CN-0130: Integrated Device Power Supply (DPS) for ATE with Output Voltage Range

Circuit Note
CN-0130
Devices Connected/Referenced
Circuit Designs Using Analog Devices Products
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AD5560
1.2 A Programmable Device Power Supply
AD7685
16-Bit, 250 kSPS PulSAR® ADC
ADR435
5 V Ultralow Noise XFET® Voltage Reference
Integrated Device Power Supply (DPS) for ATE with Output Voltage Range 0 V to 25 V
CIRCUIT FUNCTION AND BENEFITS
In the past, DPS (device power supply) solutions were designed
from discrete amplifiers, switches, DACs, resistors, etc. New
silicon processes and shrinking silicon now allow highly
integrated solutions, but it’s rarely possible to put everything
onto one single piece of silicon. Even with its high level of
integration, the AD5560 DPS requires a few well chosen
external components to provide a complete system solution.
The goal of this circuit note is to describe in more detail what is
required and why it was selected and to provide a more
complete device power supply solution.
This product is used primarily in the automatic test equipment
(ATE) industry as the power supply that drives the device under
test (DUT). As such, there are many different requirements
placed on the DPS, including voltage and current specifications
(depending on the type of DUT it will drive), and other factors,
such as stability, accuracy, etc.
As a device power supply, it is of utmost importance that the
AD5560 can deliver the voltage and currents required by the
DUT in a timely manner.
The AD5560 is designed to achieve a peak-to-peak voltage
span of 25 V that can be placed anywhere within the range of
−22 V to +25 V, limited by the maximum allowable voltage of
|AVDD − AVSS| ≤ 33 V.
In addition, the current range that the AD5560 can deliver can be
as high as ±1.2 A. Note that 1.2 A isn’t practical at the higher output
voltages because of the power dissipation limitations of the package.
The 1.2 A capability is primarily intended for supplying a low
voltage rail no greater than approximately 3.5 V, but this
depends greatly on the cooling abilities and other conditions.
Therefore, in reviewing the voltage/current requirements, many
factors need to be taken into account, such as headroom,
footroom, power dissipation under worst case conditions,
supply rails, thermal performance, etc.
This circuit is designed to deliver three DUT rails:
0 V to 25 V @ 5 µA to 25 mA
0 V to 7 V @ 500 mA
0 V to 3 V @ 1.2 A
The selection of components and configuration of the circuit
will be tailored specifically for the above combinations.
For alternative use or just for more detailed information on the
part itself, refer to the AD5560 data sheet.
CIRCUIT DESCRIPTION
The AD5560 DPS covers the voltage supply and the measuring
functions that the DUT needs, but to complete the rest of the
circuit, there are a few more components required: a reference
voltage, an ADC to digitize the measured result, and a thermal
monitor to measure the temperature of the internal sense
diodes, allowing users to view the thermal gradient across the
die or, alternatively, across their PC board.
The ADC is used to digitize the measurement output. The
measurement output (MEASOUT pin) can deliver different
output ranges, depending on the voltage reference and on where
the OFFSET DAC is set.
The OFFSET DAC is what is used to offset the Force Voltage
output range to achieve different output ranges. The particular
output range we are concerned about here is 0 V to 25 V. As a
result, the default MEASOUT output range (MEASOUT
GAIN = 1) will also be 0 V to 25 V. There are no ADCs with
input ranges that can handle this directly, so there needs to be
some external signal conditioning to match this range to that of
any bipolar or unipolar ADC.
There is an alternative MEASOUT setting (MEASOUT
GAIN = 0.2), which scales and offsets the MEASOUT output
range to 0 V to 5.125 V. (Some slight overrange is included here
for calibration, etc.)
