Data Sheet

Freescale Semiconductor
Data Sheet: Technical Data
Document Number: MMA9555L
Rev. 2.2, 6/2015
MMA9555L Intelligent Motion-
MMA9555L
Sensing Pedometer
The MMA9555L intelligent motion-sensing pedometer is an extension of the
MMA955xL intelligent sensor platform. This device incorporates a 3-axis
MEMS accelerometer, signal conditioning, data conversion, and a 32-bit
microcontroller. This intelligent motion-sensing sensor provides sophisticated
pedometer functionality, activity level and six directional orientation monitoring.
The integrated functionality of sensor initialization, calibration, data
compensation, and computation functions off-loads CPU bandwidth from the
system application processor. Therefore, total system power consumption is
significantly reduced, because the application processor stays powered down
until absolutely needed. In addition, the device can be configured for an
autosleep/autowake capability.
MMA9555L is available in a plastic LGA package; the device is guaranteed to
operate over the extended temperature range of –40 °C to +85 °C.
16-pin LGA
3 mm x 3 mm x 1 mm
Case 2094-01
Features
•
RGPIO8 / PDB_B
VDDA
15
14
1
13
RGPIO7 / AN1
BKGD-MS /
RGPIO9
2
12
RGPIO6 / AN0
RESETB
3
11
SCL0 / RGPIO0 /
SCLK
RGPIO5 /
PDB_A / INT_O
4
10
VSS
VSS
5
9
Freescale reserves the right to change the detail specifications as may be required
to permit improvements in the design of its products.
© 2015 Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. All rights reserved.
16
VDD
6
7
8
RGPIO3 / SSB
•
VSSA
•
Top view
RGPIO2 / SDO
•
•
High resolution 3-axis accelerometer with
16-bit ADC (0.061 mg/LSB @ 2 g)
Selectable g range (±2/4/8 g) and output data rates (488 Hz–3.8 Hz)
One slave SPI or I2C interface operating at up to 2 Mbps for communication
with the host processor
1.8 V supply voltage low power consumption
• 2 µA typical current at stop mode
• 117 µA for pedometer running at active and 92 µA at suspend
• 87 µA when six-direction detection mode
Complete built-in firmware for smart sensing intelligence
• Real time and preemptive application task scheduling
• Command interpreter support command/response and streaming
mode
• Low-power pedometer with rich output information
– Step counting
– Speed, distance, calorie count estimation
– Activity level (rest, walking, jogging, running)
• Six-direction detection output
• Extensive set of power-management features and low-power
mode
• GPIO2–GPIO8 can be used for expanded configurable GPIO
functions
Minimal external component requirements
RGPIO1 / SDA0 / SDI
•
Pin Connections
RGPIO4/INT
Typical Applications
This low-power, intelligent sensor is optimized for use in portable and mobile consumer products such as:
• Pedometers, wearable devices, smart watches, wristband
• Sleep monitoring
• Smart earphone
• Health monitoring
Ordering information
Part number
Firmware
Temperature range
Package description
Shipping
MMA9555LR1
Pedometer + Six
Directions of Orientation +
GPIO Input/Output
–40 °C to +85 °C
LGA-16
Tape and reel
Related Documentation
The MMA9555L device features and operations are described in reference manuals, release notes, and application notes. To
find the most-current versions of these documents:
1.
2.
Go to the Freescale homepage at: freescale.com.
In the Keyword search box at the top of the page, enter the device number MMA9555L.
In the Refine Your Results pane on the left, click on the Documentation link.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Contents
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Intelligent Sensing Platform Offering. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
General Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
2.1
Functional Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2.2
Pinout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.3
Pin Function Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
2.4
System Connections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Mechanical and Electrical Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
3.1
Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.2
Pin Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.3
Absolute Maximum Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.4
Operating Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.5
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) and Latch-up Protection Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.6
General DC Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
3.7
Supply Current Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.8
Accelerometer Transducer Mechanical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.9
ADC Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.10 ADC Sample Rates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3.11 AC Electrical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3.12 General Timing Control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.13 I2C Timing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.14 Slave SPI Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Communication Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
4.1
Overview of Communication Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.2
Mailbox Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.3
Mailbox Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Version Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25
5.1
Reading the version information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Scheduler Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27
6.1
Scheduler application elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
6.2
Interrupts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
6.3
Scheduler configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
6.4
Scheduler status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
GPIO-AppMap Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
7.1
Overview of GPIO-AppMap application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
7.2
GPIO configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Mailbox Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
8.1
Overview of Mailbox application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
8.2
Mailbox configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
8.3
Mailbox status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
8.4
Reading aggregated data (Legacy mode—Quick read) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Analog Front End Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
9.1
Overview of Analog Front End application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
9.2
AFE configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
9.3
AFE status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Data FIFO Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62
10.1 Overview of Data FIFO application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
10.2 Modes of operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
10.3 Reading process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
10.4 Data FIFO block diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
10.5 Data FIFO configuration registers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
10.6 Data FIFO status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
Event Queue Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71
11.1 Overview of Event Queue application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
11.2 Event Queue configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
11.3 Event Queue status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
Status Register Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
12.1 Overview of Status Register application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
3
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
12.2 Status Register configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
12.3 Status Register default configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Sleep/Wake Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83
13.1 Overview of Sleep/Wake application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
13.2 Sleep/Wake configuration registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
13.3 Sleep/Wake status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Reset/Suspend/Clear Control Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88
14.1 Overview of Reset/Suspend/Clear Control application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
14.2 Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
14.3 Reset/Suspend/Clear status registers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
14.4 Reboot to ROM CI from flash code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
14.5 Reboot to flash code from ROM CI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
MBOX Configuration Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
15.1 Overview of MBOX Configuration application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.2 Normal mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
15.3 Legacy mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
15.4 Configuring mailbox operational mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
15.5 MBOX Configuration memory map and register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Pedometer Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
16.1 Background and overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
16.2 Functional description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
16.3 Memory-maps and register descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
16.4 Pedometer application examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
GPIO Input/Output Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114
17.1 Overview of GPIO Input/Output application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
17.2 Memory maps and register descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
17.3 GPIO Input/Output configuration register descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
17.4 GPIO Input/Output Status register descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
17.5 GPIO Input/Output application examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Six-Direction Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .119
18.1 Overview of the Six-Direction application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
18.2 Memory maps and register descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
18.3 Six Direction configuration register descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
18.4 Six Direction Status register descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Sample operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .123
19.1 Read pedometer status variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.2 Read pedometer configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.3 Write pedometer configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.4 Read GPIO Input/output status variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.5 Read GPIO Input/output configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.6 Write GPIO Input/output configuration variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.7 Read Six direction status variables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.8 Read Six direction configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
19.9 Write Six direction configuration variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
19.10 Reset pedometer configuration variables to their defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
19.11 Enable/disable the Pedometer application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
19.12 Configure the AFE range . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
19.13 Configure output interrupt: Activity change on GPIO6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
19.14 Configure output interrupt: Step change on GPIO7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
19.15 Configure output interrupt: Suspend change on GPIO8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
19.16 Configure output interrupt: Merged flags on GPIO6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
19.17 Configure output interrupt: Every 10 steps on GPIO7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
19.18 Configure output interrupt: Device direction change on GPIO6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
19.19 Wake up from Deep Sleep (Stop No Clock mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Package Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .126
20.1 Footprint and pattern information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126
20.2 Marking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
20.3 Tape and reel information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128
20.4 Package Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
4
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
1
Intelligent Sensing Platform Offering
Freescale has a broad offering of MMA955xL devices.
The MMA9550L, MMA9551L, MMA9553L, and MMA9555L devices can function immediately as shipped. They have an internal
command interpreter and applications scheduler. These devices can interact directly with the users' host system.
The MMA9550L, MMA9551L, MMA9553L and MMA9559L devices are programmable with additional user application software.
These devices have a variety of user flash and RAM memory space available. The MMA9555L is provided with complete factory
build application specific software, no additional user software programming in the device is needed.
NOTE
The information and specifications provided in this data sheet are specific to the MMA9555L.
Information for the other devices can be found in the MMA955xL collateral and datasheet.
Table 1. Freescale Intelligent Sensing Product Comparison
Feature - Device
MMA9550L
MMA9551L
MMA9553L
Key elements
Motion sensing Gesture sensing
ADC resolution (bits)
10,12,14,16 bits 10,12,14,16 bits 10,12,14,16 bits
g measurement ranges
Pedometer
MMA9555L
MMA9559L
Pedometer
+
six-direction orientation High flexibility
+
GPIO Input/Output
10,12,14,16 bits
10,12,14,16
bits
2 g, 4 g, 8 g
2 g, 4 g, 8 g
2 g, 4 g, 8 g
2 g, 4 g, 8 g
2 g, 4 g, 8 g
Real-time and preemptive
scheduling
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Event management
No
No
No
No
Yes
• Normal mode
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• Legacy mode
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• Streaming mode
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• 100 Hz BW anti-aliasing
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• 50 Hz BW anti-aliasing
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• g-mode-dependent resolution
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
• Absolute value
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• Low-pass filter
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• High-pass filter
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• Data-ready interrupt
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
• High g/Low g
No
Yes
No
No
No
• Tilt
No
Yes
No
No
No
Slave Port Command Interpreter
Front-end processing
Gesture applications
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
5
Table 1. Freescale Intelligent Sensing Product Comparison (Continued)
Feature - Device
MMA9550L
MMA9551L
MMA9553L
MMA9555L
MMA9559L
• Portrait/Landscape
No
Yes
No
No
No
• Programmable orientation
No
Yes
No
No
No
• Tap/Double-tap
No
Yes
No
No
No
• Freefall
No
Yes
No
No
No
• Motion
No
Yes
No
No
No
• Data FIFO
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• Event queue
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
• Inter-process FIFO
No
No
No
No
Yes
• Run and Stop on idle
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
• Run and No stop
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
• Stop NC
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
• Auto-Wake / Auto-Sleep / Doze
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Data-management daemons
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
• Step count
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
• Distance
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
• Adaptive distance
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
• Activity monitor
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Six Directional Orientation
No
No
No
Yes
No
GPIO management
No
No
No
Yes
No
Data-storage modules
Power-control module
Pedometer applications
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
6
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
2
General Description
2.1
Functional Overview
The MMA9555L is an intelligent motion sensing pedometer, it consists of a 3-axis, MEMS accelerometer and a mixed-signal ASIC
with an integrated, 32-bit CPU. The mixed-signal ASIC can be utilized to measure and condition the outputs of the MEMS accelerometer, internal temperature sensor, or a differential analog signal from an external device.
The calibrated, measured sensor outputs can be read via the slave I2C or SPI port and utilized internally within the MMA9555L
to provide advanced intelligent motion detection outputs like pedometer step count, activity level and six directional orientation
detections which can be accessed via the slave I2C or SPI port.
INT_O
Control
and
mailbox
RESET
BDM BKGD
SIM
SPI slave
INT
DBG
SCLK
SDI
SDO
SSB
SCL0/RGPIC0/SCLK
Analog Front End (AFE)
X
axis
32 bit CPU
Y
axis
Z
axis
SDA0/RGPIO1/SDI
RGPIO2/SCL1/SDO
Temp
Sensor
C to V
ADC
ROM
SCL0
SDA0
AN0
AN1
RGPIO3/SDA1/SSB
RGPIO
CLKGEN
INTC
2
I C slave
RGPIO4/INT
RGPIO5/PDB_A/INT_O
RGPIO6/AN0/TPMCH0
2
I C Master
SCL1
SDA1
RGPIO7/AN1/TPMCH1
RGPIO8/PDB_B
Flash
Programmable
delay block
PDB_A
PDB_B
BKGD/MS/RPGPIO9
RAM
VDD
Two-channel, 16-bit TPMCH0
Timer / PWM module TPMCH1
VDDA
VSS
VSS
16-bit
Modulo timer module
VSSA
Figure 1. MMA9555L block diagram
A block-level view is shown in Figure 1 with building blocks of devices and built-in applications summarized at a high level. The
analog/mixed-mode subsystem associated with a digital engine is composed of:
• The analog subsystem is composed of:
• A 3-axis transducer that is an entirely passive block including the MEMS structures.
• An Analog Front End (AFE) with the following:
– A capacitance-to-voltage converter
– An analog-to-digital converter
– A temperature sensor
• The digital subsystem is composed of:
• A 32-bit CPU
• Memory: RAM, ROM, and flash
• Rapid GPIO (RGPIO) port-control logic
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
7
Pinout
–
–
–
I2C or SPI slave interface
System Integration Module (SIM)
Clock-Generation Module
The slave interfaces (either SPI or I2C) operate independently of the CPU subsystem. They can be accessed at any time,
including while the device is in low-power, deep-sleep mode.
2.2
Pinout
BKGD-MS / RGPIO9
VDDA
1
RGPIO8 / PDB_B
VDD
VSSA
The package pinout definition for this device is designed as a superset of functions on Freescale's other MMA955xL offerings.
All pins on the device are utilized and many are multiplexed.
16
15
14
13
RGPIO7 / AN1
2
12
RGPIO6 / AN0
RESETB
3
11
RGPIO5 / PDB_A / INT_O
SCL0 / RGPIO0 / SCLK
4
10
VSS
VSS
5
7
8
RGPIO1 / SDA0 / SDI
RGPIO2 / SDO
RGPIO3 / SSB
9
6
RGPIO4/INT
Figure 2. Device pinout (top view)
2.2.1
Pin Functions
The following table summarizes functional options for each pin on this device.
Table 2. Pin functions
Pin #
Pin Name
1
VDD
2
BKGD / MS / RGPIO9
3
RESETB
4
Description
Digital power supply
Background-debug / Mode select / RGPIO9
Active-low reset. RESETB is an open-drain, bidirectional pin. By default, the output function is not on. Must
be pulled to VDD via resistor at startup. After startup, Reset may be asserted low to reset the device.
SCL0 / RGPIO0 / SCLK Serial clock for slave I2C / RGPIO0 / Serial clock for slave SPI
5
VSS
6
SDA0 / RGPIO1 / SDI
7
RGPIO2 / SDO
RGPIO2 / SPI serial data output
8
RGPIO3 / SBB
RGPIO3 / SPI slave select. RGPIO3 / SSB = Low at startup selects SPI. High at startup selects I2C.
Digital ground
Serial data for slave I2C / RGPIO1 / SPI serial data input
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
8
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Pin Function Descriptions
Table 2. Pin functions (Continued)
Pin #
Pin Name
9
RGPIO4/INT
RGPIO4 / Interrupt input
10
RESERVED
Must be connected to VSS ground externally
11
RGPIO5 / INT_O
12
RGPIO6 / AN0
RGPIO6 / ADC Input 0
13
RGPIO7 / AN1
RGPIO7 / ADC Input 1
14
VDDA
15
RGPIO8
16
VSSA
2.3
Description
RGPIO5 or INT_O slave-port interrupt output. INT_O can only output interrupts from the COCO bit. For
setting sensor data output interrupts, use RGPIO6–RGPIO9.
Analog power
RGPIO8
Analog ground
Pin Function Descriptions
This section provides a brief description of the various pin functions available on the MMA9555L pedometer sensor. Ten of the
device pins are multiplexed with Rapid GPIO (RGPIO) functions.
VDD and VSS: Digital power and ground. VDD is nominally 1.8 V.
VDDA and VSSA: Analog power and ground. VDDA is nominally 1.8 V. To optimize performance, the VDDA line can be filtered to
remove any digital noise that might be present on the 1.8 V supply. (See Figure 3 and Figure 4.)
RESETB: The RESETB pin is an open-drain, bidirectional pin with an internal, weak, pullup resistor. At start-up, it is configured
as an input pin, but also can be programmed to become bidirectional. By default, the output function is not on. Using this feature,
the MMA9555L device can reset external devices for any purpose other than power-on reset. Reset must be pulled high at power
up to boot to Application code space. If low, it will boot to ROM code. After startup, Reset may be asserted to reset the device.
The total external capacitance to ground has to be limited when using RESETB-pin, output-drive capability. For more details, see
the “System Integration Module” chapter of the MMA955xL Intelligent, Motion-Sensing Platform Hardware Reference Manual
(MMA955xLHWRM), listed in “Related Documentation” on page 2.
Slave I2C port: SDA0 and SCL0: These are the slave-I2C data and clock signals, respectively. The MMA9555L device can be
controlled via the serial port or via the slave SPI interface.
Analog-to-Digital Conversion: AN0, AN1: The on-chip ADC can be used to perform a differential, analog-to-digital conversion
based on the voltage present across pins AN0(–) and AN1(+). Conversions for these pins are at the same Output Data Rate
(ODR) as the MEMS transducer signals. Input levels are limited to 1.8 V differential.
Rapid General Purpose I/O: RGPIO[9:0]: The Intelligent Pedometer has a feature called Rapid GPIO (RGPIO). This is a 16-bit,
input/output port with single-cycle write, set, clear, and toggle functions available to the CPU. The MMA9555L device brings out
the lower 10 bits of that port as pins of the device. At reset, all of the RGPIO pins are configured as input pins, although pin muxing
does reassign some pins to non-RGPIO function blocks. Pullups are disabled.
RGPIO[9:6] can be set as interrupt pins for most interrupt sources. INT_O can only output interrupts from the COCO bit. For
setting sensor data output interrupts, use RGPIO6–RGPIO9.
RGPIO3 / SBB = Low at startup selects SPI. High at startup selects I2C.
RGPIO[5] or INT_O can only output interrupts from the COCO bit. For setting sensor data output interrupts, use
RGPIO6–RGPIO9.
RGPIO[9] is connected to BKGD/MS.
RGPIO[1:0] SDA0 and SCL0 are connected at reset.
Interrupts: INT: This input pin can be used to wake the CPU from a deep-sleep mode. It can be programmed to trigger on either
rising or falling edge, or high or low level. This pin operates as a Level-7 (high-priority) interrupt.
Debug/Mode Control: BKGD/MS: At start-up, this pin operates as mode select. If this pin is pulled high during start up, the CPU
will boot normally and run code. If this pin is pulled low during start-up, the CPU will boot into active Background-Debug Mode
(BDM). In BDM, this pin operates as a bidirectional, single-wire, background-debug port. It can be used by development tools for
downloading code into on-chip RAM and flash and to debug that code. There is an internal pullup resistor on this pin, therefore,
It may be left floating.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
9
System Connections
Slave SPI Interface: SCLK, SDI, SDO and SBB: These pins control the slave SPI clock, data in, data out, and slave-select
signals, respectively. The MMA9555L platform can be controlled via this serial port or via the slave-I2C interface. SBB has a
special function at startup that selects the Slave interface mode. Low at startup selects SPI and high selects I2C.
INT_O: The slave-port output interrupt pin can be used to flag the host when a response to a command is available to read on
the slave port. INT_O can only output interrupts from the COCO bit. For sensor data output interrupts, use RGPI06–RGPIO9.
2.4
2.4.1
System Connections
Power Sequencing
An internal circuit powered by VDDA provides the device with a power-on-reset signal. In order for this signal to be properly recognized, it is important that VDD is powered up before or simultaneously with VDDA. The voltage potential between VDD and VDDA
must not be allowed to exceed the value specified in Table 6 on page 14.
2.4.2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Layout Recommendations
Provide a low-impedance path from the board power supply to each power pin (VDD and VDDA) on the device and from the
board ground to each ground pin (VSS and VSSA).
Place 0.01 to 0.1 µF capacitors as close as possible to the package supply pins to meet the minimum bypass requirement.
The recommended bypass configuration is to place one bypass capacitor on each of the VDD/VSS pairs. VDDA/VSSA ceramic
and tantalum capacitors tend to provide better tolerances.
Capacitor leads and associated printed-circuit traces that connect to the chip VDD and VSS (GND) pins must be as short as
possible.
Bypass the power and ground with a capacitor of approximately 1 µF and a number of 0.1-µF ceramic capacitors.
Minimize PCB trace lengths for high-frequency signals. This is especially critical in systems with higher capacitive loads that
could create higher transient currents in the VDD and VSS circuits.
Take special care to minimize noise levels on the VDDA and VSSA pins.
Use separate power planes for VDD and VDDA and separate ground planes for VSS and VSSA. Connect the separate analog
and digital power and ground planes as close as possible to power supply outputs. If both analog circuit and digital circuits
are powered by the same power supply, it is advisable to connect a small inductor or ferrite bead in series with both the VDDA
and VSSA traces.
Physically separate the analog components from noisy digital components by ground planes. Do not place an analog trace
in parallel with digital traces. It is also desirable to place an analog ground trace around an analog signal trace to isolate it
from digital traces.
Provide an interface to the BKGD/MS pin if in-circuit debug capability is desired.
Ensure that resistors RP1 and RP2, in the following figure, match the requirements stated in the I2C standard. For the shown
configuration, the value of 4.7 kΩ would be appropriate.
2.4.3
MMA9555L Pedometer Sensor as an Intelligent Slave
I2C pullup resistors, and a few bypass capacitors are all that are required to attach this device to a host platform. The basic configurations are shown in the following two figures. In addition, the RGPIO pins can be programmed to generate interrupts to a
host platform in response to the occurrence of real-time application events. In this case, the pins should be routed to the external
interrupt pins of the CPU.
NOTE
Immediately after a device reset, the state of pin number 8 (RGPIO3 / SDA1 / SSB functions) is used to select the slave port
interface mode. This implies important rules in the way the host controller or, more generally, the complete system should be
handling this pin.
First of all, whenever a reset occurs on the MMA9555L, the RGPIO3 pin level shall be consistent with the interface mode of operation. This is particularly important if this pin is driven from external devices. If the RGPIO3 level does not match the current
mode of operation, an alternate mode is selected and communication with the host is lost.
If I2C mode is used, a good practice is to tie RGPIO3 to a pull-up resistor so that it defaults to high level. When using I2C mode
for the slave interface, the RGPIO3 pin plays two roles: RGPIO3 and mode selection. When the MMA9555L is powered on and
the mode selection is I2C, the RGPIO3 pin is released as a GPIO pin. The default setting of RGPIO3 is as an output pin and
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
10
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
System Connections
output low. In order to reduce the leakage current on the pull-up resistor, a large resistor value can be used or RGPIO3 can be
set as an input pin.
When using SPI mode for the slave interface, the situation is more complex as the same pin plays two roles: SSB and mode
selection. Moreover, after a SPI read or write operation, the SSB line returns to high level. Consequently, if the host is sending a
command to the MMA9555L that induces a subsequent reset, immediately after the write transaction, the host shall force the
SSB line to low level so that SPI mode is still selected after reset. The duration for the SSB line to be kept low typically depends
on the latency between the write transaction and the execution of the reset command. Such latency can be significant for the
MMA9555L pedometer firmware as the Command Interpreter and Scheduler Application are running at 30 Hz which gives a
33 ms typical latency.
The rule obviously applies also when a hardware reset is issued by the host through MMA9555L pin number 3 (RESETB active
low). Again the host has to drive the SSB line low prior to release of the hardware reset line to high level, which triggers immediate
MMA9555L reset and boot sequence. Keeping the SSB line low for a 1 ms duration (after RESETB is released) is enough for the
MMA9555L slave device to re-boot into SPI mode.
Quiet VDDA for
best performance
1.8 V
1.8 V
1.8 V
2
3
1.8 V
R3
4.7 KΩ
2
R4
4.7 KΩ
14
15
VDD
IO7 / AN1
BKGD / MS / IO9
IO6 / AN0
RESETB
4
SCL0 / IO0 / SCLK
5
VSS
7
6
12
* IO5 / PDB_A / INT_O
11
VSS
10
IO4 / INT
I C_CLK
13
9
IO3 / SSB
1
8*
R1
4.7 KΩ
SDA0 / IO1 / SDI
R2
4.7 KΩ
C1* * C1 is not necessary for
1 μF all implementations, but is
recommended as good
design practice for achieving
low noise operation.
VDDA
1.8 V
IO8 / PDB_B
VSSA
U1
MMA955X
IO2 / SDO
C3
0.1 μF
16
C2
0.1 μF
INT_OUT
* IO5 can only be
configured as
COCO bit interrupt.
For most interrupt
sources, use
IO6-IO9.
*See the NOTE in this section.
2
I C_DATA
Figure 3. MMA9555L Pedometer Sensor as an I2C slave
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
11
System Connections
Quiet VDDA for
best performance
1.8 V
1.8 V
INT_OUT
1.8 V
14
15
BKGD / MS / IO9
IO6 / AN0
RESETB
4
SCL0 / IO0 / SCLK
5
VSS
SPI_CLK
6
SPI_DI (MOSI)
SPI_DO (MISO)
13
12
* IO5 / PDB_A / INT_O
11
VSS
10
IO4 / INT
INT_COCO
9
* IO5 can only be configured as
COCO bit interrupt. For most
interrupt sources, use IO6-IO9.
IO3 / SSB
3
IO7 / AN1
IO2 / SDO
2
VDD
8*
1
SDA0 / IO1 / SDI
R1
4.7 KΩ
R2
4.7 KΩ
VDDA
1.8 V
IO8 / PDB_B
VSSA
16
U1
MMA955X
7
C3
0.1 μF
C1* * C1 is not necessary for
1 μF all implementations, but is
recommended as good
design practice for achieving
low noise operation.
C2
0.1 μF
* See the NOTE in this section.
SPI_EN
Figure 4. MMA9555L Pedometer Sensor as an SPI slave
2.4.4
Sensing Direction and Output Response
Figure 5 shows the device’s default sensing direction when measuring gravity in a static manner from the six standard orientation
modes: portrait up/down, landscape left/right and back/front.
