ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite Manual (Rev 2.0, January 2003)

ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite
Evaluation System Manual
Part Number: 82-000490-01
Revision 2.0
January 2003
Notice
Analog Devices, Inc. reserves the right to make changes to or to discontinue any product or service
identified in this publication without notice.
Analog Devices assumes no liability for Analog Devices applications assistance, customer product design,
customer software performance, or infringement of patents or services described herein. In addition,
Analog Devices shall not be held liable for special, collateral, incidental or consequential damages in
connection with or arising out of the furnishing, performance, or use of this product.
Analog Devices products are not intended for use in life-support applications, devices, or systems. Use of
an Analog Devices product in such applications without the written consent of the Analog Devices officer
is prohibited.
Users are restricted from copying, modifying, distributing, reverse engineering, and reverse assembling or
reverse compiling the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite operational software (one copy may be made for backup purposes only).
No part of this document may be reproduced in any form without permission.
Trademark and Service Mark Notice
The Analog Devices logo, SHARC, the SHARC logo, VisualDSP, the VisualDSP logo, and EZ-ICE are
registered trademarks; and TigerSHARC, the TigerSHARC logo, White Mountain DSP, VisualDSP++, the
VisualDSP++ logo, Apex-ICE, EZ-KIT Lite, Mountain-ICE, Summit-ICE, Trek-ICE, and The DSP
Collaborative are trademarks of Analog Devices, Inc.
Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks and Windows NT is a trademark of Microsoft
Corporation.
Adobe and Acrobat are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
All other brand and product names are trademarks or service marks of their respective owners.
Limited Warranty
The ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite hardware is warranted against defects in materials and workmanship for a
period of one year from the date of purchase from Analog Devices or from an authorized dealer.
Copyright © 2000-2003, Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved.
1
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................................................4
LIST OF FIGURES.....................................................................................................................................6
1
INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................................................7
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
2
FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ANALOG DEVICES, INC. PRODUCTS ..........................................8
FOR TECHNICAL OR CUSTOMER SUPPORT ......................................................................................8
PURPOSE OF THIS MANUAL ............................................................................................................8
INTENDED AUDIENCE .....................................................................................................................8
MANUAL CONTENTS DESCRIPTION.................................................................................................9
DOCUMENTS AND RELATED PRODUCTS .......................................................................................10
GETTING STARTED.......................................................................................................................11
2.1
OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................11
2.2
CONTENTS OF YOUR EZ-KIT LITE PACKAGE...............................................................................11
2.3
PC CONFIGURATION.....................................................................................................................12
2.4
VISUALDSP++ .............................................................................................................................12
2.5
INSTALLATION PROCEDURES ........................................................................................................13
2.5.1
Installing the EZ-KIT Lite Hardware ..................................................................................13
2.5.2
Installing VisualDSP++......................................................................................................13
2.5.3
Installing the VisualDSP++ EZ-KIT Lite License...............................................................15
2.5.4
Default Settings ...................................................................................................................15
3
USING EZ-KIT LITE SOFTWARE ...............................................................................................17
3.1
OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................17
3.2
STANDARD OPERATION ................................................................................................................17
3.2.1
I/O Devices ..........................................................................................................................17
3.2.2
POST Routines.....................................................................................................................20
3.2.3
Monitor Program Operation ...............................................................................................22
3.2.4
AD1819 Transmissions........................................................................................................23
3.3
RUNNING YOUR OWN PROGRAMS ................................................................................................24
3.3.1
ADSP-21065L Memory Map ...............................................................................................24
3.3.2
Using the AD1819A SoundPort Codec as the Analog Front End .......................................27
3.3.3
Method 1: Using the Monitor’s Codec DMA Buffers and Interrupt Handler .....................27
3.3.4
DSP Programming of the AD1819 Indexed Control Registers ...........................................32
3.3.5
EMAFE Programming.........................................................................................................32
4
DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS.................................................................................................33
4.1
OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................33
4.2
STARTING THE VISUALDSP++ DEBUGGER ..................................................................................33
4.3
DEBUGGER OPERATION WITH THE ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT LITE .................................................34
4.3.1
Loading Programs...............................................................................................................34
4.3.2
Registers and Memory .........................................................................................................35
4.3.3
Setting Breakpoints and Stepping........................................................................................35
4.3.4
Resetting the EZ-KIT Lite Board .........................................................................................36
4.4
BENCHMARKING UTILITIES ..........................................................................................................36
4.5
DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS ......................................................................................................38
4.5.1
FFT.dxe ...............................................................................................................................38
4.5.2
BP.dxe..................................................................................................................................38
4.5.3
Pluck.dxe .............................................................................................................................38
4.5.4
Gunn.dxe..............................................................................................................................38
3
4.5.5
4.5.6
4.5.7
5
Primes.dxe ...........................................................................................................................39
Tt.dxe ...................................................................................................................................39
Blink.dxe ..............................................................................................................................39
WORKING WITH EZ-KIT LITE HARDWARE..........................................................................40
5.1
OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................40
5.2
SYSTEM ARCHITECTURE...............................................................................................................40
5.3
BOARD LAYOUT ...........................................................................................................................41
5.3.1
Boot EPROM .......................................................................................................................41
5.3.2
User Push-Button Switches .................................................................................................42
5.3.3
User LED’s..........................................................................................................................42
5.4
POWER SUPPLIES ..........................................................................................................................42
5.4.1
Power Connector.................................................................................................................43
5.4.2
European Power Supply Specifications...............................................................................43
5.4.3
AD1819 Connections...........................................................................................................44
5.4.4
Expansion Port Connectors.................................................................................................44
5.4.5
EMAFE Interface Connector...............................................................................................44
5.4.6
JTAG Connector (Emulator Port) .......................................................................................44
5.5
JUMPERS .......................................................................................................................................45
5.5.1
Boot Mode Selection Jumper...............................................................................................45
5.5.2
EPROM Size Selection Jumpers ..........................................................................................46
5.5.3
Processor ID Jumpers .........................................................................................................46
5.6
EPROM OPERATION ....................................................................................................................47
5.6.1
Designers Note ....................................................................................................................48
5.7
UART ..........................................................................................................................................48
5.7.1
Designers Note ....................................................................................................................48
5.8
EMAFE .......................................................................................................................................49
5.9
AD1819 .......................................................................................................................................49
5.10 S...................................................................................................................................................49
5.11 TIMING DIAGRAMS .......................................................................................................................50
6
EXPANSION CONNECTORS ........................................................................................................53
6.1
OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................53
6.2
EMAFE EXPANSION ....................................................................................................................54
6.2.1
EMAFE Connector Interface Signal Descriptions ..............................................................57
7
REFERENCE ....................................................................................................................................60
7.1
OVERVIEW ...................................................................................................................................60
7.2
SETTINGS MENU COMMANDS .......................................................................................................60
7.2.1
Test Communications ..........................................................................................................60
7.3 Baud Rate and COM Port ............................................................................................................60
7.2.2
Codec...................................................................................................................................62
7.3
DEMO MENU COMMANDS ............................................................................................................64
APPENDIX A RESTRICTIONS & CPLD CODE LISTING ...............................................................66
APPENDIX B BILL OF MATERIALS ..................................................................................................75
APPENDIX C SCHEMATICS.................................................................................................................81
INDEX.........................................................................................................................................................82
LIST OF TABLES
4
TABLE 2-1
TABLE 2-2
TABLE 3-1
TABLE 3-2
TABLE 3-3
TABLE 3-4
TABLE 3-5
TABLE 3-6
TABLE 3-7
TABLE 5-1
TABLE 5-2
TABLE 5-3
TABLE 5-4
TABLE 5-5
TABLE 5-6
TABLE 5-7
TABLE 5-8
TABLE 6-1
TABLE 6-2
TABLE 6-3
TABLE 6-4
TABLE 6-5
TABLE 6-6
TABLE 7-1
PC MINIMUM CONFIGURATION .................................................................................................12
USER CONFIGURABLE EZ-KIT LITE SETTINGS .........................................................................15
FLAG SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................18
INTERRUPTS USED BY THE MONITOR PROGRAM........................................................................19
TABLE 3-3. POST ROUTINES ......................................................................................................20
TABLE 3-4. POST ERROR CODES ..............................................................................................20
MEMORY MAP ...........................................................................................................................25
AVAILABLE MEMORY LOCATIONS ON THE EZ-KIT LITE ..........................................................26
DSP PROGRAMMING OF THE AD1819 INDEXED CONTROL REGISTERS .....................................32
POWER CONNECTOR ..................................................................................................................43
EUROPEAN POWER SUPPLY SPECIFICATIONS .............................................................................43
BOOT MODE SELECTION............................................................................................................45
EPROM SIZE SELECTION ..........................................................................................................46
PROCESSOR SELECTION .............................................................................................................46
LINE IN SELECTION ...................................................................................................................47
AD1819 CODEC SELECTION......................................................................................................47
SDRAM PIN CONNECTIONS .......................................................................................................50
EXPANSION CONNECTORS .........................................................................................................53
EVALUATION BOARD POWER CONNECTIONS.............................................................................55
EMAFE CONNECTOR ................................................................................................................56
EMAFE CONNECTOR INTERFACE SIGNAL DESCRIPTION ROW A ..............................................57
EMAFE CONNECTOR INTERFACE SIGNAL DESCRIPTION ROW B ..............................................58
EMAFE CONNECTOR INTERFACE SIGNAL DESCRIPTION ROW C ..............................................59
FFT DEMO DIALOG DESCRIPTION .............................................................................................64
5
LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE 2-1 COMPONENT SELECTION ...........................................................................................................14
FIGURE 3-1 ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT LITE MONITOR KERNEL CODEC TRANSFER SCHEME ..........................29
FIGURE 4-1 TARGET SELECTION DIALOG .....................................................................................................33
FIGURE 4-2 TARGET MESSAGE.....................................................................................................................34
FIGURE 4-3 TARGET COMMUNICATIONS STATUS MESSAGE BOX .................................................................34
FIGURE 5-1 EZ-KIT LITE SYSTEM BLOCK DIAGRAM ..................................................................................40
FIGURE 5-2 EZ-KIT LITE LAYOUT .............................................................................................................41
FIGURE 5-3 JTAG CONNECTOR WITH JUMPERS INSTALLED ........................................................................45
FIGURE 5-4 EPROM ADDRESS (256K X 8 EXAMPLE) ..............................................................................48
FIGURE 5-5 EMAFE WRITE CYCLE TIMING PARAMETER DEFINITIONS .......................................................50
FIGURE 5-6 EMAFE WRITE CYCLE TIMING DIAGRAM................................................................................51
FIGURE 5-7 EMAFE READ CYCLE TIMING PARAMETER DEFINITIONS ........................................................51
FIGURE 5-8 EMAFE READ CYCLE TIMING DIAGRAM.............................................................................52
FIGURE 6-1 PHYSICAL LAYOUT OF ADSP-21065L DSP EVALUATION BOARD AND EMAFE DAUGHTER
BOARD ..................................................................................................................................................55
FIGURE 7-1 SETTINGS MENU COMMANDS ....................................................................................................60
FIGURE 7-2 SAMPLE RATE DIALOG ..............................................................................................................63
FIGURE 7-3 SOURCE SETTING ......................................................................................................................63
FIGURE 7-4 FFT DEMO DIALOG...................................................................................................................64
FIGURE 7-5 BANDPASS DEMO CONTROLS DIALOG.......................................................................................65
6
1 INTRODUCTION
Thank you for purchasing the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite evaluation kit. The evaluation board is
designed to be used in conjunction with VisualDSP++  development environment and is based on
the ADSP-21065L SHARC® floating-point digital signal processor (DSP). The kit is shipped with an
evaluation board and VisualDSP++ software. The VisualDSP++ that comes with the kit will only
operate with the evaluation board. The complete version must be purchased seperately. Using the
EZ-KIT Lite with VisualDSP++, you can observe the ADSP-21065L DSP execute programs from
on-chip RAM, interact with on-board devices, and communicate with other peripherals.