For this25 ge; this will allow us to easily use a unipolar input
Rev. B
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CN-0130
Circuit Note
0.1µF
0.1µF
0.1µF
HCAVDD2
DATA SHEET RECOMMENDED
CC AND CF VALUES
HCAVSS1
AVDD
CC0 CC1 CC2 CC3
EXTFORCE1
ADR435
VIN
10µF
0.1µF
DVCC
AVDD
AVSS
HCAVDD2
0.1µF
HCAVSS2
DVCC
10µF
HCAVSS2
AVDD
HCAVDD1
10µF
HCAVDD1
AVSS
HCAVSS1
ADC.
EXTFORCE2
VOUT
VREF
+
CF0
GND
CF1
CF2
4
SPI CONTROL
CF3
DVCC
CF4
AD5560
10kΩ
ALARMS
FORCE
CLALM
SENSE
KELALM
TMPALM
DVCC
EXTMEASIH1
10kΩ
EXTMEASIH2
EXT
RSENSE2
BUSY
EXT
RSENSE1
EXTMEASIL
DVCC
DUT
VDD
I2C
D+
SCLK
SDATA
GPO
MEASOUT
ADT7461
TEMPERATURE
MONITOR
DUTGND
GND
D–
AVCC
0.1µF
GND
IN+
IN–
22µF
VREF
AD7685
SPI CONTROL
08608-001
GND
Figure 1. Device Power Supply (DPS) for ATE (Simplified Schematic: Decoupling and All Connections Not Shown)
For this example, we will use the 0 V to 5.125 V range; this will
allow us to easily use a unipolar input ADC.
The 16-bit 250 kSPS AD7685 ADC was chosen for this
application due to its ability to handle the 0 V to 5 V output
range on the MEASOUT path. In addition to this, the
availability of other ADCs with faster speeds in the same
footprint (AD7686, 500 kSPS) also makes it very attractive for
upgrade paths.
ADC Considerations
An ADC can be dedicated to each individual DPS channel,
providing the fastest throughput; or an ADC can be shared
across multiple channels. In many typical applications, a single
ADC is shared across 8 or 16 channels.
Sharing an ADC across multiple channels can be accomplished
using the internal “Disable” feature of each MEASOUT pin.
This requires a write command to the DPS register to
enable/disable the appropriate switch. If this method is chosen,
note that no more than one MEASOUT should be selected at
any one time.
Alternatively, an external 4:1 or 8:1 multiplexer can be used to
control the measurement channel selection. In this way, all
MEASOUT paths can be enabled, and the multiplexer takes
care of the selection. Similarly, a 16:1 multiplexer allows more
measurement paths to share a single ADC. The choice of this
multiplexer will depend on the ADC used and its input voltage
range. (For bipolar input ADCs, the ADG1404/ADG1204
would be ideal; while for single-supply usage, the ADG706 or
ADG708 would be more suited.) The output impedance of the
MEASOUT path is typically 60 Ω; in addition to the switch
impedance, an ADC buffer should be considered to drive the
Rev. B | Page 2 of 8
Circuit Note
CN-0130
ADC (the ADA4898-1 is an example of an op amp that would
be suitable).
ing requirements. This design handles capacitive loads from 0
µF up to 160 µF. The external capacitors shown in Table 1 are
required in order that the internal compensation algorithm will
achieve optimum stability and settling into this load range.
Voltage Reference
The ADR435 5 V X-FET reference was chosen because a 25 V
output voltage range was required. This reference has excellent
temperature drift performance and low noise and is capable of
driving multiple PMU channels.
Table 1. Suggested Compensation Capacitor Selection for
DUT Capacitance of 0 µF to 160 µF
Capacitor
CC0
CC1
CC2
CC3
CF0
CF1
CF2
CF3
CF4
Thermal Monitor
The AD5560 has an array of 16 thermal monitoring diodes
placed at various points on the chip. These diodes must be
driven with a current to produce a voltage, which is an indicator
of the temperature in that area of the die. The reason for having
so many thermal diodes on chip is to allow users to measure the
temperature gradient across the chip or, alternatively, across
their board under their specific conditions. For this purpose,
ON Semiconductor’s ADT7461A temperature monitor was
chosen to interface with the on-chip thermal diodes. The
ADT7461A has series resistance cancellation, which is
important in this case because each of the diodes are muxed to
the GPO pin of the AD5560. The multiplexer on-resistance
would produce measurement errors without the series
resistance cancellation feature. Note that the ADT7461A has a
two-wire interface.