Side view
Top view
Back
Portrait Up
Pin 1
Xout @ 0 g
Yout @ 0 g
Zout @ -1 g
Gravity
Xout @ 0 g
Yout @ -1 g
Zout @ 0 g
Landscape Right
Landscape Left
Xout @ -1 g
Yout @ 0 g
Zout @ 0 g
Front
Portrait Down
Xout @ 0 g
Yout @ 1 g
Zout @ 0 g
Xout @ 0 g
Yout @ 0 g
Zout @ 1 g
Xout @ 1 g
Yout @ 0 g
Zout @ 0 g
+X
+Z
+Y
Figure 5. Sensing direction and output response
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
12
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
3
Mechanical and Electrical Specifications
This section contains electrical specification tables and reference timing diagrams for the MMA9555L device, including detailed
information on power considerations, DC/AC electrical characteristics, and AC timing specifications.
3.1
Definitions
Cross-axis sensitivity
The proportionality constant that relates a variation of accelerometer output to cross acceleration. This
sensitivity varies with the direction of cross acceleration and is primarily due to misalignment.
Full range
The algebraic difference between the upper and lower values of the input range. Refer to the input/
output characteristics.
Hardware compensated Sensor modules on this device include hardware-correction factors for gain and offset errors that are
calibrated during factory test using a least-squares fit of the raw sensor data.
Linearity error
The deviation of the sensor output from a least-squares linear fit of the input/output data.
Nonlinearity
The systematic deviation from the straight line that defines the nominal input/output relationship.
Pin group
The clustering of device pins into a number of logical pin groupings to simplify and standardize electrical data sheet parameters. Pin groups are defined in Section 3.2, “Pin Groups”.
Software compensated Freescale’s advanced nonlinear calibration functions that—with the first-order hardware gain and offset calibration features—improve sensor performance.
Warm-up time
The time from the initial application of power for a sensor to reach its specified performance under the
documented operating conditions.
3.2
Pin Groups
The following pin groups are used throughout the remainder of this section.
Group 1
RESETB
Group 2
RESERVED
Group 3
RGPIO[9:0]
3.3
Absolute Maximum Ratings
Absolute maximum ratings are the limits the device can be exposed to without permanently damaging it. Absolute maximum ratings are stress ratings only; functional operation at these ratings is not guaranteed. Exposure to absolute maximum ratings conditions for extended periods may affect reliability.
This device contains circuitry to protect against damage due to high static voltage or electrical fields. It is advised, however, that
normal precautions be taken to avoid application of any voltages higher than maximum-rated voltages to this high-impedance
circuit. Reliability of operation is enhanced if unused inputs are tied to an appropriate logic voltage level (for instance, either VSS
or VDD).
Table 3. Absolute maximum ratings
Rating
Symbol
Minimum
Maximum
Unit
Digital supply voltage
VDD
–0.3
2.0
V
Analog supply voltage
VDDA
–0.3
2.0
V
Voltage difference, VDD to VDDA
VDD – VDDA
–0.1
0.1
V
Voltage difference, VSS to VSSA
VSS – VSSA
–0.1
0.1
V
Input voltage
VIn
–0.3
VDD + 0.3
V
Input/Output pin-clamp current
IC
–20
20
mA
Output voltage range (Open-Drain Mode)
VOUTOD
–0.3
VDD + 0.3
V
Storage temperature
Tstg
–40
125
°C
Mechanical shock
SH
—
5k
g
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
13
Operating Conditions
3.4
Operating Conditions
Table 4. Nominal operating conditions
Rating
3.5
Symbol
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Digital supply voltage
VDD
1.71
1.8
1.89
V
Analog supply voltage
VDDA
1.71
1.8
1.89
V
Voltage difference, VDD to VDDA
VDD – VDDA
–0.1
—
0.1
V
Voltage difference, VSS to VSSA
VSS – VSSA
–0.1
—
0.1
V
Input voltage high
VIH
0.7 * VDD
—
VDD+0.1
V
Input voltage low
VIL
VSS – 0.3
—
0.3*VDD
V
Operating temperature
TA
–40
25
85
°C
Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) and Latch-up Protection
Characteristics
Table 5. ESD and latch-up protection characteristics
Rating
Symbol
Value
Unit
VHBM
±2000
V
Machine Model (MM)
VMM
±200
V
Charge Device Model (CDM)
VCDM
±500
V
ILAT
±100
mA
Human Body Model (HBM)
Latch-up current at 85 °C
3.6
General DC Characteristics
Table 6. DC characteristics(1)
Symbol
Condition(s)(2)
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Output voltage high
• Low-drive strength
• High-drive strength
VOH
Pin Groups 1 and 3
ILOAD = –2 mA
ILOAD = –3 mA
VDD – 0.5
—
—
V
Output voltage low
• Low-drive strength
• High-drive strength
VOL
Pin Groups 1 and 3
ILOAD = 2 mA
ILOAD = 3 mA
—
—
0.5
V
Output-low current
Max total IOL for all ports
IOLT
—
—
—
24
mA
Output-high current
Max total IOH for all ports
IOHT
—
—
—
24
mA
Input-leakage current
|IIN|
Pin Group 2
Vin = VDD or VSS
—
0.1
1
µA
Hi-Z (off-state) leakage current
|IOZ|
Pin Group 3 input
resistors disabled
Vin = VDD or VSS
—
0.1
1
µA
Pullup resistor
RPU
when enabled
17.5
—
52.5
kΩ
Power-on-reset voltage
VPOR
—
—
1.50
—
V
VPOR–hys
—
—
100
—
mV
CIN
—
—
7
—
pF
COUT
—
—
7
—
pF
Characteristic
Power-on-reset hysteresis
Input-pin capacitance
Output-pin capacitance
1.
2.
All conditions at nominal supply: VDD = VDDA = 1.8 V.
Pin groups are defined in “Pin Groups” on page 13.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
14
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Supply Current Characteristics
3.7
Supply Current Characteristics
Table 7. Supply current characteristics(1)
Characteristic
Supply current in STOPNC mode
Supply current in STOPSC mode
Supply current in RUN mode(2)
1.
2.
Symbol
Condition(s)
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
IDD–SNC
Internal clocks disabled
—
2
—
µA
IDD–SSC
Internal clock in
slow-speed mode
—
15
—
µA
IDD–R
Internal clock in
fast mode
—
3.1
—
mA
All conditions at nominal supply: VDD = VDDA = 1.8 V.
Total current with the analog section active, 16 bits ADC resolution selected, MAC unit used and all peripheral clocks enabled.
3.8
Accelerometer Transducer Mechanical Characteristics
Table 8. Accelerometer characteristics
Characteristic
Symbol
Condition(s)
2g
±1.8
±2
±2.2
AFR
4g
±3.6
±4
±4.4
8g
±7.2
±8
±8.8
2g
—
0.061
—
4g
—
0.122
—
8g
—
0.244
—
–100
—
+100
2g
—
±0.25
—
4g
—
±0.5
—
8g
—
±1
—
Full range
Sensitivity/resolution
ASENS
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
g
mg/LSB
2g
Zero-g level offset accuracy
(Pre-board mount)
OFFPBM
4g
mg
8g
Nonlinearity
Best fit straight line
ANL
% AFR
Sensitivity change vs.temperature
TCSA
2g
—
±0.17
—
%/°C
Zero-g level change vs. temperature(1)
TCOff
—
—
±1.9
—
mg/°C
OFFBM
4g
–100
—
+100
mg
—
—
ODR/2
—
Hz
Zero-g Level offset accuracy
(Post-board mount)
2g
8g
Output data bandwidth
Output noise
BW
Noise
Cross-axis sensitivity
1.
—
2 g, ODR = 488 Hz
—
100
—
µg/sqrt(Hz)
8 g, ODR = 488 Hz
—
120
—
µg/sqrt(Hz)
—
–5
—
5
%
Relative to 25 °C.
3.9
ADC Characteristics
Table 9. ADC characteristics(1)
Characteristic
Symbol
Condition(s)
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Input voltage
VAI
Voltage at AN0 or AN1
0.2
—
1.1
V
Differential input voltage
VADI
AN1 – AN0
–0.9
—
0.9
V
Full-scale range
VFS
—
—
1.8
—
V
Programmable resolution
RES
—
10
14
16
Bits
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
15
ADC Sample Rates
Table 9. ADC characteristics(1) (Continued)
Characteristic
Symbol
Condition(s)
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
tc
—
—
207
—
µs
Integral nonlinearity
INL
Full scale
—
±15
—
LSB
Differential nonlinearity
DNL
—
—
±2
—
LSB
IIA
—
—
—
±2
µA
Conversion time @ 14-bits resolution
(Three-sample frame)
Input leakage
1.
All conditions at nominal supply: VDD = VDDA = 1.8 V and RES = 14, unless otherwise noted.
3.10
ADC Sample Rates
The MMA9555L internal ADC supports the following sample output rates, while the pedometer application uses 30.52 fps as
default:
•
488.28 frames per second (fps)
•
244.14 fps
•
122.07 fps
•
61.04 fps
•
30.52 fps
•
15.26 fps
•
7.63 fps
•
3.81 fps
3.11
AC Electrical Characteristics
Tests are conducted using the input levels specified in Table 4 on page 14. Unless otherwise specified, propagation delays are
measured from the 50-percent to 50-percent point. Rise and fall times are measured between the 10-percent and 90-percent
points, as shown in the following figure.
Low
VIH
Input Signal
High
90%
50%
10%
Midpoint1
VIL
Fall Time
Rise Time
Note: The midpoint is VIL + (VIH – VIL)/2.
Figure 6. Input signal measurement references
The subsequent figure shows the definitions of the following signal states:
• Active state, when a bus or signal is driven and enters a low-impedance state
• Three-stated, when a bus or signal is placed in a high-impedance state
• Data Valid state, when a signal level has reached VOL or VOH
• Data Invalid state, when a signal level is in transition between VOL and VOH
Data1 Valid
Data1 Valid
Data1
Data3 Valid
Data2
Data3
Data
3-stated
Data Invalid State
Data Active
Data Active
Figure 7. Signal states
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
16
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
General Timing Control
3.12
General Timing Control
Table 10. General timing characteristics(1)
Characteristic
VDD rise time
POR release delay
(2)
Warm-up time
Frequency of operation
System clock period
Full/Slow clock ratio
Oscillator frequency absolute accuracy @
25 °C
Oscillator frequency variation over
temperature
(–40 °C to 85 °C vs. ambient)
Minimum RESET assertion duration
1.
2.
3.
Symbol
Condition(s)
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Trvdd
TPOR
10% to 90%
Power-up
—
0.35
—
1
1.5
TWU
From STOPNC
—
7
—
FOPH
FOPL
tCYCH
tCYCL
—
Full Speed Clock
Slow Clock
Full Speed Clock
Slow Clock
—
—
—
—
—
—
8
62.5
125
16
128
—
—
—
—
—
ms
ms
sample
periods
MHz
KHz
ns
μs
—
Full Speed Clock
–5
—
+5
%
—
Slow Clock
–6
—
+6
%
tRA
—
4T(3)
—
—
—
All conditions at nominal supply: VDD = VDDA = 1.8 V
This is the time measured from VDD = VPOR until the internal reset signal is released.
In the formulas, T = 1 system clock cycle. In full speed mode, T is nominally 125 ns. In slow speed mode, T is nominally 16 μs.
3.13
I2C Timing
This device includes a slave I2C module that can be used to control the sensor and can be active 100 percent of the time.
SDA
tf
tLOW
tf
tSU; DAT
tr
tSP
tHD; STA
tr
tBUF
SCL
S
tHD; STA
tHD; DAT
Figure 8.
3.13.1
tSU; STA
tHIGH
I2C
tSU; STO
SR
P
S
standard and fast-mode timing
Slave I2C
Table 11. I2C Speed Ranges
Max Baud
Rate (fSCL)
Min
Bit Time
Min SCL Low
(tLOW)
Min SCL High
(tHIGH)
Min Data setup Time
(tSU; DAT)
Min/Max Data Hold Time
(tHD; DAT)
Standard
100 kHz
10 μs
4.7 μs
4 μs
250 ns
0 μs/3.45 μs(1)
Fast
400 kHz
2.5 μs
1.3 μs
0.6 μs
100 ns
0 μs/0.9 μs(1)
1 MHz
1 μs
500 ns
260 ns
50 ns
0 μs/0.45 μs(1)
2.0 MHz
0.5 μs
200 ns
200 ns
10 ns(2)
0 ns/70 ns (100 pf)(1)
Mode
Fast +
High-speed
supported
1.
2.
The maximum tHD; DAT must be at least a transmission time less than tVD;DAT or tVD;ACK. For details, see the I2C standard.
Timing met with IFE = 0, DS = 1, and SE = 1. Refer to the chapter titled Port Controls in the MMA955xL Intelligent, Motion-Sensing Platform Hardware
Reference Manual (MMA955xLHWRM), listed in “Related Documentation” on page 2.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
17
Slave SPI Timing
3.14
Slave SPI Timing
Table 12. Slave SPI timing
Time
Period
Function
(1)
—
1.
Symbol
Min
Max
Unit
fop
0
FOPH/4
Hz
Operating frequency
1
SCLK period
tSCLK
4
—
tCYCH
2
Enable lead time
tLead
0.5
—
tCYCH
3
Enable lag time
4
Clock (SCLK) high or low time
5
6
7
8
tLag
0.5
—
tCYCH
tWSCLK
200
—
ns
Data-setup time (inputs)
tSU
15
—
ns
Data-hold time (inputs)
tHI
25
—
ns
Access time
ta
—
25
ns
SDO-disable time
tdis
—
25
ns
9
Data valid (after SCLK edge)
tv
—
25
ns
10
Data-hold time (outputs)
tHO
0
—
ns
11
Rise time
Input
Output
tRI
tRO
—
—
25
25
ns
ns
12
Fall time
Input
Output
tFI
tFO
—
—
25
25
ns
ns
Time period from Figure 9.
SS
(INPUT)
1
11
12
3
SCLK
(INPUT)
2
4
4
8
7
SDO
(OUTPUT)
SLAVE
5
SDI
(INPUT)
9
MSB OUT
BIT 6 . . . 1
< 10
10
SLAVE LSB OUT
SEE
NOTE
6
MSB IN
BIT 6 . . . 1
LSB IN
NOTE:
1. Not defined but normally MSB of character just received.
Figure 9. SPI slave timing
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
18
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
4
Communication Interface
4.1
Overview of Communication Interface
All access to the MMA9555L is made via the slave, serial Communication Interface that is part of the hardware and firmware
infrastructure of the platform. The communication occurs in Command/Response (Normal) or Quick Read (Legacy) mode.
Commands are sent from the host and through the slave communications port (either SPI or I2C). The Communication Interface
interprets the command and sends the data to the correct application. The application executes the command and returns with
data, if requested with the command response. It also responds with error codes when appropriate.
The Communications Interface works with the Mailbox application to implement the command and response. The mailboxes’
functionality is configured with two applications: the MBOX Configuration application (APP_ID = 0x18) and the MBOX application
(APP_ID = 0x04).
4.2
Mailbox Interface
Commands are received through a set of 32 mailboxes that are 32 registers arranged consecutively to provide addressable
memory regions. Each mailbox can hold one byte of data.
After a command has completed, the Communication Interface writes the results to the mailboxes and the results (response out)
are retrieved by the host via the SPI or the I2C slave interface.
The following figure shows the structure of the data packet when writing one byte into a specific mailbox.
Device Address = 0x4C
S 1
0
0
1
1
0
Start
R/W
0
0
Data Byte
Destination Mailbox Address
A
A7 A6 A5 A4 A3 A2 A1 A0 A
Acknowledge
Stop
D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0 A
Acknowledge
P
Acknowledge
Figure 10. I2C interface writing one byte of information to a mailbox
If the transaction contains more than one data byte, the internal-destination mailbox address is automatically incremented so that
the incoming byte is placed in the next mailbox. For mailbox addresses greater than 31 bytes or for transactions where the
mailbox address auto-increments past mailbox 31, the destination address wraps back to the start of the mailbox addresses.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
19
Mailbox Usage
4.2.1
Mailbox Timing
Clock
Data
Data
values
S
S
Start
A
Acknowledge
P
Stop
98
00
A
A
00
A
00
A
P
Figure 11. I2C timing diagram
Enable
Clock
MOSI
MISO
MOSI values
80
00
00
MISO values
FF
FF
FF
MISO: SPI Master In , Slave Out
MOSI: SPI Master Out, Slave In
SPI: Serial, Peripheral Interface
Figure 12. SPI timing diagram
4.3
Mailbox Usage
Commands to the MMA9555L consist of a write followed by one or more reads. It may take some time to complete the command
and a flag can be checked to determine if the command has completed. That flag is the Command Complete (COCO) bit, the
seventh bit of the read data in the second mailbox. (See Table 16 on page 23.)
On a read operation, the COCO bit indicates if the command has been processed. The host processor can determine the status
of the command’s processing by repeatedly reading or polling the second mailbox until the COCO bit is set. Alternatively, the
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
20
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Mailbox Usage
MMA9555L can be configured to assert an interrupt signal at the completion of a command. If configured, the INT_O interrupt
will be set immediately after the COCO bit has been set.
For more information, see “Configuring mailbox operational mode” on page 96.
4.3.1
Mailbox Command Format for a Write
Commands written to the MMA9555L are sent in the format shown in the following table. Mailboxes are filled with data, depending
on the target application. All commands start with the APP_ID, the command, the destination offset, and the number of data bytes
to write.
All commands must be written in a single, I2C/SPI transaction starting at Mailbox 0, but the response can be read from any subset
of the mailbox registers.
For a write-request command, the first four mailboxes must be written with enough bytes to hold the requested number of bytes.
The format of the data bytes is specific to the targeted application. (Applications are described in Table 15.)
Table 13. Mailbox commands formats
Offset
7
6
5
4
0x00
0x01
3
2
1
0
Application ID (APP_ID)
0
Command
Byte offset (upper 4 bits)
0x02
Byte offset (lower 8 bits)
0x03
Requested number of bytes to read/write
0x04
Write data 0
0x05
Write data 1
0x06
Write data 2
….
Write data n
The following table gives the details of the different parts of the data packet for a Write command.
Table 14. Mailbox command format details
Block
Application ID
Description
Application targeted for the issued command, see Table 15.
Command to be performed:
Command
Byte offset
•
•
•
•
0: Read application fixed bytes (version information)
1: Read application configuration bytes
2: Write application configuration bytes
3: Read application status or output
Sets the offset of the first byte to be accessed, counting from the start of the register space. This enables
a subset of the registers to be accessed by setting the start location to something other than zero.
Requested number
Number of bytes requested to be read or written.
of bytes
Write data
The data being written.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
21
Mailbox Usage
4.3.2
Application IDs, names, and descriptions
The following table gives the names and IDs of the Freescale applications associated with MMA9555L.
Table 15. Application descriptions
Application ID
Application Name
0x00
Version
0x01
Scheduler
0x02
Reserved
0x03
GPIO-AppMap
Description
Returns a 12-byte pack with the device identifier number and the version
numbers of the ROM, firmware, and hardware.
(For more details, see Chapter 5, “Version Application”.)
Configures the system, applications, and the MMA9555L infrastructure to run
at specific sample rates. Additionally, the identifier reads the number of times
each task has been executed.
Configures the GPIO application to map a specific application output bit to
specific GPIO pins. (For more details, see Chapter 7, “GPIO-AppMap
Application”) The GPIO pins are limited to GPIO6 through 9.
Configures an internal mailbox table to map which output bytes from specific
application identifiers will be accessible in the Normal mode and the Legacy
mode’s Quick-Read registers mailboxes. The application identifier can perform
a table reset to reinstall the default values when the MMA9555L resets.
0x04
Mailbox
0x05
Reserved
0x06
Analog Front End
0x0C–0x0D
Reserved
0x0F
Data FIFO
0x10
Event queue
0x11
Status register
0x12
Wake/Sleep
0x13–0x14
Reserved
0x15
Pedometer
0x16
Reserved
0x17
Reset/suspend/clear
Controls the Reset/Suspend/Clear functions of the MMA9555L.
0x18
Mailbox mode config
Configures different operation modes of the mailbox and provides the status
value of the mailbox when Stream mode is running.
0x19
GPIO Input/Output
0x1B–0x1F
Reserved
0x20–0xFF
Reserved
Configures different parameters of the AFE and reads XYZ data from the
accelerometer. For further details, see Chapter 9, “Analog Front End
Application”.
Configures parameters of the Data-FIFO application and reads the output
bytes from its output structure and the contents of the FIFO buffer.
Configures parameters of the Event-queue application and reads the output
bytes from its output structure and the contents of the Event-queue buffer.
Provides access to the MMA9555L system-status information.
Configures the power-control modes of the accelerometer. The application has
three modes of operation: Run, Doze, and Sleep.
Application that can detect the step count.
Controls GPIO2–GPIO8 as input or output pins.
Indicates an invalid application index.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
22
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Mailbox Usage
4.3.3
Mailbox command format for a read
Though all commands must be written in a single I2C/SPI transaction starting at Mailbox 0, the response can be read from any
subset of the mailbox registers. When the MMA9555L is configured to stream data (as in FIFO mode), the read commands must
be constructed as multiples of 32 bytes in order to trigger the internal transfer of the next set of data to the mailboxes.
A read-request command requires a write to the first four mailboxes.
The format of the information returned from the MMA9555L is shown in Table 16. Similar to the command format, the response
format follows the specific application’s format.
Mailboxes are filled with data depending on the target application.
All responses start with the responding APP_ID, the COCO the ERROR STATUS, the actual data count, and the requested data
count.
The format of the remaining data bytes is specific to the responding application.
Table 16. Mailbox response formats
Mailbox
7
6
5
0x00
0x01
4
3
2
1
0
Application ID (APP_ID)
COCO
Error code
0x02
Actual number of bytes read/written
0x03
Requested number of bytes to read/write
0x04
Read data 0
0x05
Read data 1
0x06
Read data 2
….
Read data n
Table 17 describes the details of the different parts and fields of a response message.
Table 17. Mailbox response format details
Block
Application ID
(APP_ID)
Description
The ID of the application that is responding. (See Table 16 on page 23.)
COCO
Command complete.
This bit must be set to 0b when a command is written and is set to 1b by the MMA9555L platform, when
the command has been processed. The other registers do not contain valid results until this bit is set.
Error code
The seven bytes that store the error code of the command. A zero indicates there was no error. (For more
information, see Table 18.)
Actual number of
bytes
Actual number of bytes read or written.
This block reports back the actual number of bytes that were read or written. It is normally the same as
the requested number of bytes, but it will be reduced if the requested number of bytes plus the Byte Offset
exceeds the number of bytes in the requested block’s data structure.
Requested number
Number of bytes requested to be read or written.
of bytes
Read data
The data that was read.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
23
Mailbox Usage
Table 18 describes the status or error-code results returned in Mailbox 0x01.
Table 18. Error-Status codes returned in Mailbox 0x01
Error Code
Name
0x00
MCI _ERROR_NONE
Command completed with no errors.
0x04
MCI _ERROR_PARAM
Incorrect input parameter.
Error may be due to an incorrect application ID, an incomplete command,
or an incorrect offset.
0x19
MCI _INVALID_COUNT
Returned when the command COUNT is greater than the output structure
size.
0x1C
MCI_ERROR_COMMAND
0x21
0x22
0x23
0x24
Description
Returned any time that the command interpreter does not recognize a
command code.
Returned when the host sends a number of bytes with a wrong payload.
MCI_ERROR_INVALID_LENGTH MMA9555L checks any mismatches between the amount of bytes
received and the actual payload sent by the host.
MCI_ERROR_FIFO_BUSY
FIFO is busy performing a push operation and it is not possible to execute
any other function.
Returned when the host tries to reconfigure the FIFO module. The FIFO
application configuration can only be written once. In order to reconfigure
MCI_ERROR_FIFO_ALLOCATED
the FIFO, the whole device must be reset. This is because the FIFO
application requests RAM and RAM can only be allocated once.
MCI_ERROR_FIFO_OVERSIZE
Returned when the host wants to set a FIFO buffer size out of the memory
boundaries within the MMA9555L device.
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5
Version Application
The MMA9555L device's system-version information is stored in a 12-byte packet and
contains system-identity information including device-hardware ID; the versions of the ROM Application
ID
bootloader, primary firmware, and hardware; and the system-build information.
Table 19 describes the system-version packet and its corresponding mailbox alignment.
Default speed
Always
available.
Byte
Configuration
registers
None.
Status
registers
None.
Table 19. Version command description bytes
Mailbox
number
Description
0x00
4
Device identifier
31:24
5
Device identifier
24:16
6
Device identifier
15:8
7
Device identifier
7:0
8
ROM major version number
7:0
9
ROM minor version number
7:0
10
Firmware major version number
7:0
11
Firmware minor version number
7:0
12
Hardware major version number
7:0
13
Hardware minor version number
7:0
14
Build major version number
7:0
15
Build minor version number
7:0
Table 20 describes the Build Major and Build Minor version-number fields.
Table 20. Version application, Build major and minor bytes
Byte
3
4
Address
0x1FD
0x1FC
Description
Bit fields
Build major version number
• 7–3 Build’s day of the month
Range, 1 to 31
• 2–0 Year of build, from 2010
Range, 0 to 7.
Build minor version number
• 7 — Release
– 1 Engineering version
– 0 Production release
• 6–4 Build number
• 3–0 Month of build
Range, 1 to 12
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
25
Reading the version information
5.1
Reading the version information
To read the MMA9555L's version information, send the following command packets to the mailboxes:
1. MB0: Set APP_ID to 0x00.
2. MB1: Command to 0x00.
Reads version information.
3. MB2: Set offset to zero 0x00.
Starts reading at offset 0.
4. MB3: Set count field to 0x0C.
Reads12 bytes of data.
Bytes to Send: 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x0C.
The expected response to these commands is given in the following example.
NOTE
The current Firmware Build information reflects the framework build and not the pedometer
or directional features of the MMA9555L.
Example 1.
