cd00270706

UM0935
User manual
STEVAL-PCC009V2, IBU universal interface
based on the STM32F103RB
Introduction
The IBU universal interface (UI) is a tool which contains:
■
An IBU UI board (STEVAL-PCC009V2), which is an STM32-based USB-to-serial
interface bridge consisting of a configurable 10-pin and 30-pin interface
■
Dll files which are available software resources that allow the user to develop customized
GUIs as per application requirements.
This user manual explains the functions of the IBU UI tool (STEVAL-PCC009V2) and how to
use it. IBU UI is a complete tool to rapidly develop application prototypes. On this
demonstration board, the STM32 microcontroller is used as the interface between the PC
and the end device. Due to intelligence available in the STM32 device, various
communication peripherals are multiplexed with GPIOs and ADC and PWM channels in
both a 10-pin and 30-pin interface.
In these interfaces, there is a provision to connect a device which can communicate using
I2C, SPI and UART. Therefore, the IBU UI tool allows the user to connect a serial
communication based device to the PC. At the same time it allows the user to control some
GPIOs available in 10-pin and 30-pin interfaces and set them in input/output modes, as per
application requirements.
Power to the board is provided from a USB mini B-type connector.
DLL files are provided with this tool so that the user can make their own customized PC GUI
as per requirements.
Therefore the IBU UI tool, by taking care of all the microcontroller complexities, provides an
option for the end user to focus on its application development, therefore increasing its
efficiency and time to market.
The IBU UI tool supports two modes:
January 2011
■
Application mode: this PC GUI allows interfacing of the SPI, I2C and UART interface and
controlling the communication parameters with the help of the GUI itself
■
DFU mode: this mode allows the user to change the firmware, if required, to suit its
applications.
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www.st.com
Contents
UM0935
Contents
1
Section organization of the user manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
2
Getting started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.1
System requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.2
Package contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.3
Software installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
2.4
Hardware installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
2.5
3
Power supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
2.4.2
Jumper/header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Selection of the interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Running the IBU UI tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
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2.4.1
Using the I2C interface of the 10-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3.1.1
Steps for making the hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
3.1.2
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1.4
Using GPIOs as ADC mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
3.1.5
I2C read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Using the SPI interface of the 10-pin connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
3.2.1
Steps for making hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3.2.2
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
3.2.3
Using GPIOs as PWM settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2.4
Using GPIOs as ADC settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2.5
SPI header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
3.2.6
SPI read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Using the UART(SCI) interface of the 10-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
3.3.1
Steps for making hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.3.2
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.3.3
Using GPIOs in PWM settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
3.3.4
Using GPIO in ADC settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.3.5
UART1 (SCI1) header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
3.3.6
UART1 (SCI1) read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Using the I2C interface of the 30-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
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Contents
3.5
3.6
3.7
4
3.4.1
Steps for making hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.4.2
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.4.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
3.4.4
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.4.5
I2C header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3.4.6
I2C read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Using the SPI interface of the 30-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
3.5.1
Steps for making hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.5.2
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.5.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.5.4
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.5.5
SPI header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.5.6
SPI read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Using the UART1(SCI1) interface of the 30-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.6.1
Steps for making hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.6.2
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
3.6.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.6.4
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.6.5
UART1 (SCI1) header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
3.6.6
UART1 (SCI1) read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Using UART2 (SCI2) interface of 30-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.7.1
Steps for making hardware connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7.2
Select UART2 (SCI2) interface using DLL software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7.3
GPIO settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
3.7.4
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.7.5
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.7.6
UART2 (SCI2) header settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
3.7.7
UART2 (SCI2) read and write operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Working in DFU mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Appendix A Schematics and BOM list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Appendix B All possible interpretations of the 10-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Appendix C All possible interpretations the of 30-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
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Contents
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Appendix D Tables and figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Revision history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
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List of tables
List of tables
Table 1.
Table 2.
Table 3.
Table 4.
Table 5.
Table 6.
Table 7.
Table 8.
Table 9.
Table 10.
Section to be referred to for a particular mode of a 10-pin or 30-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Availability of various communication peripherals and GPIOs on 10-pin and 30-pin
interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Number of total GPIOs, PWM GPIOs, and ADC channels in 10-pin and 30-pin headers in
various modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
BOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
All possible Interpretations of the 10-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
All possible interpretations of the 30-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
GPIO modes of 10-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
GPIO modes of 30-pin interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
PWM channel settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Document revision history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
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List of figures
UM0935
List of figures
Figure 1.
Figure 2.
Figure 3.
Figure 4.
Figure 5.
Figure 6.
Figure 7.
Figure 8.
Figure 9.
Figure 10.
Figure 11.
Figure 12.
Figure 13.
Figure 14.
Figure 15.
Figure 16.
Figure 17.
Figure 18.
Figure 19.
Figure 20.
Figure 21.
Figure 22.
Figure 23.
Figure 24.
Figure 25.
Figure 26.
Figure 27.
Figure 28.
Figure 29.
Figure 30.
Figure 31.
Figure 32.
Figure 33.
Figure 34.
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Installation Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
License Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Destination folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Installation ongoing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Installation complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
STEVAL-PCC009V2, IBU universal interface board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Jumper J1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Jumper J2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Enumeration result . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
J1 Interpretation for I2C interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Connection diagram for I2C interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Transfer sequence of one byte of I2C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
J2 interpretation for SPI interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Connecting diagram for the 10-pin SPI interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
J1 interpretation for UART (SCI) interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Connection diagram for the 10-pin UART interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
J2 Interpretation for I2C interface of 30-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Connection diagram for I2C interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Transfer sequence of one byte of I2C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
J2 Interpretation for SPI interface of 30-pin header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Connection diagram for 30-pin SPI interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Transfer sequence of one byte of SPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
J2 interpretation for UART1 (SCI1) interface of 30-pin header. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Connection diagram for 30-pin UART1 interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Transfer sequence of one byte of UART1 (SCI1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
J2 interpretation for UART2 (SCI2) interface of 30-pin header. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Connection diagram for 30-pin UART2 interface/GPIOs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Transfer sequence of one byte of UART2 (SCI2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Enumeration in DFU mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Microcontroller section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
JTAG interface, mode selection switch and power supply section . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
10-pin com interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
30-pin com interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
PWM signal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
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1
Section organization of the user manual
Section organization of the user manual
The user must go through Section 2.1 to Section 2.4 of this manual to perform the initial
setup that is required to run the IBU UI tool. After reading these sections, the user can
understand how to install the software and hardware setup.
To choose how to select a communication interface, the user must read Section 2.5, this
section explains the seven modes (as shown in Table 1) that are available in the 10-pin and
30-pin header and how to select which interface mode is best suited to the development of
their application.