Value
100 pF
100 pF
330 pF
3.3 nF
4.7 nF
22 nF
100 nF
470 nF
2.2 μF
Although there are four compensation input pins (CCX) and five
feedforward capacitor inputs pins (CFX), the user may need to
use all capacitor inputs only if large variations in DUT load
capacitances are expected. If the DUT load capacitance is known
and doesn’t change for all combinations of voltage ranges and
test conditions, then it is possible only one set of CCX and CFX
capacitors are required. More details on the compensation
algorithm are described in the AD5560 data sheet.
Compensation and Feedforward Capacitors
As a device power supply, the AD5560 can see a wide range of
capacitive loads depending on the DUT bypassing and decoupl1. LOW CURRENT,
HIGH VOLTAGE RANGE
2. HIGH CURRENT RANGE
3. MID CURRENT RANGE
HCAVSS1 = –5V
AVSS = –5V
AVDD = +28V
10µF
10µF
0.1µF
0.1µF
HCAVSS2 = –5V
HCAVDD1 = +6.5V
10µF
10µF
10µF
0.1µF
0.1µF
HCAVDD2 = +11V
10µF
DVCC = 3V/5V
0.1µF
0.1µF
33kΩ
0.1µF
100kΩ
33kΩ
100kΩ
EXTFORCE2
±500mA RANGE
OUTPUT RANGE
–0.5V TO +8.5V
EXTFORCE1
±1.2A RANGE
OUTPUT RANGE
–0.5V TO +4.25V
ALLOW ±0.5V FOR EXT RSENSE
DUT VOLTAGE RANGE
0V TO + 8V @ ±500mA
ALLOW ±0.5V FOR EXT RSENSE
DUT VOLTAGE RANGE
0V TO + 3.75V @ ±1.2mA
INTERNAL RSENSE
±0.5V @ FULL CURRENT
FORCE
DUT VOLTAGE RANGE
0V TO +25V (±5µA TO ±25mA)
08608-002
AD5560
INTERNAL RANGE SELECT
(5µA, 25µA, 250µA, 2.5mA, 25mA)
Figure 2. One Example of Using the Extra Supply Rails Within the AD5560 to Achieve Multiple Voltage/Current Ranges and Minimize Power Dissipation
(Simplified Schematic: Decoupling and All Connections Not Shown).
Rev. B | Page 3 of 8
CN-0130
Circuit Note
The voltage range for the CCX and CFX pins is the same as the
voltage range expected on FORCE; therefore, choice of capacitors should take this into account. CFX capacitors can have
10% tolerance; this extra variation directly affects settling times,
especially when measuring current in the low current ranges.
CCX should be at ≤5% tolerance.
HCAVSS1 = –5V
AVSS = –5V
HCAVDD1 = +6.5V
EXT1 RANGE
AVDD = +28V
SS32
Vf = ~0.5V
PIN VOLTAGE
= +27.5V
33kΩ
Output Voltage Range
The output voltage ranges for this design are as follows:
08608-003
33kΩ
AD5560
0 V to 25 V @ 5 µA to 25 mA
0 V to 7 V @ 500 mA
Figure 3. Example of Diodes Used for EXT1 Range
0 V to 3 V @ 1.2 A
To configure these combinations of rails, we need to adjust the
OFFSET DAC setting from the default. A suggested value of
0xD1D would achieve the ranges above. The diagram in
Figure 2 shows an example of how the AD5560 is partitioned to
achieve these output ranges.