00 80 0C 0C 2F 33 48 B8 01 01 02 02 01 06 03 41
MB0: APP_ID = 0x00
MB1: STATUS = 0x80 Command Complete, no errors
MB2: RequestedData count= 0xC
MB3: Actual Data Count= 0xC
MB4-7: Device ID = 0x2F3348B8
MB8-9: ROM Version = 01.01
MB10-11: Firmware Version = 02.02
MB12-13: Hardware Version = 01.06
MB14-15: Firmware Build = 03.41 (Production #3, 4 Mar 2011)
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
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6
Scheduler Application
A simple task scheduler manages execution of the applications of the MMA9555L. Based
on a run-to-completion scheme, the scheduler features very low cycle and memory
overhead.
The scheduler is tightly coupled with the Analog Front End's sampling rate and is triggered
at the start of every sample interval. The system is designed such that all applications must
complete their processing within the sample interval. The scheduler is used in the defined
applications.
A priority scheme allows short-duration, high-priority tasks, such as data sampling and
filtering, to preempt long-duration, low-priority tasks.
The scheduler scans serially through the list of applications, looking for applications that
have the same priority as the scheduler's current priority. When there is a priority match, an
activity level is checked to determine if the application should be run in the current
scheduler's interval.
Application
ID
0x01
Default speed
(Runs all the
time.)
Configuration
registers
Start on page
29.
Status
registers
Start on page
36.
An application’s activity mask can be set to High, Low, Both, or None. This feature allows an application to run during high activity,
low activity, both, or not at all. The Sleep/Wake application defines the thresholds of activity between Sleep and Wake, or High
and Low activity.
Priorities from 16 to 23 are linked directly to the frame execution rate, see Table 21. The lower-priority levels provide a range of
values for managing applications in the user system.
The scheduler automatically executes all the applications with a priority corresponding to the scheduler's current running priority
level.
Once the scheduler has identified an application to run, it does a context switch to that application. When the application
completes, context is returned to the scheduler and it looks for more applications with the same priority.
For additional information, contact Freescale Sensors Applications Engineering.
6.1
Scheduler application elements
Each MMA9555L application is assigned an application code, a priority and an activity level. The priority and activity level
parameters determine when the scheduler runs the application.
6.1.1
Priority levels
A priority scheme allows short-duration, high-priority applications—such as data sampling and filtering—to preempt longduration, low-priority applications.
The scheduler supports 24 unique priorities, from 0x00 to 0x17 (0 to 23, in decimal). The larger the number, the higher the
priority—higher-numbered applications run before lower-numbered applications. Multiple applications can be assigned the same
priority level.
The priority level for each application is encoded by the lower six bits in the scheduler_parameters registers. See “Scheduler
parameters register” on page 33.
Priorities from 0 to 15 (0x00 to 0x0F) can trigger an application when an interrupt occurs. Priorities 16 to 23 (0x10 to 0x17) are
linked to the Analog Front End (AFE) execution rate. All applications with a priority of 16 to 23 are automatically software-triggered
by the Scheduler.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
27
Scheduler application elements
Table 21. Priorities descriptions
Priority Level
Description
0x17
Applications with this priority run at 488 Hz
0x16
Applications with this priority run at 244 Hz
0x15
Applications with this priority run at 122 Hz
0x14
Applications with this priority run at 61 Hz
0x13
Applications with this priority run at 30 Hz
0x12
Applications with this priority run at 15 Hz
0x11
Applications with this priority run at 7 Hz
0x10
Applications with this priority run at 3 Hz
0x0F
Highest user assignable priority level (lower than 3 Hz)
0x0E
0x0D
0x0C
0x0B
0x0A
0x09
0x08
0x07
User-assignable priority levels
0x06
0x05
0x04
0x03
0x02
0x01
0x00
6.1.2
Lowest user assignable priority level
Activity levels
The MMA9555L uses an activity level attribute to indicate how physically active the device is. The measured physical acceleration
and motion actions of the device are classified into two ranges: high activity and low activity.
The activity level is used with the priority level to determine which applications run first. Applications can be set to run during
these conditions:
•
Always run
•
Run during high activity
•
Run during low activity
•
Never run
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28
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Interrupts
The activity level for each application is encoded in the upper two bits of the scheduler_parameters registers. See “Scheduler
parameters register” on page 33.
The Sleep/Wake application alone determines the activity level, therefore high/low activity is entirely a function of the sleep/wake
threshold parameters. When in run mode, the scheduler only executes applications with the high activity parameter bit set.
Similarly, when in doze mode, the scheduler only executes applications with the low activity parameter bit set. Since these bits
are separate, an application has the option to set both to run regardless of the activity level.
The low activity level parameter is like a filter that skips applications normally run after each AFE sample interval. The idea is that
when the sensor is not moving, such as sitting on your desk, you can save power by not running applications, for example portrait
landscape.
6.2
Interrupts
Interrupts immediately divert execution from any application or the idle state into dedicated interrupt handlers. The scheduler is
not invoked, so the interrupt returns without redirection.
All interrupt handlers disable interrupts, so application ready, communication, and pin interrupts divert execution only from
applications or the idle state.
Interrupts are never nested.
The MMA9555L supports the interrupts listed in the Table 22. Each supported interrupt can be associated with zero or more
priorities. When the interrupt occurs, the scheduler triggers all the applications associated with the priorities configured for that
interrupt.
The priorities for each interrupt are configured in the scheduler configuration parameter structure.
Table 22. Supported interrupts (1)
Name
SFD
1.
Description
Start of Digital Frame interrupt.
This interrupt occurs when the start of frame signal is asserted.
COCO
Conversion-complete interrupt.
This interrupt occurs when the AFE cycle has completed and all ADC conversions are complete and
ready to be used.
IRQ
IRQ pin interrupt.
This interrupt occurs when the selected input pin detects the configured condition (rising edge/high
level or falling edge/low level).
For more information, see the MMA955xL Intelligent, Motion-Sensing Platform Hardware Reference Manual (MMA955xLHWRM), listed in “Related
Documentation” on page 2.
Interrupts are assigned to an application in the Interrupt Assignment registers. See “Interrupt assignment registers” on page 32.
6.3
Scheduler configuration registers
The scheduler has the following three groups of configuration registers:
•
request_to_start register
•
interrupt assignment registers
•
scheduler parameters registers
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
29
Scheduler configuration registers
The configuration and status registers are listed in the following table.
Table 23. Scheduler configuration and status registers
Register type
Configuration
Status
1.
Address
Width (bits)
Register Name
0x00–0x03
32
Request_to_start
0x04–0x07
32
SFD Interrupt_AppIDs
0x08–0x0B
32
AFE COCO Interrupt_AppIDs
0x0C–0x0F
32
IRQ Interrupt_AppIDs
0x10–0x13
32
Reserved
0x14–0x17
32
Reserved
0x18–0x1B
32
Reserved
0x1C–0x1F
32
Reserved
0x20–0x23
32
Reserved
0x24–0x27
32
Reserved
0x28–0x2B
32
Reserved
0x2C
8
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x00
0x2D–0x4A
8 each
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x01 through 0x1E(1)
0x4B
8
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1F
Address
Width (bits)
Register Name
0x00–0x03
32
Timeout Status
Shaded rows indicate the compressed registers.
The request_to_start register is a way to run the applications under scheduler control. The interrupt assignment registers connect
applications to interrupt events. The scheduler parameter registers assign activity levels and priorities to the applications.
In the event that an application does not complete before it is triggered again, the first instance of the application runs to
completion before the second instance starts. If a third trigger occurs before the first instance of the application completes, the
application misses an instance and is marked in the timeout register.
By checking the timeout_status register, the user can determine which priority application was missed. The corresponding bit of
the timeout is set in the timeout_status register.
6.3.1
request_to_start register
An application can be scheduled to run by setting the bit corresponding to the application's APP_ID in the request_to_start
register. The scheduler manages starting applications, depending on priority and activity.
When an application finishes and returns, the scheduler clears the corresponding bit in the request_to_start register.
The request_to_start register enables a user to trigger one or more applications via the slave-port command. When modifying
this register, the user must logically OR the current value with the new value (with a read/modify/write access) to prevent the
erasure of the task waiting to be started.
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Scheduler configuration registers
Table 24. request_to_start register
0x00(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x01
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
request_to_start [31:24]
request_to_start [23:16]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x02
0x03(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
request_to_start [15:8]
request_to_start [7:0]
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
1
0
Table 25. request_to_start description
Field
Description
Indicates which APP_IDs are marked for starting at the beginning of the next scheduler interval. Each bit
corresponds to an APP_ID. It is important that the user do a read/modify/write type of access to ensure that
the contents of the resister are logically ORed with the new value to avoid erasing the request_to_start bit of
31:0
the other APP_IDs that are waiting to start. Setting the bit will mark the APP_ID for starting in the next
request_to_start
scheduler loop.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 0xFFFFFFF.
The host controller may issue a command through the slave communications port to trigger the running of an application. To do
this, the host controller does a read/modify/write to the request_to_start configuration register and sets the appropriate bit
associated with the application that the host wants to start.
Regardless of which mechanism triggers the Scheduler application to start—a hardware interrupt, a slave port command, or an
internal trap interrupt—it always executes the highest-priority applications first. As a result, a slave-port command could trigger
a low-priority application, but some time may occur before that application actually executes.
6.3.2
request_to_start register configuration example
To configure the request_to_start register, send this command, read the register and modify it, and write it back.
Example 2.
1.
2.
3.
4.
MB0: Set the Scheduler application identifier (0x01).
MB1: Set the Command: Read Config application identifier (0x10).
MB2: Set the Offset to Zero field (0x00) to point to the request_to_start configuration register.
MB3: Set the Count field (0x04) to request four bytes.
Bytes to send: 0x01, 0x10, 0x00, 0x04.
5. Read back the mailboxes.
The current value of the request_to_start register is stored in MB4–MB7.
6. Modify the value as needed:
7. MB0: Set the Scheduler application identifier (0x01).
8. MB1: Set the Command: Write Config application identifier (0x20).
9. MB2: Set the Offset to Zero field (0x00) to point to the request_to_start configuration register.
10. MB3: Set the Count field (0x04) to writing four bytes.
11. MB4: Set the DATA value to 0xAA.
12. MB4: Set the DATA value to 0xBB.
13. MB4: Set the DATA value to 0xCC.
14. MB4: Set the DATA value to 0xDD.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
31
Scheduler configuration registers
Bytes to send: 0x01, 0x20, 0x00, 0x04, 0xAA, 0xBB, 0xCC, 0xDD.
6.3.3
Interrupt assignment registers
There are 10 possible interrupts in the MMA955xL platform, among these interrupts three are accessible in MMA9555L from the
host system. Each interrupt is assigned to an application through the user_interrupt parameter registers. When an interrupt
happens, the scheduler handler logically ORs the contents of the user_interrupt register with the request_to_start parameter
register.
The scheduler runs the appropriate application the next time the application’s priority is runable.
The scheduler uses the interrupt vector to determine which application-ready interrupt occurred and sets a bit in the
request_to_start register. In the bit vector, each bit corresponds to a task and the bit position indicates the priority of the
application.
The appropriate interrupt is acknowledged to the hardware, usually by clearing a flag bit in the peripheral’s memory-mapped
status register. In the special case that an AFE, results-ready interrupt occurred, supervisor-only AFE registers are copied into
user-mode shadow registers.
Table 26. user_interrupt registers
0x04(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x05
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
SFD Interrupt_AppIDs [31:24]
SFD Interrupt_AppIDs [23:16]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x06
0x07(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
SFD Interrupt_AppIDs [15:8]
SFD Interrupt_AppIDs [7:0]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x08(MSB)
0x09
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
Field
AFE_COCO Interrupt_AppIDs [31:24
AFE_COCO Interrupt_AppIDs [23:16]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0A
0x0B(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
AFE_COCO Interrupt_AppIDs [15:8]
AFE_COCO Interrupt_AppIDs [7:0]
Reset
0x00
0x00
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
32
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Scheduler configuration registers
Table 26. user_interrupt registers (Continued)
0x0C(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x0D
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
IRQ Interrupt_AppIDs [31:24]
IRQ Interrupt_AppIDs [23:16]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0E
0x0F(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
IRQ Interrupt_AppIDs [15:8]
IRQ Interrupt_AppIDs [7:0]
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
1
0
Table 27. user_interrupt bit descriptions
Field
Description
Bit vector indicating the tasks that start after the interrupt. Each bit corresponds to a task and the bit position
indicates the task’s priority. This 32-bit parameter should match the priority of the task that is executing when
31:0
the interrupt occurs.
Interrupt_AppIDs
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 0xFFFFFF.
6.3.3.1
Interrupt_App_IDs register configuration example
In this example, the user has an external interrupt source that wants to run application APP_ID = 0x19. This requires setting the
0x19 bit position in the IRQ_interrupt_APP_IDs register at offset 0x0C–0x0F.
Example 3.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
MB0: Set the Scheduler application identifier (0x01).
MB1: Set the “Command: Write Config” application identifier (0x20).
MB2: Set the Offset to Zero field (0x0C) to point to the IRQ_interrupt_APP_IDs register.
MB3: Set the Count field (0x04) to write four bytes.
MB4: Set the DATA value to 0x20.
This bit is the 0x19th bit in this 32 bit register.
MB4: Set the DATA value to 0x00.
MB4: Set the DATA value to 0x00.
MB4: Set the DATA value to 0x00.
6.
7.
8.
Command to send for write: 0x01, 0x20, 0x0C, 0x04, 0x20, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00.
6.3.4
Scheduler parameters register
The sched_parms registers structure is shown in Table 28. For more information on the (Activity) and (Priority) bits, see Table 29
on page 34.
Table 28. sched_parms register structure
Bit
Field
7
6
(Activity)
5
4
3
2
1
0
(Priority)
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
33
Scheduler configuration registers
Table 29. sched_parms_APP_ID bit descriptions
Field
Description
Scheduler parameters for each task, this value allows accelerometer activity (motion) to determine whether
a task should run.
High and low activity thresholds are defined with the Sleep/Wake application. (See Chapter 13, “Sleep/Wake
Application”.)
Units: None.
Range of valid values:
7:6
(Activity)
•
•
•
•
0x03: ALWAYS
0x02: ACTIVE
0x01: INACTIVE
0x00: NEVER
// execute application during high and low activity
// execute application only during high activity
// execute application only during low activity
// never execute application
Scheduler parameters for each task, this value determine the priority of the application.
Units: None.
Range of valid values:
5:0
(Priority)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
0x17: TASK488HZ
0x16:TASK244HZ
0x15: TASK122HZ
0x14: TASK61HZ
0x13: TASK30HZ
0x12: TASK15HZ
0x11: TASK7HZ
0x10: TASK3HZ
0x0F: PRIORITY15
0x0E: PRIORITY14
0x0D: PRIORITY13
0x0C: PRIORITY12
0x0B: PRIORITY11
0x0A: PRIORITY10
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
9: PRIORITY9
8: PRIORITY8
7: PRIORITY7
6: PRIORITY6
5: PRIORITY5
4: PRIORITY4
3: PRIORITY3
2: PRIORITY2
1: PRIORITY1
0: PRIORITY0
// task running at 488 Hz
// task running at 244 Hz
// task running at 122 Hz
// task running at 61 Hz
// task running at 30 Hz
// task running at 15 Hz
// task running at 7 Hz
// task running at 3 Hz
The variable data for the sched_parms registers include the register name, offset, and reset. Each of the possible application IDs
(0x00–0x1F) is associated with a scheduler parameter register. The following table shows the APP_IDs and their associated
register offsets and reset values.
Table 30. sched_parms registers’ differentiating values
Register
Resets
Offset
Name
Application
Bits 7:6
Bits 5:0
0x2C
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x00
Version
0x00
0x00
0x2D
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x01
Scheduler
0x00
0x17
0x2E
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x02
Communications
0x03
0xD7
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
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Scheduler configuration registers
Table 30. sched_parms registers’ differentiating values (Continued)
Register
Resets
Offset
Name
Application
Bits 7:6
Bits 5:0
0x2F
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x03
GPIO-AppMap
0x03
0xD7
0x30
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x04
Mailbox
0x03
0x17
0x31
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x05
Reserved
—
—
0x32
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x06
AFE
0x03
0xD7
0x33
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x07
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x34
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x08
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x35
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x09
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x36
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x0A
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x37
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x0B
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x38
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x0C
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x39
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x0D
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x3A
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x0E
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x3B
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x0F
Data FIFO
0x03
0xD7
0x3C
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x10
Event Queue
0x03
0xD7
0x3D
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x11
Status Register
0x03
0xD7
0x3E
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x12
Wake/Sleep
0x03
0xD7
0x3F
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x13
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x40
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x14
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x41
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x15
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x42
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x16
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x43
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x17
Reset/Suspend/Clear
0x03
0xD7
0x44
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x18
Mailbox Configuration
0x00
0x00
0x45
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x19
GPIO Input/Output
0x00
0x00
0x46
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1A
6 Directions Detection
0x00
0x00
0x47
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1B
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x48
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1C
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x49
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1D
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x4A
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1E
Reserved
0x00
0x00
0x4B
sched_parms_APP_ID_0x1F
Reserved
0x00
0x00
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
35
Scheduler status registers
6.4
Scheduler status registers
The scheduler applications contain a set of output or status registers. Status registers can be read by a host processor, through
the I2C/SPI slave-port read-data commands, or by internal applications, through direct reads.
The scheduler status is a 32-bit register that gives the priority levels for applications that have timed out. Applications time out
when their priority level is the one that is currently running and they have been marked with request_to_start. Such an application
has not finished running before it needs to start again.
6.4.1
Timeouts
A timeout condition indicates that the scheduler has been compromised by an application.
Table 31. Scheduler status register
0x00(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x01
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
timeout_status[31:24]
timeout_status[23:16]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x02
0x03(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
timeout_status[16:8]
timeout_status[7:0]
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
1
0
Table 32. sched_parms_APP_ID bit descriptions
Field
Description
31:0
timeout_status
Indicates the priority level of the task that has timed out, one or more times.
The register sets the corresponding priority-level bit when a task is timed out (currently running and being
marked request_to_start). This bit must be monitored to verify that no user task is compromising the
scheduler execution.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 0xFFFFFFFF.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
7
GPIO-AppMap Application
7.1
Overview of GPIO-AppMap application
The GPIO-AppMap application assigns a bit from an application’s status register to a
specific GPIO pin. The configuration registers contain the application ID and the bit number
of the output byte for each GPIO pin.
Application
ID
0x03
Default speed
Configuration
The GPIO-AppMap application connects the MMA955xL platform’s GPIO pins to status bits
registers
in an application’s status registers. The GPIO-AppMap application can control four physical
GPIO pins. Each of the four GPIO pins (GPIO6, 7, 8, and 9) has an associated APP_ID
Status
register and an SR_bit register.
registers
The GPIO-AppMap application also has a general polarity register where the GPIO pins can
be set to be active high or active low. The default or start-up condition of the GPIO pins are
unassigned.
30 Hz.
Start on page
37.
None.
The GPIO pins that can be mapped are described in Table 33.
Table 33. GPIO pin names, numbers and functions
7.2
Name
Pin number
GPIO6
12
GPIO7
13
GPIO8
15
GPIO9
2
GPIO configuration registers
The GPIO-AppMap application’s configurations registers consist of 10 eight-bit registers. This includes two registers for each of
the four GPIO pins and two registers for setting the polarity of the GPIO pin. Each GPIO pin is assigned to an APP_ID and as an
output bit from the assigned application.
The following table gives the bit descriptions for the GPIO-AppMap application’s registers. The application’s registers are shown
in Table 35 through Table 43.
The bit descriptions are given in Table 45 on page 40.
7.2.1
GPIO register tables
Table 34. APP_ID GPIO6 register
0x00
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID GPIO6
Reset
0xFF
2
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
37
GPIO configuration registers
Table 35. SR_bitnum GPIO6 register
0x01
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
SR_bitnum GPIO6
Reset
0x00
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
Table 36. APP_ID GPIO7 register
0x02
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID GPIO7
Reset
0xFF
Table 37. SR_bitnum GPIO7 register
0x03
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
SR_bitnum GPIO7
Reset
0x00
Table 38. APP_ID GPIO8 register
0x04
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID GPIO8
Reset
0xFF
Table 39. SR_bitnum GPIO8 register
0x05
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
SR_bitnum GPIO8
Reset
0x00
Table 40. APP_ID GPIO9 register
0x06
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID GPIO9
Reset
0xFF
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
38
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
GPIO configuration registers
Table 41. SR_bitnum GPIO9 register
0x07
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
SR_bitnum GPIO9
Reset
0x00
2
1
0
2
1
0
Table 42. GPIO_pol MSB register
0x08(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Reserved
GPIO9
GPIO8
Reset
0x00
0
0
1
0
Table 43. GPIO_pol LSB register
0x09(LSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
Field
GPIO7
GPIO6
Reserved
Reset
0
0
0x00
7.2.2
5
4
3
2
GPIO polarity configuration
Table 44. GPIO output, depending on polarity configuration and bit value
Input Bits
Output Bit
GPIO_POLARITY
SR_bit x
VAL GPIO x
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
39
GPIO configuration registers
7.2.3
GPIO application bit descriptions
Table 45. GPIO application bit descriptions
Field
Description
7:0
APP_ID GPIOx
The application identifier (APP_ID) of the application assigned to the GPIO pin. A value of 0xFF indicates
there is no application assigned.
After a reset, no application output bits are mapped to a GPIO.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: [0:31] and 0xFF.
The bit number of the application status registers being assigned to the GPIO pin.
7:0
The bit number depends of the amount of output bytes and the position of the bit in the register.
SR_bitnum GPIOx Units: None.
Range of valid values: [0:255]
GPIO_polx
Reserved
Defines the output polarity of the GPIO pin designated by the n variable in the field name.
This register uses negative logic 0 to configure active high and 1 for active low. Table 34 on page 37
indicates which pin of the register corresponds to each GPIO.
Units: None.
Range of valid values:
0: Output is active high (output bit = high → high on GPIO pin).
1: Output is active low (output bit = high → low on GPIO pin).
Indicates that the bit is reserved.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
40
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
8
8.1
Mailbox Application
Application
ID
Overview of Mailbox application
The Mailbox (MBOX) application gathers output data from other applications and puts that
data into the mailbox registers. This enables users to customize and group up to 28
applications’ specific data bytes for quick reads.
0x04
Default speed
30 Hz.
Configuration
Normally, the host may need to read the status and output data from many applications. This
registers
requires multiple, serial-slave-port transactions. Using the mailbox application enables the
2C or SPI transaction.
host to read all necessary data in one serial, I
Status
The MBOX application provides a shortcut for the user to read different pieces of data from registers
different applications by combining the data for reading in one I2C or SPI read transaction.
Start on page
41.
None.
The MBOX application is different than the hardware mailboxes used by the Communication Interface application. The MBOX
application combines selected data bytes from specific applications and loads them into the Communications Interface
mailboxes.
In order to properly configure the system Communications Interface, the MBOX Configuration and Mailbox applications also must
be properly configured. The MBOX Configuration application controls how the mailboxes behave and the Mailbox application
controls what is placed in the mailboxes.
8.2
Mailbox configuration registers
The Mailbox application’s registers are described in the following table. The registers’ bit descriptions are given in “MBOX bit
descriptions” on page 45.
Each response mailbox (MB4 to MB31) has two associated configuration registers: APP_ID register and Byte_ID register. When
the Mailbox application runs, it copies the data at the Byte_ID from the specified APP_ID and puts that value in the associated
mailbox.
Users can configure mailboxes 4 through 31. Mailboxes 20 through 31 have a special function in Legacy mode. They are updated
automatically in the Legacy/Quick-Read mode.
Table 46. MBOX registers
0x00
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
0x01
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID MBOX_4
Byte_ID MBOX_4
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x02
0x03
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID MBOX_5
Byte_ID MBOX_5
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x04
0x05
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID MBOX_6
Byte_ID MBOX_6
Reset
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
41
Mailbox configuration registers
Table 46. MBOX registers (Continued)
0x06
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
0x07
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID MBOX_7
Byte_ID MBOX_7
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x08
0x09
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID MBOX_8
Byte_ID MBOX_8
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0A
0x0B
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID MBOX_9
Byte_ID MBOX_9
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0C
0x0D
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
Field
APP_ID MBOX_10
Byte_ID MBOX_10
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0E
0x0F
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_11
Byte_ID MBOX_11
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x10
0x11
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_12
Byte_ID MBOX_12
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x12
0x13
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_13
Byte_ID MBOX_13
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x14
0x15
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_14
Byte_ID MBOX_14
Reset
0x00
0x00
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
42
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Mailbox configuration registers
Table 46. MBOX registers (Continued)
0x16
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
0x17
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_15
Byte_ID MBOX_15
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x18
0x19
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_16
Byte_ID MBOX_16
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x1A
0x1B
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_17
Byte_ID MBOX_17
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x1C
0x1D
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_18
Byte_ID MBOX_18
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x1E
0x1F
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_19
Byte_ID MBOX_19
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x20
0x21
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_20
Byte_ID MBOX_20
Reset
0x11 (Defaults to Status Register application)
0x00 (Status application - MSB)
Offset
0x22
0x23
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_21
Byte_ID MBOX_21
Reset
0x11 (Defaults to Status Register application)
0x01 (Status application - LSB)
Offset
0x24
0x25
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_22
Byte_ID MBOX_22
Reset
0x10 (Defaults to Event Queue application)
0x03 (Event Queue Status)
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
43
Mailbox configuration registers
Table 46. MBOX registers (Continued)
0x26
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
0x27
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
APP_ID MBOX_23
Byte_ID MBOX_23
Reset
0x0F (Defaults to Data FIFO application)
0x03 (FIFO status)
Offset
0x28
0x29
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1
0
Field
APP_ID MBOX_24
Byte_ID MBOX_24
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x28 (Analog Front End Frame Counter - MSB)
Offset
0x2A
0x2B
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
APP_ID MBOX_25
Byte_ID MBOX_25
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x29 (Analog Front End Frame Counter - LSB)
Offset
0x2C
0x2D
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
APP_ID MBOX_26
Byte_ID MBOX_26
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x00 Analog Front End Stage 0 - X MSB
Offset
0x2E
0x2F
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
APP_ID MBOX_27
Byte_ID MBOX_27
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x01 (Analog Front End Stage 0 - X LSB)
Offset
0x30
0x31
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
APP_ID MBOX_28
Byte_ID MBOX_28
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x02 (Analog Front End Stage 0 - Y MSB)
Offset
0x32
0x33
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
APP_ID MBOX_29
Byte_ID MBOX_29
Reset
0x04 (Analog Front End Stage 0 - Z MSB)
0x03 (Analog Front End Stage 0 - Y LSB)
Offset
0x34
0x35
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
APP_ID MBOX_30
Byte_ID MBOX_30
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x04 (Analog Front End Stage 0 - Z MSB)
0
0
0
0
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
44
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Mailbox configuration registers
Table 46. MBOX registers (Continued)
0x36
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
0x37
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
APP_ID MBOX_31
Byte_ID MBOX_31
Reset
0x06 (Defaults to Analog Front End application)
0x05 (Analog Front End Stage 0 - Z LSB)
8.2.1
0
MBOX bit descriptions
Table 47. MBOX bit descriptions
Field
Description
7:0
APP_ID MBOX_x
Specifies the application to provide the output byte, using the application identifier.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 1 to 31. Values outside this range or values for a nonexistent application may cause
unexpected system behavior.