After this, the user must decide which communication interface of a 10-pin or 30-pin header
should be used. As shown in Table 1 below, Section 3 is documented in such a manner that
the user need only refer to the section corresponding to the communication interface to be
used. For instance, if the user wants to use the UART2 interface mode of the 30-pin header,
they need only refer to Section 3.7 of this document.
Table 1.
Section to be referred to for a particular mode of a 10-pin or 30-pin
interface
Header
Interface
I2C
10-pin header
Refer to section
mode
3.1
SPI mode
3.2
UART mode
3.7
2C
mode
3.7
SPI mode
3.7
UART1 mode
3.7
UART2 mode
3.7
I
30-pin header
Section 4 explains how to use the DFU capability of this tool. This section needs to be
referred to when there it is necessary to update the firmware of the microcontroller of this
tool.
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Getting started
UM0935
2
Getting started
2.1
System requirements
In order to use the IBU universal interface (IBU UI) tool with a Windows operating system, a
recent version of Windows, such as Windows 2000 or Windows XP, must be installed on the
PC.
The version of the Windows OS installed on the PC may be determined by clicking on the
“System” icon in the control panel.
2.2
Package contents
The IBU UI tool includes the following items:
●
●
●
2.3
Hardware content:
–
One board
–
BOM list
–
Schematic
Software content:
–
DFU firmware
–
DLL files of the I2C, SPI and UART interface of the 10-pin header
–
DLL files of the I2C, SPI, and UART1 and UART2 interface of the 30-pin header
–
Source code (including DFU)
Documentation:
–
User manual (to work in functional mode)
–
User manual (to work in DFU mode)
–
Help file on how to use the DLL file
Software installation
The DLLs are provided with the tool, mainly in the form of a CD as a part of the package.
The folder contains the setup files.
●
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Step1: as soon as the user clicks the setup.exe icon, the following window appears:
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Getting started
Figure 1.
●
Installation Window
Step 2: read the license file and click the “Next” button if you accept the license.
Figure 2.
License Window
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Getting started
●
UM0935
Step 3: select the folder in which to install the software. By default it installs the
software in the following path: C:\Program Files\STMicroelectronics\USB to serial
interface SDK\Dll&Libraries
Figure 3.
●
Step 4: after selecting the folder and clicking the “Next” button, the software starts
installing.
Figure 4.
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Destination folder
Installation ongoing
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Getting started
Figure 5.
Installation complete
After clicking the “Finish” button, the software is installed in the directory selected or in the
default directory. The shortcut of this software is also available in the Start menu. The help
file on how to use DLL is also available in the same directory.
2.4
Hardware installation
Figure 6 below shows a snapshot of the IBU UI board.
Figure 6.
STEVAL-PCC009V2, IBU universal interface board
30-pin
10-pin
20-pin
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Getting started
2.4.1
UM0935
Power supply
The board is directly powered by the USB mini B-type connector J4 (bus powered). There is
a power LED D2 available onboard, as soon as the board is powered, using the USB mini-B
cable, it lights up.
2.4.2
Jumper/header settings
●
J1: J1 is the 10-pin header available on the IBU UI board. There are 8 GPIOs, GND,
and VDD (3.3 V) lines available, as shown in Figure 7 below:
Figure 7.
●
J2: J2 is the 30-pin header available on the IBU UI board. There are 24 GPIOs, GND,
and VDD lines available, as shown in Figure 8 below:
Figure 8.
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Jumper J1
Jumper J2
●
J3: This is the standard 20-pin JTAG header available on the board. This can be used
by the user to run the board in debug mode using any JTAG based debugger for an
STM32 device.
●
SW1: this is the reset switch that can be used to reset the board at any point.
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2.5
Getting started
Selection of the interface
The tool has 10-pin and 30-pin interface headers. Both of these headers support various
communication peripherals, as shown in Table 2.
These headers and their corresponding pins can be used in various modes and GPIO
configurations.
Table 2.
Availability of various communication peripherals and GPIOs on 10-pin
and 30-pin interfaces
Interfaces
30-pin interface
10-pin interface
I2C
1
1
SPI
1
1
UART(SCI)
2
1
PWM GPIOs
4
2
ADC channels
4
1
As shown in Table 3, the user can configure the IBU UI tool in 7 modes, 3 of these modes
are on a 10-pin header and 4 on a 30-pin header. For instance, if the user mainly aims at
using an I2C communication interface, there are two available choices:
a)
I2C mode of a 10-pin header: along with the communication peripheral I2C, the
user has 6 GPIOs, of which 2 GPIOs can be used as PWM channels and 1 can be
used as an ADC channel
b)
I2C mode of 30-pin header: along with the communication peripheral I2C, the user
has 22 GPIOs, of which 4 GPIOs can be used as PWM channels and 4 can be
used as ADC channels
Table 3.
Number of total GPIOs, PWM GPIOs, and ADC channels in 10-pin and 30pin headers in various modes
Header
10-pin header
Interfaces modes
Total GPIOs
PWM GPIOs
ADC channels
I2C mode
6
2
1
SPI mode
4
2
1
UART mode
4
2
1
I2C mode
22
4
4
SPI mode
20
4
4
UART1 mode
20
4
4
UART2 mode
22
4
4
30-pin header
Please refer to Appendix B, Table 5 to understand the possible GPIO modes and
communication interfaces available on each pin in 10-pin headers. Refer also to Appendix
C, Table 6 to understand the possible GPIO modes and communication interfaces available
on each pin in 30-pin headers.
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Based on the above description, the user is able to select which mode is most suited to their
application development.
Please note that any two communication interfaces of 10-pin or 30-pin headers cannot be
used at the same time. For instance, the user cannot use the I2C mode of 10-pin headers
and the I2C mode of 30-pin headers at the same time or use the I2C and SPI mode at the
same time. To switch between the 7 modes available the user needs to select, using DLL,
the interface to be used. As the user switches between the two modes, the settings of the
previous mode are reset. For Instance, if the user is using the I2C mode of a 10-pin header
and switches to the I2C mode of a 30-pin header, the settings of the previous 10-pin header
are reset and all the pins of the 10-pin header go into input pull-up mode.
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3
Running the IBU UI tool
Running the IBU UI tool
To run the board, connect it to the PC with the USB mini B-type cable.
As soon as the board is powered using the USB mini-B cable, power LED D2 lights up. If this
LED fails to light up, take the following steps:
1.
Check if the USB cable is working properly or not
2.
Press the SW1 reset button.
As a result, the board should be enumerated as an IBU universal interface tool and it is
shown as “STM32 based IBU UI Tool”, as shown in Figure 9, in the device manager window.
If this message does not appear, please contact technical support.
Figure 9.
Enumeration result
Once this is done, the user can use their own customized GUI to connect to the board.