High Current (HC) Supply Path Diodes
Because the AD5560 can output high power, offering current
ranges up to 1.2 A, the power supply rails are broken out into
three different power rails: the low current range (5 µA to
25 mA) is powered from AVDD/AVSS; the medium current
range, named EXT2, is powered from HCAVDD2/HCAVSS2;
the high current range, named EXT1, is powered from
HCAVDD1/HCAVSS1. The HC supplies should always be equal
to or less than the AVDD/AVSS rails. The purpose of the HC
rails is to allow the user to choose lower voltage supplies to
reduce the power dissipated in the AD5560. The design of the
EXT1 and EXT2 output stage requires them to be supplied by a
voltage higher than the voltage present at the DUT; if the HC
supplies are lower than the AVDD/AVSS supplies, then there
are situations where this might not be the case. As a result, we
recommend that a diode be added into the path between the
HC supply and the HC package pin (as shown in Figure 1).
When either the EXT1 or EXT2 stages are off, we want to keep
them off and keep them from leaking onto the DUT, so this
diode, in conjunction with the internal bleed resistor, will allow
the HC package pin voltage to increase (close to the AVDD/
AVSS rail), thereby keeping the EXT1/EXT2 output stages in
the off condition. Now, in the example we have shown here, the
AVSS, HCVSS1, and HCVSS2 pins are all at –5V, therefore,
there is no need for the diode in the HCVSS paths for these
particular conditions. Details of the diode circuits for the EXT1
and EXT2 ranges are shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4,
respectively.
The diode needs to be able to carry the highest current that the
stage can deliver (including instantaneous current/fault
conditions). The EXT1 range will likely have much higher
current requirements than that of the EXT2 stage; therefore,
when choosing diodes, it will likely work best (in terms of board
size) to choose separate diodes for EXT1 and EXT2.
The voltage drop should be as low as possible to minimize the
overall power dissipation and supply overheads.
The leakage or reverse current when the diode is off should be
low enough to ensure that the HC pin voltage can support the
DUT output voltage range. The reverse current of the diode
develops a voltage drop across the internal bleed resistor (33 kΩ
for EXT1 and 100 kΩ for EXT2); the HC pin voltage will be
lower as a result.
Suitable diodes are available from many vendors, such as
ON Semiconductor, Vishay, etc.
An alternative to a diode would be a low on-resistance power
MOSFET instead, as shown in Figure 5. Using a MOSFET has
the advantage of reducing the overall power dissipation because
the drop across the FET would be much less than that of a
diode.
Note that discrete power MOS devices have a parasitic body
diode between drain and source. The direction of this diode
must be in the same direction as the normal diodes the MOS
devices are replacing. A suitable driver for the MOS gate must
also be provided.
HCAVSS2 = –5V
AVSS = –5V
EXT2 RANGE
HCAVDD2 = +10V
AVDD = +28V
SS16
Vf = ~0.5V
PIN VOLTAGE
= +26.5V
100kΩ
AD5560
Figure 4. Example of Diodes Used for EXT2 Range.
Rev. B | Page 4 of 8
08608-004
100kΩ
Circuit Note
CN-0130
Thermal Measurements
HCAVSS1 = –5V
AVSS = –5V
An example of the thermal gradients measured using the
ADT7461A is shown in Figure 9. The heat sink used here is just
a simple heat sink with no air flow present. The intent is to give
an idea of the thermal gradient across the die using the on-chip
thermal diodes under a load of 1 A, power dissipated
approximately 5.4 W. The diodes are numbered (per the data
sheet), and this example cycles through some of the diodes at
different points in time. Even with this simple heat sink,
temperature differences of 17°C can be seen across the die.