You can access the ADSP-21065L SHARC processor using the PC through a serial port or an
optional JTAG emulator. The monitor program that runs on the EZ-KIT Lite, gives you access to the
ADSP-21065L processor’s internal memory space through the serial port. In contrast, the JTAG
emulator allows the PC to perform in-circuit emulation through the processor’s JTAG interface.
The board’s features include:
•
Analog Devices ADSP-21065L DSP running at 60MHz
•
Analog Devices AD1819A 16-bit SoundPort® Codec
•
RS-232 interface
•
Socketed EPROM (128K x 8 on board, or 256K x 8, 512K x 8, and 1M x 8 selectable)
•
SDRAM (1M x 32)
•
Four push buttons for Flag inputs
•
Three push buttons for IRQ inputs
•
Six user programmable LEDs
•
Power supply regulation
•
EMAFE (Enhanced Modular Analog Front End) connector for expansion
•
Expansion connectors
The EZ-KIT Lite board is equipped with hardware that facilitates interactive demonstrations. The
push button switches and user programmable LEDs provide user control and board status.
Additionally, the AD1819A SoundPort Codec provides access to an audio input (selectable as line
level or microphone) and an audio output (line level).
The EZ-KIT Lite includes a monitor program stored in non-votilitile memory. The monitor program
allows the user to download, execute and debug ADSP-21065L programs. By removing the socketed
EPROM, replacing it with an EPROM containing user code, the board can run as a stand-alone unit,
without the PC.
7
The user can also connect a JTAG emulator to the EZ-KIT Lite. Through the JTAG emulator, you
can load programs, start and stop program execution, observe and alter registers and memory, and
perform other debugging operations. JTAG emulators are purchased seperately through Analog
Devices.
Additionally, the EZ-KIT Lite provides expansion connectors that let the user examine the processor
signals, as well as provide an interface for host control.
1.1 For More Information About Analog Devices, Inc. Products
Analog Devices is accessible on the Internet at www.analog.com. The DSP web page is directly
accessible at www.analog.com/dsp. This page provides access to DSP specific technical
information and documentation, product overviews, and product announcements.
1.2 For Technical or Customer Support
You can reach our Customer Support group in the following ways:
•
Email questions to [email protected]
•
Contact your local Analog Devices sales office or an authorized Analog Devices distributor
1.3 Purpose of This Manual
The ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite evaluation system manual gives directions for installing the
evaluation board and software on the PC. Also, the manual provides guidelines for running user
code on the ADSP-21065L.
1.4 Intended Audience
This manual is a user’s guide and reference to the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite evaluation board.
DSP programmers who are familiar with Analog Devices SHARC architecture, operation, and
programming are the primary audience for this manual.
DSP programmers who are unfamiliar with Analog Devices DSPs can use this manual, but
should supplement this manual with the ADSP-21065L User’s Manual, the ADSP-21065L
Technical Reference and the VisualDSP++ tools manuals.
8
1.5 Manual Contents Description
This manual contains the following information:
•
Chapter 1 — Introduction
Provides manual information and Analog Devices contact information.
•
Chapter 2 — Getting Started
Provides software and hardware installation procedures, PC system requirements, and basic
board information.
•
Chapter 3 — Using EZ-KIT Lite Software
Provides information on the EZ-KIT Lite system from a software perspective, and details the
monitor program, EMAFE, and codec.
•
Chapter 4 — Demonstration Programs
Provides information on VisualDSP++ debugger operation with the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT
Lite, benchmarking utilities, and demonstration programs.
•
Chapter 5 — Working With EZ-KIT Lite Hardware
Provides information on the Hardware aspects of the evaluation system.
•
Chapter 6 — Expansion Connectors
Provides information on EMAFE expansion and descriptions of connector interface signals.
•
Chapter 7 — Reference
Provides information on settings menu commands and demo menu commands.
•
Appendix A — Restrictions & CPLD Code Listing
Provides information on board restrictions you may encounter when using your EZ-KIT
Lite, and the files used on the programmable device(s) on the EZ-KIT Lite board.
•
Appendix B — Bill of Materials
Provides a list of components used in the manufacture of the EZ-KIT Lite board.
Appendix C — Schematics
Provides a resource to allow EZ-KIT Lite board level debugging or to use as a reference
design.
9
1.6 Documents and Related Products
For more information on the ADSP-21065L and the components of the EZ-KIT Lite system, see
the following documents:
•
ADSP-21065L SHARC User's Manual & Technical Reference
•
ADSP-21065L
•
AC’97 SoundPort®
The ADSP-2106x family of processors is supported by a complete set of evaluation tools.
Software tools include a C compiler, assembler, runtime libraries and librarian, linker, simulator,
and PROM splitter. See the following documents:
•
VisualDSP++ Getting Started Guide
•
VisualDSP++ User's Guide for the ADSP-21xxx Family DSPs
•
Assembler Manual for the ADSP-21xxx Family DSPs
•
C/C++ Compiler & Library Manual for the ADSP-21xxx Family DSPs
•
Linker & Utilities for the ADSP-21xxx Family DSPs
•
Product Bulletin for VisualDSP++ and the ADSP-21xxx Family DSPs
If you plan to use the EZ-KIT Lite in conjunction with the JTAG emulator, refer to the
documentation that accompanies the emulator.
Your software installation kit includes on-line help as part of the Windows interface. These help
files provide information about the ADSP-21065L evaluation board and accompanying tools.
10
2 GETTING STARTED
2.1 Overview
This chapter provides information to install the software and the ADSP-21065L evaluation
board. It is important that installation of the software and hardware are in the order presented for
correct operation. This chapter also provides basic board information and conatins the following
sections:
•
Contents of your EZ-KIT Lite package
•
PC configuration
•
Installation procedures
2.2 Contents of Your EZ-KIT Lite Package
The EZ-KIT Lite evaluation board contains ESD (electrostatic discharge)
sensitive devices. Electrostatic charges readily accumulate on the human body
and equipment and can discharge without detection. Permanent damage may
occur on devices subjected to high energy discharges. Proper ESD precautions
are recommended to avoid performance degradation or loss of functionality.
Unused EZ-KIT Lites should be stored in the protective shipping package.
The ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite evaluation board package should contain the following items.
If any item is missing, contact the vendor where you purchased your EZ-KIT Lite or Analog
Devices.
•
ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite board
•
Power cable with DC power supply (7.5 Volts)
•
RS-232 serial port 9-pin cable
•
EZ-KIT Lite CD containing examples, target .dll files, help files, and utilities
•
VisualDSP++ CD
•
Registration card - please fill out and return
11
2.3 PC Configuration
For correct operation of the VisualDSP++ software and EZ-KIT Lite demos, all computers must
have the minimum configuration shown below.