The user can create their own GUI using the DLLs provided in the package along with the
board. The DLL help file is also available along with the package.
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Using the I2C interface of the 10-pin header
Select the I2C interface by sending the command from the DLL, as mentioned in the DLL
help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in I2C mode. The section below explains
how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made using the DLLs and it
also explains how the hardware setup is to be done. Figure 10 shows the interpretation of
the 10-pin header when it is configured in I2C mode.
Figure 10. J1 Interpretation for I2C interface
3.1.1
Steps for making the hardware connection
To use any I2C based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the connection for
jumper J1, as shown in Figure 11.
●
The SCL (synchronous clock line), SDA (serial data), and GND (ground line) should be
connected to the corresponding lines of the daughter board for I2C communication
●
VDD (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the daughter board
is to be powered using the IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements
●
As shown in Figure 11 below, the SDA and SCL line of the interface is already pulled up
to 3.3 V through a resistive pull-up of value 4.7 kΩ.
Figure 11. Connection diagram for I2C interface/GPIOs
10-pin
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Running the IBU UI tool
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the I2C interface, it is necessary to make the
proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control lines, chip select or status line, such
as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the PWM feature available on one pin.
Therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings accordingly.
To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 6.
By default, I2C_GPIO1 to I2C_GPIO6 are in input pull-up mode.
Here you can set only the GPIOs mentioned. I2C lines (SDA and SCL) and power lines are
fixed. To perform the settings of a GPIO, use the I2C DLL referring to the DLL help file
available.
Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes, as shown in Table 7, such as
simple input mode, input with interrupt, and push-pull output mode. Also in the I2C interface,
there is an option in GPIO5 and GPIO6 to use this GPIO as the PWM clock signal and there
is an option in GPIO6 to use it as an ADC channel. Please refer to Table 7 in Appendix D.
3.1.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings
As mentioned above, GPIO 5 and GPIO 6 can also additionally be set in PWM mode. To do
this, set GPIO5 or GPIO6 in PWM mode and provide the PWM frequency (maximum value
tested is around 10 MHz), and also the duty cycle to generate different kinds of clocks.
The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10 MHz. The duty cycle
of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with the duty cycle at 0
% and logic '1' is obtained with the duty cycle at 100 %. Please note that the PWM
generated on GPIO5 and GPIO6 shares the same frequency but can have different duty
cycles. Please refer to Figure 34 in Appendix D.
3.1.4
Using GPIOs as ADC mode settings
As mentioned above, GPIO 6 can also additionally be set as analog channel input. For that
set the GPIO 6 in ADC mode and do the analog settings. Analog settings include ADC
sample time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples that
are required. Then Analog input can be provided on this pin and the set of the digital value
can be obtained. If the resolution set is 8 bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the
ADC conversion. If the resolution set is 12 bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of
the ADC conversion. ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
3.1.5
I2C read and write operation
Once the I2C settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the slave device
and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write operation, the user
can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device.
The I2C register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending on the address
length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For instance, if the
register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123.
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Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the I2C
communication taking place between the IBU UI board and the I2C slave daughter board
can be checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should be non-zero and
in decimal format.
The status messages are of the following types depending on the communication that has
taken place:
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
Wrong acknowledge failure/connection errors
●
I2C timeout that occurs when the slave device does not respond for a predefined
interval of time
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED D1 available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 2), 3), or 4) above. The LED status is
updated after each read or write operation.
The transfer sequence for one byte of I2C is shown in Figure 12.
Figure 12. Transfer sequence of one byte of I2C
Therefore this interface allows any I2C interface based slave device to be connected and
tested.
3.2
Using the SPI interface of the 10-pin connector
To use the SPI interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the DLL, as
mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in SPI mode. The
section below explains how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made
using the DLLs and it also explains how the hardware setup is to be done. Figure 13 below
shows the interpretation of the 10-pin header when it is configured in SPI mode.
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Figure 13. J2 interpretation for SPI interface
3.2.1
Steps for making hardware connection
To use any SPI based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the connection for
jumper J1, as shown in Figure 14.
●
The SCK (synchronous clock line), MISO (master in slave out), MISO (master out slave
in), NSS (slave select) and GND (ground line) should be connected to the
corresponding lines of the daughter board for SPI communication
●
VDD (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the daughter board
is to be powered using the IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements
Figure 14. Connecting diagram for the 10-pin SPI interface/GPIOs
10-pin
3.2.2
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the SPI interface, it is necessary to make the
proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control lines, chip select or status line, such
as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the PWM feature available on one pin.
Therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings accordingly.
To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 5.
By default SPI_GPIO1 to SPI_GPIO4 are in input pull-up mode.
Here you can set only the GPIOs mentioned. SPI lines (MISO, MOSI, NSS and SCK) and
power lines are fixed. To make the settings of a GPIO, use the SPI DLL referring to the DLL
help file available.
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Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes (as shown in Table 7), such as
simple input mode, input with interrupt, and push-pull output mode. Also in the SPI interface,
there is an option in GPIO3 and GPIO4 to use this GPIO as the PWM clock signal. And
there is an option in GPIO4 to use it as the ADC channel.
3.2.3
Using GPIOs as PWM settings
As mentioned above, GPIO 3 and GPIO 4 can also additionally be set in PWM mode. To do
this, set the GPIO3 or GPIO4 in PWM mode and provide the PWM frequency (maximum
value tested is around 10 MHz) and also the duty cycle to generate different kinds of clocks.
The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10 MHz.
The duty cycle of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with duty
cycle 0 % and logic '1' is obtained with duty cycle 100 %. Please, refer to Figure 34.
3.2.4
Using GPIOs as ADC settings
As mentioned above, GPIO 4 can also additionally be set as an analog channel input. To do
this, set the GPIO 4 in ADC mode and perform the analog settings. Analog settings include
ADC sample time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples
that are required. Analog input can then be provided on this pin and the set of the digital
value can be obtained.
If the resolution set is 8-bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion.
If the resolution set is 12-bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of the ADC
conversion. ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
3.2.5
SPI header settings
Once the GPIO settings are done, the daughter board can be connected to the IBU UI
board. Before using the SPI communication, some parameters must first be defined.
These parameters include the selection of CPOL, CPHA and baud rate pre-scalar (by
default, the most significant bit is put first).
As in SPI standard protocol, CPHA and CPOL values can be 0 or 1. SPI baud rate should
be set with values equal to 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, and 256. The SPI base frequency is
36 kHz. Therefore, if the baud rate pre-scalar is set as 4, the SPI runs at a frequency equal
to 9 kHz.
Once the selection is made, it sets the SPI interface and now the system is ready to read or
write the data from the SPI slave device connected to the IBU UI board.
3.2.6
SPI read and write operation
Once the SPI settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the slave
device and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write operation,
the user can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device.
