for any other application in which the failure of the Freescale Semiconductor product
could create a situation where personal injury or death may occur. Should Buyer
purchase or use Freescale Semiconductor products for any such unintended or
unauthorized application, Buyer shall indemnify and hold Freescale Semiconductor and
its officers, employees, subsidiaries, affiliates, and distributors harmless against all
claims, costs, damages, and expenses, and reasonable attorney fees arising out of,
directly or indirectly, any claim of personal injury or death associated with such
unintended or unauthorized use, even if such claim alleges that Freescale
Semiconductor was negligent regarding the design or manufacture of the part.
Freescale and the Freescale logo are trademarks of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.,
Reg. U.S. Pat. & Tm. Off. The Energy Efficiency Solutions Logo and Xtrinsic are
trademarks of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
All other product or service names are the property of their respective owners.
© 2012 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. All rights reserved.
Similar pages