Table 2-1 PC Minimum Configuration
Windows 98, 2000, XP
Windows NT
Windows 98, Windows 2000, or Windows XP
Windows NT, release 4.0, Service Pack 3 or later
Pentium processor 166 MHz or faster
Pentium processor 166 MHz or faster
VGA Monitor and color video card
VGA Monitor and color video card
2-button mouse
2-button mouse
100 MB available space
100 MB available space
32 MB RAM
32 MB RAM
CD-ROM
CD-ROM
2.4 VisualDSP++
The ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite system is shipped with the VisualDSP++ Integrated
Development Environment (IDE), debugger and code generation tools. VisualDSP++ is limited
in functionality by the EZ-KIT Lite serial number that is shipped with this product. The EZ-KIT
Lite serial number restricts the VisualDSP++ debugger to only connect to the ADSP-21065L EZKIT Lite evaluation board running the debug monitor via the serial port (no emulator or
simulator support). Additionally, the linker will restrict the user to only 25% (2.5k words) of the
ADSP-21065L’s on-chip program memory space. If the full VisualDSP++ software suite is
purchased, the user will obtain a new serial number from Analog Devices that will lift the
restrictions mentioned above. The basic components that are shipped with VisualDSP++ are:
•
Integrated Development Environment (IDE) — graphical interface for project management,
allowing the user to set project options, access the code generation tools, and launch the
debugger.
•
Debugger — allows the user to view the insides of the DSP and perform debug operations
such as read/write memory, read/write registers, load programs, run, step, halt, and more.
•
SHARC Family Code Generation Tools — C compiler, assembler, runtime libraries and
librarian, linker, simulator, and PROM splitter.
•
Example Projects — Both VisualDSP++ and the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite are shipped
with example projects and C and Assembly source code that demonstrate various features of
the tools and ADSP-21065L DSP.
12
2.5 Installation Procedures
The following procedures are provided for the safe and effective use of the ADSP-21065L
evaluation board. It is important that you follow these instructions in the order presented to
ensure correct operation of your software and hardware.
2.5.1 Installing the EZ-KIT Lite Hardware
The ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite board is designed to run outside the PC as a stand alone
unit. There is no need to remove the chassis from your computer. Use the following steps to
connect the EZ-KIT Lite board:
1. Remove the EZ-KIT Lite board from the package—be careful when handling these
boards to avoid the discharge of static electricity, which may damage some components.
2. Connect the RS-232 cable to an available Comm Port on the PC and to J3 on the
ADSP-21065L evaluation board.
3. Plug the provided cord into a 120-Volt AC receptacle and plug the connector at the
other end of the cable into J1 (Power In) on the evaluation board.
All of the LEDs light up briefly. The FLAG9 and power (red) LED remain on. If the LEDs
do not light up, check the power connections.
To configure your board to take advantage of the audio capabilities of the demos, use the
following procedure:
1. Plug a set of self-powered computer speakers into jack J7(Line Out) on the board.
Turn on the speakers and set the volume to an adequate level.
2. Connect the line out of an electronic audio device to jack J8 (MIC/Line In) on the
board. Set jumpers JP1 and JP2 to LINE.
3.
Set Jumper JP3 to GND to enable the AD1819 codec. (This is the board default)
This completes the hardware installation.
2.5.2 Installing VisualDSP++
This EZ-KIT Lite comes with the latest evaluation version of VisualDSP++ for SHARC
Family DSPs. You must install this software prior to installing the EZ-KIT Lite software.
Insert the VisualDSP++ CD into the CD-ROM drive. This will bring up the CD browser.
Click on the “Install VisualDSP++” option. This will launch the setup wizard. When
prompted, by the component selection dialog of the installation wizard, insure that the
21065L EZ-Kit Light check box is checked. Follow this wizard with the on-screen
instructions.
13
Figure 2-1 Component Selection
14
2.5.3 Installing the VisualDSP++ EZ-KIT Lite License
Before the VisualDSP++ software can be used, the license must be installed. To install the
EZ-KIT Lite license, follow these steps:
1. Make sure VisualDSP++ has been installed first.
2. Insert the VisualDSP++ CD into the CD-ROM drive if it is not already
in the drive.
3. Once the CD browser is on the screen select the "Install License"
option.
4. Now follow the setup wizard instructions. (Note: Make sure that you
have the proper serial number located on the back of the CD holder.)
2.5.4 Default Settings
After you have installed the board and utility software, your PC and EZ-KIT Lite have
the default settings shown in Table 2-2. You can change these settings through the
Settings menu in the debugger.
Table 2-2 User Configurable EZ-KIT Lite Settings
Selection
Default Setting
Comm Port
Comm 1
Baud Rate
115200
Codec Sample Rate
48000 Hz
Codec Source
Microphone
Codec Gain
0.0
2.5.4.1 On-Line Help
The VisualDSP++ Debugger comes with a complete on-line help file and Adobe .pdf
files of all manuals.
•
You can use the context help button
to get help on any command or icon
or
•
Highlight a command and press F1.
For help on commands and dialogs click from the toolbar Help -> Help Topics to get to
15
the Debugger Help help file.
16
3 USING EZ-KIT LITE SOFTWARE
3.1 Overview
The combination of the EZ-KIT Lite board and the monitor software operate as a target for the
VisualDSP++ debugger. The debugger allows viewing of the processor registers and memory,
perform several debugging activities, such as: setting breakpoints, stepping through code, and
plotting a range of memory.
If VisualDSP++ is not installed, please install it from the VisualDSP++ CD that came with this
product. For more information, refer to Chapter 2, section “VisualDSP++”.
This chapter provides monitor level software information on how the EZ-KIT Lite board operates
with the installed software. This chapter also provides information that helps the user run his/her
own programs on the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite board. This information appears in the
following sections:
•
“Standard Operation”
Describes the operation of the EZ-KIT Lite board, from Power On self Test (POST)
routines to the AD1819 codec’s operation.
•
“Running Your Own Programs”
Provides information about writing and running your own DSP executables that link with
the monitor program to run on the EZ-KIT Lite board.
3.2 Standard Operation
This section covers the standard operation of the EZ-KIT Lite board. It describes the I/O
capabilities of the on-board components, board power-up, and the on-board Monitor program.
3.2.1 I/O Devices
3.2.1.1 Flags
The ADSP-21065L has 12 asynchronous FLAG I/O pins that let you interact with the
running program. All flags are configured as inputs on reset of the DSP. For more
information on the Flag pins, see Chapter 12, “System Design, Flag Pins” in the ADSP21065L SHARC User’s Manual. The flags and their uses, are as follows:
•
FLAG0-3 are connected to the push buttons on the EZ-KIT Lite board and are for
user input. For instance, the user can tell the program to poll for a flag and
when it occurs, do some other operation such as jump to another instruction.
The push button flags are set as inputs through the MODE2 register. Once
configured, they may be read through the ASTAT register.
17
•
FLAG4-9 connect to the LEDs and supply feedback for program execution. For
example the user can write code to trigger a flag (and the corresponding LED)
when a routine is complete the LED will light. The LED flags are configured
through the IOCTL register and are set/read through the IOSTAT register.
•
FLAG10 is available to the EMAFE interface and is used for signaling. The
EMAFE flag is configured through the IOCTL register and is set/read through
the IOSTAT register.
•
FLAG11 is reserved for the monitor to determine if the AD1819 codec is
enabled. When using the monitor program supplied with the EZ-KIT Lite
board, do not use or alter this flag pin.
Table 3-1 Flag Summary
Flag
Use
Flag0-3
Push-button Input
(SW3, SW5, SW7, SW8)
Flag4-9
LED Feedback
Flag10
EMAFE Flag
Flag11
Reserved for monitor
3.2.1.2 Interrupts
Each of the three external interrupts, IRQ0-2, of the ADSP-21065L are directly accessible
through push button switches SW2, SW4, and SW6 on the EZ-KIT Lite board. IRQ0-1
are “wire-Or’ed”; IRQ0 is used to implement interrupt driven serial routines with the
UART and IRQ1 is provided for use with an EMAFE board and can be set to read and
write registers.
The external interrupts are controlled through the MODE1, MODE2, and IMASK registers and are configured in one of two ways: by modifying the vector table or through
instructions in user code. The MODE2 register also controls the interrupt sensitivity
between level and edge. To prevent an interrupt from being masked, write to the
particular interrupt in the IMASK register.
The monitor program running on the ADSP-21065L uses three interrupts; IRQ0, SPT1I
and SFT3, for normal operation. These interrupt vectors are provided in the
“demorth.asm” file that comes with the EZ-KIT Lite.
18
When writing code, these interrupts (and their corresponding vectors) should not be
altered. If these vectors are overwritten, the kernel may not work as shown in Table 3-1.
For more information on the registers that control interrupts, and a complete list of interrupt vector addresses, see Appendix E and F in the ADSP-21065L SHARC Technical
Reference.
Table 3-2 Interrupts Used by the Monitor Program
Interrupt
Description
Lost Functionality if Overwritten
IRQ0
Multiplexed from the UART through
Debugger’s ability to interrupt
an open collector device
running code
SFT3
Used to signal the monitor to send Ability to send messages from
data back to the Host
SPT1
user code to the debugger
AD1819 Transmit Interrupt
Monitor’s ability to control the
AD1819
SPR1
AD1819 Receive Interrupt
The following rules and restrictions should be followed when using interrupts:
•
You cannot step into an interrupt.
•
Interrupts are disabled when the user program is halted.
•
The board cannot communicate with the host if an interrupt higher than IRQ0 is
used.
•
The board cannot communicate with the host if interrupt nesting is disabled.
•
If the user does not require the supplied monitor program, IRQ0 with SW2 can be
configured by the user. In the initialization code of the user’s program, the interrupt
vector for IRQ0 must be replaced. This removes all monitor functionality.
•
If the user does not connect an EMAFE to the EZ-KIT Lite, IRQ1 with SW4 can be
configured for other purposes. If an EMAFE card is attached and it uses IRQ1, there
is no way to disable the EMAFE's control of the interrupt line. If the EMAFE is not
attached, IRQ1 is available for other uses. Note: the monitor program does not
interact with the EMAFE board, and does not have any response to an IRQ1 request.