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The SPI register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending on the address
length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For instance, if the
register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123.
Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the SPI
communication taking place between the IBU UI board and the SPI slave daughter board
can be checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should be non-zero and
in decimal format. The status messages are of the following types depending on the
communication that has taken place:
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
SPI timeout
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 2) or 3) above. The LED status is updated
after each read or write operation.
Depending on the CPHA and CPOL values, the transfer sequence for one byte of SPI is
shown in Figure 17.
Therefore this interface allows any SPI interface based slave device to be connected and
tested.
3.3
Using the UART(SCI) interface of the 10-pin header
To use the UART1 interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the DLL, as
mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in UART1 mode. The
section below explains how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made
using the DLLs and it also explains how the hardware setup is to be done. Figure 15 below
shows the interpretation of the 10-pin headers when it is configured in UART mode.
Figure 15. J1 interpretation for UART (SCI) interface
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Steps for making hardware connection
To use any UART (SCI) based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the connection
for jumper J1, as shown in Figure 16.
●
The TX (transmitter), RX (receiver), and GND (ground line) should be connected to the
corresponding lines of the daughter board for UART (SCI) communication
●
VDD equal to 3.3 V (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the
daughter board is to be powered using the IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements.
Figure 16. Connection diagram for the 10-pin UART interface/GPIOs
10-pin
3.3.2
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the UART (SCI) interface, it is necessary to
make the proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control lines, chip select or status
line, such as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the PWM feature available on
two pins, therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings accordingly.
To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 5.
By default UART_GPIO1 to UART_GPIO4 are in input pull-up mode.
Here you can set only the GPIOs mentioned. UART (TX, RX, CTS, and RTS) lines and
power lines are fixed. To perform the settings of a GPIO, use the UART (SCI) DLL referring
to the DLL help file available.
Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes, such as simple input mode,
input with interrupt, and push pull output mode. Also in the UART (SCI) interface, there is an
option in GPIO3 and GPIO4 to use this GPIO as the PWM clock signal and there is an
option in GPIO4 to use it as an ADC channel.
3.3.3
Using GPIOs in PWM settings
As mentioned above, GPIO 3 and GPIO 4 can also additionally be set in PWM mode. To do
this, set the GPIO3 or GPIO4 in PWM mode and provide the PWM frequency (maximum
value tested is around 10 MHz) and also the duty cycle to generate different kinds of clocks.
The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10MHz. The duty cycle
of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with the duty cycle at 0
% and logic '1' is obtained with the duty cycle at 100 %. Please refer to Figure 34.
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Running the IBU UI tool
Using GPIO in ADC settings
As mentioned above, GPIO 4 can also additionally be set as analog channel input. To do
this, set the GPIO 4 in ADC mode and perform the analog settings. Analog settings include
ADC sample time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples
that are required. Analog input can then be provided on this pin and the set of the digital
value can be obtained.
If the resolution set is 8-bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion.
If the resolution set is 12-bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of the ADC
conversion.
ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
3.3.5
UART1 (SCI1) header settings
Once the GPIO settings are completed, the daughter board can be connected to the IBU UI
board. Before using the UART1 (SCI1) communication, some parameters must first be
defined.
These parameters include the selection of parameters such as:
●
UART (SCI) bits per second values can be 110, 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200,
38400, 57600, 115200, 230400, and 460800
●
UART (SCI) data per bits can be 8-bit or 9-bit
●
UART (SCI) parity bits can be even, odd, or none
●
UART (SCI) stop bits can be 1 or 2
●
UART (SCI) flow control can be hardware, hardware CTS, hardware RTS, or none
Once the selection is made, it sets the UART1 (SCI1) interface and now the system is ready
to read or write the data from the UART1 (SCI1) slave device connected to the IBU UI board.
3.3.6
UART1 (SCI1) read and write operation
Once the UART1 (SCI1) settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the
slave device and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write
operation, the user can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device.
The UART1 (SCI1) register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending on the
address length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For instance, if
the register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123.
Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the UART1
(SCI1) communication taking place between the IBU UI board and the UART1 (SCI1) slave
daughter board can be checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should
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be non-zero and in decimal format. The status messages are of the following types
depending on the communication that has taken place.
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
Error conditions
●
UART(SCI) timeout
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 2), 3), or 4) above. The LED status is
updated after each read or write operation. Depending on the stop bits and data per bits
configured, the transfer sequence for one byte of UART (SCI) is shown in Figure 25.
Therefore this interface allows any UART (SCI) interface based slave device to be
connected and tested.
3.4
Using the I2C interface of the 30-pin header
To use the I2C interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the DLL, as
mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in I2C mode. The
section below explains how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made
using the DLLs and it also explains how the hardware setup is to be done.
Figure 17 below shows the interpretation of the 30-pin header when it is configured in UART
mode.
Along with the I2C communication interface, the 30-pin header in I2C interface mode also
consists of 22 configurable GPIOs in various modes. Of these 22 GPIOs, 4 can additionally
be configured as analog channels and another 4 GPIOs can be configured as PWM
channels.
Figure 17. J2 Interpretation for I2C interface of 30-pin header
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Running the IBU UI tool
Steps for making hardware connection
To use any I2C based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the connection for
jumper J2, as shown in Figure 18.
●
The SCL (synchronous clock line), SDA (serial data), and GND (ground line) should be
connected to the corresponding lines of the daughter board for I2C communication
●
VDD (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the daughter board
is to be powered using the IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements
●
As shown in Figure 18, the SDA and SCL line of the interface is already pulled up to 3.3
V through a resistive pull up value of 4.7 k.
Figure 18. Connection diagram for I2C interface/GPIOs
30-pin
3.4.2
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the I2C interface of the 30-pin header, it is
necessary to make the proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control lines, chip
select or status line, such as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the PWM
feature available on 4 pins, therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings accordingly.
To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 6.
Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes, as shown in Table 8.
By default I2C_GPIO1 to I2C_GPIO22 are in input pull-up mode.
3.4.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings
Also in 30 pin interface in I2C mode, there is provision to use pin# 7,8,19,21 to use these
GPIOs as PWM clock signal. As shown in the table below, PWM channel 1 is available on
pin 7 of the 30-pin interface. Please refer to Table 9.
Note:
PWM channel 1 and 2 can have different duty cycles but they share the same frequency
To generate different kinds of clocks, configure the PWM channel (1, 2, 3, or 4) by providing
the PWM frequency (maximum value tested is around 10 MHz) and the duty cycle. Please
refer to Figure 34 for the PWM signal.
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The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10 MHz.
The duty cycle of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with the
duty cycle at 0 % and logic '1' is obtained with the duty cycle at 100 %.