HCAVDD1 = +6.5V
AVDD = +28V
CONTROL
G
S
D
33kΩ
AD5560
08608-005
33kΩ
Figure 5. Example of Using MOSFET Instead of a Diode
4.5
AVDD = +28V
AVSS = –5V
VREF = +5V
OFFSET DAC = 0xD1D
OUTPUT RANGE = 0V TO 23V
4.0
3.5
LINEARITY ERROR (mV)
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0
–0.5
–1.0
0
10k
20k
30k
40k
50k
60k
08608-006
The circuit must be constructed on a multilayer PC board with
a large area ground plane. Proper layout, grounding, and
decoupling techniques must be used to achieve optimum
performance (see Tutorial MT-031, Grounding Data Converters
and Solving the Mystery of "AGND" and "DGND" and Tutorial
MT-101, Decoupling Techniques). Note that Figure 1 is a
simplified schematic and does not show all the necessary
decoupling. Careful consideration of the power supply and
ground return layout helps to ensure the rated performance.
Design the printed circuit board (PCB) on which the AD5560 is
mounted so that the analog and digital sections are separated
and confined to certain areas of the board. If the AD5560 is in a
system where multiple devices require an AGND-to-DGND
connection, the connection should be made at one point only.
Establish the star ground point as close as possible to the device.
CODE
Figure 6. Typical Linearity Performance Using the AD7685 to Measure FVMV
(Force Voltage, Measure Voltage) Linearity Error Referred to the DUT.
+28 V, −5 V Skewed Power Supplies. Note That This Includes FV Error.
Linearity Measurements
3
AVDD = +15V
AVSS = –15V
VREF = +5V
OFFSET DAC = 0x8000 (DEFAULT)
OUTPUT RANGE = –11V TO +11V
2
LINEARITY ERROR (mV)
1
0
–1
–2
–3
0
10k
20k
30k
40k
50k
60k
08608-007
Linearity measurements on the system in the FVMV (force
voltage, measure voltage) mode are shown in Figure 6 and
Figure 7. Figure 6 shows linearity for skewed power supplies
(+28 V, −5 V). Linearity performance for this particular gain
setting (MEASOUT GAIN = 0.2) degrades with skew supply
conditions. Figure 7 shows improved linearity for symmetrical
power supplies (±15 V). Both measurements were made with
the AD7685 ADC using the circuit shown in Figure 1. Linearity
measurements in the FVMI (force voltage, measure current) mode
are shown in Figure 8 for symmetrical power supplies.
CODE
Figure 7. Typical Linearity Performance Using the AD7685 to Measure FVMV
Linearity Error Referred to the DUT, ±15 V Symmetrical Power Supplies. Note
That This Includes FV Error (Linearity Performance Under These Supply
Conditions is Superior to That of Skewed Supply Shown in Figure 6).
Rev. B | Page 5 of 8
CN-0130
Circuit Note
the gain setting “m” register to shrink the range even further. It’s
possible to use a scaling factor of ¼ for “m” and still retain
16-bit resolution. For these low voltage applications, there is no
need for AVDD/AVSS to be high voltage rails, since the
AD5560 is designed to work with a much smaller supply
differential such that |AVDD – AVSS| ≥ 16 V. This helps by
reducing the power dissipated in the AD5560. See the AD5560
data sheet for further details.
0.05
0.04
0.02
0.01
0
–0.01
–0.02
AVDD = +15V
AVSS = –15V
VREF = +5V
OFFSET DAC = 0x8000 (DEFAULT)
FORCE VOLTAGE RANGE ±11V
–0.03
–0.04
08608-008
LINEARITY ERROR (%FSR)
0.03
–0.05
0
20k
40k
60k
CODE
Figure 8. Typical Linearity Performance Using AD7685 to Measure FVMI
(Force Voltage, Measure Current) Linearity Error, ±15 V Symmetrical
Power Supplies .
PROGRAM FV = 1V
INTO 1Ω LOAD, 1A
PD = ~5.4W
IN POWER 1A-1 NPN
DEVICE (24)
DOWN
25mA CH
ENABLED
EXT1 RANGE
ENABLED
PROGRAM FV = 0.5V
INTO 1Ω LOAD
500mA PD = ~3.4W
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
15 13
14
12 11 10 9 8
Other ADCs can also be selected, such as those with bipolar
ranges or faster sampling rates. If external multiplexers are used,
the ADG1404/ADG1204 are ideal for bipolar input ADCs;
while for single-supply usage, the ADG706 or ADG708 would
be more suited.