3.2.1.3 Serial Ports
The ADSP-21065L features two synchronous Serial Ports (SPORT0 and SPORT1). The
SPORTs can operate at up to 1x clock frequency, providing each with a maximum data
rate of 30 Mbit/sec. Each SPORT has a primary and a secondary set of transmit and
receive channels. SPORT data can be automatically transferred to and from on-chip
memory using DMA.
19
Each of the SPORTs supports three operation modes: DSP SPORT mode, I2S mode (an
interface commonly used by audio codecs) and TDM (Time Division Multiplex)
multichannel mode. For additional information on the serial ports please refer to Chapter
9 of the ADSP-21065L SHARC User’s Manual.
Both of the synchronous serial ports are connected to the EMAFE interface. SPORT1 is
also connected to the on-board AD1819. Jumper JP3 is used to disable the AD1819, so it
doesn’t interfere with the EMAFE. For normal operation of the AD1819, JP3 must be
connected to GND. If the EMAFE is using SPORT1, the serial communication to the
AD1819A should be disabled by connecting JP3 to +3.3VCC.
3.2.2 POST Routines
POST (Power On Self Test) routines are a series of standard tests and initializations that the
EZ-KIT Lite performs on a power-on reset. To perform a power-on reset, disconnect power
to the board for at least three seconds and then reconnect power. The board automatically
resets (note that all the LED’s light up briefly). The user may also reset the board during
operation through the Debug -> Reset command from the debugger menu bar. Both types
of reset cause the DSP to reset to a known state and is followed by a message box that
displays the message “Communications Success”. At this point the user should reload any
programs he/she was working on. Table 3-3 shows the types of resets and their functions.
Table 3-3 Table 3-3. Post Routines
Routine
EPROM Check
Internal Memory Check
External Memory Check
UART Check
AD1819 Check
Initializations
Power-on Reset
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Reset During Operation
No
No
No
No
No
Yes
Error codes are transmitted to the PC and are displayed on the LEDs. If the LED remains
lit after reset, then the error has been caused by the component shown in Table 3-4
Table 3-4 Table 3-4. POST Error Codes
Flag LED
4
5
6
7
Error
EPROM
UART
AD1819
Memory
20
3.2.2.1 Memory Checks
The monitor program performs some standard memory checks which are as follows:
•
EPROM
•
Internal memory
•
External SDRAM
The EPROM test consists of verifying a number in memory. If the monitor code is
corrupted, the monitor may crash before reaching the actual program code. These
checks include:
•
Write, then verify all 0’s
•
Write, then verify all 1’s
•
Write, then verify memory address
•
Write, then verify compliment of memory address
3.2.2.2 UART Check/Initialization
The UART check is done in three stages. Two of these stages are implemented in the
POST. The third is controlled by the host (PC), when it attempts to connect to the
EZ-KIT Lite. These stages are:
•
Register Write
This test confirms that the ADSP-21065L is capable of writing to and
reading from a register in the UART. Three patterns are written to and then
read from a register in the UART, and tested. All three patterns must be read
back correctly to pass this test.
•
Internal Loop Back
In this test, 256 bytes are sent to and read from the UART. This test checks
the functionality of the UART connections from the ADSP-21065L, up to
and through the UART chip.
•
Transmitted Loop Back
The last UART test is performed by the host after the POST is complete. In
this test, the host sends the UART test protocol. This protocol specifies the
number of bytes that are transmitted to the EZ-KIT Lite board, and instructs
the board to echo the byte stream back to the host. This test determines
whether the EZ-KIT Lite board is set to the correct baud rate, and verifies the
external connections between the board and the host.
21
On power up, the EZ-KIT Lite board defaults to a baud rate of 115200 baud with 8
data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity. If you want to change this rate change it after the
POST is complete use the Settings -> Baud Rate command from the debugger menu
bar. Note that setting the baud rate to a lower number can significantly slow the
boards response to all debug activities.
3.2.2.3 AD1819 Check/Initialization
On reset, the AD1819 begins transmitting the clock used to synchronize data transfers
over SPORT1.
Once this bit goes high, the AD1819 is ready for standard communication over
SPORT1. The POST then writes and verifies three patterns to an internal register in
the AD1819. If all three writes are verified, the connection is verified.
3.2.3 Monitor Program Operation
The monitor program runs on the EZ-KIT Lite board as part of the DSP executable and provides the ability to download, debug, and run user programs. The VisualDSP++ debugger
is the interface for the monitor and using the EZ-KIT Lite as a target with the debugger lets
you operate the board remotely.
There are three main components of the monitor program:
•
Halt loop
•
UART ISR
•
Command Processing Kernel
The monitor program idles in the Halt loop when it is not running user code. While there,
you can read/write memory, read/write registers, download programs, set breakpoints,
change the UART’s baud rate, modify the AD1819 configuration, and single step through
code. To enter the halt loop from your code, you must halt user code—either with a
breakpoint or a halt instruction. At this point, the halt loop polls the UART. With every
character received from the UART, the command processing kernel verifies whether a full
command has been received. If a command has been received, the kernel processes the
command; otherwise control is returned to the halt loop to wait for more characters. The
only method of executing your code once the halt loop has been entered is to send a Run or
Single Step command in the debugger.
The UART ISR is entered when user code is running, but the host is still interacting with
the board. As the host sends bytes, the UART ISR takes the data stream from the UART,
and builds the command. As with the halt loop, each character received is passed to the
command processing kernel. Unlike the halt loop, the monitor returns to the user code
immediately after the interrupt is serviced.
22
The following restrictions should be followed to ensure correct board operation.
•
The host loses contact with the monitor while the user program is running if the
user program disables the UART interrupt or changes the UART interrupt
vector.
•
The host loses contact with the monitor while the program is running and in an
ISR when nesting is turned off.
•
The host loses contact with the monitor while the program is running and in the
timer ISR, provided the highest priority timer vector is used.
•
The host cannot halt with the debugger’s Debug, Halt command if global IRQ
enable is disabled (IRPTEN bit), however, breakpoints will work.
Command processing, initiated from either the UART ISR or the Halt Loop, is done in the
command processing kernel. This kernel parses the commands and executes the
instructions. If the instruction requires data to be sent back to the host, the kernel initiates
the response.
3.2.3.1 Break Points
The ability to stop the execution of code and examine processor registers and memory
is extremely helpful when debugging code. Note that the debugger automatically
inserts breakpoints an the function Main(), when the Settings -> Run To Main
command is checked, and at the _exit instruction.
3.2.4 AD1819 Transmissions
After reset, the AD1819 generates the clock used to transfer data across SPORT1. The
ADSP-21065L initiates all transmissions with the AD1819 by sending a synchronization
pulse. Even though the AD1819 transmits the data clock, it may not be ready for normal
operation. Until the AD1819 is ready, it holds the first bit (AD1819 Ready bit) of SLOT 0
low. When ready, this bit is driven high.
The first transmission to the AD1819 is done differently than subsequent transmissions.
The packets initially expected by the AD1819 do not have a consistent size. This first
transmission instructs the AD1819 to standardize the packet size to 16-bit. This command
is created by shifting and stuffing bits in the transmit buffer.
Slot 0 in each transmission specifies which slots contain valid data. The ADSP-21065L
uses DMA transfers to automatically send and receive data from the AD1819.
When the transmit DMA empties the transmit buffer, an interrupt occurs. If Tx Request >
0, the interrupt loads the data from the User Tx buffer into the Tx buffer. If the variable Tx
Request < 0 the Tx buffer is loaded with 0s. After the Tx buffer is loaded, the DMA is
initialized to transmit the new data in the Tx buffer.
The receive portion of the AD1819 interface is designed in a similar way. The DMA for
SPORT1’s receive register is configured to load the Rx buffer.
23
When the Rx buffer is full, an interrupt is generated that checks the Rx request variable. If
the variable > 0 then the contents of the Rx buffer are written into the User Rx Buffer, and
the Rx request is cleared. Afterwards, the DMA is re-initialized to fill the Rx buffer again.
3.3 Running Your Own Programs
This section provides the user with the basic information that is needed to run their own programs
on the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite. Build these programs using the SHARC tools. This
information includes rules for using processor memory, a description AD1819 control registers
(with respect to DSP programming), and a simple program generation procedure.
Although there are many ways to go about developing programs in the VisualDSP++ environment, all program evaluation within the environment should include the following steps:
•
Step1: Create a New Project File
•
Step 2: Set Target Processor Project Options
•
Step 3: Add and Edit Project Source Files
•
Step 4: Customize Project Build Options
•
Step 5: Build a Debug Version of the Project
•
Step 6: Debug the Project
•
Step 7: Build a Release Version of the Project
By following these steps, DSP projects build consistently and accurately with minimal project
management. The ADSP-21065L SHARC Technical Reference and ADSP-21065L SHARC User’s
Manual provides detailed information on programming the processor and the VisualDSP++
manuals provide information on code evaluation with the SHARC tools.
•
Do not run more than one ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite Session in the debugger at any one
time. You may run an EZ-KIT Lite session and a simulator or ICE session at the same time
or you can open two debugger interfaces to run more than one EZ-KIT Lite session.
•
Before making changes to the source code in the IDE, the user needs to clear all breakpoints
and close the source window. Then make the changes, rebuild the program and reload it
into the debugger.
3.3.1 ADSP-21065L Memory Map
The ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite board contains 1M x 32 of external SDRAM. This
memory is connected to MS3 (Memory Select). The ADSP-21065L has 544 Kbits of
internal SRAM that can be used for either program or data storage. The configuration of
on-chip SRAM is detailed in the ADSP-21065L SHARC User’s Manual. Table 3-5 shows
the memory map of the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite.
The IMDW0 bit in the SYSCON register must be set to 1 to keep communication with the
host. This bit determines if data accesses made to internal memory block 0 are 40-bit three
column accesses (set = 1) or 32-bit two column accesses (cleared = 0). The monitor
program requires three column data accesses to memory block 0.