3.4.4
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings
There are 4 ADC channels available on pin# 20, 22, 24, and 25 of the 30-pin interface. So
these pins can also be additionally set as analog channel input. To do this, set the particular
channel in ADC mode and perform the analog settings. Analog settings include ADC sample
time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples that are
required. Analog input can then be provided on this pin and the set of the digital value can
be obtained.
If the resolution set is 8-bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion.
If the resolution set is 12-bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of the ADC
conversion.
ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
ADC resolution values can be 8-bit or 12-bit.
3.4.5
I2C header settings
Once the GPIO settings have been made, the daughter board can be connected to the IBU
UI board. Before using the I2C communication, some parameters must first be defined.
These parameters include the selection of I2C address types (7-bit or 10-bit), I2C slave
device address, and I2C speed.
As in I2C standard protocol, the I2C address type can be 7-bit or 10-bit addressing. The I2C
address is a one byte address in the case of 7-bit addressing and a 2 byte address in the
case of 10-bit addressing. The I2C speed should be set between 10 kHz to 400 kHz.
Once the selection is made, it sets the I2C interface and now the system is ready to read or
write the data from the I2C slave device connected to the IBU UI board.
3.4.6
I2C read and write operation
Once the I2C settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the slave device
and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write operation, the user
can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device.
The I2C register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending on the address
length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For instance, if the
register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123.
Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the I2C
communication taking place between IBU UI board and the I2C slave daughter board can be
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checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should be non-zero and in
decimal format.
The status messages are of the following types depending on the communication that has
taken place.
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
Wrong acknowledge failure/connection errors
●
I2C timeout
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 2), 3), or 4) above. The LED status is
updated after each read or write operation.
The transfer sequence for one byte of I2C is shown in Figure 19.
Figure 19. Transfer sequence of one byte of I2C
Therefore, this interface allows any I2C interface based slave device to be connected and
tested.
3.5
Using the SPI interface of the 30-pin header
To use the SPI interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the DLL, as
mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in SPI mode. The
section below explains how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made
using the DLLs and it also explains how the hardware setup is to be done.
Along with the SPI communication interface, the 30-pin header in SPI interface mode also
consists of 20 configurable GPIOs in various modes. Of these 20 GPIOs, 4 can additionally
be configured as analog channels and another 4 GPIOs can be configured as PWM
channels.
Figure 20 below shows the interpretation of the 30-pin header when it is configured in SPI
mode.
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Figure 20. J2 Interpretation for SPI interface of 30-pin header
3.5.1
Steps for making hardware connection
To use any SPI based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the connection for
jumper J2, as shown in Figure 21.
●
The SCK (synchronous clock line), MISO (master in slave out), MISO (master out slave
in), NSS (slave select), and GND (ground line) should be connected to the
corresponding lines of the daughter board for SPI communication
●
VDD (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the daughter board
is to be powered using IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements.
Figure 21. Connection diagram for 30-pin SPI interface/GPIOs
30-pin
3.5.2
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the SPI interface of the 30-pin header, it is
necessary to make the proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control lines, chip
select or status line, such as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the PWM
feature available on 4 pins, therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings accordingly.
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To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 6.
Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes, as shown in Table 8.
By default SPI_GPIO1 to SPI_GPIO20 are in input pull-up mode. Please refer to Table 8.
3.5.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings
Also in the 30-pin interface in SPI mode, there is a provision to use pin# 7, 8, 19, and 21 to
use these GPIOs as the PWM clock signal. PWM channel 1 is available on pin 7 of the 30pin interface. Please refer to Table 9.
Note:
PWM channel 1 and 2 can have different duty cycles but they share the same frequency.
To generate different kinds of clocks, configure the PWM channel (1, 2, 3, or 4) by providing
the PWM frequency (maximum value tested is around 10 MHz) and the duty cycle. Please,
refer toFigure 34.
The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10 MHz.
The duty cycle of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with the
duty cycle at 0 % and logic '1' is obtained with the duty cycle at 100 %.
3.5.4
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings
There are 4 ADC channels available on pin# 20, 22, 24, and 25 of the 30-pin interface. So
these pins can also be additionally set as analog channel input. To do this, set the particular
channel in ADC mode and perform the analog settings. Analog settings include ADC sample
time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples that are
required. Analog input can then be provided on this pin and the set of the digital value can
be obtained.
If the resolution set is 8-bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion. If
the resolution set is 12-bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion.
ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
ADC resolution values can be 8-bit or 12-bit.
3.5.5
SPI header settings
Once the GPIO settings have been made, the daughter board can be connected to the IBU
UI board. Before using the SPI communication, some parameters must first be defined.
These parameters include the selection of CPOL, CPHA and baud rate pre-scalar.
By default, the most significant bit is put first.
As in SPI standard protocol, CPHA and CPOL values can be 0 or 1. SPI baud rate should
be set with values equal to 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, or 256. The SPI base frequency is
36 kHz. So, if the baud rate pre-scalar is set as 4, the SPI runs at a frequency equal to 9
kHz.
Once the selection is made, it sets the SPI interface and now the system is ready to read or
write the data from the SPI slave device connected to the IBU UI board.
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Running the IBU UI tool
3.5.6
UM0935
SPI read and write operation
Once the SPI settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the slave
device and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write operation,
the user can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device.
The SPI register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending on the address
length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For instance, if the
register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123.
Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the SPI
communication taking place between the IBU UI board and the SPI slave daughter board
can be checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should be non-zero and
in decimal format.
The status messages are of the following types depending on the communication that has
taken place:
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
SPI timeout
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 1), 2), or 3) above. The LED status is
updated after each read or write operation.
The transfer sequence for one byte of SPI is shown in Figure 22.
30/53
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Running the IBU UI tool
Figure 22. Transfer sequence of one byte of SPI
Therefore, this interface allows any SPI interface based slave device to be connected and
tested.
3.6
Using the UART1(SCI1) interface of the 30-pin header
To use the UART1 interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the DLL, as
mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in UART1 mode. The
section below explains how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made
using the DLLs and it also explains how the hardware setup is to be done. Figure 23 below
shows the interpretation of the 30-pin header when it is configured in UART1 mode.
Along with the UART1 (SCI1) communication interface, the 30-pin header in UART1 (SCI1)
interface mode also consists of 20 configurable GPIOs in various modes. Of these 20
GPIOs, 4 can additionally be configured as analog channels and another 4 GPIOs can be
configured as PWM channels.
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Running the IBU UI tool
UM0935
Figure 23. J2 interpretation for UART1 (SCI1) interface of 30-pin header
3.6.1
Steps for making hardware connection
To use any UART1 (SCI1) based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the
connection for jumper J2, as shown in Figure 24.
●
The SCL (synchronous clock line), SDA (serial data), and GND (ground line) should be
connected to the corresponding lines of the daughter board for UART1 (SCI1)
communication
●
VDD (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the daughter board
is to be powered using the IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements.