7:0
Byte_ID MBOX_x
Indicates the byte number of the application’s status or output registers that are being sent to this mailbox.
The most-significant byte for a specific application’s output is identified as Byte 0 and the least-significant
byte is Byte x.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 255.
8.2.2
Configuring XYZ data
The MBOX application aggregates application data and presents it in the mailboxes.
The AFE application (APP_ID 0x06) provides the XYZ accelerometer data with output registers 0 through 5 containing the
FRONTEND_Stage_0 XYZ data. The following example shows what a host would send to the MMA9555L device to create the
configuration to set up quick-read mailboxes 4–9 to contain the following, FRONTEND_Stage_0_XYZ data:
•
Data X to mailboxes 4 and 5
•
Data Y to mailboxes 6 and 7
•
Data Z to mailboxes 8 and 9
Example 4.
MBOX0 = 0x04
MBOX1 = 0x20
MBOX2 = 0x00
MBOX3 = 0x0C
MBOX4 = 0x06
MBOX5 = 0x00
MBOX6 = 0x06
MBOX7 = 0x01
MBOX8 = 0x06
MBOX9 = 0x02
MBOX10 = 0x06
MBOX11 = 0x03
MBOX12 = 0x06
MBOX13 = 0x04
MBOX14 = 0x06
MBOX15 = 0x05
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
Host communicating to MBOX Application */
CONFIG_W command */
Starting at Offset 0 which is the config for MB4 */
Number of bytes to write 12 bytes */
APP_ID_MBOX4 0x06 - AFE APP_ID = 0x06 */
Byte_ID_MBOX4 Data - X MSB */
APP_ID_MBOX5 */
Byte_ID_MBOX5 Data - X LSB */
APP_ID_MBOX6 */
Byte_ID_MBOX6 Data - Y MSB */
APP_ID_MBOX7 */
Byte_ID_MBOX7 Data - Y LSB */
APP_ID_MBOX8 */
Byte_ID_MBOX8 Data - Z MSB */
APP_ID_MBOX9 */
Byte_ID_MBOX9 Data Z - LSB */
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
45
Mailbox status registers
8.3
Mailbox status registers
There are no status registers for this application.
8.4
Reading aggregated data (Legacy mode—Quick read)
Once the MBOX application is configured and the device is set to Legacy communication mode, the aggregated data can be read.
Assuming that the MBOX application was set up as shown in Section 8.2.2, “Configuring XYZ data”, the X, Y, and Z acceleration
data output will be available in mailboxes 4 through 9, through the normal command/response Communications Interface.
If the host needs to just read the data without the finer control of the command/response model, the MMA9555L can be put into
Legacy mode. This assigns the desired data to registers in the Quick-Read section of the Mailbox registers (MB20–MB31).
In Legacy mode, the lower mailbox registers continue to operate in the command/response mode and the upper registers operate
in the Quick-Read mode. The data in the Quick-Read registers is automatically updated, so a read-request command is not
required before reading the data form the upper mailboxes.
The following examples show how to wake up the device, configure it for quick-reading the low-passed-filtered XYZ data, enable
the Legacy mode, and read the data.
The MMA9555L platform comes out of reset in the Low-Power or Sleep mode. In order to start the AFE application and start
collecting samples, the MMA9555L must be brought out of Sleep mode and into Run mode
This example shows how to disable Sleep mode and enable Wake mode.
Example 5.
MBOX0
MBOX1
MBOX2
MBOX3
MBOX4
=
=
=
=
=
0x12
0x20
0x06
0x01
0x00
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
Host communicating to Sleep/Wake Application */
CONFIG_Write command */
Starting at Offset 0x6 */
Number of bytes to write 1 byte */
Write 0x00 which wakes up the device */
Bytes to Send: 0x12, 0x20, 0x06, 0x01, 0x00
The AFE application (APP_ID 0x06) provides the XYZ accelerometer data with output registers 0 through 5 containing the
FRONTEND_Stage_0 XYZ data. By default, the Quick-Read registers (MB26–MB31) are assigned 0x00 Analog Front End Stage
0 - X MSB.
The AFE application, however, provides XYZ, low-pass-filtered data in registers 0x18 through 0x1D
(FRONTEND_488_100_LPF). To quickly read this data, the Quick-Read mailbox registers would have to be configured so that
they are populated with the low-passed-filtered, XYZ data.
The following example shows how a host would direct the MMA9555L device to set up quick-read mailboxes to contain the
following, FRONTEND_488_100_LPG XYZ data:
•
Data X to mailboxes 26 and 27
•
Data Y to mailboxes 28 and 29
•
Data Z to mailboxes 30 and 31
Example 6.
MBOX0 = 0x04 /* Host communicating to MBOX Application */
MBOX1 = 0x20 /* CONFIG_W command */
MBOX2 = 0x2C /* Starting at Offset 0x2C, the configuration starting point for MB26 */
MBOX3 = 0x0C /* Number of bytes to write 12 bytes */
MBOX4 = 0x06 /* APP_ID_MBOX26 = 0x06 - AFE APP_ID = 0x06 */
MBOX5 = 0x18 /* Byte_ID_MBOX26 = 0x18 - LPF Data starts at register 0x18 - X MSB */
MBOX6 = 0x06 /* APP_ID_MBOX27 */
MBOX7 = 0x19 /* Byte_ID_MBOX27 Data - X LSB */
MBOX8 = 0x06 /* APP_ID_MBOX28 */
MBOX9 = 0x1A /* Byte_ID_MBOX28 Data - Y MSB */
MBOX10 = 0x06 /* APP_ID_MBOX29 */
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
46
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Reading aggregated data (Legacy mode—Quick read)
MBOX11
MBOX12
MBOX13
MBOX14
MBOX15
=
=
=
=
=
0x1B
0x06
0x1C
0x06
0x1D
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
Byte_ID_MBOX29 Data - Y LSB */
APP_ID_MBOX30 */
Byte_ID_MBOX30 Data - Z MSB */
APP_ID_MBOX31 */
Byte_ID_MBOX31 Data Z - LSB */
Bytes to send: 0x04, 0x20, 0x2C, 0x0C, 0x06, 0x18, 0x06, 0x19, 0x06, 0x1A, 0x06, 0x1B, 0x06, 0x1C, 0x06, 0x1D.
The host then must configure the Mailbox application to operate in Legacy mode, as shown in the following example.
Example 7.
1. MB0 = 0x18.
Sets the “APP_ID: Mailbox Mode Config” application identifier (0x18).
2. MB1 = 0x20.
Sets the “Command: Write Config” (0x20).
3. MB2 = 0x00.
Sets the Offset to Zero field (0x00) to point to the configuration register.
4. MB3 = 0x01.
Sets the Count field to 0x01 because only one data byte needs to be sent.
5. MB4 = 0x10.
Sets the DATA value to 0x10, which sets the LEGACY field to 1b or Legacy mode.
Bytes to send: 0x18, 0x20, 0x00, 0x01, 0x10.
The MMA9555L platform now is set to Legacy mode and the Quick-Read registers are being constantly updated with the lowpass-filtered, AFE data.
All that remains is the issuing of a command to read the six bytes starting at MB26, which contains the XYZ data in constant-read
mode.
In the following example, “0x__ ” represents the data that is sent back to the host.
Example 8.
MBOX0
MBOX1
MBOX2
MBOX3
MBOX4
MBOX5
MBOX6
MBOX7
MBOX8
MBOX9
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
0x04
0x30
0x1A
0x06
0x__
0x__
0x__
0x__
0x__
0x__
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
/*
Host communicating to MBOX Application */
Read Output Data command */
Starting at Offset 0x1A, the hexadecimal offset for mailbox 26 */
Number of bytes to read 6 bytes two bytes each for X, Y, andZ*/
MSB - X */
LSB - X */
MSB - Y */
LSB - Y */
MSB - Z */
LSB - Z*/
Bytes to send: 0x04, 0x30, 0x1A, 0x06, 0x__ , 0x__ , 0x__ , 0x__ , 0x__ , 0x__ .
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
47
9
Analog Front End Application
9.1
Application
ID
Overview of Analog Front End application
0x06
The Analog Front End application (AFE) samples raw accelerometer data from the analogto-digital converter (ADC) at the execution rate of the application, applies factory and user Default speed
trim-correction terms, and filters data to several configurable bandwidths.
Configuration
For the proper operation of the Pedometer, it is recommended that any change to any of the
registers
configuration registers of the AFE Application be avoided unless the outcome is well
understood.
Status
registers
30 Hz.
Start on page
52.
Start on page
56.
Outputs
Analog Front End
Raw
488/100 Hz
Sample rate
4
ADC data
3
Offset
correction
Scale
correction
Anti-aliasing
filter
Normalized
488/100 Hz
Normalize
1:2
Anti-aliasing
filter
ABS
Absolute value
488/100 Hz
Configurable,
low-pass filter
Normalized
488 Hz/Low-pass filter
Configurable,
high-pass filter
Normalized
488 Hz/High-pass filter
Temperature output
Configurable, low-pass
filter
Normalized
244/50 Hz
External input
conversion
Temperature
External
Figure 13. Front-end signal processing
9.1.1
Sample rate
The rate at which the ADC samples the accelerometer data is defined by the sfd_rate register, which is offset 0x0C in the
configuration registers of this application. The sample rate can be changed from 488 Hz to 3.81 Hz by setting the appropriate
value in the sfd_rate register. For more details, see Table 59 and Table 60 on page 55.
NOTE
Although the sample rate can be changed in the hardware, it is recommended that the 30 Hz
sample rate not be changed, because the Pedometer application requires 30 Hz and the
MMA9555L runs at 30 Hz after MMA9555L startup.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
48
Overview of Analog Front End application
9.1.2
Offset and scale correction
The AFE’s offset and scale correction stages of the signal chain applies trim offset and scaling correction factors which were
measured at factory calibration and stored inside each device. Since user offsets are defined at 8-g resolution, those offsets are
shifted according to the g mode.
User offsets are used to calibrate and compensate for the physical mounting of the part inside the final product. After board mount
and assembly, the final test process may include a test to fine tune and compensate the accelerometer orientation.
9.1.3
Anti-aliasing filter
After trim correction, the front end uses a sixth-order Chebyshev filter, running up to 488 Hz, to limit the signal bandwidth to
100 Hz.
Figure 14. Frequency response of Analog Front End anti-aliasing filter
The bandwidth of the anti-aliasing filter depends on the sample rate at which the front end application is running. The following
table shows the variation of the filter bandwidth according to the sample rate.
Table 48. Anti-aliasing filter bandwidth for different sample rates
Stage-0 anti-aliasing Filter
Stage-1 anti-aliasing Filter
Bandwidth (Hz)
Bandwidth (Hz)
488.28
100
50
244.17
50
25
122.07
25
12.5
61.04
12.5
6.25
31.52
6.25
3.125
15.26
3.125
1.562
7.63
1.562
0.781
3.81
0.781
0.390
Sample rate
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
49
Overview of Analog Front End application
9.1.4
Raw data
The output of the sensor is a 16-bit, signed value. The sensor always uses all the bits for high accuracy. Depending on the range
setting (2-, 4-, or 8-g mode), the output value per g changes.
The following table shows the full scale value at the different g ranges, as well as the value of a measured 1-g acceleration at the
different g ranges.
Table 49.Raw accelerometer output, according to g mode
9.1.5
Range
Full scale
One-g acceleration
+2g
+ 32 K
16 K
+4g
+ 32 K
8K
+8g
+ 32 K
4K
Normalization
The filtered data is shifted according to the g mode to normalize the resolution to the 8-g range. The normalized data allows for
common handling of the data in the other applications. Data is normalized so that 1-g force acceleration shows output of 0x1000
counts or 4096 decimal counts.
9.1.6
Down-sampling and stage-1, anti-aliasing filter
The output of the normalizer is down-sampled by two to generate data sampled at half of the original sample rate. At 488 Hz, the
previous, sixth-order Chebyshev filter is applied to down-sampled (244 Hz) data, to create a 50-Hz bandwidth data stream.
Table 60 on page 55 provides more details about the varying of the bandwidth, depending of the sample rate of the front-end
application.
9.1.7
Absolute value
The absolute value of the sensor output is computed.
9.1.8
Configurable, low-pass and high-pass filters
First-order, low-pass and high-pass filters—with separate configurable cutoff frequencies at –3 dB—are provided.
Eqn. 1
Eqn. 2
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
50
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Overview of Analog Front End application
Figure 15. Frequency response of configurable, high- and low-pass filters
The two following tables contain the cutoff frequency of the filters, varying with the value of K and the sample rate at which the
front-end application is executed.
Table 50. Cut-off frequency as a function of K and the sample rate for low-pass filter
LPF cut-off frequency (Hz)
K
Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate
= 488.28
= 244.14
= 122.07
= 61.04
= 30.52
= 15.26
= 7.63
= 3.81
1
56.13
28.07
14.03
7.02
3.51
1.75
0.88
0.4385
2
22.50
11.25
5.62
2.81
1.40
0.70
0.3516
0.1758
3
10.39
5.19
2.60
1.30
0.65
0.32
0.1623
0.0811
4
5.014
2.51
1.25
0.63
0.31
0.16
0.0783
0.0392
5
2.47
1.23
0.62
0.31
0.15
0.08
0.0385
0.0193
6
1.22
0.6116
0.31
0.15
0.08
0.04
0.0191
0.0096
7
0.61
0.30
0.15
0.08
0.04
0.02
0.0095
0.0048
8
0.30
0.15
0.08
0.04
0.02
0.01
0.0048
0.0024
9
0.15
0.076
0.04
0.02
0.01
0.0047
0.0024
0.0012
10
0.0759
0.038
0.019
0.0095
0.0047
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
11
0.0379
0.019
0.0095
0.0047
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
12
0.019
0.0095
0.0048
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0001
13
0.0095
0.0048
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0001
0.00007
14
0.0047
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0001
0.0007
0.00004
15
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0002
0.00008
0.00004
0.00002
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
51
AFE configuration registers
Table 51. Cut-off frequency as a function of K and the sample rate for high-pass filter
HPF cut-off frequency (Hz)
K
Sample rate = Sample rate = Sample rate = Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate Sample rate =
488.28
244.14
122.07
= 61.04
= 30.52
= 15.26
= 7.63
3.81
1
31.932
15.966
7.9831
3.9915
1.9958
0.9979
0.4989
0.2495
2
17.405
8.7023
4.3511
2.1756
1.0878
0.5439
0.2719
0.136
3
9.1573
4.5787
2.2893
1.1447
0.5723
0.2862
0.1431
0.0715
4
4.7092
2.3546
1.1773
0.5887
0.2943
0.1472
0.0736
0.0368
5
2.3912
1.1956
0.5978
0.2989
0.1495
0.0747
0.0374
0.0187
6
1.2054
0.6027
0.3014
0.1507
0.0753
0.0377
0.0188
0.0094
7
0.6051
0.3026
0.1513
0.0756
0.0378
0.0189
0.0095
0.0047
8
0.3026
0.1513
0.0757
0.0378
0.0189
0.0095
0.0047
0.0024
9
0.1513
0.0757
0.0378
0.0189
0.0095
0.0047
0.0024
0.0012
10
0.0756
0.0378
0.0189
0.0095
0.0047
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
11
0.039
0.0195
0.0098
0.0049
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
12
0.0195
0.0098
0.0049
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0002
13
0.0098
0.0049
0.0025
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0002
8E–05
14
0.0049
0.0025
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0002
8E–05
4E–05
15
0.0024
0.0012
0.0006
0.0003
0.0002
8E–05
4E–05
2E–05
9.2
9.2.1
AFE configuration registers
afe_csr
Table 52. afe_csr registers
0x00(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
0x01(LSB)
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
FS
Ext
ADC
Temp
CM
Reserved
Reserved
Reset
0x00
0
0
0x00
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
52
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
AFE configuration registers
Table 53. afe_csr bit descriptions
Field
Description
7:6
FS
Full-scale selection. AFE_CSR[FS] and AFE_BIAS[SC_AAF_EN] are combined to control AFE gain and
trim mode.
Units: None.
Range of values:
Full-scale data range
XYZ acceleration scaling (mg/LSB)
00:
±8 g
0.244
01:
±2 g
0.061
10:
±4 g
0.122
11:
±8 g
0.244
Specifies whether an external input will or will not be measured during the next analog acquisition phase.
Note: The ExtADC and Temp bits must not be set at the same time.
Units: None.
5
Ext ADC
• 0: No external input is measured during the next analog acquisition phase.
• 1: Enables the four AFE channels to measure the external analog input during the next analog acquisition phase.
Specifies whether the temperature sensor output will or will not be measured during the next analog
acquisition phase.
Note: The ExtADC and Temp bits must not be set at the same time.
Units: None.
Temperature will change slowly so it can be measured with a very low sample rate (1 Hz or less) by
occasionally replacing an external ADC measurement with the Temperature ADC measurement.
Range of valid values: For valid values for FS and CM parameters, see the Intelligent, Motion-Sensing
Platform Hardware Reference Manual (MMA955xLHWRM), listed in “Related Documentation” on page 2
Accelerometer Reference Manual (MMA955xLRM).
4
Temp
• 0: No temperature sensor output will be measured during the next analog acquisition phase.
• 1: The temperature sensor output will be measured during the next analog acquisition phase.
Conversion Mode. Controls the ADC resolution/accuracy versus power and conversion time trade-offs.
Units: None
3:2
CM
•
•
•
•
Reserved
9.2.2
00: Conversion complete in 32 cycles
01: Conversion complete in 16 cycle
10: Conversion complete in eight cycles
11: Conversion complete in four cycles
Bit field reserved.
user_offset [XYZ]
Often, during the mounting process, the accelerometer sensor is not mounted perfectly flat to the board and might also be rotated
slightly. This register enables a user to make an after-manufacturing calibration correction.
Table 54. user_offset [XYZ] registers
0x02(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x03(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
user_offset[X]
user_offset[X][
Reset
0xFF
0xFF
Offset
0x04(MSB)
0x05(LSB)
Bit
7
6
Field
5
4
3
user_offset[Y]
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
2
1
0
user_offset[Y]
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
53
AFE configuration registers
Table 54. user_offset [XYZ] registers (Continued)
Reset
0xFF
0xFF
Offset
0x06(MSB)
0x07(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
user_offset[Z]
user_offset[Z]
Reset
0xFF
0xFF
2
1
0
Table 55. user_offset [XYZ] bit descriptions
Field
Description
7:0
user_offset[XYZ]
Sets user offsets in the X, Y, and Z axes for the accelerometer, depending on the position on the device in
the user board. These values are considered as post-mount offsets.
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB.
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
Reset value: 0xFF which is interpreted as –1.
9.2.3
config_k
This register’s bits are shown in the following table.
Table 56. config_k registers
0x08
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
0x09
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
config_k[HIGHPASS]
config_k[LOWPASS]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0A
0x0B
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
config_k[TEMP_LPF]
config_k[EIC_LPF]
Reset
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
1
0
Table 57. config_k bit descriptions
Field
Description
7:0
config_k[HIGHPASS]
High-pass filter configurable cutoff.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 15.
7:0
config_k[LOWPASS]
Low-pass filter configurable cutoff.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 15.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
54
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
AFE configuration registers
Table 57. config_k bit descriptions
Field
Description
Low-pass filter, configurable cutoff for temperature sensor output.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 15.
7:0
config_k[TEMP_LPF]
Low-pass filter, configurable cutoff for external input conversion output.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 15.
7:0
config_k[EIC_LPF]
9.2.4
sfd_rate
This register’s bits are shown in the following table. The system defaults to 30 Hz; therefore, this document assumes that 30 Hz
is the rate being run. If the user slows down the rate by changing the sfd_rate register, all references to the system frame rate
scale accordingly.
Table 58. sfd_rate register
0x0C
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
2
1
0
0
1
1
1
sfd_rate
Field
Reset
3
0
0
0
0
Table 59. sfd_rate bit description
Field
7:0
sfd_rate
Description
Defines the system frame interval, the time period for each sample or the system sample rate in Hz.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 7 to 14. Table 60 shows the relation between the register value and the interval
between each frame.
Table 60. Frame interval, according to the sfd_rate value
sfd_rate value
Time frame (s)
Max frames per second
7
2.05E–3
488.28
8
4.10E–3
244.17
9
8.19E–3
122.07
10
1.64E–2
61.04
11
3.28E–2
30.52
12
6.55E–2
15.26
13
1.31E–1
7.63
14
2.62E–1
3.81
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
55
AFE status registers
9.3
AFE status registers
9.3.1
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][XYZ]
These registers’ bits are shown in the following table.
Table 61. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][XYZ] registers
0x00(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x01(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][X]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][X]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x02(MSB)
0x03(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][Y]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][Y]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x04(MSB)
0x05(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][Z]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][Z]
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
1
0
1
0
Table 62. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][XYZ] bit description
Field
Description
Normalized accelerometer data sampled at the default rate with complete bandwidth.
7:0
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB.
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0][XYZ]
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
9.3.2
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][XYZ]
These registers’ bits are shown in the following table.
Table 63. output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][XYZ] registers
0x06(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x07(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][X]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][X]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x08(MSB)
0x09(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][Y]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][Y]
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
56
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
AFE status registers
Table 63. output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][XYZ] registers (Continued)
0x0A(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x0B(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][Z]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][Z]
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
1
0
Table 64. output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][XYZ] bit description
Field
Description
Normalized accelerometer data sampled at the default rate of half bandwidth.
7:0
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB.
output[FRONTEND_Stage_1][XYZ]
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
9.3.3
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][XYZ]
These registers’ bits are shown in the following table.
Table 65. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][XYZ] registers
0x0C(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x0D(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][X]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][X]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x0E(MSB)
0x0F(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][Y]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][Y]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x10(MSB)
0x11(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][Z]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][Z]
Reset
0x00
0x00
0
0
Table 66. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][XYZ] bit description
Field
Description
7:0
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_ABS][XYZ]
Absolute value normalized accelerometer data sampled at the default rate of
complete bandwidth.
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB.
Range of valid values: 0 to 32,767.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
57
AFE status registers
9.3.4
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][XYZ]
These registers’ bits are shown in the following table.
Table 67. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][XYZ] registers
0x12(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x13(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][X]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][X]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x14(MSB)
0x15(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][Y]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][Y]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x16(MSB)
0x17(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][Z]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][Z]
Reset
0x00
0x00
0
0
0
Table 68. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][XYZ] bit description
Field
Description
Raw accelerometer data sampled at the default rate with complete bandwidth. The
resolution depends on the g-mode setting configured by afe_csr[fs].
Units:
• ±2 g mode: 0.061 mg/LSB
• ±4 g mode: –0.122 mg/LSB
7:0
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_GM][XYZ] • ±8 g mode: 0.244 mg/LSB
Range of valid values:
• ±2 g mode: 0.061 mg/LSB = –32768 to 32767
• ±4 g mode: 0.122 mg/LSB = –8192 to 8192
• ±8 g mode: 0.244 mg/LSB = –4096 to 4096
9.3.5
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][XYZ]
These registers’ bits are shown in the following table.
Table 69. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][XYZ] registers
0x18(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x19(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][X]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][X]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x1A(MSB)
0x1B(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][Y]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][Y]
Reset
0x00
0x00
0
0
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AFE status registers
Table 69. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][XYZ] registers (Continued)
0x1C(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x1D(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][Z]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][Z]
Reset
0x00
0x00
0
Table 70. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][XYZ] bit description
Field
Description
7:0
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_LPF][XYZ]
9.3.6
Normalized accelerometer data sampled at the default rate, with configurable,
low-pass filter cutoff.
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB.
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][XYZ]
These registers’ bits are shown in the following table.
Table 71. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][XYZ] registers
0x1E(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x1F(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][X]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][X]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x20(MSB)
0x21LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][Y]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][Y]
Reset
0x00
0x00
Offset
0x22(MSB)
0x23(LSB)
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Field
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][Z]
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][Z]
Reset
0x00
0x00
0
0
0
Table 72. output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][XYZ] bit description
Field
Description
7:0
output[FRONTEND_Stage_0_HPF][XYZ]
Normalized accelerometer data sampled at the default rate, with configurable,
high-pass filter cutoff.
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB.
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
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59
AFE status registers
9.3.7
output_temp
This register’s bits are shown in the following table.
Table 73. output_temp registers
0x24(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
0x25(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
output_temp
output_temp
Reset
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
Table 74. output_temp bit description
Field
Description
7:0
output_temp
Temperature sensor output measurement.
Units: ADC counts.
output_temp(in count) = –51.4T + 1146, where T is temperature in °C
Note that this is only a typical characteristic example. User shall perform minimal calibration to adjust
at least the offset.