LOCAL TEMPERATURE SENSOR
AD5560 THERMAL ARRAY
0
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
The output impedance of the MEASOUT path is typically 60 Ω;
in addition to the switch impedance, an ADC buffer should be
considered to drive the ADC (the ADA4898-1 is an example of
an op amp that would be suitable).
08608-009
TEMPERATURE (°C)
80
1A-1 PNP
DEVICE (16)
90
The 16-bit 250 kSPS AD7685 ADC was chosen for this
application due to its ability to handle the 0 V to 5 V output
range on the MEASOUT path. In addition to this, the
availability of other ADCs with faster speeds in the same
footprint (AD7686, 500 kSPS) also makes it very attractive for
upgrade paths.
SENSING DIODES LOCATED
IN COOL BLOCK
CORRESPONDING TO:
PROGRAM
FV = 0V
100
Variations in partitioning of DPS measurement channels per
ADC channel might mean that one ADC channel is shared
among more PMU channels (sometimes 8:1 or 16:1 ratios). The
on-chip MEASOUT disable feature can be used. Alternatively,
an analog multiplexer can be used for this function. This adds
additional series resistance into the measurement path, so
consideration should be given to buffering the measurement
path prior to the ADC input. Many of the ADC data sheets
include recommendations for suitable ADC drivers.
TIME (Seconds)
Figure 9. Example of Using the ADT7461A as the Thermal Monitor
(X-Axis Is Time in Seconds).
Selecting the Right Supplies for an Output Voltage
Range of ±10V Device Power Supply (DPS) for ATE
COMMON VARIATIONS
Depending on the type of DUT being driven, DPS circuits don’t
always need to use a full 25 V range. For example, the use of the
ADR421 (2.5 V) voltage reference allows the user to achieve a
lower output voltage range (±6.4 V nominally). This can be
scaled to suit the DUT requirements by using the on-chip
OFFSET DAC (see the ADR421 data sheet for more detail). If
the voltage range required is even smaller than this, simply use
In the example shown in Figure 10 the AD5560 is supplied
with symmetrical supply rails, and the design must deliver
three DUT rails:
−10 V to +10 V @ ±5 µA to ±25 mA
−5 V to +5 V @ ±500 mA
0 V to 3 V @ +1.2 A
To configure these combinations of rails, we can use the default
OFFSET DAC setting with a VREF = 5 V. This will achieve a
nominal ±10 V output with plenty of over-range.
Rev. B | Page 6 of 8
Circuit Note
CN-0130
1. LOW CURRENT,
HIGH VOLTAGE RANGE
3. MID CURRENT RANGE
2. HIGH CURRENT RANGE
HCAV SS2 = –7.5V
HCAV SS1 = –7.5V
AVSS = –15V
10µF
10µF
0.1µF
0.1µF
HCAV DD2 = +7.5V
HCAV DD1 = +5.5V
AVDD = +15V
10µF
10µF
10µF
10µF
DV CC = 3V/5V
0.1µF
0.1µF
0.1µF
0.1µF
33kΩ
0.1µF
100kΩ
33kΩ
100kΩ
EXTFORCE2
±500mA RANGE
OUTPUT RANGE
–5.5V TO +5.5V
EXTFORCE1
±1.2A RANGE
OUTPUT RANGE
–0.5V TO +3.5V
ALLOW ±0.5V FOR EXTRSENSE
ALLOW ±0.5V FOR EXTRSENSE
DUT VOLTAGE RANGE
–5V TO +5V @ ±500mA
DUT VOLTAGERANGE
0V TO +3V @ +1.2mA
AD5560
FORCE
INTERNAL RSENSE
±0.5V @ FULL CURRENT
DUT VOLTAGE RANGE
–10V TO +10V (±5µA TO ±25mA)
08608-010
INTERNAL RANGE SELECT
(5µA, 25µA, 250µA, 2.5mA, 25mA)
Figure 10. One Example of Using the Extra Supply Rails Within the AD5560 to Achieve Multiple Voltage/Current Ranges and Minimize Power Dissipation
High Current (HC) Supply Path Diodes
For the voltage conditions above, we now need to use a diode in
both paths (HCVSS, HCAVDD) which is different from the
previous discussion which used asymmetrical supply rails.