Figure 24. Connection diagram for 30-pin UART1 interface/GPIOs
30-pin
3.6.2
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the UART1 (SCI1) interface of the 30-pin
header, it is necessary to make the proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control
lines, chip select or status line, such as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the
PWM feature available on 4 pins, therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings
accordingly.
To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 6.
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Running the IBU UI tool
Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes. By default, UART1
(SCI1)_GPIO1 to UART1 (SCI1)_GPIO20 are in input pull-up mode.
3.6.3
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings
Also in the 30-pin interface in UART1 (SCI1) mode, there is a provision to use pin# 7,8, 19,
and 21 to use these GPIOs as PWM clock signal. The PWM channel 1 is available on pin 7
of the 30-pin interface. Please refer to Table 9.
Note:
PWM channel 1 and 2 can have different duty cycles but they share the same frequency
To generate different kinds of clocks, configure the PWM channel (1, 2, 3, or 4) by providing
the PWM frequency (maximum value tested is around 10 MHz) and the duty cycle. Please
refer to Figure 34.
The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10 MHz.
The duty cycle of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with the
duty cycle at 0 % and logic '1' is obtained with the duty cycle at 100 %.
3.6.4
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings
There are 4 ADC channels available on pin# 20, 22, 24, and 25 of the 30-pin interface. So
these pins can also be additionally set as analog channel input. To do this, set the particular
channel in ADC mode and perform the analog settings. Analog settings include ADC sample
time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples that are
required. Analog input can be provided on this pin and the set of the digital value can be
obtained.
If the resolution set is 8-bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion.
If the resolution set is 12-bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of the ADC
conversion.
ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
3.6.5
UART1 (SCI1) header settings
Once the GPIO settings are completed, the daughter board can be connected to the IBU UI
board. Before using the UART1 (SCI1) communication, some parameters must first be
defined.
These parameters include the selection of parameters such as:
●
UART (SCI) bits per second values can be 110, 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200,
38400, 57600, 115200, 230400, and 460800
●
UART (SCI) data per bits can be 8-bit or 9-bit
●
UART (SCI) parity bits can be even, odd, or none
●
UART (SCI) stop bits can be 1 or 2
●
UART (SCI) flow control can be hardware, hardware CTS, hardware RTS, or none
Once the selection is made, it sets the UART1 (SCI1) interface and now the system is ready
to read or write the data from the UART1 (SCI1) slave device connected to the IBU UI board.
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
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Running the IBU UI tool
3.6.6
UM0935
UART1 (SCI1) read and write operation
Once the UART1 (SCI1) settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the
slave device and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write
operation, the user can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device.
UART1 (SCI1) register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending on the
address length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For instance, if
the register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123
Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the UART1
(SCI1) communication taking place between IBU UI board and the UART1 (SCI1) slave
daughter board can be checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should
be non-zero and in decimal format. The status messages are of the following types
depending on the communication that has taken place.
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
Error conditions
●
UART1 (SCI1) timeout
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 2), 3), or 4) above. The LED status is
updated after each read or write operation. The transfer sequence for one bye of UART1
(SCI1) is shown in Figure 25.
34/53
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Running the IBU UI tool
Figure 25. Transfer sequence of one byte of UART1 (SCI1)
d
f
d
f
f
f
P
B
Therefore, this interface allows any UART1 (SCI1) interface based slave device to be
connected and tested.
3.7
Using UART2 (SCI2) interface of 30-pin header
To use the UART1 interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the DLL, as
mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in UART1 mode. The
section below explains how the tool and its features behave once selection has been made
using the DLLs and it also explains how the hardware setup is to be done. Figure 26 below
shows the interpretation of the 30-pin header when it is configured in UART2 mode. Along
with the UART2 (SCI2) communication interface, the 30-pin header in UART2 (SCI2)
interface mode also consists of 22 configurable GPIOs in various modes. Of these 22
GPIOs, 4 can additionally be configured as analog channels and another 4 GPIOs can be
configured as PWM channels.
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Running the IBU UI tool
UM0935
Figure 26. J2 interpretation for UART2 (SCI2) interface of 30-pin header
3.7.1
Steps for making hardware connection
To use any UART2 (SCI2) based slave with the IBU UI tool, you need to make the
connection for jumper J2, as shown in figure below.
●
The UART2_TX and UART2_RX lines and GND (ground line) should be connected to
the corresponding lines of the daughter board for UART2 (SCI2) communication
●
VDD (power supply line) of the two boards should be connected if the daughter board
is to be powered using the IBU UI tool
●
The GPIOs of the IBU UI tool and daughter board can be connected or left
unconnected as per user requirements.
Figure 27. Connection diagram for 30-pin UART2 interface/GPIOs
30-pin
3.7.2
Select UART2 (SCI2) interface using DLL software
To use the UART2 (SCI2) interface, it must be selected by sending the command from the
DLL, as mentioned in the DLL help file. After this, the board is ready to be used in UART2
(SCI2) mode.
3.7.3
GPIO settings
For the GPIO which is to be used along with the UART2 (SCI2) interface of the 30-pin
header, it is necessary to make the proper settings. These GPIOs may be used as control
lines, chip select or status line, such as interrupt line, or to generate a clock signal using the
PWM feature available on 4 pins, therefore, you need to make the GPIOs settings
accordingly.
36/53
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
UM0935
Running the IBU UI tool
To understand the modes that are supported by a particular pin, please refer to Table 6.
Through selection, the GPIO can be set in different modes, as shown inTable 8.
By default UART1 (SCI1)_GPIO1 to UART1 (SCI1)_GPIO20 are in Input pull-up mode,
please refer to Table 8.
3.7.4
Using GPIOs in PWM mode settings
3.
Note:
Also in the 30-pin interface in UART2 (SCI2) mode, there is a provision to use Pin# 7, 8,
19, and 21, to use these GPIOs as PWM clock signals. PWM channel 1 is available on
pin 7 of the 30-pin interface. Please refer to Table 9.
PWM channel 1 and 2 can have different duty cycles but they share the same frequency
To generate different kinds of clocks, configure the PWM channel (1, 2, 3, or 4) by providing
the PWM frequency (maximum value tested is around 10 MHz) and the duty cycle. Please,
refer to Figure 34.
The frequency of the PWM clock generated can vary from 10 kHz to 10 MHz.
The duty cycle of the PWM clock can vary from 0 % to 100 %. Logic '0' is obtained with the
duty cycle at 0 % and logic '1' is obtained with the duty cycle at 100 %.
3.7.5
Using GPIOs in ADC mode settings
There are 4 ADC channels available on pin# 20, 22, 24, and 25 of the 30-pin interface. So
these pins can also be additionally set as analog channel input. To do this, set the particular
channel in ADC mode and perform the analog settings. Analog settings include ADC sample
time selection and ADC resolution. After that, specify the number of samples that are
required. Analog input can then be provided on this pin and the set of the digital value can
be obtained.