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
9.3.8
output_EIC
This register’s bits are shown in the following table.
Table 75. output_EIC registers
0x26(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
0x27(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
output_EIC
output_EIC
Reset
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
Table 76. output_EIC bit description
Field
7:0
output_EIC
Description
Output of the external, analog-input conversion value.
Units: ADC counts.
output_EIC(in count) = 29570 (AN0–AN1) – 122, where AN0–AN1 is in V.
Note that this equation is only a typical example, with ADC conversion in 16-bit mode.
Range of valid values: –32,768 to 32,767.
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AFE status registers
9.3.9
frame_counter
This register’s bits are shown in the following table.
Table 77. frame_counter registers
0x28(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
0x29(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
frame_counter
frame_counter
Reset
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
Table 78. output_EIC bit description
Field
7:0
frame_counter
Description
Provides the number of frames processed at the configured sample rate. It is not a real-time
representation because the time that the device remains in the stop mode is not taken into account.
The frame counter will restart at zero when it reaches 65,535.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 65,535.
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61
10 Data FIFO Application
10.1
Overview of Data FIFO application
The Data FIFO (First In First Out) application is a buffer intended to store the output data
from an application. Every scheduler interval, the Data FIFO application gathers the output
data from an application and stores it until the host processor reads the data.
Application
ID
Default speed
Configuration
The FIFO application uses the mailboxes differently than other applications—operating in
registers
the streaming mode. In streaming mode, the host continues reading data until a maximum
of up to 255 bytes is read per host request. The host must read all the data that it requested.
Status
The FIFO can be connected to one application and can collect packets of data in different registers
sizes (one, two, four, or six bytes).
0x0F
30 Hz.
Start on page
67.
Start on page
69.
The Data FIFO has two different modes of operation: Stop on Overflow and Free Run.
The application’s status register displays current status values such as overflow condition, watermark reached, and buffer empty.
These conditions have a flag that is asserted individually each time one of these conditions occurs.
The user can configure the FIFO buffer size by writing to the fifo_size word within the configuration registers. The buffer size can
be configured only once and is limited by the amount of RAM available. The amount of available RAM can be impacted by the
Event Queue Application which also can be configured to use large amounts of RAM.
NOTE
Before configuring the Data FIFO application, it is recommended that the Data FIFO
Application be suspended. After the parameter is configured, remove the application from
suspend. A suspend is done with the Reset/Suspend/Clear Application (APP_ID 0x17).
10.2
Modes of operation
This section examines the modes of operation of the FIFO buffer.
10.2.1
Stop-on-overflow
The FIFO stores data from an application, every single frame (a scheduler interval), as long as the FIFO is enabled. In this mode,
the FIFO stores data until an overflow condition is reached. At an overflow condition, the overflow flag is set.
The host asynchronously reads payload packets from the Data FIFO application. Reading payload packets frees up slots for new
entries into the FIFO. If the host reads data faster than the applications put data into the FIFO, the overflow condition will never
happen.
The overflow condition occurs when the available buffer memory is full and there is no space available for another packet.
10.2.2
Free-run
The FIFO behaves as a circular buffer that stores data from the configured channel, every single frame, as long as the FIFO is
enabled. In this mode, the FIFO never stops storing data, even though the overflow condition is reached and the overflow flag is
set.
When the FIFO becomes full, the oldest data in the buffer will be overwritten first.
10.3
Reading process
To read the data FIFO, the host sends a read-data command to the MMA9555L device that calls the Data FIFO application, stores
the requested data within the FIFO into a buffer, and returns the number of bytes read. The data FIFO does not tag each entry
with a timestamp, only storing a timestamp for the last entry.
When the reading process is performed, the Data FIFO application calculates the timestamp for the first group of requested data
and appends the timestamp to the data. If the host requests N bytes and that is bigger than the entry size, the pop routine will
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Reading process
append the timestamp only for the first entry that fits in the N bytes requested. The host must calculate the timestamps for the
extra entries requested within the N bytes.
The host can request to read up to 255 bytes at a time. Assuming the AFE is providing data, this is exactly 36 packets of AFE data.
Each host, FIFO-read transaction includes a status byte and a timestamp word. These three bytes are prefixed to the payload
data.
Payload data is prefixed with the APP_ID of the application that has provided the data. In the AFE case, the APP_ID is 0x06.
(255 – 3 (status and timestamp) ) / 7 (APP_ID + 6 byte XYZ data) = 36
Reading the FIFO example
The device powers up in Sleep mode, but it may become necessary to wake the MMA9555L device.
Waking the device uses the following mailboxes:
MB0: 0x12, App_ID = 0x12; Power Controller modes
MB1: 0x20, Command 0x20 = Write configuration; Offset = 0
MB2: 0x06, Offset = 0x06
MB3: 0x01, Count of data to write
MB4: 0x00, Actual Data Value; Clears sleep bit
Bytes to Send: 0x12, 0x20, 0x06, 0x01, 0x00.
Example 9.
To configure for FIFO operation, write the following transaction to the Data-FIFO application:
1. MB0: Set APP_ID to (0x0F).
Selects the Data-FIFO application.
2. MB1: Command to (0x20).
Command is a Write Configuration space.
3. MB2: Set offset to zero (0x00).
Start writing configuration values at register 0.
4. MB3: Set count field to (0x0A).
Sends nine bytes.
5. MB4: Send Data (0x0C).
Sends six bytes, free-run mode.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
MB5: Send Data (0x00).
MB6: Send Data (0x00).
MB7: Send Data (0x00).
MB8: Send Data (0x00).
MB6: Send Data (0x3C).
Reserves 60 bytes—10 packets of six bytes each.
11. MB7: Send Data (0x06).
Associates APP ID = AFE – .
12. MB5: Send Data (0x00).
13. MB6: Send Data (0x00).
14. MB7: Send Data (0x00).
Bytes to Send: 0x0F, 0x20, 0x00, 0x0A, 0x0C, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x3C, 0x06, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00.
The configuration registers can only be written once. To reconfigure the FIFO, the device first must be reset.
Read the FIFO applications status register to get the data.
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Reading process
Send the following command to set up for reading the status register.
Example 10.
1. MB0: Set APP_ID to (0x0F).
Selects the Data-FIFO application.
2. MB1: Command to (0x30).
Sends a Read Status space command.
3. MB2: Set offset to zero (0x03).
Starts reading the configuration values from register 0x03.
4. MB3: Set count field to (0x0A).
Reads 10 bytes (three status bytes, one APP_ID, and six bytes of data).
Bytes to Send: 0x0F, 0x30, 0x03, 0x0A.
This results in the following response.
0F 80 0A 0A 05 83 13 06 00 81 FF EA 11 0C
The last six bytes are the AFE data: X, Y, and Z.
This response was with the device flat, in the Face-Up orientation. The X and Y data are close to 0x0000, or 0 g, and the Z data
is close to 0x1000, or 1 g.
MB0: APP_ID = 0x0F; FIFO application
MB1: STATUS = 0x80; Command Complete, no errors
MB2: RequestedData count = 0x0A; 10 bytes of data
MB3: Actual Data Count = 0x0A; 10 bytes of data
MB4: 0x05 = FIFO Status; Watermark and Overflow flag is set
MB5–MB6: = 0x8313; Timestamp
MB7: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x06; AFE application
MB8–MB9: AFE X data; 0x0081
MB10–MB11: AFE Y data; 0xFFEA
MB12–MB13: AFE Z Data; 0x110C
The read size for one (1+6 byte) payload is 10 bytes. The size for two payloads is 17 bytes, 3 = 24 bytes.
Reading three payloads
Send the following command to set up for reading the status register.
Example 11.
1. MB0: Set APP_ID to (0x0F).
Selects the Low-g application.
2. MB1: Command to (0x30)
Sends a Write Configuration space command.
3. MB2: Set offset to zero (0x03).
Starts writing configuration values at register 0.
4. MB3: Set count field to (0x18)
Reads 24 bytes (3 status byes + 3x(APP_ID+6 data)).
Bytes to Send: 0x0F, 0x30, 0x03, 0x18.
The response is below:
0F 80 18 18 05 33 53 06 00 93 00 7F 11 06 06 00 A2 00 7D 11 08 06 00 9C 00 79 11 07
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Reading process
The last six bytes are the AFE data, X, Y, and Z.
This response was with the device flat, in the Face-Up orientation. The X and Y data are close to 0x0000—or 0-g—and the Z
data is close to 0x1000—or 1-g.
MB0: APP_ID = 0x0F; FIFO application
MB1: STATUS = 0x80; Command Complete, no errors
MB2: Requested data count = 0x18; 24 bytes of data
MB3: Actual Data Count = 0x18; 24 bytes of data
MB4: 0x05 = FIFO Status; Watermark and Overflow flag is set
MB5-6: = 0x3353; Timestamp
MB7: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x06; The AFE application
MB8-9: AFE X data; 0x0093
MB10-11: AFE Y data; 0x007F
MB12-13: AFE Z Data; 0x1106
MB14: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x06; the AFE application
MB15-16: AFE X data; 0x00A1
MB17-18: AFE Y data; 0x007D
MB19-20: AFE Z Data; 0x1108
MB21: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x06; the AFE application
MB22-23: AFE X data; 0x009C
MB24-25: AFE Y data; 0x0079
MB26-27: AFE Z Data; 0x1107
To read data stored by the data FIFO application, the host must send a Read Data command along with a specific offset value.
This process has three conditions:
•
The offset must be fixed to three
•
The number of bytes to read must be larger than one and a multiple of the entry size
•
The host must add three bytes to de-count the total bytes to read
Failure to adhere to the three conditions above could cause the data FIFO to enter into an error state and be unable to pop
coherent data. To recover the data FIFO, reset the flag in the Reset_control byte (APP_ID 0x17).
When the command is sent, the first four bytes that the MMA9555L device returns correspond to the response of the command.
The next byte gives the status of the data FIFO application module and the following two bytes represent the timestamp; thus the
three-byte offset.
These bytes are part of those requested by the host, so it is very important that the user add three bytes to the number of bytes
to read. The data stored in the data FIFO comes after these seven bytes.
If the module is storing data at the exact moment that a read is issued by the host, the MMA9555L device will return an error
condition (A2). When this occurs, the host must retry reading the data. If any other error is returned, the host must take the proper
action.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
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65
Data FIFO block diagram
10.4
Data FIFO block diagram
Frame
counter
TimeStamp register
APP_ID =
nn
Watermark
level
FIFO buffer
(Host decides the size
in bytes)
Mode
• Stop on overflow
• Free run
FIFO size
Entry
size
Records
number
WM
flag
OvF
flag
Empty
flag
GPIO mapping logic
Interrupt
Figure 16. Data FIFO model
Figure 16 shows the block-level model of the data FIFO. The application is driven by the watermark and mode inputs that
configure the functionality.
The watermark level helps the host prevent data loss by raising a warning just before the overflow condition occurs. When the
number of bytes in the buffer approaches its capacity, the data FIFO asserts the watermark flag in the status register. The
watermark level is user-configurable. If the level of 0 is configured, the watermark is disabled.
The channel has its own data format code (DFC) bit field that configures the payload to be stored (one, two, four, or six bytes).
A NULL or zero value in the APP_ID Channel register means the channel is disabled. Any valid APP_ID value means the channel
is enabled.
The data FIFO has a status register in its output structure that contains status flags such as watermark, overflow, and buffer
empty. These flags can be mapped to the GPIO pins to generate an interrupt to the host.
The output also has an Entry Size register that shows the size, in bytes, of each entry that the data FIFO calculated, according
to its payload configuration. A Records Number register records the number of entries stored in the data FIFO. Both registers
help the host to calculate how many bytes to request, so that it can dump the entire FIFO buffer. A simple multiplication of those
two registers’ value gives the total number of bytes stored in the FIFO.
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Data FIFO configuration registers
10.4.1
Entries format
Channel enabled
Size defined by DFC1
(1, 2, 4, or 6 bytes)
Entry 1
APP_ID (1 byte)
Payload (N bytes)
Entry 2
APP_ID (1 byte)
Payload (N bytes)
APP_ID (1 byte)
Payload (N bytes)
•
•
•
Entry M
Figure 17. FIFO-entry formats, when channel enabled
10.5
Data FIFO configuration registers
This section contains the FIFO configuration registers. These registers can only be written once. To reconfigure the FIFO, the
device must be reset. This is because the FIFO application requests RAM and RAM can only be allocated once.
10.5.1
FIFO configuration byte
Table 79. FIFO Config Byte register
0x00
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
DFC1
Mode
Reset
0x00
0x00
0x00
Table 80. FIFO Config Byte bit descriptions
Field
Reserved
3:2
DFC1
(Data Format Code)
1:0
Mode
Description
Bit field reserved.
Configures the payload size of the channel.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 3.
•
•
•
•
00: One byte.
01: Two bytes.
10: Four bytes
11: Six bytes.
Configures the FIFO mode.
Units: None.
Range of valid values:
• 00: Free Run.
• 01: Stop On Overflow.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
67
Data FIFO configuration registers
10.5.2
FIFO size word
Table 81. FIFO-size word registers
0x04(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x05(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
FIFO Size Word 1
FIFO Size Word 2
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
Table 82. FIFO-size word bit description
Field
Description
7:0
FIFO Size Word
Reserves the maximum size (in bytes) that the FIFO can use. This is limited by the available RAM.
Units: Bytes.
Range of valid values: 0 to available RAM.
0x1C8 (decimal, 456) is the maximum amount of RAM that can be requested from the MMA9555L device.
The RAM is shared by multiple applications, so be careful not to set the FIFO to use more memory than
is physically available. That will cause unknown and undesirable results.
10.5.3
FIFO APP_ID
Table 83. FIFO Channel APP_ID register
0x06
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
2
Field
FIFO Ch APP_ID
Reset
0x00
1
0
Table 84. FIFO Channel APP_ID bit description
Field
Description
7:0
The APP_ID of the application that supplied data to be buffered by the FIFO.
FIFO Ch APP_ID Range of valid values: 0 to 0xFF.
10.5.4
Watermark
Table 85. Watermark registers
0x08(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x09(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Watermark
Watermark
Reset
0x00
0x00
2
1
0
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Data FIFO status registers
Table 86. Watermark bit description
Field
Description
Sets the count, in bytes, for the FIFO to set or clear the watermark flag.
Units: Bytes.
Range of valid values: 0–available RAM.
7:0
Watermark
10.6
Data FIFO status registers
10.6.1
Records number
Table 87. Records-number register
0x00(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
0x01(LSB)
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
Records Number
Records Number
Reset
0x00
0x00
1
0
Table 88. Records-number bit description
Field
Description
7:0
Records Number
This word stores the current number of records in the FIFO buffer.
A record is the payload packet of data comprised of an APP_ID and the actual data—which could be one,
two, four, or six bytes long. A record can be two, three, four, or seven bytes long.
Units: Number of entries in the Data FIFO (entry size in bytes = Ch APP_ID+ DFC1).
Range of valid values: 0 to available oxFFFF.
10.6.2
Entry size
Table 89. Entry-size register
0x02
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Entry Size
Reset
0x00
2
1
0
Table 90. FIFO config-byte/bit description
Field
7:0
Entry Size
Description
This byte shows the size in bytes of each entry that the data FIFO has stored, that calculation based on
its configuration.
Units: Bytes.
Range of valid values: 0 to 6.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
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69
Data FIFO status registers
10.6.3
FIFO_Status
Table 91. FIFO_Status register
0x03
Offset
7
Bit
Field
6
5
on_going_push on_going_pop
Reset
0x00
0x00
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
ovf_flag
empty_ flag
wmrk_ flag
0x00
0
0
0
Table 92. FIFO_Status bit descriptions
Field
7
fifo_on_going_push
6
fifo_on_going_pop
5:3
Reserved
2
fifo_ovf_flag
Description
Indicates that a push operation is being executed—the is FIFO receiving data from the application.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
• 0: A push is not being executed.
• 1: A push is being executed.
Indicates that a pop operation is being executed. The FIFO is sending out data and it is being read.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
• 0: A pop operation is not being executed.
• 1: A pop operation is being executed.
Bit field reserved.
Indicates that FIFO buffer has reached the maximum number of entries allowed. This meaning can vary
depending of the mode of operation.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values:
• 0: Not overflow condition.
• 1: Overflow condition.
1
fifo_empty_flag
0
fifo_wmrk_flag
Indicates whether the FIFO buffer is empty.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values:
• 0: FIFO buffer is not empty.
• 1: FIFO buffer is empty.
Indicates when the entries in the FIFO buffer have reached the watermark count.
Units: Nondimensional..
Range of valid values:
• 0: Watermark not reached.
• 1: Watermark reached.
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
11 Event Queue Application
11.1
Application
ID
Overview of Event Queue application
This application manages a queue of asynchronous events. The size of the queue is flexible
and can be configured by writing to the queue_size word within the configuration registers Default speed
of the Event Queue Application.
Configuration
The size of the Event Queue is limited by the available RAM. The amount of RAM may be
registers
reduced by the Data FIFO Application which also can be configured to use the RAM.
Some applications inside the MMA9555L platform have an eight-bit event-mask register
within configuration-registers structure that selects the specific event to be stored into the
Event Queue. The user can set an application’s event-mask bit to enable or prevent that
application’s events from being added to the Event Queue.
Status
registers
0x10
30 Hz.
Start on page
74.
Start on page
76.
When the selected event happens, Event Queue Application calls a routine with the following prototype to push the application’s
event into the Event Queue:
void eventQueue_push(void *data, uint8_t size)
With these variables:
•
Data: Pointer to the first element of the data to be stored into the queue. The data must have the order: APP_ID + Payload
bytes.
•
Size: Amount of data (in bytes) to be stored into the queue.
Each entry into the Event Queue is of fixed size and has the following format:
'SBNF$PVOUFS
"11*%
1BZMPBE
4JYCZUFTQFSFOUSZ
Figure 18. Entry format for the Event Queue
If an application’s payload is less than three bytes, the Event Queue will store the data and complete the entry padding with zeros.
If the application has a payload more than three bytes, the Event Queue will calculate the number of entries that this payload
needs to be successfully stored, split in the format shown in Figure 18.
If an application tries to push data into the Event Queue and there is not enough space to store it, the Event Queue will ignore
the attempt. This will be transparent for the application since there is no communication between the application and the Event
Queue.
11.1.1
Modes of operation
The Event Queue works only in one mode. It stores data and stops when the end of the queue is reached and asserts an overflow
flag. The queue is not circular.
The application has a configurable watermark that asserts a flag when entries have reached the configured point.
11.1.2
Reading process
To read the Event Queue, the host sends a read-status command to the MMA9555L device, calling the Event Queue application
that stores the data within the queue into a buffer and returns the number of bytes read. If the number of requested bytes is not
a multiple of the entry size, the pop routine ignores the extra bytes and tells the host how many effective bytes were popped.
To read data stored by the Event Queue application, the host must send a Read Data command along with a specific offset value.
The following examples show the command for reading the data stored by the Event Queue Application.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
71
Overview of Event Queue application
Reading Event Queue example
The following example shows how to configure the Event Queue application.
Example 12.
1.
MB0: Set APP_ID to (0x10).
Selects the Data-FIFO application.
2. MB1: Command to (0x20).
Sends a Write Configuration space command.
3. MB2: Set offset to zero (0x00).
Starts writing configuration values at register 0.
4. MB3: Set count field to (0x06).
Sends nine bytes.
5. MB4: Send Data (0x00).
Sets Queue size.
6. MB5: Send Data (0x50).
7. MB6: Send Data (0x00).
Watermark
8. MB7: Send Data (0x05).
9. MB8: Send Data (0x00).
Timeout.
10. MB6: Send Data (0x00).
Bytes to Send: 0x10, 0x20, 0x00, 0x06, 0x00, 0x50, 0x00, 0x05, 0x00, 0x00.
The configuration registers can only be written once. If the Event Queue must be reconfigured, the device must be reset and the
configuration rewritten.
Some data now must be sent to the event queue. In this example, the Low-g application is configured to send an event.
Example 13.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
MB0: Set APP_ID to (0x09).
Specifies the Low-g application.
MB1: Command to (0x20).
Sends a Write Configuration space command.
MB2: Set offset to zero (0x09).
Start writing configuration values at Register 9.
MB3: Set count field to (0x01).
Sends nine bytes.
MB4: Send Data (0x08) – Event Mask Register.
Enables Low-g events.
Bytes to Send: 0x09, 0x20, 0x09, 0x01, 0x08.
In this example, all other Low-g configuration register values are at the reset default values.
The device powers up in Sleep mode, but it may become necessary to wake the part. That process is done in the following
example.
Example 14.
1.
2.
3.
4.
MB0: Set App_ID to (0x12).
Selects the Power Controller modes.
MB1: Command to (0x20).
Sends a write configuration, with offset = 0.
MB2: Set offset to (0x06).
MB3: Set count field to (0x01).
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Overview of Event Queue application
5.
MB4: Send the data value (0x00).
Bytes to Send: 0x12, 0x20, 0x06, 0x01, 0x00.
The device is enabled and configured to have an event Queue and send Low-g events to the Event Queue.
To cause a Low-g event that can be measured on the X, Y, and Z axes, toss the board into the air. Read the Event Queue
applications status register to get the data.
To set up for reading the status register, send the command in the following example.
Example 15.
1.
2.
3.
4.
MB0: Set APP_ID to (0x10).
Selects the Event Queue application.
MB1: Command to (0x30).
Sends a Read Status space command.
MB2: Set offset to zero (0x03).
Start reading status values at register 0.
MB3: Set count field to (0x20).
Reads 10 bytes (3 status + APP_ID+6 data)
Bytes to Send: 0x10, 0x30, 0x03, 0x20.
The following response is returned:
10 80 13 20 09 95 AC 09 0F 00 00 95 BE 09 0F 00 00 95 D0 09 0F 00 00
MB0: APP_ID = 0x10; Event Queue application
MB1: STATUS = 0x80; Command Complete, no errors
MB3: Actual Data Count = 0x13; 10 bytes of data
MB2: Requested Data count = 0x20; 10 bytes of data
MB4: 0x09 = Event Queue Status; Watermark and Overflow flags are set
MB5–MB6: = 0x95AC; Timestamp
MB7: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x09; the AFE application
MB8–MB10: 0x0F0000 = 0x0F is the status register from the Low-g applications; 0x0F indicates a Low-g event on all axes.
MB5–MB6: = 0x95BE; Timestamp
MB7: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x09; the AFE application
MB8–MB10: 0x0F0000
MB5–MB6: = 0x95D0; Timestamp
MB7: APP ID of the application providing the actual data = 0x09; the AFE applications
MB8–MB10: 0x0F0000
The offset is fixed to three bytes.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
73
Event Queue configuration registers
When the command is sent, the first four bytes that the MMA9555L device returns correspond to the response of the command.
The fifth byte is the status from the Event Queue application. This byte is part of the bytes requested by the host, therefore it is
very important that the user adds one byte to the number of bytes to be read.
Due to the application’s read functionality, if the application is storing data at the exact moment a read is issued by the host, the
MMA9555L device will return an error condition. When this occurs, the host must retry reading the data. If any other error is
returned, the host must take the proper action.
11.1.3
Event Queue block diagram
The following figure shows the Event Queue Data Flow Model that receives the Application ID and the N size of the payload from
a specific application. The Event Queue logic appends the frame counter with this data and pushes the entry (six bytes in size)
into the queue. If the queue is full, the logic will ignore the push request.
APP (AP_ID)
16-bit frame count
AP_ID
Payload
Queue processing
Various elements in the application
can set or clear bits in this register.
Data Array
Host decides
the size
(in bytes)
Event_Queue_Flag Register
Logical AND
Event_Queue_Mask Register
Event_Queue_Flag Register
Config command can
Modify this register.
Frame
Counter
Command calls a
pop routine to dump
the memory.
Full WM First entry (after reset)
GPIO mapping
logic
Interrupt
Payload N
AP_ID – Payload N
Push
subroutine
Config command can
modify this table.
Figure 19. Event Queue data flow
11.2
Event Queue configuration registers
The Event Queue application’s configuration can only be written once. In order to reconfigure the Event Queue, the whole device
must be reset. This is because the Event Queue application requests RAM and RAM can only be allocated once.
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Event Queue configuration registers
11.2.1
queue_size
Table 93. queue_size registers
0x00(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
0x01(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
queue_size
Field
Reset
Table 94. queue_size bit description
Field
Description
7:0
queue_size
Defines the size in bytes that the Event Queue will reserve, in order to store the data sent by any
application.
Units: Bytes
Range of valid values: 0–available RAM.
0x1C8 (decimal 456) is the maximum amount of RAM that can be requested from the MMA9555L device.
The RAM is shared by multiple applications, so be careful not to set the FIFO to use more memory than
is physically available. That will cause unknown and undesirable results.
11.2.2
queue_wmrk
Table 95. queue_wmrk registers
0x02(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
0x03(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
2
1
0
queue_wmrk
Field
Reset
Table 96. queue_wmrk bit description
Field
Description
7:0
queue_wmrk
11.2.3
Sets the count, in bytes, for the Event Queue to set or clear the watermark flag.
Units: Bytes.
Range of valid values: 0 to available bytes in the buffer.
queue_timeout
Table 97. queue_timeout registers
0x04(MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
Field
5
4
3
0x05(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
queue_timeout
Reset
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
75
Event Queue status registers
Table 98. queue_timeout bit description
Field
Description
7:0
queue_timeout
11.3
Sets the count, in cycles, for the Event Queue to set or clear the time-out flag.
Units: Time; [queue_timeout] * [1/SRqueue] ).
Range of valid values: 0 to 65,535.
SR_queue is the sample rate of the Event Queue application, which defaults to 30 Hz.
Event Queue status registers
11.3.1
records_number
Table 99. records_number registers
0x00(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
0x01(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
records_number
Field
Reset
Table 100. records_number bit description
Field
Description
7:0
records_number
11.3.2
Shows the current number of entries or records stored in the queue.