24
On reset, restart, and halt, the debug monitor kernal forces IMDW0 to 1 and IMDW1 to 0
but user code should also set these bits to ensure that it operates in the same way on both
the simulator and the EZ-KIT Lite board. These settings only affect data accesses, not
instruction fetches.
•
Block 0 resides in Three Column memory. If you are storing data in Block 0, it
must be in three column format.
•
The user may not use DAG2 (PM data bus) to access SDRAM because SDRAM
is mapped into an address that is greater than 24 bits. For example, the C
segment seg_pmda should not be mapped to SDRAM.
•
If the user is using C interrupt handlers in his/her program, (i.e. interrupt()) then
seg_dmda must not be located in external SDRAM. In this case seg_dmda
MUST be located in internal memory. This is caused by a problem with the
interrupt handlers in libc.dlb. A correction will be posted to the Analog Devices
FTP site.
Table 3-5 Memory Map
Start Address
End Address
Content
0x0000 0000
0x0000 02FF
Registers
0x0000 8000
0x0000 9FFF
Block 0 Normal Address
(internal memory)
0x0000 C000
0x0000 DFFF
Block 1 Normal Address
(internal memory)
0x0001 0000
0x0001 3FFF
Block 0 Short word
0x0001 8000
0x0001 BFFF
0x0002 0000
0x0002 FFFF
Block 1 Short word
EPROM (through BMS)1
0x0100 0000
0x0100 0000
EMAFE Address (reserved for
the EZ-KIT)
0x0100 0001
0x0100 0001
EMAFE Data (reserved for
the EZ-KIT)
0x0100 0004
0x0100 0007
UART (reserved for the EZKIT)
0x0300 0000
0x0310 0000
SDRAM (reserved for the EZKIT)
1. Use caution when accessing the Boot EPROM. The EPROM chip select, BMS, has the same limitations as
MS0. EPROMs larger than 128K x 8 have restricted access to their data below address 0x020000 and their data
is aliased to other memory locations. The user program can access this data from these other locations.
25
Table 3-6 shows currently used and available memory locations on the EZ-KIT Lite board. The user may
not change these locations in their programs.
Table 3-6 Available Memory Locations on the EZ-KIT Lite
Memory Range
Availability
0x00008000 - 0x0000801F
Interrupt Vectors - user (48-bit)
0x00008020 - 0x00008023
IRQ0 vector (reserved by monitor and not overwritten
on any .dxe load)
0x00008024 - 0x00008033
Interrupt Vectors - user (48-bit)
0x00008034 - 0x00008037
SPORT Vector (reserved by monitor)
0x00008038 - 0x0000807B
Interrupt Vectors - user (48-bit)
0x0000807C - 0x0000807F
SWI3 Vector (reserved by monitor)
0x00008100 - 0x00008FFF
User Program Space (3840 48-bit locations, internal
RAM block 0)
0x00009000 - 0x000097FF
Kernel Code (48-bit, internal block 0)
0x0000C000 - 0x0000DFFF
User space (can be configured as 8192 x 32, or 2K x
48 + 4K x 32 or
4K x 48 +2K x 32)
0x01000000
EMAFE address location (external block 0)
0x01000001
EMAFE data location (external block 0)
0x01000008 - 0x0100000F
16550 UART registers (external block 0)
0x01000010
AD1819 reset address (external block 0)
0x03000000 - 0x030FFEFF
User space (external block 3; 1048320 32-bit
locations in SDRAM)
0x030FFF00 - 0x030FFF05
User AD1819 transmit buffer
0x030FFF06
User AD1819 transmit ready flag
0x030FFF07 - 0x030FFF0C
User AD1819 receive buffer
0x030FFF0D
User AD1819 receive ready flag
0x030FFF0E
User SWI3 data pointer
0x030FFF0F
User SWI3 number of data items
0x030FFF10
User SWI3 data type
0x030FFF11 - 0x030FFFFF
Reserved for Kernel
26
3.3.2 Using the AD1819A SoundPort Codec as the Analog Front End
There are two ways you can use the AD1819 SoundPort codec on the 21065L EZ-KIT Lite
with the VisualDSP++ debugger.
Method 1 — Use the codec DMA buffers and the codec interrupt handler within the
EPROM monitor that are installed by the AD1819/SPORT1 initialization
routine in the EPROM Monitor Program. This method is useful if you want
to quickly test your DSP algorithm.
This method may be preferable for early DSP evaluation, and the user does not need to be
concerned with many of the details of the AD1819 theory of operation. The following
section provides coding guidelines for the programmer to link in the required codec and
SPORT DMA buffers. All of the audio demos provided with the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT
Lite use this method for communicating with the codec for RS-232 host codec control.
Method 2 — Disabling and Overwriting the SPORT1 DMA codec buffers, and downloading a custom AD1819/SPORT1 initialization routine with the RS-232
monitor.
The custom user routine includes instructions necessary to reset the codec, program
SPORT1, activates serial port 1 transmit and receive DMA transfers, and programs any
AD1819a register to a desired configuration. This method may be preferable if you want to
test AD1819 code that may be downloaded via the SHARC JTAG, burnt into a new
EPROM, or to test AD1819 functionality in a new custom-based 21065L design.
For detailed AD1819 and SHARC interface information and example source that demonstrates this second method, contact Analog Devices DSP hotline or search our web site for
the following document: Interfacing The ADSP-21065L SHARC DSP to the AD1819a 'AC97' SoundPort codec. Further information on the AC-97 serial protocol may be found in the
AD1819A Datasheet.
3.3.3 Method 1: Using the Monitor’s Codec DMA Buffers and
Interrupt Handler
This section provides more detail on Method 1 from the previous section. The ADSP21065L uses DMA transfers to automatically send and receive data from the codec. After
codec reset, the codec begins transmitting the clock used to synchronously transfer data
across SPORT1. The ADSP-21065L, in turn, initiates all transmissions with the codec by
sending a frame synchronization pulse. Even though the codec transmits the data clock, it
may not be ready for normal operation. While the codec is not ready it holds the first bit
(codec Ready bit) of SLOT 0 low. When ready, this bit is driven high. Once this bit goes
high, the codec is ready for standard communication with the ADSP-21065L.
The AD1819 initially expects all data transfers to be in packets according the AC'97 specification, where there is 1 x 16-bit time slot and 12 x 20 bit slots in the TDM audio frame.
This packet scheme does not work well in DMA transfer schemes, nor to standard Multichannel Mode data transfers with the ADSP-21065L, which expects all slots to be the same
number of bits. To realign your data, set the SLOT16 bit in the AD1819’s Serial
Configuration register as soon the serial port is enabled. To do this, the program must perform a single transfer using the initial packing style.
27
After the SLOT16 bit is set, all subsequent packets are standardized to 16 bits.
Once the data is aligned, the EPROM's monitor POST routine then writes and verifies three
patterns to an internal register in the codec. If all three writes are verified, the codec
connection is verified. The ADSP-21065L then continually transmits and receives data
from the codec. Slot 0 in each transmission specifies which slots contain valid data (and
are called the Tag Phase time slot).
3.3.3.1
Linking Your Code to the RS-232 Monitor Codec
Interrupt Handlers
To use the EPROM monitor’s interrupt handler for the AD1819, the user needs
to use one of the following methods:
C-code—link your code with the file demorth.asm (this is located in the
...\demos\tt folder). This file contains a replacement for the standard C runtime
header 060_hdr.asm. This file also includes a jump to the EPROM codec
interrupt handler at the SPORT1 Tx interrupt vector location.
Assembly—use the demorth.asm file as the interrupt vector table or create your
own interrupt vector table that includes a jump to address 0x9001at the SPORT1
Tx interrupt vector location.
3.3.3.2 Linking Your Code to the RS-232 Monitor DMA Buffers
The monitor constantly sends and receives packets from the codec. To send
data to the codec, the user needs to put the desired data into the codec transmit
buffer, and set the transmit variable. Similarly, to receive data from the codec,
the receive variable should be set to a value > 0. The variable may then be
polled for the change back to 0. When this happens codec data has been
transferred into the codec receive buffer, and may be read.
Figure 3-1 shows the software structure of the codec data transfer. The transfer
is set up by the RS232 monitor program via EPROM boot.
28
Figure 3-1 ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite Monitor Kernel Codec Transfer Scheme
3.3.3.2.1 DSP/Codec Transmit Sequence
1. The SPORT1 transmit DMA empties the transmit buffer, a SPORT1 transmit
interrupt occurs.
2. If the variable Tx Request > 0, then the interrupt loads the data from the User
Tx Buffer into the Tx Buffer; otherwise, the Tx Buffer is loaded with 0s.
3. After the Tx Buffer is loaded, the DMA is re-initialized to transmit the new data
in the Tx Buffer.
4. With this structure set up by the monitor, the user needs to only put data in the
User Tx Buffer, and then set Tx Request to 1, to send data to the codec.
3.3.3.2.2 DSP/Codec Receive Sequence
1.
The receive portion of the codec interface is designed in a similar way to the
transmit portion.
2.
The DMA for SPORT1's receive register is configured to load the Rx Buffer.
3.
When the Rx Buffer is full, an interrupt is forced that checks the Rx Request
variable. If the variable > 0 then the contents of the Rx Buffer is written into the
User Rx Buffer, and the Rx Request is cleared.
4.
The DMA is re-initialized to fill the Rx Buffer again.
29
3.3.3.3 RS-232 Monitor Codec Memory Map
To use the monitor's codec variables, examine the buffers.asm and .ldf files provided
with the demos. These two files provide access to the necessary variables by
overlapping the locations of the variables.