If the resolution set is 8-bit, one byte is obtained for every sample of the ADC conversion.
If the resolution set is 12-bit, two bytes are obtained for every sample of the ADC
conversion.
ADC sample time selection values can be one of the following:
7.5 cycles, 13.5 cycles, 28.5 cycles, 41.5 cycles, 55.5 cycles, 71.5 cycles, or 239.5 cycles.
3.7.6
UART2 (SCI2) header settings
Once the GPIO settings are completed, the daughter board can be connected to the IBU UI
board. Before using the UART2 (SCI2) communication, some parameters must first be
defined.
These parameters include the selection of parameters such as:
●
UART (SCI) bits per second values can be 110, 300, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200,
38400, 57600, 115200, 230400, and 460800
●
UART (SCI) data per bits can be 8-bit or 9-bit
●
UART (SCI) parity bits can be even, odd, or none
●
UART (SCI) stop bits can be 1 or 2
●
UART (SCI) flow control can be hardware, hardware CTS, hardware RTS, or none
Once the selection is made, it sets the UART2 (SCI2) interface and now the system is ready
to read or write the data from the UART2 (SCI2) slave device connected to the IBU UI board.
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
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Running the IBU UI tool
3.7.7
UM0935
UART2 (SCI2) read and write operation
Once the UART2 (SCI2) settings have been made, it is possible to read the registers of the
slave device and write in the registers of the slave device. After every read and write
operation, the user can obtain information about the status of the communication.
To read/write in the register, select the register address length depending on the slave
device. The UART2 (SCI2) register address length can range from 0 to 4 bytes. Depending
on the address length given, the register address should be provided in hex format. For
instance, if the register address is 3 bytes, its value should be in the form 0x123.
Then, provide values, to read and write from the slave device, to the tool. Data to be written
should be provided in the hex format. After every read or write operation, the tool provides
the status (e.g. status: communication complete/bus free) so that the status of the UART2
(SCI2) communication taking place between the IBU UI board and the UART2 (SCI2) slave
daughter board can be checked. Please note that the number of bytes to be written should
be non-zero and in decimal format. The status messages are of the following types
depending on the communication that has taken place.
●
Communication complete/bus free
●
Error conditions
●
UART2 (SCI2) timeout
●
Other reasons: this occurs when the user tries to perform read/write operations with a
data length equal to zero.
Also, there is a communication status LED available on the board. It lights up whenever
there is any type of communication error of type 2), 3), or 4) above. The LED status is
updated after each read or write operation. The transfer sequence for one bye of UART2
(SCI2) is shown in Figure 28.
Figure 28. Transfer sequence of one byte of UART2 (SCI2)
d
f
d
f
f
f
P
B
Therefore, this interface allows any UART2 (SCI2) interface based slave device to be
connected and tested.
38/53
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
UM0935
4
Working in DFU mode
Working in DFU mode
To work in DFU mode, please send the appropriate command through the DLL. To do this,
please refer to the DLL help file.
The DFU setup is available at www.st.com/mcu/modules.
Scroll down to Software-PC\DFUSE on the relevant webpage to download the zip folder.
The folder contains the setup files. After installing the setup, plug in the board. When the PC
asks for the driver, browse to the path of the driver. The driver is available at the installed
software path at Program Files\STMicroelectronics\DFUSe\Driver.
The user manual for the DFU GUI is also available on the same link.
As a result, you should find the board enumerated as device firmware upgrade and it is
shown as “Device Firmware Upgrade”, as seen in Figure 29. If this message does not
appear, please contact technical support.
Figure 29. Enumeration in DFU mode
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
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Schematics and BOM list
UM0935
Appendix A
Figure 30. Microcontroller section
127(550281721($7$7,0(
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Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
<
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40/53
!-V
Schematics and BOM list
9
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3&7$03(557&
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Schematics and BOM list
41/53
Figure 31. JTAG interface, mode selection switch and power supply section
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
UM0935
!-V
UM0935
Figure 32. 10-pin com interface
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Schematics and BOM list
42/53
!-V
Schematics and BOM list
43/53
Figure 33. 30-pin com interface
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
UM0935
!-V
Category
ST devices
UM0935
Table 4.
BOM
Manufacturer
Manufacturer’s
ordering code /
orderable part
number
Supplier
Supplier ordering
code
STMicroelectronics
LD1117D33TR
STMicroelectronics
LD1117D33TR
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Reference
designator
Component
Description
Package
U9
LD1117D33TR
SO-8
U1
STM32F103RBT6
LQFP64
STMicroelectronics STM32F103RBT6 STMicroelectronics
U10
USBLC6-2P6
SOT-666
STMicroelectronics
USBLC6-2P6
STMicroelectronics
USBLC6-2P6
U2,U3,U4,U5,
U6,U7,U8,
U11
ESDALC6V1M6
uQFN16
STMicroelectronics
ESDALC6V1M6
STMicroelectronics
ESDALC6V1M6
Y1
CRYSTAL 8.00 MHZ
20 pF 49US
11.35 x 4.5 mm
crystal
Digi-Key
X1094-ND
J1
Box header 2.54
mm, double row
R/A, 10pin,
Header 2x5 pin,
2.54 mmx2.54
mm Pitch
Protectron
P9604-10-15-1
J2
Box header 2.54
mm, double row
R/A, 30 pin,
Header 2x15
pin,
2.54mmx2.54
mm Pitch
Protectron
P9604-30-15-1
J3
Box header 2.54
mm, double row
straight 20 pin
Header 2x10
pin, 2.54
mmx2.54 mm
Pitch
Protectron
P9603-20-15-1
J4
USB Mini B-Type
USB Mini BType
Samtec
MUSB-05-S-B-SM-A
SW1
RESET switch
Push button
Farnell
9471898
SW2(DNM)
SPDT switch
Slider
Farnell
674357
D1, D2
LED
SMD0805
Any
STM32F103RBT6
NON ST
devices
Crystal and
oscillator
Connectors
and jumpers
44/53
Schematics and BOM list
LEDs
Category
Capacitors
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Inductors
BOM (continued)
Manufacturer’s
ordering code /
orderable part
number
Reference
designator
Component
Description
Package
C1,C2,C3,C6,
C9,C10,C11,
C12,C14,C16,
C19
100 nF
SMD0805
Any
C4,C5
22 pF
SMD0805
Any
C15
4.7 µF
SMD1206
Any
C7,C18
CAP CER 10 µF 16
V X5R 1206
SMD1206
Digikey
C8
10 nF
SMD0805
Any
C17
4.7 nF
SMD0805
Any
L1
Inductor multilayer
10 µH 2012
SMD0805
Digi-Key
445-1059-1-ND
R1,R5
Res 100 kΩ 1/8 W
5% 0805 SMD
SMD0805
Digi-Key
311-100KARTR-ND
R3(DNM),
R25,R8,
R24(DNM),
R4
Res 0.0 Ω 1/8 W
0805 SMD
SMD0805
Digi-Key
RMCF1/100RTR-ND
R6,R14
Res 1 MΩ 1/8 W 5%
0805 SMD
SMD0805
Digi-Key
RMCF1/101MJRTR-ND
R2,R15
360 Ω
SMD0805
Any
R7,R9, R10,
R16, R11,
R12
10 kΩ
SMD0805
Any
R17
100 Ω
SMD0805
R13
RES 1.5 kΩ 1/8 W
5% 0805 SMD
SMD0805
Resistors
Manufacturer
Supplier
587-1339-2-ND
RMCF1/101.5KJRTRND
UM0935
Digi-Key
Supplier ordering
code
Schematics and BOM list
45/53
Table 4.