Units: Entries (Entry = six bytes).
Range of valid values: 0 to 65,535. Typically, this number should not be more than the available RAM
divided by the payload size.
entry_size
Table 101. entry_size registers
0x02
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Set-bit values
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
entry_size
Field
Reset
0
0
0
0
Table 102. entry_size bit description
Field
Description
7:0
entry_size
Shows the size in bytes of each entry or record in the queue. This value is six bytes fixed and is not userconfigurable.
Units: Bytes.
Range of valid values: Fixed to six.
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Event Queue status registers
11.3.3
queue_status
Table 103. queue_status registers
0x03
Offset
Bit
7
6
Field
on_going_push
on_going_pop
5
4
Reserved
3
2
1
0
to_flag
ovf_flag
empty_flag
wmrk_flag
Reset
Table 104. queue_status bit descriptions
Field
Description
7
on_going_push
Indicates that a push operation is being executed.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
6
on_going_pop
Indicates that a pop operation is being executed.
Units: Nondimensional..
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
5:4
Reserved
Bit field reserved.
3
to_flag
Indicates when the Event Queue has not been read for the time configured by the queue_TimeOut
parameter once the overflow marker has been reached.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
2
ovf_flag
Indicates when the Event Queue is full and no more entries can be stored.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
1
empty_flag
Indicates when the Event Queue is empty, no records or entries having been stored.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
0
wmrk_flag
Indicates when the number of bytes within the Event Queue has reached the watermark.
Units: Nondimensional.
Range of valid values: 0 to 1.
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
77
12 Status Register Application
12.1
Overview of Status Register application
The Status Register Application provides a simple way for users to combine specific status
information bits from multiple applications and read that combined information from one
place.
The Status Register Application configures the output of its status register by mapping a
specific status register bit to a specific output bit of a specific application. This enables the
Status Register Application to provide a combined status from the selected bits of userspecified applications.
There are eight, user-configurable bits in the Status Register. Each bit mirrors an output bit
in the related application.
12.2
Application
ID
0x11
Default speed
30 Hz.
Configuration
registers
Start on page
78.
Status
registers
Start on page
82.
Status Register configuration registers
The following tables show the configuration registers for the Status Register Application. The bit descriptions are given in
Table 122 on page 82.
12.2.1
APP_ID SR_00
Table 105. APP_ID SR_00 register
0x00
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_00
Reset
0x07
12.2.2
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
Output_Bit_ID SR_00
Table 106. Output_Bit_ID SR_00 register
0x01
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_00
Reset
0x00
12.2.3
APP_ID SR_01
Table 107. APP_ID SR_01 register
0x02
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_01
Reset
0x07
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
78
Status Register configuration registers
12.2.4
Output_Bit_ID SR_01
Table 108. Output_Bit_ID SR_01 register
0x03
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_01
Reset
0x01
12.2.5
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
APP_ID SR_02
Table 109. APP_ID SR_02 register
0x04
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_02
Reset
0x07
12.2.6
Output_Bit_ID SR_02
Table 110. Output_Bit_ID SR_02 register
0x05
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_02
Reset
0x02
12.2.7
APP_ID SR_03
Table 111. APP_ID SR_03 register
0x06
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_03
Reset
0x07
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
79
Status Register configuration registers
12.2.8
Output_Bit_ID SR_03
Table 112. Output_Bit_ID SR_03 register
0x07
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_03
Reset
0x03
12.2.9
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
APP_ID SR_04
Table 113. APP_ID SR_04 register
0x08
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_04
Reset
0x07
12.2.10 Output_Bit_ID SR_04
Table 114. Output_Bit_ID SR_04 register
0x09
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_04
Reset
0x04
12.2.11 APP_ID SR_05
Table 115. APP_ID SR_05 register
0x0A
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_05
Reset
0x00
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Status Register configuration registers
12.2.12 Output_Bit_ID SR_05
Table 116. Output_Bit_ID SR_05 register
0x0B
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_05
Reset
0x00
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
2
1
0
12.2.13 APP_ID SR_06
Table 117. APP_ID SR_06 register
0x0C
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_06
Reset
0x07
12.2.14 Output_Bit_ID SR_06
Table 118. Output_Bit_ID SR_06 register
0x0D
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_06
Reset
0x06
12.2.15 APP_ID SR_07
Table 119. APP_ID SR_07 register
0x0E
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
Field
APP_ID SR_07
Reset
0x00
Table 120. APP_ID SR_07 register description
Field
Description
7:0
APP_ID (APP_ID SR_n)
The application identifier. Zero value and 0xFF are reserved.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: [0 to 31] and 0xFF, realistically up to 0x1F, refer to the App-ID table
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
81
Status Register default configuration
12.2.16 Output_Bit_ID SR_07
Table 121. Output_Bit_ID SR_07 register
0x0F
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
2
Field
Output_Bit_ID SR_07
Reset
0x00
1
0
Table 122. Output_Bit_ID SR_07 register description
Field
Description
7:0
Bit_ID (Output_Bit_ID SR_n)
12.3
The bit number to be mapped on the Status Register bit n.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: [0 to 255], refer to the register memory map of each application
Status Register default configuration
After reset, the status register configuration registers contain the Data Ready and Command Complete bits.
NOTE
The upper two bits in the upper byte are fixed, but the lower eight bits in the lower byte can
be remapped by the user to any application and bits.
Table 123. Status Register MSB
0x00
Offset
Bit
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
Field
Command
Complete
Data
Ready
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
2
1
0
Reset
Table 124. Status Register LSB
0x01
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
Field
Unassigned
Reserved
Unassigned
4
3
Reserved
Reset
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
13 Sleep/Wake Application
13.1
Application
ID
Overview of Sleep/Wake application
This application configures and controls the power-control modes of the accelerometer
provides configuration flexibility for minimizing power consumption.
0x12
Default speed
The application has three modes of operation: Run, Doze, and Sleep. The Sleep/Wake
Configuration
module puts the accelerometer into Doze mode automatically when no movement is
registers
detected. When a change in orientation or movement above the threshold is detected for the
specified time period, the application returns to the Run mode.
Status
To save a significant amount of power, only run the calculation-intensive applications when registers
the accelerometer is in motion.
30 Hz.
Start on page
84.
Start on page
87.
Using the activity level settings, some tasks may easily be bypassed when the accelerometer is sleeping. For example, it may
not be necessary to run the Pedometer application while the device is sitting undisturbed flat on a desktop.
13.1.1
Run mode
In Run mode, all applications are scheduled to run at their maximum established frame rate. An application enters Run mode if
the following conditions are met:
•
The GPIO interrupt is asserted (RGPIO4/INT)
•
A write command is issued from the host to the MMA9555L
•
Movement above the threshold is detected and the previous state was Doze mode
Sleep = 1
Run mode,
Pedometer
application
executing
Sleep mode,
nothing done
Sleep = 0
Movement
above threshold
detected
Sleep = 1
No movement or host
command for the short
configured time
Doze mode,
long time between
AFE samples
Some movement
detected
Doze mode,
short time between
AFE samples
No movement or
host command
for the short
configured time
0 Hz SR
1/(long time) Hz SR
Average sample rate
1/(short time) Hz SR
30 Hz SR
Figure 20. MMA9555L’s power modes state diagram
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
83
Sleep/Wake configuration registers
13.1.2
Doze mode
In Doze mode, the application only executes four AFE samples at a sample rate defined by the user. The user can configure two
sample rate values: long time and short time. These parameters are configured in the long_time_off and short_time_off
registers, respectively.
The short-time sample rate is used when the sensor detects some movement, but not enough to change to Run mode.
The long-time sample rate is used when the Sleep/Wake module detects no movement in the accelerometer.
The application enters Doze mode when the Sleep/Wake module detects no movement in the accelerometer for a specified
period of time. The amount of time is configured in the doze_thresh register.
13.1.3
Sleep mode
In Sleep mode, the MMA9555L device does nothing and remains in the lowest power mode. The device can enter this mode only
when the user sets the SNCEN bit from the cfg configuration register or when the application starts. Since the SNCEN bit is set
by default, the application starts in Sleep mode.
To exit the Sleep mode, the user must clear the SNCEN bit from the cfg configuration register. This is done by issuing the
corresponding write configuration command through the slave communications interface.
13.2
Sleep/Wake configuration registers
The following sections give the configuration registers for the Sleep/Wake application.
13.2.1
sensitivity_thresh
Table 125. sensitivity_thresh registers
0x00(MSB)
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
4
3
Field
sensitivity_thresh
Reset
0x00
0x01(LSB)
2
1
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
2
1
0
0
0
0
sensitivity_thresh
1
0
1
0
0
Table 126. sensitivity_thresh bit description
Field
Description
7:0
sensitivity_thresh
13.2.2
Configures the movement threshold of the application to change from Doze to Run mode.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 120 to 300.
doze_time_thresh
Table 127. doze_time_thresh registers
0x02 (MSB)
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
3
2
1
0
7
6
5
doze_thresh
Field
Reset
4
0x03 (LSB)
0
0
0
0
1
4
3
doze_thresh
1
1
1
1
0
1
0
0
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Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Sleep/Wake configuration registers
Table 128. doze_time_thresh bit description
Field
Description
7:0
doze_thresh
Configures the time that the device must be still before entering Doze mode.
For example, if the system sample rate if 488 Hz, then to set a time of 1 second, write 488 (0x1EB) to this
register.
Units: Algorithm cycles (Time = [Algorithm cycles] * [1/SRPWRCTRL]).
Range of valid values: 1 to 65,535
13.2.3
long_time_off
Table 129. long_time_off registers
0x04
Offset
7
Bit
6
5
Field
Reserved
Reset
0x00
4
3
2
1
0
long_time_off [3:0]
0
1
1
1
Table 130. long_time_off bit description
Field
Description
7:4
Reserved
Bit field reserved.
Configures the long-time interval between AFE samples when the application is in Doze mode.
Units: Time.
Range of valid values: from 0 to 10.
Long-time values
Time (seconds)
3:0
long_time_off
13.2.4
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
0........................................ 4.1 ms
1...................................... 8.19 ms
2...................................... 16.4 ms
3......................................... 32 ms
4...................................... 65.5 ms
5....................................... 131 ms
6....................................... 162 ms
7....................................... 524 ms
8......................................... 1.05 s
9........................................... 2.1 s
10....................................... 4.19 s
short_time_off
Table 131. short_time_off register
0x05
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
Field
Reserved
Reset
0x00
4
3
2
1
0
short_time_off [3:0]
0
1
1
0
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
85
Sleep/Wake configuration registers
Table 132. short_time_off bit description
Field
Description
7:4
Reserved
Bit field reserved.
Configures the short-time interval between AFE samples when the application is in Doze mode.
Units: Time.
Range of valid values: 0 to 10.
Long-time values
Time (seconds)
3:0
short_time_off
13.2.5
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
0........................................ 4.1 ms
1...................................... 8.19 ms
2...................................... 16.4 ms
3......................................... 32 ms
4...................................... 65.5 ms
5....................................... 131 ms
6....................................... 162 ms
7....................................... 524 ms
8......................................... 1.05 s
9........................................... 2.1 s
10....................................... 4.19 s
cfg
Table 133. cfg register
0x06
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
Stop_DIS
IRQ_EN
SCHEN
FLEEN
SNCEN
Reset
0x00
0
0
0
0
1
Table 134. cfg bit descriptions
Field
7:5
Reserved
4
Stop_DIS
3
IRQ_EN
2
SCHEN
Description
Bit field reserved.
Disables or enables the low-power mode. If this bit is set, the device doesn’t execute the STOP assembler
instruction even if the SNCEN, FLEEN, or SCHEN bits are set as 1b.
• 0: Enables STOP mode.
• 1: Disables STOP mode.
Enables or disables the IRQ interruption in the GPIO4.
• 0: Disables IRQ interruption.
• 1: Enables IRQ interruption.
Enables or disables the Doze mode.
• 0: Disables the Doze mode.
• 1: Enables the Doze mode.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
86
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Sleep/Wake status registers
Table 134. cfg bit descriptions (Continued)
Field
Description
1
FLEEN
0
SNCEN
13.3
Controls the use of long and short time between AFE samples when in Doze mode. If this bit is cleared,
the application does not use the long- and short-time values to determine the time between AFE samples.
Instead, the time is fixed as 2.05 ms.
• 0: Time between AFE samples fixed at 2.05 ms.
• 1: Long- and short-time values determine the time between AFE samples.
Enables or disables the Sleep mode.
Note: When this bit is set, the device will enter Sleep mode. The device can only exit this mode is by
clearing this bit via a configuration-write command.
• 0: Disables the Sleep mode.
• 1: Enables the Sleep mode.
Sleep/Wake status registers
13.3.1
scheduler_mode
Table 135. scheduler_mode register
0x00
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
Field
—
—
—
—
—
—
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
scheduler_mode
0
0
Table 136. scheduler_mode bit description
Field
1:0
scheduler_mode
Description
Shows the scheduler mode when the SCHED and FLEEN bits are set in the cfg register. If those bits are
not set, the value of this register may not reflect the actual scheduler mode.
Units: None.
Range of valid values: 0 to 0x02.
• 00: Doze mode. Frame rate determined by the long_time_off configuration register.
• 01: Doze mode. Frame rate determined by the short_time_off configuration register.
• 10: Run mode.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
87
14 Reset/Suspend/Clear Control Application
14.1
Overview of Reset/Suspend/Clear Control
application
This application provides a way to reset, suspend, and clear the outputs of the applications
in the MMA9555L. The reset and clear functions are implemented in each application as
callback functions. The suspend function is handled in the Scheduler Application.
One of the requirements of an application on the MMA9555L device is that it has a reset
and clear function that can be called by the scheduler or another application. This chapter
describes how an application’s reset and clear callback functions can be called or
triggered.
Application
ID
0x17
Default speed
30 Hz.
Configuration
registers
Start on page
89.
Status
registers
None.
There are three groups of configuration registers for the Reset/Suspend/Clear Control
application.
14.1.1
Reset
The reset bit, when set, schedules a reset for an application. At the next system cycle, the reset process is handled. The reset
bit is automatically cleared by the Scheduler Application.
When the reset bit for an application is set, the following actions occur:
•
The application’s reset callback function is executed. The reset function is part of an application and it typically resets the
application’s outputs and internal variables.
•
The reset bit is cleared.
•
The scheduled application is executed.
14.1.2
Suspend
The suspend bit, when set, prevents an application from executing while the suspend bit is set. Setting or clearing the suspend
flag is managed by the host through a command.
To preserve data coherency in an application, the suspend flag must be set before attempting to modify an application’s
configuration. The bit then must be cleared after the configuration has been changed.
14.1.3
Clear
The clear bit clears an application’s outputs. The clear flag is automatically cleared by the scheduler.
When an application’s clear bit is set, it causes the following actions:
•
The application’s clear callback is executed. This typically resets the application’s outputs.
•
The clear flag is cleared.
•
The application is executed.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
88
Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control applications
14.2
Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control
applications
14.2.1
Reset configuration register
Table 137. Reset registers
(MSB) 0x00 = reset_bits[31:24]
Offset
31
Bit
30
29
28
27
Reserved
Field
1
Reset
1
1
1
26
25
24
Six-Direction
GPIO Input/
Output
Reserved
1
1
1
1
0x01 = reset_bits[23:16]
Offset
Bit
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
Field
Rst/Susp/
Clr
Reserved
Pedometer
Reserved
Reserved
Auto-Wake/
Sleep
Status
Event FIFO
Reset
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
10
9
8
1
1
1
0x02 = reset_bits[15:8]
Offset
Bit
15
Field
Data FIFO
Reset
1
14
13
12
11
Reserved
1
1
1
1
(LSB) 0x03 = reset_bits[7:0]
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
AFE
Reserved
MBOX
GPIO_AP
PMAP
CI
Scheduler
General Rst
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Table 138. Reset bit descriptions
Field
31:27
Reserved
26
Six Direction
25
GPIO Input/Output
24
Reserved
Description
Not used.
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the Six Direction application.
• 0: Normal Operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the GPIO Input/Output application.
Not used.
23
• 0: Normal operation.
Reset/Suspend/Clear • 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the Reset/Suspend/Clear application.
22
Reserved
Not used.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
89
Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control applications
Table 138. Reset bit descriptions (Continued)
Field
Description
21
Pedometer
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the Pedometer application.
20:19
Reserved
Not used.
18
Auto-Wake/Sleep
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the Auto-Wake/Sleep application.
17
Reserved
Not used.
16
Event-FIFO
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the Event-Queue application.
15
Data FIFO
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the Data FIFO application.
14:8
Reserved
Reserved
7
Reserved
Reserved
6
AFE
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiate the reset sequence of the front-end application.
5
Reserved
Reserved
4
Mailbox
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the mailbox application.
3
GPIO_AppMap
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the GPIO AppMap application.
2
• 0: Normal operation.
Command Interpreter • 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the command-interpreter application.
1
Scheduler
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the reset sequence of the scheduler-application.
0
General Reset
14.2.2
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates a system-wide reset sequence of all MMA9555Lapplications.
Suspend configuration register
Table 139. Suspend registers
(MSB) 0x04 = reset_bits[31:24]
Offset
Bit
31
30
28
27
Reserved
Field
Reset
29
1
1
1
1
1
26
25
24
Six
Direction
GPIO Input/
Output
Reserved
1
1
1
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
90
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control applications
Table 139. Suspend registers (Continued)
0x05 = reset_bits[23:16]
Offset
Bit
23
22
21
Field
Rst/Susp/Clr
Reserved
Pedometer
Reset
0
1
1
20
19
Reserved
1
18
17
16
Auto-Wake/
Sleep
Status
Event FIFO
1
1
1
10
9
8
1
1
1
1
0x06 = reset_bits[15:8]
Offset
Bit
15
14
13
Field
Data FIFO
Frame
Counter
Reset
1
1
12
11
Reserved
1
1
1
(LSB) 0x07 = reset_bits[7:0]
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
AFE
Reserved
MBOX
GPIO
CI
Scheduler
General
Susp
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Table 140. Suspend bit descriptions
Field
31:27
Reserved
26
Six Direction
25
GPIO Input/Output
24
Reserved
Description
Not used.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Suspend the Six Direction application.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Suspend the GPIO Input/output application.
Not used.
23
• 0: Normal operation.
Reset/Suspend/Clear • 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the Reset/Suspend/Clear application.
22
Reserved
21
Pedometer
20:19
Reserved
18
Auto-Wake/Sleep
17
Reserved
16
Event-FIFO
Not used.
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Suspend the Pedometer application.
Not used.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the Auto-Wake/Sleep application.
Not used.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the Event-Queue application.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
91
Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control applications
Table 140. Suspend bit descriptions (Continued)
Field
Description
15
Data FIFO
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the Data FIFO application.
14:8
Reserved
• Reserved
6
AFE
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiate the suspend sequence of the front-end application.
5
Reserved
Reserved.
4
Mailbox
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the mailbox application.
3
GPIO AppMap
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the GPIO AppMap application.
2
• 0: Normal Operation
Command Interpreter • 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the command-interpreter application.
1
Scheduler
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiates the suspend sequence of the scheduler-application.
0
General Suspend
14.2.3
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Initiates a system-wide suspend sequence of all MMA9555Lapplications.
Clear configuration register
Table 141. Clear registers
(MSB) 0x08 = reset_bits[31:24]
Offset
Bit
31
30
28
27
Reserved
Field
Reset
29
1
1
1
1
26
25
24
Six
Direction
GPIO Input/
Output
Reserved
1
1
1
18
17
16
AutoWake/
Sleep
Status
Event FIFO
1
1
1
10
9
8
1
1
1
0x09 = reset_bits[23:16]
Offset
Bit
23
22
21
Field
Rst/Susp/Clr
Reserved
Pedometer
Reset
0
1
1
20
19
Reserved
1
1
0x10 = reset_bits[15:8]
Offset
Bit
15
14
Field
Data FIFO
Frame
Counter
Reset
1
1
13
12
11
Reserved
1
1
1
1
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
92
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Configuration registers for Reset/Suspend/Clear Control applications
Table 141. Clear registers (Continued)
(LSB) 0x11 = reset_bits[7:0]
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Field
Reserved
AFE
Reserved
MBOX
GPIO
CI
Scheduler
General Clear
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Table 142. Clear bit descriptions
Field
31:27
Reserved
26
Six Direction
25
GPIO Input/Output
24
Reserved
Description
Not used.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the Six Direction application
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the GPIO Input/output application
Not used.
23
• 0: Normal operation.
Reset/Suspend/Clear • 1: Clear the Reset/Suspend/Clear application.
22
Reserved
21
Pedometer
20:19
Reserved
18
Auto-Wake/Sleep
17
Reserved
Not used.
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Clear sequence of the Pedometer application.
Not used.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the Auto-Wake/Sleep application.
Not used.
16
Event-FIFO
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the Event-Queue application.
15
Data FIFO
• 0: Normal operation.
• 1: Clear the Data FIFO application.
14:8
Reserved
Reserved.
7
AFE
Reserved.
6
AFE
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the front-end application.
5
Reserved
4
Mailbox
Reserved.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the mailbox application.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
93
Reset/Suspend/Clear status registers
Table 142. Clear bit descriptions (Continued)
Field
3
GPIO AppMap
Description
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the GPIO AppMap application.
2
• 0: Normal Operation
Command Interpreter • 1: Clear the command-interpreter application.
1
Scheduler
0
General Clear
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear the scheduler-application.
• 0: Normal Operation
• 1: Clear all MMA9555L applications.
Once an application has set a flag, it can be reset by one of the following mechanisms:
•
Execute a power-on reset.
•
Wake the device after a low-power mode.
•
Direct the host to write to general, reset/suspend/clear configuration bit.
•
Direct the host to write to an application reset/suspend/clear configuration bit.
14.3
Reset/Suspend/Clear status registers
There are no status registers.
14.4
Reboot to ROM CI from flash code
In order to reboot to ROM Command Interpreter, it is necessary to execute the reset callback function of the reset/suspend/clear
application by setting the respective reset flag. The complete command for this operation is:
Example 16.
MBOX0
MBOX1
MBOX2
MBOX3
MBOX4
14.5
=
=
=
=
=
0x17
0x20
0x01
0x01
0x80
/*Application ID*/
/*CONFIG_W command*/
/*Offset*/
/*Number of bytes to write*/
/*Data*/
Reboot to flash code from ROM CI
The operation to reboot into flash code when the ROM Command Interpreter is running can be performed by sending a
CI_RESET command, the mailbox settings for this command is:
Example 17.
MBOX0
MBOX1
MBOX2
MBOX3
MBOX4
MBOX5
=
=
=
=
=
=
0x29
0x00
0xFF
0xFF
0xFF
0xFF
/*ROM Command for boot to flash*/
/*Reserved*/
/*CI_PWR*/
/*CI_PWR*/
/*CI_PWR*/
/*CI_PWR*/
For details about the ROM CI commands, see the MMA955xL Intelligent, Motion-Sensing Platform Hardware Reference Manual
(MMA955xLHWRM), listed in “Related Documentation” on page 2.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
94
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
15 MBOX Configuration Application
15.1
Overview of MBOX Configuration
application
The MBOX Configuration application works with the Mailbox application (Chapter 8,
“Mailbox Application”) and the Communications application (Chapter 4, “Communication
Interface”) to provide data back to the host in a way that the host can best use the data.
The MBOX Configuration application configures how the mailboxes behave. The Mailbox
application configures what data is stored in the mailboxes.
By default, the MMA9555L operates in the Command/Response mode, where a host must
issue a write command followed by one or more reads to get data. The MMA9555L can also
be put into a Legacy mode, where the host just issues a read command to get data.
Application
ID
0x18
Default speed
Always
available.
Configuration
registers
See page 97.
Status
registers
None.
The mailboxes can be accessed in either of two modes: Normal or Legacy. The mailboxes’ default mode is Normal, but the mode
can be changed through this the mailbox configuration application (APP_ID = 0x18).
The following figure shows the differences between the Normal and Legacy modes.
Address
Normal Mode
Legacy Mode
0
Command
/
Response
mailboxes
...
Command
/
Response
mailboxes
19
20
Quick-Read
mailboxes
...
31
Figure 21. Difference between Normal and Legacy modes
15.2
Normal mode
In Normal mode, only the command/response communications model is supported. In order to read valid data from the
MMA9555L, the host must send a command through the mailboxes and wait for the command to be processed. Then, the host
must read back the mailboxes that now have the data. The host can wait for the command to be processed by polling the
Command Complete (COCO) bit or the host can wait for the INT_O interrupt.
The Normal mode fully supports streaming-read transactions when the response to a command may be more than 32 bytes long.
The following procedure gives the sequence for setting up the interrupt pin to go active after a COCO:
Example 18.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
MB0: Set the “APP_ID: Communication application” (0x18) application identifier.
MB1: Set the “Command: Write Config” (0x20) application identifier.
MB2: Set the Offset to Zero field (0x00) to point to the configuration register.
MB3: Set the Count field to (0x01).
This is done because only one data byte needs to be sent.
MB4: Set the DATA (0x80) bit 7.
This enables the interrupt pin.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
95
Legacy mode
Bytes to Send: 0x18, 0x20, 0x00, 0x01, 0x80.
15.3
Legacy mode
In Legacy mode, the lower-address mailboxes operate as described in the Normal mode—in the command/response
communications model. MB20 through MB31, however, are used as Quick-Read registers. These registers are automatically
updated at the end of each sample frame with the latest results from the chosen applications.
The Mailbox application determines what data will appear in the mailboxes.
The quick-read output data is selected with the configuration of the Mailbox application. (For more detail, see “Mailbox
Application” on page 41.)
Quick-Read registers enable the host to quickly and directly read a limited set of data directly from the MMA9555L without first
having to issue a command and wait for the completion of the command processing. This makes support easier for legacy
systems that expect to read sensor data. (In Legacy mode, MB20 to MB31 are reserved for mapping the Quick-Read registers.)