The RS-232 Monitor Program was complied and linked to place the following user
variables and buffers to communicated to the codec in the following memory
locations:
0x030FFF00 - 0x030FFF05
User CODEC transmit buffer
DM(user_tx_buf)
0x030FFF06
User CODEC transmit ready flag
DM(user_tx_ready)
0x030FFF07 - 0x030FFF0C
User CODEC receive buffer
DM(user_rx_buf)
0x030FFF0D
User CODEC receive ready flag
DM(user_rx_ready)
When writing code, the user needs to define variables so that they are linked in to
these exact locations as was defined by the monitor kernel so that your DSP code has
access to the kernel codec buffers. To use this scheme for passing audio data for
user DSP algorithm written in C, include the following file (found in buffers.asm) in
your code:
/* TITLE: BUFFERS.ASM
BUFFERS.ASM
Links variables into the same locations the kernel
uses so that the demo can talk to the kernel to use
its codec isr*/
.GLOBAL
.GLOBAL
.GLOBAL
.GLOBAL
.GLOBAL
.GLOBAL
.GLOBAL
_user_tx_buf;
_user_tx_ready;
_user_rx_buf;
_user_rx_ready;
_user_data_out_ptr;
_user_num_data;
_user_data_type;
.SEGMENT/DM
seg_bnk3;
// make the buffers line up the same as in the
kernel
30
.var _user_tx_buf[6];
.var _user_tx_ready;
.var _user_rx_buf[6];
.var _user_rx_ready;
.ENDSEG;
Note that these variables have a leading underscore to make them C-compatible. If writing in
assembly code, include the following segment within the data variable declaration section in
the same assembly codec file as the DSP code:
.SEGMENT/DM
seg_bnk3;
.VAR user_tx_buf[6]; !
.VAR user_tx_ready;
! Codec isr (set up by the kernel)
flags and buffers
.VAR user_rx_buf[6]; !
.VAR user_rx_ready;
!
.ENDSEG;
In addition to the variable declaration, the users needs to tell the linker to place these
variables in the specified monitor kernel program locations for the codec in bank 3. This is
done by including the following lines in the Linker Description File:
MEMORY
{
seg_bnk3 { TYPE(DM RAM) START(0x030FFF00)
END(0x030FFFFF) WIDTH(32) }
}
PROCESSOR p0
{
SECTIONS
{
seg_bnk3
{
INPUT_SECTIONS( $OBJECTS(seg_bnk3)
$LIBRARIES(seg_bnk3))
} >seg_bnk3
}
}
This ensures that the linked variables reside as follows:
•
DM(user_tx_buf) is placed at addresses 0x030FFF00 - 0x030FFF05
•
DM(user_tx_ready) is placed at address 0x030FFF06
•
DM(user_rx_buf) is placed at addresses 0x030FFF07 - 0x030FFF0C
•
DM(user_rx_ready) is placed at address 0x030FFF0D
For examples on how these codec variables are declared and linked together with ADSP-
31
21065L EZ-KIT Lite C and assembly programs, the user can inspect the source files for the
EZ-KIT Lite audio demos.
3.3.4 DSP Programming of the AD1819 Indexed Control Registers
The monitor program provides a setup routine for the AD1819. Table 3-7 shows the registers used
by the DSP and their state after reset. The user can use the monitor buffers contained in the demo
programs or write their own code to use the AD1819 codec. The code must initialize these registers
when using the AD1819.
For example programs and further documentation on AD1819 programming with the ADSP21065L, you can visit our web site at www.analog.com/dsp.
Table 3-7 DSP Programming of the AD1819 Indexed Control Registers
Address
Index Register Name
#define Label in 2106x program
State
0x06
Master Volume Mono
MASTER_VOLUME_MONO
0x8000
0x0E
Microphone Volume
MIC_VOLUME
0x8008
0x10
Line Volume
LINE_IN_VOLUME
0x8808
0x1C
Record Gain
RECORD_GAIN
0x0F0F
0x20
General Purpose
GENERAL_PURPOSE
0x8000
0x78
Sample Rate 0
SAMPLE_RATE_GENERATE_0
0xBB80
0x7A
Sample Rate 1
SAMPLE_RATE_GENERATE_1
0xBB80
3.3.5 EMAFE Programming
Communicating with the EMAFE is done through either of the SPORTs, or through indexed
addressing. To read or write memory on the EMAFE, the memory should be written to address
0x0100 0000. After writing the address, the data can be read from or written to address 0x0100
0001. Multiple reads, or writes, are executed without rewriting the address.
Because of the bus timings of the ADSP-21065L, an address hold cycle must be added to the bus
cycles of MS1 to communicate with the EMAFE.
This is done in the WAIT register of the ADSP-21065L and guarantees that the data remains valid
when the WR line goes high (invalid). If this is not done, the data and or address written to the
EMAFE may not be stored correctly.
As stated in the previous section, JP3 must be connected to +3.3VCC if SPORT1 is
used on the EMAFE or the AD1819 will contend with the EMAFE’s operation.
32
4 DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS
4.1 Overview
This chapter describes loading and running the demonstration programs supplied with the ADSP-21065L
EZ-KIT Lite board. The demos are designed to run on the VisualDSP++ Debugger which is supplied on
the CD that shipped with this product. For detailed information on debugger features and operation, see
the VisualDSP++ Debugger Guide & Reference and the Debugger Tutorial (for ADSP-2106x Family
DSPs).
4.2 Starting the VisualDSP++ Debugger
After the VisualDSP++ software and license have been installed, click the Windows Start menu.
1.
Select Programs -> VisualDSP++ -> Debugger from the Start menu. The debugger interface
appears.
2.
From the Session menu, select New Session. The Target Selection dialog appears.
3.
Configure the debug session as shown in Figure 4-1 and click OK.
Figure 4-1 Target Selection Dialog
A Target Message dialogue box will appears.
33
Figure 4-2 Target Message
4.
Press the Reset button on the evaluation board.
All the LEDs light up and after a brief delay (<2 seconds) all of the LEDs turn off except for the
FLAG9 and power LEDs. Make sure that the LEDs turn off (except for the FLAG9 and power
LEDs) before you click OK.
During this delay, the POST tests run which verify operation of RAM, the AD1819, the UART,
and the EPROM. After the LEDs go dark, a message box opens with the message shown in
Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-3 Target Communications Status Message Box
5.
Click OK.
The initialization completes and the disassembly window opens. The code in the disassembly
window is the EZ-KIT Lite monitor program.
4.3 Debugger Operation with the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite
The VisualDSP++ Debugger Guide & Reference and the Debugger Tutorial (for ADSP-2106x Family
DSPs) contains most of the information you need to operate the VisualDSP++ Debugger with your EZ-KIT
Lite evaluation board. Because the manual was written using a simulator as a target, there are some
differences and restrictions in debugger operation that are described in this section.
4.3.1 Loading Programs
Because you are loading programs into a hardware target, the load process takes a bit more time
then loading in the simulator. Wait for the Load Complete message in the Output window before
you attempt any debug activities.
34
To load a program, use the following procedure:
1.
From the File menu, select Load.
The Open a Processor Program dialog appears.
2.
Navigate to the folder where the DSP executable file resides.
The demos that are supplied with the EZ-KIT Lite are located in
C:\Program Files\Analog Device\VisualDSP++\21k\EZKITs\21065L\demos folder.
3.
Select the .dxe file and click Open.
The file loads and the message Load Complete appears in the Output window when the load
process has completed.
4.3.2 Registers and Memory
To see current values in registers, use the F12 key or the Window, Refresh command.
•
Values may not be changed while the user program is running.
•
The current version of the VisualDSP++ Debugger does not let you view hardware stack
information.
4.3.3 Setting Breakpoints and Stepping
•
Breakpoints set in the last three instructions of a do-loop are allowed, but this causes
improper debugger operation.
•
Breakpoints set after a delayed branch instruction and before the branch occurs causes
improper debugger operation.
•
Using the single stepping function steps through a delayed branch instruction and the last
three instructions of a do-loop.
•
The debugger automatically inserts breakpoints an the function Main(), when the
Settings, Run To Main command is checked, and at the _exit instruction.
35
4.3.4 Resetting the EZ-KIT Lite Board
The EZ-KIT Lite board can be reset with the push button switch on the board or with the Debug > Reset command in the debugger menu bar. Both resets, clear and reset the chips memory and
debug information so there will be a need to reload any programs that were running. The Debug > Restart command resets the processor, however, the processor retains all debug information
and memory contents.
•
The following sequence must be used when starting the debugger:
1.
Start the debugger from the windows Start menu. Start -> Programs ->
VisualDSP -> Debugger
2.
The debugger starts and the Target message Hit Reset Button appears
3.
Press the Reset button on the board.
4.
Wait approximately three seconds for the LED’s (except power and FLAG9) to turn
off.
5.
Click OK. The message Communications Success appears.
•
Do not use the reset button while the debugger is open unless the debugger requests you to
press it.
•
While the user may load several programs into the debugger during a single debug session
without resetting the EZ-KIT Lite board, it is recommended to reset the board prior to loading
a new program.
4.4 Benchmarking Utilities
An evaluation platform needs to report an accurate cycle count in order for you to develop efficient DSP
programs. Because the monitor program running on the EZ-KIT Lite board is intrusive, the debugger’s
cycle counter (located in the status bar) does not work. To get an accurate cycle count, the EZ-KIT Lite
comes with a set of benchmarking utilities. These utilities come in both C and assembly code types. Use
the following procedures to enable accurate cycle counting of any DSP program.
In C, embed the count_start and count_end functions in your code. The count_start is a function
that returns an initial starting value of the current cycle counter. The user then uses this value as an
argument to the count_end function. The count_end function returns the total number of elapsed cycles
between count_start and count_end. These functions are a completely self contained, so the user
does not need to save or restore any processor registers. The following is an example of how to write these
functions into your existing code.