Category
Resistors
Test point
BOM (continued)
Manufacturer’s
ordering code /
orderable part
number
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Reference
designator
Component
Description
Package
R18,R19,R20,
R21,R22,R23
4.7 kΩ
SMD0805
Any
RN1,RN2,
RN4,RN5,
RN6,RN7,
RN8,RN9
Res array 150 Ω 5%
4 res SMD
1206 (3216
Metric), Convex
Digi-Key
Y9151CT-ND
RN3
Res array 4.7 kΩ
8TRM 4RES SMD
1207 (3216
Metric), Convex
Digi-Key
YC164J-4.7KCT-ND
TP1, TP2
Term test point ,
Slotted .032"DIA
Test points,
slotted
Digi-Key
1031K-ND
Not applicable
Screw : 02 series:
Pan Style 4-40
Screw
Length : 1.00
(25.4) inches
(mm) diameter :
.210 (5.3)
inches (mm)
All electronics
hardware
12-02-160
All electronics
hardware
12-00-440
Scews and
nuts
Not applicable
00 series: Hex Nut
Diameter : .250
(6.4) inches
(mm)
Manufacturer
Supplier
Supplier ordering
code
UM0935
Table 4.
Schematics and BOM list
46/53
Table 5.
All possible interpretations of the 10-pin interface
All possible Interpretations of the 10-pin interface
GPIO
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Input pull-up,
input floating,
input with
interrupt falling
and rising
Output push-pull
and output open
drain
ADC
PWM
Supply
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
RX
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
GND
4
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
V_CON
5
No
CTS
MISO
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
6
No
RTS
SCK
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
7
No
No
MOSI
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
8
No
No
NSS
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
9
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
10
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Pin#
I2C
UART
SPI
1
SCL
TX
2
SDA
3
All possible interpretations of the 10-pin interface
47/53
Appendix B
UM0935
Table 6.
All possible interpretations the of 30-pin interface
UM0935
Appendix C
All possible interpretations of the 30-pin interface
GPIO
48/53
Output push
pull and output
open drain
ADC
PWM
Supply
No
No
No
No
No
5V
No
No
No
No
No
No
GND
No
CTS
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
4
No
RTS
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
5
No
TX
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
6
No
RX
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
7
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
8
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
9
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
10
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
11
SCL
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
12
SDA
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
13
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
GND
14
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
V_CON
15
No
No
MISO
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
16
No
No
CLK
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
17
No
No
MOSI
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
18
No
No
NSS
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
I2C
UART
SPI
1
No
No
2
No
3
All possible interpretations the of 30-pin interface
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Input pull-up,
input floating,
input with
interrupt falling
and rising
Pin#
All possible interpretations of the 30-pin interface (continued)
GPIO
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
Input pull-up,
input floating,
input with
interrupt falling
and rising
Output push
pull and output
open drain
ADC
PWM
Supply
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
No
22
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
23
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
AGND
24
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
25
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
26
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
27
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
28
No
No
No
No
No
No
No
GND
29
No
TX
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
30
No
RX
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
Pin#
I2C
UART
SPI
19
No
No
20
No
21
All possible interpretations the of 30-pin interface
49/53
Table 6.
UM0935
Tables and figures
Appendix D
Table 7.
UM0935
Tables and figures
GPIO modes of 10-pin interface
Mode
Input mode (read)
Sub-mode
Expected result
Input pull-up (default
mode)
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO
value as ‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 1.
Input with rising
interrupt
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO
value as ‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 0. As
soon as the value changes from 0 to 1(rising interrupt detected), the
interrupt status reads 01 from 00.
Input with falling
interrupt
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO
value as ‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 1. As
soon as the value changes from 1 to 0(falling interrupt detected), the
interrupt status reads 01 from 00.
Output push-pull
When the “Write” operation is performed with values 0 or 1, the
voltage level on the corresponding GPIO pin can be observed
corresponding to the value written.
Output PWM (only
GPIO5 and GPIO6)
Depending on the duty cycle and the frequency settings, the PWM
clock is generated.
Output mode
(write)
Figure 34. PWM signal
%
50/53
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
kHz
UM0935
Table 8.
Tables and figures
GPIO modes of 30-pin interface
Mode
Input mode (read)
Sub-mode
Expected Result
Input pull-up
(default mode)
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO value as
‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 1.
Input floating
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO value as
‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 0 or 1 randomly.
Input with rising
interrupt
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO value as
‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 0. As soon as the
value changes from 0 to 1(rising interrupt detected), the interrupt status
reads 01 from 00.
Input with falling
Interrupt
When you perform the GPIO “Read” operation, you get the GPIO value as
‘0’ or ‘1’. If no connection is made to this pin, it reads 1. As soon as the
value changes from 1 to 0(falling interrupt detected), the interrupt status
reads 01 from 00.
Output push-pull
When the “Write” operation is performed with values 0 or 1, the voltage level
on the corresponding GPIO pin can be observed corresponding to the value
written.
Output opendrain
When the “Write” operation is performed with value 0, the voltage level on
the corresponding GPIO pin is 0. When the “Write” operation is performed
with value 1, the voltage level on the corresponding GPIO pin can be 0 or 1
randomly.
Output mode
(write)
Table 9.
PWM channel settings
PWM channel
Pin # (see Figure 17)
Frequency
Duty cycle
PWM channel 1
7
F1
D1
PWM channel 2
8
F1
D2
PWM channel 3
19
F2
D3
PWM channel 4
21
F2
D4
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
51/53
Revision history
UM0935
Revision history
Table 10.
52/53
Document revision history
Date
Revision
Changes
17-Sep-2010
1
Initial release.
21-Sep-2010
2
Typo error in cover page
07-Jan-2011
3
– Modified: Table 4: BOM
– Modified: title
Doc ID 17398 Rev 3
UM0935
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