By default, the Quick-Read registers (MB20–MB31) contain the following data:
MB20–MB21 = Status 0,1
MB22 = Event Queue status
MB23 = FIFO status
MB24–MB25 = AFE Frame Counter
MB26–MB27 = AFE, Stage 0; X-axis data
MB28–MB29 = AFE, Stage 0; Y-axis data
MB30–MB31 = AFE, Stage 0; Z-axis data
This data—in the Quick-Read registers in Legacy mode—can be changed with the Mailbox application.
15.4
Configuring mailbox operational mode
The operational mode of the slave communications interface mailbox is configured via the Mailbox Configuration application. This
application allows the host system to configure the slave communications interface functions including the mailbox transaction
interrupt pin mode, mailbox Normal/Legacy modes, and transaction-streaming modes.
The following example shows how to configure the mailbox operating mode from Normal to Legacy
Example 19.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
MB0: Set the “APP_ID: Mailbox Mode Config” application identifier (0x18).
MB1: Set the “Command: Write Config” application identifier (0x20).
MB2: Set the Offset to Zero field (0x00) to point to the configuration register.
MB3: Set the Count field to 0x01 because only one data byte needs to be sent.
MB4: Set the DATA value to 0x10.
This sets the Legacy field to 1b which selects the Legacy mode.
Bytes to send: 0x18, 0x20, 0x00, 0x01, 0x10.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
96
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
MBOX Configuration memory map and register
15.5
MBOX Configuration memory map and register
15.5.1
MBOX Configuration memory map
Table 143. memory map
Offset
address
Register
0x00
15.5.2
MBOX Configuration register
Access
Reset
Details
Read/Write
0x00
Section 15.5.2
MBOX Configuration register
Table 144. MBOX Configuration register
0x00
Offset
Bit
7
6
5
4
Field
INT_O_EN
INT_O_POL
INT_O_
FRAME_EN
LEGACY
Reset
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
0
UPDMODES
—
—
00
0
0
Table 145. Communications configuration register field descriptions
Field
7
INT_O_EN
6
INT_O_POL
5
INT_O_FRAME_EN
Description
Enables or disables the assertion of the INT_O signal every time a mailbox command is been
processed.
Range of valid values:
0 Disables the assertion of the INT_O signal.
1 Enables the assertion of the INT_O signal.
Configures the polarity of the INT_O signal when it is asserted.
Range of valid values:
0 Active high.
1 Active low.
If enabled, generates the INT_O interrupt on completion of the AFE sample—once each frame. If not
enabled, the INT_O signal is generated on a command-complete basis.
This bit was added to support synchronization between the host and the MMA9555L device. Data will
be ready on a frame basis.
Range of valid values:
0: Interrupt not generated.
1: Interrupt generated on completion of AFE sample.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
97
MBOX Configuration memory map and register
Table 145. Communications configuration register field descriptions (Continued)
Field
4
LEGACY
3
UPDMODES
1:0
Reserved
Description
Selects between Normal and Legacy mode.
Range of valid values:
0: Normal mode.
1: Legacy mode.
When in Legacy mode, configures how and when the Quick-Read registers are updated.
This field is valid only if the Mailbox is operating in Legacy mode. See Bit 4.
Range of valid values:
00 Mode 0: Updates the Quick–Read registers (QR) whether the slave port is active or inactive.
01 Mode 1: Updates the QR registers only if the slave port is inactive. If the slave port is active, the
update takes no action and waits until the slave port is inactive.
10 Mode 2: Updates the QR registers if the slave port is inactive. If the slave port is active (I2C
transactions are running), this mode will enable a receive interrupt in the slave port to be triggered
immediately after the transaction ends. After this, the QR register is immediately updated and the
receive interrupt disabled.
Reserved.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
98
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
16 Pedometer Application
16.1
Background and overview
The MMA9555L’s major application is the pedometer.The pedometer has calculations for
step-counting, speed, distance, activity-monitoring, and calorie-counting, as well as
autonomous sleep functionality to minimize current consumption.
The following figure illustrates the hardware and software components and interactions in
the MMA9555L.
Application ID
0x15
Default speed
30 Hz.
Configuration
registers
Start on
page 104.
Status registers
Start on
page 108.
Platform
Host
processor
Device
MMA9555L firmware
Analog Front End
Analog Front End
application
Slave port
Command
Interpreter
RGPIO
RGPIO
application
Pedometer firmware
Figure 22. Pedometer Data Flow Diagram
16.2
Functional description
16.2.1
Step detection
Step detection is based solely on detecting step impact, without taking into consideration the consumer’s height, weight, or
gender.
The algorithm operates by keeping track of momentary acceleration, defined as:
A =
2
2
X +Y +Z
2
where X, Y, and Z represent a single accelerometer reading, normalized by dividing by 1 g.
The values of A are accumulated over a fixed period of time (0.19 seconds). At every reading, the average A for that period is
calculated and saved. The algorithm detects steps by analyzing the spread of the accumulated average A values. The spread is
the difference between minimum and maximum of the calculated values.
For a step to be reported, the spread in the buffer of average values of A has to exceed a fixed threshold (0.13 g) and stay above
that threshold for at least the fixed value of 0.07 seconds. If the spread falls below the threshold sooner than 0.07 seconds, the
motion is ignored.
The STEPCNT variable contains the number of steps detected since the last reset. That count is updated every time a step is
detected.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
99
Functional description
16.2.2
Distance estimation
The distance estimation begins with the Base Stride Length (BSL), the estimated stride length for this consumer. The BSL is
calculated as follows:
BSL = Height ( centimeters ) × GenderFactor × 1.1
where Height is the consumer’s height and GenderFactor is 0.415 for males or 0.413 for females. For more information about
Height, see “Height/Weight register” on page 106. For more information on GenderFactor, see “Filter register” on page 106.
If no consumer information is provided, BSL is set to 0, and the resulting distance values are 0. If there is a need to update the
BSL without consumer information, the configuration structure can be used to set a fixed stride length.
The estimated stride length is calculated by adjusting the BSL for step rate (steps/second). Stride length for a particular step is
calculated as follows:
Stride = BSL × StepRateFactor
The StepRateFactor values are shown in the following table:
Table 146. StepRateFactor calculation
Step rate, S
(steps/sec)
StepRateFactor
S < 1.6 (very slow)
0.88
1.8 ≤ S < 2.35 (normal)
1.00
1.6 ≤ S < 1.8 (slow)
2.35 ≤ S < 2.8 (fast)
S ≥ 2.8 (very fast)
0.95
1.30
2.30
The overall distance is calculated as the sum of estimated stride lengths for all steps detected since the last reset.
The DISTANCE variable contains the value of overall distance and is updated every time a step is detected.
16.2.3
Speed calculation
Speed is calculated over a sliding time window as:
Distance (meters)
Speed = -------------------------------------------Time
where Distance is the total distance covered by all steps detected within the time window. Time is the length of the window and
can be configured by the SPDPRD variable.
For more information, see:
•
Speed: “Speed register” on page 110
•
Distance: “Distance register” on page 110
•
Time: “Filter register” on page 106
•
SPDPRD variable: “Speed Period/Step Threshold register” on page 107
The SPEED variable contains the current speed value and is updated every time a step is detected or once per second if there
are no steps. If there are no steps, the speed may not necessarily fall to zero even if the activity level, which is described in the
following section, falls to Rest. The activity level is reset to Rest if there are no steps for a certain amount of time. The speed
calculation does not include a similar reset when there are no steps. Therefore, it may conflict with the activity level. In this
scenario, the user should disregard the speed if the activity level is Rest.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
100
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Functional description
16.2.4
Activity-level calculation
The activity-level calculation is based on the speed value. The activity-level value is assigned according to the following table.
Table 147. Activity-level calculation
Latest speed, S
(Km/h)
Activity level
S ≥ 10.5
Running
6.5 ≤ S < 10.5
Jogging
1.0 ≤ S < 6.5
Walking
S < 1.0
Rest
The ACTIVITY variable contains the current activity level and is updated every time a step is detected or once per second if there
are no steps. Additionally, if no steps are detected for the previous 2.5 seconds, the activity level is reset to Rest.
16.2.5
Calorie-expenditure calculation
The estimated amount of calories burned by a single step is calculated as:
MetabolicFactor × 0.00029
Calories = ---------------------------------------------------------------------- × Weight
StepRate
where StepRate is calculated as described in “Distance estimation” on page 100, Weight is the consumer’s weight in kilograms,
and MetabolicFactor is calculated according to the following table:
Table 148. MetabolicFactor calculation
Step Rate, S
(steps/sec)
MetabolicFactor
S < 1.6 (very slow)
2.0
1.6 ≤ S < 1.8 (slow)
1.8 ≤ S < 2.35 (normal)
2.35 ≤ S < 2.8 (fast)
S ≥ 2.8 (very fast)
2.5
3.8
8.0
12.5
For more information, see:
— StepRate: “Filter register” on page 106
— Weight: “Height/Weight register” on page 106
The CALS variable contains the total amount of calories burned since the last reset. The value is updated every time a step is
detected.
16.2.6
Debounce count
The debounce_count() function implements a debounce counter as defined in application note Motion and Free fall Detection
Using the MMA8450Q (AN3917), listed in “Related Documentation” on page 2.
If the input condition is satisfied, the count is incremented by one up to the threshold. Otherwise, the count is decremented or
cleared depending on the debounce counter mode.
The debounce counter’s behavior is shown in Figure 23.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
101
Functional description
Low-g event
on all three axes
(Freefall)
(a)
Count threshold
FF_MT
counter value
EA FF
Low-g event
on all three axes
(Freefall)
DBCNTM = 1
Count threshold
(b)
FF_MT
counter value
EA FF
Low-g event
on all three axes
(Freefall)
DBCNTM = 0
Count threshold
(c)
FF_MT
counter value
EA FF
Figure 23. Debounce counter behavior
16.2.7
Autonomous suspend
The pedometer uses the acceleration vector magnitude squared, (X2 + Y2 + Z2), to determine if the device is stationary. It is
designed to suspend the pedometer conservatively and wake the pedometer aggressively to avoid missing any steps.
The autonomous-suspend function compares the acceleration vector magnitude to the configurable minimum and maximum
thresholds (SLEEPMIN and SLEEPMAX) and passes the boolean result to a debounce counter. If the thresholds are satisfied for
at least SLEEPTHD samples, the pedometer autonomously suspends. The thresholds are satisfied if the output of the debounce
counter is asserted.
If the thresholds are not satisfied for at least SLEEPTHD samples, the pedometer executes normally.
The parameters SLEEPMIN, SLEEPMAX, SLEEPTHD, and SLP_DBCNTM configure the behavior. The SLEEPMAX
parameter’s reset value disables the autonomous suspend function by default.
For more information, see:
•
SLEEPMIN: “Sleep Minimum register” on page 104
•
SLEEPMAX: “Sleep Maximum register” on page 104
•
SLEEPTHD: “Sleep Count Threshold register” on page 105
•
SLP_DBCNTM: “Configuration/Step Length register” on page 105
If custom sleep functionality is desired, a user may disable the pedometer’s autonomous-suspend functionality and instead use
the MMA9555L’s Reset/Suspend/Clear application to enable or disable the pedometer. For an example, see “Enable/disable the
Pedometer application” on page 124.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
102
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Memory-maps and register descriptions
16.3
Memory-maps and register descriptions
The Pedometer Application running in the MMA9553L device has eight configuration registers and six status or data registers.
The configuration registers allow the user to customize and control the behavior of the pedometer application. The status
registers report back the measured and calculated data.
All status registers are shown as 16-bits wide. They are byte-accessible, but should be read 16 bits (two bytes) or more at a time
with a single command, if the user wishes to read them atomically.
Similarly, configuration registers are shown as 16-bits wide but are also byte-accessible. Most fields defined within the
configuration registers are 8-bits or less and are byte-aligned, so they can be written one byte at a time if desired. All bytes should
be written using a single command if the user wishes to modify them atomically.
16.3.1
Pedometer memory maps
Table 149. Configuration registers
Offset
address
Register
Access
Reset
Details
0x0
Sleep Minimum register
R/W
0x0000
“Sleep Minimum register” on page 104
0x2
Sleep Maximum register
R/W
0x0000
“Sleep Maximum register” on page 104
0x4
Sleep Count Threshold register
R/W
0x0001
“Sleep Count Threshold register” on page 105
0x6
Config/Step Length register
R/W
0x0000
“Configuration/Step Length register” on page 105
0x8
Height/Weight register
R/W
0xAF50
“Height/Weight register” on page 106
0xA
Filter register
R/W
0x0403
“Filter register” on page 106
0xC
Speed Period register
R/W
0x0582
“Speed Period/Step Threshold register” on page 107
0xE
Activity Count Threshold
register
R/W
0x0000
“Activity Count Threshold register” on page 107
0xF
Step Coalesce register
R/W
0x01
“Step Coalesce register” on page 107
Table 150. Status registers
Offset
address
Register
Access
Reset
Details
0x0
Status register
R
0x0002
“Status register” on page 108
0x2
Step count register
R
0x0000
“Step Count register” on page 109
0x4
Distance register
R
0x0000
“Distance register” on page 110
0x6
Speed register
R
0x0000
“Speed register” on page 110
0x8
Calories register
R
0x0000
“Calories register” on page 110
0xA
Sleep Count register
R
0x0000
“Sleep Count register” on page 111
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
103
Memory-maps and register descriptions
16.3.2
Pedometer configuration-register descriptions
16.3.2.1
Sleep Minimum register
Table 151. Sleep Minimum register
15
Bit
14
13
12
11
10
9
Read
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
SLEEPMIN
Write
0x0000
Reset
Table 152. Sleep Minimum register field descriptions
Field
Description
15:0
SLEEPMIN
Minimum acceleration vector magnitude for autonomous suspend.
The acceleration vector magnitude must be greater than SLEEPMIN and less than SLEEPMAX to satisfy the
autonomous suspend condition(1). At rest, the acceleration vector magnitude measures approximately 1 g.
Therefore, SLEEPMIN and SLEEPMAX are expected to be set to values near 1 g (4096 at 0.244 mg/LSB
resolution).
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16). Units: 0.244 mg/LSB
1.
This condition must be satisfied for SLEEPTHD samples for the pedometer to autonomously suspend. See Table 156 on page 105.
16.3.2.2
Sleep Maximum register
Table 153. Sleep Maximum register
15
Bit
Read
Write
Reset
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
SLEEPMAX
0x0000
Table 154. Sleep Maximum register field descriptions
1.
Field
Description
15:0
SLEEPMAX
Maximum acceleration vector magnitude for autonomous suspend.
The acceleration vector magnitude must be greater than SLEEPMIN and less than SLEEPMAX to satisfy the
autonomous suspend condition(1). At rest, the acceleration vector magnitude measures approximately 1 g.
Therefore, SLEEPMIN and SLEEPMAX are expected to be set to values near 1 g (4096 at 0.244 mg/LSB
resolution).
Set to SLEEPMAX 0 to disable autonomous suspend.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16).
Units: 0.244 mg/LSB
This condition must be satisfied for SLEEPTHD samples for the pedometer to autonomously suspend. See Table 156 on page 105.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
104
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Memory-maps and register descriptions
16.3.2.3
Sleep Count Threshold register
Table 155. Sleep Count Threshold register
15
Bit
14
13
12
11
10
9
Read
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
SLEEPTHD
Write
0x0001
Reset
Table 156. Sleep Count Threshold register field descriptions
1.
Field
Description
15:0
SLEEPTHD
Autonomous suspend debounce count threshold.
The autonomous suspend condition(1) must be satisfied for SLEEPTHD samples for the pedometer to
autonomously suspend.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16).
The acceleration vector magnitude must be greater than SLEEPMIN and less than SLEEPMAX to satisfy this condition. For more information on
SLEEPMIN and SLEEPMAX, see “Sleep Minimum register” and “Sleep Maximum register”.
16.3.2.4
Configuration/Step Length register
14
13
0
0
Read
Write
Reset
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
SLP_DBCNTM
15
ACT_DBCNTM
Bit
CONFIG
Table 157. Configuration/Step Length register
—
STEPLEN
0
00000
0x00
2
1
0
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 158. Configuration/Step Length register field descriptions
Field
15
CONFIG
Description
(Re)initializes the pedometer with current configuration values.
Modifications to other pedometer configuration registers will not take effect until this bit is set. It is
automatically cleared after the (re)initialization completes.
0: Do not (re)initialize the pedometer
1: (Re)initialize the pedometer with current configuration values
14
ACT_DBCNTM
Activity debounce counter mode.
0: Decrement the count when the activity level changes
1: Clear the count when the activity level changes
13
SLP_DBCNTM
Autonomous suspend debounce counter mode.
0: Decrement the count when the device is in motion
1: Clear the count when the device is in motion
12:8
—
7:0
STEPLEN
Reserved.
Set to 0.
Step length in centimeters.
Set to 0 to automatically estimate the consumer’s step length based on gender and height.
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8)
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
105
Memory-maps and register descriptions
16.3.2.5
Height/Weight register
Table 159. Height/Weight register
15
Bit
14
13
Read
Write
Reset
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
HEIGHT
WEIGHT
0xAF
0x50
2
1
0
2
1
0
Table 160. Height/Weight register field descriptions
Field
Description
15:8
HEIGHT
Height in centimeters.
Used to estimate step length, if STEPLEN = 0.
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8)
Default = 0xAF (175 centimeters).
7:0
WEIGHT
Weight in kilograms.
Used to estimate step length, if STEPLEN = 0.
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8)
Default = 0x50 (80 kilograms).
16.3.2.6
Filter register
Table 161. Filter register
15
Bit
14
13
Read
Write
Reset
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
FILTSTEP
MALE
FILTTIME
0x04
0
0x03
Table 162. Filter register field descriptions
Field
Description
15:8
FILTSTEP
Number of steps that must occur within FILTTIME for the pedometer to decide the consumer is making steps.
Set to 0 to disable step filtering. If the value specified is greater than 6, then 6 will be used.
Valid range: 0x00:0x06 (uint8).
Default = 0x04.
7
MALE
6:0
FILTTIME
Gender
0: Female
1: Male
Number of seconds in which filter steps must occur.
Set to 0 to disable step filtering.
Valid range: 0x00:0x7F (uint8)
Default = 0x03.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
106
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Memory-maps and register descriptions
16.3.2.7
Speed Period/Step Threshold register
Table 163. Speed Period register
15
Bit
14
13
Read
Write
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
SPDPRD
STEPTHRESHOLD
0x05
0x82
Reset
1
0
Table 164. Speed Period/Step Threshold register field descriptions
Field
Description
Number of seconds in which to compute speed.
If set to a value greater than 5, then 5 will be used.
Valid range: 0x02:0x05.
Warning: Do not set SPDPRD to 0 or 1 as this may cause undesirable behavior.
15:8
SPDPRD
7:0
STEPTHRESHOLD
16.3.2.8
Magnitude acceleration threshold to detect a step. Large values make the pedometer less sensitive;
small values make the pedometer more sensitive and may lead to false positives.
Units: 1 mg/LSB
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8)
Default: 0x82 (0.13 g)
Activity Count Threshold register
Table 165. Activity Count Threshold register
15
Bit
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
Read
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
ACTTHD
Write
0x0000
Reset
Table 166. Activity Count Threshold register field descriptions
Field
15:0
ACTTHD
1.
Description
Activity debounce count threshold.
The internal activity level must be stable for ACTTHD samples before ACTIVITY is updated.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16)
0: The activity debouncer is effectively bypassed.(1)
1: The current internal activity level must equal the previous internal activity level in order to update ACTIVITY.
For more information on the activity debouncer, see Table 158 on page 105.
16.3.2.9
Step Coalesce register
Table 167. Step Coalesce register
Bit
7
Read
Write
Reset
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
STEPCOALESCE
0X01
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
107
Memory-maps and register descriptions
Table 168. Activity Count Threshold register field descriptions
Field
Description
7:0
STEPCOALESCE
16.3.3
Number of steps to coalesce before asserting STEPCHG.
0: Disables STEPCHG.
1: Asserts STEPCHG after every step. The default.
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8).
Pedometer status-register descriptions
Bit
15
14
13
12
Read
MRGFL
SUSPCHG
STEPCHG
ACTCHG
SUSP
ACTIVITY
Table 169. Status register
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
VERSION
0
0
0
0
0
000
0x02
2
1
0
Write
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
16.3.3.1
Status register
Table 170. Status register field descriptions
Field
Description
15
MRGFL
Merged status change flags.
This bit is the logical OR of the SUSPCHG, STEPCHG, and ACTCHG flags. It can be routed to a pin to
enable a single, merged-output interrupt using the MMA955xL GPIO application(1).
The host can trigger an interrupt on rising edges to receive notification when at least one of the status
change flags is asserted. The host is responsible for resolving the source if desired. That can be done by
comparing the STEPCNT to a previous value to determine that a STEPCNT change caused the MRGFL
assertion.
0: None of the status change flags are asserted
1: At least one of the status change flags (SUSPCHG, STEPCHG, ACTCHG) is asserted
14
SUSPCHG
Indicates a change in the SUSP bit.
This bit is transient and only asserts during frames in which the SUSP bit changes from the previous frame.
A frame is one 30-Hz period. This bit can be routed to a pin to enable output interrupts using the
MMA9555L GPIO AppMap application(1). The host can trigger an interrupt on rising edges to receive
notification when the pedometer suspends or resumes.
0: No change in the SUSP bit since the last pedometer call.
1: The SUSP bit changed since the last pedometer call.
13
STEPCHG
Indicates a change in STEPCNT by STEPCOALSCE steps.
This bit is transient and only asserts during frames in which STEPCNT changed from the previous frame.
A frame is one 30-Hz period. This bit can be routed to a pin to enable output interrupts using the
MMA9555L GPIO AppMap application(1). The host can trigger an interrupt on rising edges to receive
notification after every step.
0: The step count has not been incremented by STEPCOALESCE steps since the last STEPCHG
assertion or the pedometer was last initialized.
1: The step count has been incremented by STEPCOALESCE steps since the last STEPCHG assertion
or the pedometer was last initialized.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
108
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Memory-maps and register descriptions
Table 170. Status register field descriptions
1.
Field
Description
12
ACTCHG
Indicates a change in activity level.
This bit is transient and only asserts during frames in which ACTIVITY changed from the previous frame.
A frame is one 30-Hz period. This bit can be routed to a pin to enable output interrupts using the
MMA9555L GPIO AppMap application(1). The host can trigger an interrupt on rising edges to receive
notification when the activity level is changed.
0: No change in activity level since last pedometer call
1: New activity level since last pedometer call
11
SUSP
Indicates whether the pedometer is active or has been autonomously suspended.
This bit can be routed to a pin to enable output interrupts using the MMA9555L GPIO AppMap
application(1). The host can trigger an interrupt on rising edges to receive notification when the pedometer
is autonomously suspended and trigger an interrupt on falling edges to receive notification when the
pedometer resumes.
0: Pedometer is active
1: Pedometer is suspended
10:8
ACTIVITY
Activity level:
000: Unknown
001: Rest
010: Walking
011: Jogging
100: Running
101–111: Reserved
7:0
VERSION
Version number of the pedometer application, incremented by one for each new release.
0: R1.32
1: R1.33
2: R1.34
For more information on the GPIO AppMap application, see Chapter 7, “GPIO-AppMap Application”.
16.3.3.2
Step Count register
Table 171. Step Count register
Bit
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
STEPCNT
Read
Write
0x0000
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 172. Step Count register field descriptions
Field
15:0
STEPCNT
Description
The total step count since the pedometer was last reset.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16)
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
109
Memory-maps and register descriptions
16.3.3.3
Distance register
Table 173. Distance register
15
Bit
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
DIST
Read
Write
0x0000
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 174. Distance register field descriptions
Field
15:0
DIST
16.3.3.4
Description
The total distance in meters since the pedometer was last reset.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16).
Speed register
If there are no steps, the speed may not necessarily fall to zero even if the activity level falls to rest. See 16.2.3, “Speed
calculation” on page 100 for more information.
Table 175. Speed register
15
Bit
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
4
3
2
1
0
SPEED
Read
Write
0x0000
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 176. Speed register field descriptions
Field
15:0
SPEED
1.
Description
Average speed in meters per hour over SPDPRD(1).
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16)
For information on SPDPRD, see Table 164 on page 107.
16.3.3.5
Calories register
Table 177. Calories register
Bit
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
CALS
Read
Write
0x0000
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
110
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Pedometer application examples
Table 178. Calories register field descriptions
Field
Description
15:0
CALS
Total calorie count since the pedometer was last reset.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16)
16.3.3.6
Sleep Count register
Table 179. Sleep Count register
15
Bit
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
SLEEPCNT
Read
Write
0x0000
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 180. Sleep Count register field descriptions
Field
Description
15:0
SLEEPCNT
16.4
16.4.1
Current value of the autonomous suspend debounce counter.
Valid range: 0x0000:0xFFFF (uint16)
Pedometer application examples
Pedometer application configuration example
To write all the pedometer configuration registers, the following command packet shall be sent from the host to the device
mailboxes. The most significant byte of a register (MSB) is written in the lowest-numbered mailbox.
NOTE
The question marks represent placeholders for the application specific values. Please
replace the question marks with values for the application.
MB0 = 0x15: Set the Pedometer Application Identifier (0x15)
MB1 = 0x20: Set the Command: Write Config command, with zero offset (0x20)
MB2 = 0x00: Set the Offset to point to the first configuration register
MB3 = 0x11: Set the Count field to declare writing 17 bytes
MB4–MB5 = 0x????: Value for Sleep Min Register
MB6–MB7 = 0x????: Value for Sleep Max Register
MB8–MB9 = 0x????: Value for Sleep Count Threshold
MB10–MB11 = 0x????: Value for Config / Step Length Register
MB12–MB13 = 0x????: Value for Height / Weight
MB14–MB15 = 0x????: Set the Filter Register
MB16–17 = 0x????: Set the Speed Period / Step Threshold Register
MB18–19 = 0x????: Set the Activity Count
MB20 = 0x??: Set the Step Coalesce
Bytes to send: 0x15, 0x20, 0x00, 0x11, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??,
0x??, 0x??, 0x??