Details of the diode circuits for the EXT1 and EXT2 ranges are
shown in Figure 11 and Figure 12.
HCAV SS2 = –7.5V
HCAV SS1 = –7.5V
AVSS = –15V
AVSS = –15V
EXT1 RANGE
EXT2 RANGE
HCAV DD1 = +5.5V
HCAV DD2 = +7.5V
AVDD = +15V
AVDD = +15V
SS16
IREVERSE = ~15µA
SS32
Vf = ~0.5V
PIN VOLTAGE
= –14.5V
PIN VOLTAGE
= –13.5V
PIN VOLTAGE
= +14.5V
PIN VOLTAGE
= +13.5V
100kΩ
33kΩ
100kΩ
08608-011
33kΩ
AD5560
SS16
Vf = ~0.5V
AD5560
Figure 12. Example of Diodes Used for EXT2 Range.
Figure 11. Example of Diodes Used for EXT1 Range
Rev. B | Page 7 of 8
08608-012
SS32
IREVERSE = ~15µA
CN-0130
Circuit Note
Similarly, if using FETs in place of diodes, for these supply
conditions, we will again need to use them in both supply paths
as shown in Figure 13.
HCAV SS1 = –7.5V
AVSS = –15V
G
AVDD = +15V
CONTROL
D
LEARN MORE
Automatic Test Equipment (www.analog.com/ATE)
MT-031 Tutorial, Grounding Data Converters and Solving the
Mystery of AGND and DGND. Analog Devices.
HCAV DD1 = +5.5V
MT-101 Tutorial, Decoupling Techniques. Analog Devices.
S
CONTROL
G
Voltage Reference Wizard Design Tool.
S
D
Data Sheets and Evaluation Boards
AD5560 Data Sheet
33kΩ
33kΩ
08608-013
AD5560 Evaluation Board
AD5560
AD7685 Data Sheet
AD7685 Evaluation Board
ADR435 Data Sheet
Figure 13. Example of Using MOSFET Instead of a Diode
REVISION HISTORY
Choosing HCAVSSX and HCAVDDX Supply Rails
Selection of HCAVSSX and HCAVDDX supplies is determined by
the EXTFORCE1 and EXTFORCE2 output ranges. The supply
rails chosen must take into account headroom and footroom,
DUTGND voltage range, cable loss, supply tolerance, and
VRSENSE. If diodes are used in series with the HCAVSSX and
HCAVDDX supplies pins, the diode voltage drop should also be
factored into the supply rail calculation.
The AD5560 is designed for fast settling into large capacitive
loads in high current ranges; therefore, when slewing, the device
draws two to three times the nominal current from the
HCAVSSX and HCAVDDX supplies. When choosing supply rails,
ensure that they are capable of supplying each DPS channel
with sufficient current to slew.
6/11—Rev. A to Rev. B
Changes to Common Variations .....................................................6
2/11—Rev. 0 to Rev. A
Changes to Circuit Function and Benefits .....................................1
Changes to Figure 2 through Figure 5 ............................................3
Changes to Circuit Description .......................................................4
10/09—Revision 0: Initial Version
All output stages of the AD5560 are symmetrical; they can
source and sink the rated current. Supply design and bypassing
should account for this.
Figure 10 shows an example of how the AD5560 is partitioned
to achieve these output ranges. In order to confine the number
of supplies rails required in the system, the HCAVSS rails are
both tied to −7.5V, because in this example, the HCAVSS1 rail is
not required to deliver much current, therefore the power
dissipation will not be high.
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CN08608-0-6/11(B)
Rev. B | Page 8 of 8
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