36
•
User must run any program that uses this code from when the function count_start(); starts,
to at least as far as the function count_end returns without halting or stepping to obtain an
accurate cycle count.
#include "bmtools.h"
int clock_start, clock count;
clock_start = count_start();
.
.
<insert code here>
.
clock_count = count_end(clock_start);
For a complete code example that shows the C version of the benchmark utility, see the DFT_c_bm
example that is included in the Examples folder.
An assembly version of the count_start and count_end functions are also available. To use this
version, insert a pair of function calls, one to start the cycle count (count_start) and another to end the
cycle count (count_end). The elapsed number of cycles is stored within a 48-bit wide memory location,
ecount_save. These functions are completely self contained, no saving or restoring of registers is
necessary.
•
User must Run any program that uses this code from when the function count_start; starts, to at
least as far as the function count_end returns without halting or stepping to obtain an accurate
cycle count.
Call count_start;
.
.
<insert code here>
.
Call count_end
For a complete code example that shows the assembly version of the benchmark utility, see the
DFT_assm_bm program that is included in the Examples folder.
Note, that both the C and assembly utilities require that bmtools.dlb be included in the Libraries
statement of the project's LDF (Linker Description File). For more information on LDF files, refer to the
Linker & Utilities Manual for ADSP-21xxx Family DSPs.
Both the assembly and C versions of the benchmarking utilities should operate on any SHARC processor.
The maximum number of cycles that can be counted is 232 - 1.
37
4.5 Demonstration Programs
The demos included with the EZ-KIT Lite are designed to show the user the features and capabilities of the
VisualDSP++ Debugger and the ADSP-21065L DSP. The demos are listed by the executable file name and are
described by their output. All of the demos are located in the directory C:\Program Files\Analog
Devices\VisualDSP\21k\ADSP21065L EZ-KIT\Demos.
•
Do not run more than one ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite Session in the debugger at any one time. User may
run an EZ-KIT Lite session and a simulator or ICE session at the same time or you can open two debugger
interfaces to run more than one EZ-KIT Lite session.
4.5.1 FFT.dxe
The DFT demo performs a frequency analysis on an analog signal presented to the board. Use the
Demo menu command in the debugger to change how the DFT is performed.
•
This demo maps seg_dmda into SDRAM. Therefore, any added interrupts other then the
codec’s interrupt handler, fail. For more information, see “ADSP-21065L Memory Map”.
4.5.2 BP.dxe
The BP demo modifies a signal by subjecting it to a bandpass filter. As in the previous demo, the
source of the signal may be changed through the codec controls available through the Settings,
Codec command. A demo specific control window is also available to change some parameters of
the bandpass filter.
Several AD1819 options can also be modified while the BP demo program is running. Use the
Settings -> Codec command, to change the sample rate, input gain, and source (microphone input
or line input).
4.5.3 Pluck.dxe
The pluck demo plays a tune to the Line Out connector. To hear the output, connect powered
speakers to J7.
4.5.4 Gunn.dxe
The Peter Gunn demo also plays a tune to the Line Out connector. To hear the output, connect
powered speakers to J7.
38
4.5.5 Primes.dxe
The primes demo program calculates the first 20 prime numbers staring with the number 3 and
sends them to the output window. The printf function is used in this demo.
•
This demo maps seg_dmda into SDRAM. Therefore, any added interrupts other then the
codec’s interrupt handler, fail. For more information, see “ADSP-21065L Memory Map”.
4.5.6 Tt.dxe
The Talk-through demo samples data from the Line In of the AD1819 (J8 on the board with JP1
and JP2 set appropriately) at 48 kHz, and then sends the data back out the Line Out of the
AD1819 (J7).
•
This demo maps seg_dmda into SDRAM. Therefore, any added interrupts other then the
codec’s interrupt handler, fail. For more information, see “ADSP-21065L Memory Map”.
4.5.7 Blink.dxe
The Blink demo program uses a timer interrupt to blink flag LEDs 6 & 7.
39
5 WORKING WITH EZ-KIT LITE HARDWARE
5.1 Overview
This chapter discusses hardware design issues on the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite board. The following
topics are covered:
•
•
•
•
Power Supplies
EPROM Operation
UART
EMAFE
The EZ-KIT Lite board schematics are available as an insert at the end of this manual.
5.2 System Architecture
Figure 5-1 EZ-KIT Lite System Block Diagram
The Enhanced Modular Analog Front End (EMAFE) connector is accessed through the
ADSP-21065L processor bus (16-bit parallel interface) and through two serial ports that
connect directly to the processor. One of these serial ports is shared with the on-board AD1819A.
40
5.3 Board Layout
Figure 5-2 shows the layout of the EZ-KIT Lite board. This figure highlights the locations of the major
components and connectors. Each of these major components is described in the following sections.
Figure 5-2 EZ-KIT LITE Layout
5.3.1 Boot EPROM
The boot EPROM provides up to 1M x 8 bits of program storage that can be loaded by the ADSP21065L when it is programmed to boot from EPROM. Selection of the boot source is controlled
by the BMS (Boot Memory Select) and BSEL (EPROM Boot) pins. The first 256 instructions
(1536 bytes) are automatically loaded by the ADSP-21065L after reset. The remaining program
image must be loaded by the program that is installed in those first 256 instructions. Refer to the
ADSP-21065L SHARC User’s Manual for more information on booting.
41
5.3.2 User Push-Button Switches
For user input/control, there are eight push-button switches on the EZ-KIT Lite board:
RESET, FLAG 0-3 , and IRQ 0-2 .
•
The RESET switch lets you initiate a power-on reset to the DSP. If the user
loses contact between the EZ-KIT Lite board and the PC while running
programs, use the RESET button to restore communication.
•
The FLAG 0-3 switches toggle the status of four flag pins (FLAG 0-3 ) to the
DSP.
•
The IRQ 0-2 switches let you send interrupts (IRQ 0-2 ) to the DSP. This
manually causes interrupts when executing a program. IRQ0 is shared with the
UART, and IRQ1 is shared with the EMAFE connector.
See “Flags” section in Chapter 3, for more information on interfacing to the push-button
switches from DSP programs.
5.3.3 User LED’s
There are six flag LEDs on the EZ-KIT Lite board for user output that are available. The
FLAG 4-9 LEDs are controlled by the FLAG outputs of the DSP and are labeled
according to the flag output that controls them. See “Flags” section in Chapter 3 for
more information on interfacing to the user LEDs from DSP programs.
5.3.3.1 Power LED
The Power LED, when on, indicates that +3.3V DC , used by the DSP and
digital circuitry, is present.
5.4 Power Supplies
ADP3310s generate the 3.3V and 5V power required by the board. These parts are linear
regulators that also regulate current. The resistor placed between the Vin and IS pins limits the
amount of current through the device. The resistance (R s ) needed for a given maximum output
current (I o ) is determined with the equation below.
Rs = 0.05/(1.5χIo)
Power regulation is done through a P-channel FET. To help disperse the heat from the FET a
heatsink is attached to the drain. Note that the regulated voltage is available on the heat-sink,
since the voltage is regulated from the drain of the FET.
42
The minimum supply voltage for the ADSP-21065L is 3.0V. An ADM708T is used to monitor
the supply voltage and holds the processor in reset if the power supply’s voltage is below 3.08V.
The board hardware may also be reset via the push button that is connected to this part. For more
information, see “User Push-button Switches” section in this Chapter.
5.4.1 Power Connector
The power connector supplies DC voltages to the EZ-KIT Lite board. Table 5-1 shows
the power connector pinout. If the user does not use the power supply provided with the
EZ-KIT Lite board, replace it with one that has the connections shown in Table 5-1.
Table 5-1 Power Connector
Terminal
Connection
Center pin
+6.5-9.0 VDC @ 1.2 amps
Outer Ring
GND
5.4.2 European Power Supply Specifications
Table 5-2 European Power Supply Specifications
DC VOLTAGE:
7.5V +/- 5% (Full Load)
CURRENT:
1.2 Amps (Minimum Rating)
RIPPLE:
500 mV rms (Max @ Full Load)
DC CONNECTOR:
Type:
Switchcraft 760 style, FEMALE
Plug Size:
5.5 (OD) X 2.5 (ID) X 9.5 (length) millimeters
Polarity:
Center is Postitive (inside terminal)
43
5.4.3 AD1819 Connections
When the AD1819A is enabled on the EZ-KIT Lite board, accessing the audio input and
output jacks on the board is possible. Each of the audio connectors are stereo mini jacks
and accept standard commercially available stereo mini plugs.
The Microphone/Line_in Input jack connects to the LINE_IN_L (left) and LINE_IN_R
(right) pins or the MIC1 and MIC2 of the AD1819A SoundPort Stereo Codec, depending
on the setting of jumpers JP1 and JP2. Jumper settings are explained in Table 5-6.
The LINE Output jack connects to the left (L) LINE_OUT and right (R) LINE_OUT pins
of the codec.
5.4.4 Expansion Port Connectors
The two expansion port connectors provide access to the bus signals of the ADSP21065L. One possibility for the use of these connectors, beyond debugging, is host
control. All interrupts, bus signals, and PWM event signals are available through this
port. For more information, see “Expansion Connectors” section in Chapter 6.
WARNING: External port loading can effect external bus speed and performance.
5.4.5 EMAFE Interface Connector
WARNING: Using the EMAFE interface connector to connect to a MAFE board can
damage the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite, the MAFE, or both.