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
111
Pedometer application examples
To read all the pedometer configuration registers, send the following command packet from the host to the device mailboxes.
This can be used as a device identification command, allowing a host to differentiate the MMA9555L from the MMA955xL.
MB0: 0x15 = pedometer application ID
MB1: 0x10 = opcode to read configuration
MB2: 0x00 = offset into pedometer configuration register map
MB3: 0x11 = number of bytes to read
The MMA9555L response will be:
MB0: 0x15 = pedometer application ID
MB1: 0x80 = COCO=1, error code=0
MB2: 0x11 = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x11 = requested number of bytes to read
MB4: sleep minimum MSB
MB5: sleep minimum LSB
MB6: sleep maximum MSB
MB7: sleep maximum LSB
MB8: sleep count threshold MSB
MB9: sleep count threshold LSB
MB10: config
MB11: step length MB12: height
MB13: weight
MB14: filter step
MB15: male, filter time
MB16: speed period
MB17: step threshold
MB18: activity count threshold MSB
MB19: activity count threshold LSB
MB20: step coalesce
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
112
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Pedometer application examples
16.4.2
Pedometer application read example
To read all the pedometer status registers, send the following command packet from the host to the device mailboxes:
MB0 = 0x15: Set the Pedometer Application Identifier (0x15)
MB1 = 0x30: Set the Command: Read Status command, with zero offset (0x30)
MB2 = 0x00: Set the Offset (0x00) to point to the first status register
MB3 = 0x0C: Set the Count field to (12) to declare reading 12 bytes
Read back the mailboxes, when the COCO (Command Complete) bit is set the status data will be in the mailbox registers.
Bytes to send: 0x15, 0x30, 0x00, 0x0C
The response to this command will be:
MB0: 0x15 = pedometer application ID
MB1: 0x80 = COCO=1, error code=0
MB2: 0x0C = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x0C = requested number of bytes to read
MB4: pedometer status register MSB
MB5: pedometer status register LSB
MB6: step count MSB
MB7: step count LSB
MB8: distance MSB
MB9: distance LSB
MB10: speed MSB
MB11: speed LSB
MB12: calories MSB
MB13: calories LSB
MB14: sleep count MSB
MB15: sleep count LSB
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
113
17 GPIO Input/Output Application
17.1
Overview of GPIO Input/Output application
Application
ID
The GPIO input/output application provides a function that can control seven physical GPIO
Default speed
pins of MMA9555L. It can set the direction GPIOs as input or output, control the pin level
when the pin is set as an output pin and read the pin level through its status register. It also
has a mask register, called the Enable Configuration Register, to avoid conflict with the GPIO Configuration
AppMap application APP-ID 0x03.
registers
The GPIO pins that are available to this application are described in Table 181.
Table 181. GPIO pin names, numbers and functions
17.2
Name
Pin number
GPIO2
7
GPIO3
8
GPIO4
9
GPIO5
11
GPIO6
12
GPIO7
13
GPIO8
15
GPIO9
2
Status
registers
0x19
30 Hz.
Start on page
115.
Start on page
116.
Memory maps and register descriptions
The GPIO Input/Output Application has three configuration registers and one status register. The configuration registers allow
the user to customize and control the behavior of the GPIO Input/Output application. The status registers report back the level of
the GPIO2–GPIO9. The status register is 8 bits wide.
Similarly, configuration registers are 8 bits wide. They can be written one byte at a time if desired. All bytes should be written
using a single command if the user wishes to modify them atomically.
17.2.1
GPIO Input/Output memory maps
Table 182. Configuration Registers
Offset
address
Register
Access
Reset
Details
0x00
GPIO input/output direction register
R/W
0x0F
“GPIO input/output direction register” on page 115
0x01
GPIO input/output enable register
R/W
0x0F
“GPIO input/output enable register” on page 115
0x02
GPIO input/output data register
R/W
0x05
“GPIO input/output data register” on page 116
Table 183. Status register
Offset
address
0x00
Register
GPIO input/output Status register
Access
Reset
R
0x05
Details
“GPIO Input/Output Status register” on page 116
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
114
GPIO Input/Output configuration register descriptions
17.3
GPIO Input/Output configuration register descriptions
17.3.1
GPIO input/output direction register
Table 184. GPIO input/output direction register
Bit
7
Read
Write
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
DIR8
DIR7
DIR6
DIR5
DIR4
DIR3
DIR2
0x0F
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 185. GPIO input/output direction register field description
Field
Description
6:0
DIR8–DIR2
GPIO data direction. The value of this register is shifted and then copied to the hardware register RGPIO_DIR.
0: Configured as an input
1: Configured as an output
17.3.2
GPIO input/output enable register
Table 186. GPIO input/output enable register
Bit
7
Read
Write
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
EN8
EN7
EN6
EN5
EN4
EN3
EN2
0x0F
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 187. GPIO input/output enable register description
Field
6:0
EN8–EN2
Description
GPIO enable. The value of this register is shifted and then copied to the hardware register RGPIO_EN.
0: Disable the pin in this application
1: Enable the pin in this application
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
115
GPIO Input/Output Status register descriptions
17.3.3
GPIO input/output data register
Table 188. GPIO input/output data register
7
Bit
Read
Write
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
DATA8
DATA7
DATA6
DATA5
DATA4
DATA3
DATA2
0x05
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 189. GPIO input/output data register description
Field
Description
6:0
EN8–EN2
GPIO data output. The value of this register is shifted and then copied to the hardware register RGPIO_DATA.
0: Output low on the pin
1: Output high on the pin
17.4
GPIO Input/Output Status register descriptions
17.4.1
GPIO Input/Output Status register
Table 190. GPIO input/output status register
Bit
Read
Write
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
DATA9
DATA8
DATA7
DATA6
DATA5
DATA4
DATA3
DATA2
0x05
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 191. GPIO input/output status register description
Field
Description
GPIO data output. The value of this register is read from hardware register RGPIO_DATA.
0: A properly enabled RGPIO output pin is driven with a logic 0, or a properly enabled RGPIO input pin was read
7:0
as a logic 0
DATA9–DATA2
1: A properly enabled RGPIO output pin is driven with a logic 1, or a properly enabled RGPIO input pin was read
as a logic 1
NOTE
Though GPIO9 cannot be set in the configuration registers, the pin level can be detected in
the status register when GPIO9 is set as interrupt pin in APP-ID 0x03.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
116
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
GPIO Input/Output application examples
17.5
17.5.1
GPIO Input/Output application examples
GPIO Input/Output application configuration example
To write all the GPIO Input/Output configuration registers, the following command packet should be sent from the host to the
device mailboxes. The most significant byte of a register (MSB) is written in the lowest-numbered mailbox.
NOTE
The question marks represent placeholders for the application specific values. Please
replace the question marks with the values for the application.
MB0 : 0x19= Set the GPIO Input/Output Application Identifier (0x19)
MB1 : 0x20= Set the Command: Write Config command, with zero offset (0x20)
MB2 : 0x00= Set the Offset to point to the first configuration register
MB3 : 0x03= Set the Count field to declare writing 3 bytes
MB4 : 0x??= Value for GPIO input/output direction register
MB5 : 0x??= Value for GPIO input/output enable register
MB6 : 0x??= Value for GPIO input/output data register
Bytes to send: 0x19, 0x20, 0x00, 0x03, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??
To read all the GPIO Input/Output configuration registers, the following command packet should be sent from the host to the
device mailboxes.
MB0: 0x19= GPIO Input/Output application ID
MB1: 0x10= opcode to read configuration
MB2: 0x00= offset into GPIO Input/Output configuration register map
MB3: 0x03= number of bytes to read
The MMA9555L response will be:
MB0: 0x19 = GPIO Input/Output application ID
MB1: 0x80 = COCO=1, error code=0
MB2: 0x03 = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x03 = requested number of bytes to read
MB4: Value of GPIO input/output direction register
MB5: Value of GPIO input/output enable register
MB6: Value of GPIO input/output data register
17.5.2
GPIO Input/Output application read example
To read the GPIO Input/Output status register, the following command packet is sent from the host to the device mailboxes:
MB0 : 0x19 = Set the GPIO Input/Output Application Identifier (0x19)
MB1 : 0x30 = Set the Command: Read Status command, with zero offset (0x30)
MB2 : 0x00 = Set the Offset (0x00) to point to the first status register
MB3 : 0x01= Set the Count field to (1) to declare reading 1 byte
Bytes to send: 0x19, 0x30, 0x00, 0x01
To read the mailboxes, when the COCO (Command Complete) bit is set, the status data are in the mailbox registers.
The response to this command is:
MB0: 0x19 = GPIO Input/Output application ID
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
117
GPIO Input/Output application examples
MB1: 0x80 = COCO=1, error code=0
MB2: 0x01 = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x01 = requested number of bytes to read
MB4: GPIO input/output Status register
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
118
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
18 Six-Direction Application
18.1
Overview of the Six-Direction application
Application
ID
The Six-Direction application detects six major directional orientations of the device in threeDefault speed
dimensional space. It determines the primary axis that the device is oriented: +X, –X, +Y,
–Y, +Z or –Z, with reference opposite to the direction of gravity. It uses the coordinate system
as defined in Figure 5 on page 12.
Configuration
registers
When the absolute g value of the current direction is less than half g, the application detects
which axis has the largest absolute g value. If this axis is kept as the largest and the
debounce count meets the count threshold, it updates the status of the direction. When the Status
registers
absolute g value of the current direction is larger than half g, it keeps current direction.
18.2
0x1A
30 Hz.
Start on page
120.
Start on page
121.
Memory maps and register descriptions
The Six-Direction Application running in the MMA9555L device has two configuration registers and two status registers. The
configuration registers allow the user to customize and control the behavior of the Six-Direction application. The status registers
report current direction status, status change flag and debounce count status.
The status registers are 8 bits wide. They are byte-accessible, but should be read two bytes at a time with a single command, if
the user wishes to read them atomically.
Similarly, configuration registers are 8 bits wide. They can be written one byte at a time if desired. All bytes should be written
using a single command if the user wishes to modify them atomically.
18.2.1
Six Direction register memory maps
Table 192. Configuration registers
Offset
address
Register
Access
Reset
Details
0x00
SixDir Count Threshold register
R/W
0x1E
“SixDir Count Threshold register” on page 120
0x01
SixDir Debounce mode register
R/W
0x01
“SixDir Debounce mode register” on page 120
Table 193. Status register
Offset
address
Register
Access
Reset
Details
0x00
SixDir Current Status register
R/W
0x06
“SixDir Current Status register” on page 121
0x01
SixDir Debounce count register
R/W
0x00
“SixDir Debounce count register” on page 121
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
119
Six Direction configuration register descriptions
18.3
Six Direction configuration register descriptions
18.3.1
SixDir Count Threshold register
Table 194. SixDir Count Threshold register
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Read
Write
SDTHD
Reset
0x30
2
1
0
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 195. SixDir Count Threshold register description
Field
7:0
SDTHD
18.3.2
Description
SixDir debounce count threshold.
The status of the direction is not changed until the debounce count meets this threshold.
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8).
SixDir Debounce mode register
Table 196. SixDir Debounce mode register
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
2
Read
Write
1
0
SDM
0x01
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 197. SixDir Debounce mode register description
Field
0
SDM
Description
SixDir debounce counter mode.
0: Decrement the count when the device changes direction
1: Clear the count when the device changes direction
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
120
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Six Direction Status register descriptions
18.4
Six Direction Status register descriptions
18.4.1
SixDir Current Status register
Table 198. SixDir Current Status register
Bit
7
Read
Write
SC_FLG
6
5
4
3
2
1
AXIS_POS
0
AXIS
0x06
Reset
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 199. SixDir Current Status register description
Field
Description
Direction Status change flag.
0: Direction has not changed
1: Direction changed. The bit is cleared when the register is read.
7
SC_FLG
2
AXIS_POS
1:0
AXIS
18.4.2
Sign of the direction of the axis detected
0 : Negative Direction
1: Positive direction
Direction is on which axis.
00: X axis
01: Y axis
10: Z axis
SixDir Debounce count register
Table 200. SixDir Debounce count register
Bit
7
6
5
4
3
Read
Write
SDCNT
Reset
0x00
2
1
0
= Unimplemented or reserved
Table 201. SixDir Debounce count register description
Field
7:0
SDCNT
18.4.3
Description
The total debounce count since the direction status was last reset.
Valid range: 0x00:0xFF (uint8)
Six Direction application configuration example
To write all the Six-Direction configuration registers, the host should send the following command packet to the mailboxes. The
most significant byte of a register (MSB) is written in the lower numbered mailbox.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
121
Six Direction Status register descriptions
NOTE
The question marks represent placeholders for the application-specific values. Please
replace the question marks with the desired values for the application.
MB0 : 0x1A= Set the Six-Direction Application Identifier (0x1A)
MB1 : 0x20= Set the Command: Write Config command, with zero offset (0x20)
MB2 : 0x00= Set the Offset to point to the first configuration register
MB3 : 0x02= Set the Count field to declare writing 2 bytes
MB4 : 0x??= Value for SixDir Count Threshold register
MB5 : 0x??= Value for SixDir Debounce mode register
Bytes to send: 0x1A, 0x20, 0x00, 0x02, 0x??, 0x??
To read all the Six-Direction configuration registers, the following command packet is sent from the host to the device mailboxes.
MB0: 0x1A= Six-Direction application ID
MB1: 0x10= opcode to read configuration
MB2: 0x00= offset into Six-Direction configuration register map
MB3: 0x02= number of bytes to read
The MMA9555L response will be:
MB0: 0x1A = Six-Direction application ID
MB1: 0x80 = COCO=1, error code=0
MB2: 0x02 = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x02 = requested number of bytes to read
MB4: Value of SixDir Count Threshold register
MB5: Value of SixDir Debounce mode register
18.4.4
Six Direction application read example
To read the Six-Direction status register, the following command packet is sent from the host to the device mailboxes:
MB0 : 0x1A = Set the Six-Direction Application Identifier (0x1A)
MB1 : 0x30 = Set the Command: Read Status command, with zero offset (0x30)
MB2 : 0x00 = Set the Offset (0x00) to point to the first status register
MB3 : 0x02= Set the Count field to (2) to declare reading 2 bytes
Bytes to send: 0x1A, 0x30, 0x00, 0x02
To read the mailboxes, when the COCO (Command Complete) bit is set, the status data is in the mailbox registers.
The response to this command is:
MB0: 0x1A= Six-Direction application ID
MB1: 0x80 = COCO=1, error code=0
MB2: 0x02 = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x02 = requested number of bytes to read
MB4: Value of SixDir Current Status register
MB5: Value of SixDir Debounce count register
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
122
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
19 Sample operations
This section provides sample slave-port commands to read and modify application variables.
19.1
Read pedometer status variables
This command reads all 12 bytes of the status variables from the Pedometer application (APP_ID=0x15), starting at byte offset 0.
15 30 00 0C
19.2
Read pedometer configuration variables
This command reads all 16 bytes of the configuration variables from the Pedometer application (APP_ID=0x15), starting at byte
offset 0.
15 10 00 10
19.3
Write pedometer configuration variables
This command writes all 16 bytes of the configuration variables to the Pedometer application (APP_ID=0x15), starting at byte
offset 0.
15 20 00 10 00 11 22 33 44 55 66 77 88 99 AA BB CC DD EE FF
19.4
Read GPIO Input/output status variables
This command reads the status variable from the GPIO input/output application (APP_ID=0x19), starting at byte offset 0.
19 30 00 01
19.5
Read GPIO Input/output configuration variables
This command reads all 3 bytes of the configuration variables from the GPIO input/output application (APP_ID=0x19), starting
at byte offset 0.
19 10 00 03
19.6
Write GPIO Input/output configuration variables
This command writes all 3 bytes of the configuration variables to the GPIO input/output application (APP_ID=0x19), starting at
byte offset 0.
19 20 00 03 xx xx xx
19.7
Read Six direction status variables
This command reads the two status variables from the Six Direction application (APP_ID=0x1A), starting at byte offset 0.
1A 30 00 02
19.8
Read Six direction configuration variables
This command reads all 2 bytes of the configuration variables from the Six Direction application (APP_ID=0x1A), starting at byte
offset 0.
1A 10 00 02
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
123
Write Six direction configuration variables
19.9
Write Six direction configuration variables
This command writes all 3 bytes of the configuration variables to the Six Direction application (APP_ID=0x19), starting at byte
offset 0.
1A 20 00 02 xx xx
19.10 Reset pedometer configuration variables to their defaults
This command writes one byte of configuration variable to the Reset/Suspend/Clear application (APP_ID=0x17) starting at byte
offset 1.
This causes the scheduler to invoke the pedometer's reset function, pedometer_reset().
17 20 01 01 20
19.11 Enable/disable the Pedometer application
This command writes one byte of configuration variable to the Reset/Suspend/Clear application (APP_ID=0x17) starting at byte
offset 5.
This causes the scheduler to suspend the Pedometer application, even if the device is not stationary.
17 20 05 01 20 (disable)
17 20 05 01 00 (enable)
19.12 Configure the AFE range
This command writes one byte of the configuration variable to the AFE application (APP_ID=0x06), starting at byte offset 0. Since
the pedometer uses a normalized acceleration output provided by the AFE application, the g mode only affects the saturation
level and noise.
Regardless of what g mode the AFE is configured to, for or by other applications, the resolution seen by the Pedometer
application is always 8 g.
06 20 00 01 40 (2 g mode)
06 20 00 01 80 (4 g mode)
06 20 00 10 00 (8 g mode)
For more information on configuring the AFE range, see the "AFE configuration registers" section.
19.13 Configure output interrupt: Activity change on GPIO6
This command writes two bytes of the configuration variable to the GPIO application (APP_ID=0x03), starting at byte offset 0.
This causes the GPIO application to copy the pedometer's ACTCHG status bit to GPIO6 after every new accelerometer sample.
The host processor can trigger an interrupt on rising edges of this pin to receive notification when the activity level changes.
03 20 00 02 15 04
19 20 01 01 (AB & 6F)
19.14 Configure output interrupt: Step change on GPIO7
This command writes two bytes of the configuration variable to the GPIO application (APP_ID=0x03), starting at byte offset 2.
This causes the GPIO application to copy the pedometer's STEPCHG status bit to GPIO7 after every new accelerometer sample.
The host processor can trigger an interrupt on rising edges of this pin to receive notification when the step count changes.
03 20 02 02 15 05
19 20 01 01 (AB & 5F)
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
124
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Configure output interrupt: Suspend change on GPIO8
19.15 Configure output interrupt: Suspend change on GPIO8
This command writes two bytes of the configuration variable to the GPIO application (APP_ID=0x03) starting at byte offset 4.
This causes the GPIO application to copy the pedometer's SUSPCHG status bit to GPIO8 after every new accelerometer sample.
The host processor can trigger an interrupt on rising edges of this pin to receive notification when the pedometer autonomously
suspends or resumes.
03 20 04 02 15 06
19 20 01 01 (AB & 3F)
19.16 Configure output interrupt: Merged flags on GPIO6
This command writes two bytes of the configuration variable to the GPIO application (APP_ID=0x03) starting at byte offset 0.
This causes the GPIO application to copy the pedometer's MRGFL status bit to GPIO6 after every new accelerometer sample.
The host processor can trigger an interrupt on rising edges of this pin to receive notification the activity-level, step-count, or
suspend-state changes.
03 20 00 02 15 07
19 20 01 01 (AB & 6F)
19.17 Configure output interrupt: Every 10 steps on GPIO7
The first command writes one byte of configuration variable to the Pedometer application (APP_ID = 0x15), starting at byte offset
13. This causes the pedometer to coalesce steps and assert STEPCHG once every 10 steps.
The second command writes two bytes of configuration variables to the GPIO application (APP_ID = 0x03), starting at byte offset
2. This causes the GPIO application to copy the pedometer's STEPCHG status bit to GPIO7 after every new accelerometer
sample.
15 20 0D 01 0A
03 20 02 02 15 05
19 20 01 01 (AB & 5F)
19.18 Configure output interrupt: Device direction change on GPIO6
This command writes two bytes of the configuration variable to the GPIO application (APP_ID=0x03), starting at byte offset 0.
This causes the GPIO application to copy the Six-Direction's SC_FLG status bit to GPIO6 after every new accelerometer sample.
The host processor can trigger an interrupt on rising edges of this pin to receive notification when the activity level changes.
03 20 00 02 1A 07
19 20 01 01 (AB & 6F)
19.19 Wake up from Deep Sleep (Stop No Clock mode)
By default, the MMA955xL initializes all applications after a hardware reset and then falls into Deep Sleep mode where all system
clocks are stopped. A slave-port command can be used to wake up the clocks, enable the accelerometer, and execute the
pedometer.
This command writes one byte of configuration variable to the sleep/wake application (APP_ID=0x12) starting at byte offset 6.
12 20 06 01 00
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
125
20 Package Information
The MMA9555L uses a 16-lead LGA package, case number 2094. Use the following link for the latest diagram of the package:
www.freescale.com/files/shared/doc/package_info/98ASA00287D.pdf
20.1
Footprint and pattern information
Pin 16
Pin 1 ID
Pin 1
Package pad size
0.24 mm x 0.35 mm
Figure 24. Package bottom view
PCB land extension
From the edge of the package
PCB land pad
PCB pad distance
to package edge
Package size (Measurements in mm)
Figure 25. Package overlaid on PCB footprint diagram (top view)
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
126
Marking
PCB land pad size
0.65 mm x 0.25 mm
Solder mask opening
Solder stencil opening
0.777 mm x 1.377 mm
(PCB land + 0.0637 mm larger all around.
Remove slivers between pads.)
0.62 mm x 0.22 mm
(PCB land – 0.015 mm smaller all around)
Figure 26. Recommended PCB footprint
20.2
Marking
5PQ7JFX
'SFFTDBMFDPEF
"-:8
1BSUOVNCFS
5SBDFBCJMJUZEBUFDPEF
"TTFNCMZTJUF
-PUDPEF
8PSLXFFL
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
127
Tape and reel information
20.3
Tape and reel information
Figure 27. Tape dimensions
The devices are oriented on the tape as shown in Figure 28. The dot marked on each device indicates pin 1.
1JO
%JSFDUJPO
UPVOSFFM
#BSDPEFMBCFM
TJEFPGSFFM
Figure 28. Tape and reel orientation
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
128
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Package Description
20.4
Package Description
Use the following link for the latest diagram of the package:
www.freescale.com/files/shared/doc/package_info/98ASA00287D.pdf
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
129
Revision History
Revision
number
Revision
date
1.0
10/2014
Description of changes
Initial release of document.
2.0
3/2015
Features, 117 µA for pedometer... was 190 µA for pedometer
Figure 2, Device pinout
Changed pin 6 from RGPIO/SDA0/SDI to RGPIO1/SDA0/SDI
Changed pin 8 from RGPIO3/SBB to RGPIO3/SSB
Figures 3 and 4
Changed pin 7 from IO2/SCL1/SDO to IO2/SDO
Changed pin 8 from IO3/SDA1/SSB to IO3/SSB
Added Sections 4–10.
Section 16.3.2.7, added Step Threshold
Table 167, Version Reset changed from 0x01 to 0x02
Table 168, 7:0, VERSION, added 2: R1.34
Section 16.4.1, To write all the pedometer configuration registers,...
MB3 = 0x11: Set the Count field to declare writing 17 bytes
was
MB3 = 0x10: Set the Count field to declare writing 16 bytes
MB16-17 = 0x????: Set the Speed Period / Step Threshold Register
was
MB16–MB17 = 0x????: Set the Speed Period
Added MB20 = 0x??: Set the Step Coalesce
Bytes to send: 0x15, 0x20, 0x00, 0x11, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??,
0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??
was
Bytes to send: 0x15, 0x20, 0x00, 0x10, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??,
0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??, 0x??
Section 16.4.1, To read all the pedometer configuration registers,...
MB3: 0x11=number of bytes to read
was
MB3: 0x10=number of bytes to read
MB2: 0x11 = actual number of bytes read
was
MB2: 0x10 = actual number of bytes read
MB3: 0x11 = requested number of bytes to read
was
MB3: 0x10 = requested number of bytes to read
MB15: male, filter time
was
MB15: male, filter time MB16: step period
Added MB16: speed period
MB17: step threshold
was
MB17: step coalesce
Added MB20: step coalesce
Deleted
Added Section 19.3.2.9, Step Coalesce register
Section 19.6, Write GPIO Input/output configuration variables was Write pedometer configuration variables
Section 19.13, 19 20 01 01 (AB & 6F) was 19 20 01 01
Section 19.14, added 19 20 01 01 (AB & 5F)
Section 19.15, 19 20 01 01 (AB & 3F) was 19 20 01 01
Section 19.16, 19 20 01 01 (AB & 6F) was 19 20 01 01
Section 19.17, 19 20 01 01 (AB & 5F) was 19 20 01 01
Section 19.18, 19 20 01 01 (AB & 6F) was 19 20 01 01
2.1
5/2015
Section 2.4.3, Note, deleted “Note that such a connection exists when the Master I2C interface is used (SDA1
function for pin 8).”
Figure 3, changed resistor from R2 to R4
Table 150, Status register, changed Reset from 0x0001 to 0x0002
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
130
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
Revision
number
Revision
date
2.2
6/2015
Description of changes
• Table 146 StepRateFactor value changed to 1.30
• Section 16.2.5, “Calorie-expenditure calculation,” on page 101 corrected Calorie-expenditure equation to
match the calculation.
MMA9555L Intelligent Pedometer Data Sheet, Rev. 2.2
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc.
131
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Document Number: MMA9555L
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