Enhanced Modular Analog Front End (EMAFE) connector provides a standard interface
for connecting analog input/output daughter boards. The connector has 96 female pins
arranged in three rows of 32 pins on a right angle connector. The interface supports a
16-bit parallel data path, two serial ports, an interrupt output, and a flag input. Refer to
“EMAFE Expansion” section in Chapter 6 for more information on the EMAFE
interface.
5.4.6 JTAG Connector (Emulator Port)
The JTAG header (Figure 5-3) is the connecting point for the JTAG in-circuit emulator
probe. Note that one pin is missing (pin 3) to provide keying. The pin 3 socket in the
mating connector should have a plug inserted at that location.
The EZ-KIT Lite board is shipped with two jumpers installed across pins 7 & 8 and 9 &
10. These jumpers must be removed before installing the JTAG probe. When the JTAG
probe is removed, care must be taken to replace these jumpers to ensure that the ADSP21065L processor initializes correctly on power-up.
44
The proper power up sequence is:
1. JTAG Emulator
2. ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite board
To remove power, reverse the order.
Figure 5-3 JTAG Connector With Jumpers Installed
Figure 5-3 shows the locations of the configuration jumpers on the EZ-KIT Lite board
and which pin on the jumpers is the GND pin. These jumpers should be checked before
using the board to ensure proper operation. Each of the jumper selection blocks are
described in the following sections.
5.5 Jumpers
5.5.1 Boot Mode Selection Jumper
The jumper (JP6) controls the behavior of the ADSP-21065L processor when the system
is reset (from power up or when the RESET button is used). When the jumper is not
connected to GND, or is removed, the processor boots from the EPROM. If the jumper
is connected to GND, the processor attempts to boot from its host interface (through the
expansion port).
Table 5-3 Boot Mode Selection
JP6
Description
GND
HOST boot
Other
EPROM boot (factory default)
45
5.5.2 EPROM Size Selection Jumpers
The EZ-KIT Lite supports 128K x 8, 256K x 8, 512K x 8, and 1M x 8 EPROMs, each of
which is selectable through jumpers JP4 and JP5. The EPROM socket is originally
populated with a 256K x 8 EPROM. If a different EPROM is used, JP4 and JP5 should
be adjusted to accommodate the different size. Table 5-4 shows the pins that the jumpers
for JP4 and JP5 should be connected to.
Table 5-4 EPROM Size Selection
JP5
JP4
Description
3.3Vcc
3.3Vcc
128K x 8, 256K x 8 (factory default)
3.3Vcc
A18
512K x 8
A19
3.3Vcc
Not Used
A19
A18
1M x 8
5.5.3 Processor ID Jumpers
During typical operation of the EZ-KIT Lite board, there is only a single DSP in the
system. Jumpers JP7 and JP8 should be checked to guarantee that the board is
configured as a single processor system. In the case where a second processor is
attached to the board through the expansion connectors, these jumpers should be changed
to configure the EZ-KIT Lites’ ADSP-21065L processor as processor 1 or processor 2 in
the multiprocessor system. The debug monitor will not properly boot from the EPROM
if the IDs are not configured for a single processor. System configuration options are
shown in Table 5-5.
Table 5-5 Processor Selection
JP7
JP8
Description
GND
GND
Single Processor (factory default)
GND
Other
Processor 1
Other
GND
Processor 2
Other
Other
INVALID
46
5.5.3.1 Line In Selection Jumpers
The EZ-KIT Lite uses a single stereo phone jack for line in and the microphone.
JP1 and JP2 are use to select between the two functions. The valid settings for
these jumpers are shown in Table 5-6.
Table 5-6 Line In Selection
JP1
JP2
Description
Mic
Mic
Microphone In
Mic
Line
INVALID
Line
Mic
INVALID
Line
Line
Line In
5.5.3.2 AD1819 Codec Selection Jumper
SPORT1 is shared between the AD1819 and the EMAFE interface. Jumper JP3
disables the drive capability of the AD1819 on the SPORT1 lines, thereby
preventing contention between the two devices. When SPORT1 is not used by
the EMAFE device or an EMAFE device is not installed, JP3 should be
connected to ground, enabling the AD1819.
Table 5-7 AD1819 Codec Selection
JP3
Description
3.3VCC
EMAFE selected (AD1819 disabled)
GND
AD1819 selected (factory default)
5.6 EPROM Operation
The EPROM shipped with the EZ-KIT Lite is a 256K x 8 bit EPROM. The socket can
accommodate a 128K x 8, 256K x 8, 512K x 8, or a 1M x 8 bit EPROM. If any of these other
EPROMS are used, jumpers JP4 and JP5 should be changed to route the correct signals to the
EPROM. Settings for these jumpers are shown in Table 5-4.
47
EPROM addressing differs, depending on the silicon revision of the ADSP-21065L on your EZKIT Lite board. For revision 0.1 silicon, EPROM addressing begins at address 0x020000. For
revision 0.2 and greater, addressing begins at address 0x000000 (i.e. you can use all memory
space, see Figure 5-4).
5.6.1 Designers Note
When JP6 is removed or connected to GND, the ADSP-21065L is initialized to boot from the
EPROM. On this board, the ACK line is used to control wait states.
Figure 5-4 EPROM Address (256K x 8 example)
5.7 UART
The UART used is a 5V part; therefore, a 74LVTH245 is used to translate the data coming from
the UART to the required 3.3V logic needed by the processor.
5.7.1 Designers Note
To access the UART correctly, the relationship between the timing of the data, chip select,
and the read/write lines needed to be changed. Most of these changes were implemented
through a CPLD. An additional 10ns delay was needed on the control lines. Since this delay
was not possible through the CPLD, a digital delay was added to the circuit.
It is important to note that the UART and the CPLD only decode a subset of the available
address lines. Because of this partial decoding, the UART is aliased throughout the MS1
address space.
48
5.8 EMAFE
The indexed addressing required by the EMAFE interface is implemented through the
CPLD. The CPLD controls the loading of the address, as well as the data direction of the
data bus. As with the UART, the address is only partially decoded. The aliasing seen with the
UART also exists with the EMAFE interface in the MS1 address space.
On the ADSP-21065L, data is valid when the WR line goes high. If an address hold cycle is
enabled (in the WAIT register), the data stays valid through the WR transition.
The parallel communication between the ADSP-21065L processor on the evaluation
board and the EMAFE consists of some control logic for the control lines (MC, RD, WR, CS,
etc.), an 8-bit latch that stores the address information (MA[7:0]) and a transceiver buffer for the
data lines (MD[15:0]). The address lines are latched and the data lines are buffered to reduce
digital noise on the EMAFE board. The serial ports from the ADSP-21065L are directly wired to
the EMAFE connector interface pins. Level shifting of serial port signals from the ADSP-21065L
may be required for 5V (non 3.3V compliant) peripherals on the EMAFE board, or from 5V
peripherals on the EMAFE board to the 3.3v (non 5V tolerant) ADSP-21065L. For information
on EMAFE pins, see “EMAFE Expansion” in Chapter 6.
5.9 AD1819
As with the UART, the AD1819 is a 5V device. To prevent over driving the SPORT lines on the
ADSP-21065L, the lines from the AD1819 are buffered through a 74LVT125. This buffer has the
additional purpose of bypassing the AD1819’s control of SPORT1, when SPORT1 is required by
the EMAFE. This is done to prevent contention between the two devices on the SPORT1 lines.
On power up, the AD1819 reads the SDATA_OUT signal line. If the pin is high or floating, the
AD1819 enters a test mode. To prevent the AD1819 from entering this mode, a pull down
resistor has been added to the line.
5.10 SDRAMS
The processor’s SDRAM interface enables it to transfer data to and from synchronous
DRAM (SDRAM) at 2xCLKIN. The synchronous approach coupled with 2xCLKIN frequency
supports data transfer at a high throughput—up to 240 Mbytes/sec. All inputs are
sampled and all outputs are valid at the rising edge of the clock SDCLK. Table 5-8 lists and
describes the processor’s SDRAM pins and their connections.
49
Table 5-8 SDRAM pin connections
Pin
Type
Description
CAS
I/O/Z
SDRAM Column Address Select pin. Connect to SDRAM’s CAS buffer pin.
DQM
O/Z
SDRAM Data Mask pin. Connect to SDRAM’s DQM buffer pin.
The processor drives this pin high during reset, until SDRAM is started.
MSx
O/Z
Memory select lines of external memory bank configured for SDRAM. Connect to
SDRAM’s
CS (chip select) pin.
RAS
I/O/Z
SDRAM Row Address Select pin. Connect to SDRAM’s RAS pin.
SDA10
O/Z
SDRAM A10 pin. SDRAM interface uses this pin to retain control of the SDRAM device
during host bus requests. Connect to SDRAM’s A10 pin.
SDCKE
I/O/Z
SDRAM Clock Enable pin. Connect to SDRAM’s CKE pin.
SDCLK0
O/S/Z
SDRAM SDCLK0 output pin. Connect to the SDRAM’s CLK pin.
SDCLK1
O/S/Z
SDRAM SDCLK1 output pin. Connect to the SDRAM’s CLK pin.
SDWE
I/O/Z
SDRAM Write Enable pin. Connect to SDRAM’s WE or W buffer pin.
I = Input; O = Output; S = Synchronous; Z = Hi-Z
There are two 1M x 16 bit SDRAM chips on the EZ-KIT Lite board connected to MS3. They are
configured to be accessed in parallel, providing 1M x 32 bits of external data memory, starting at address
0x3000000. The ADSP-21065L uses address line 13 as the bank select. Additionally, the ADSP21065L has a separate address line (line 10) for the SDRAM, since this line is used during refresh. This
allows refresh to occur while another data transfer runs on the data bus.
See Chapter 10, “SDRAM Interface” in the ADSP-21065L SHARC User’s Manual for more information
on the SDRAM controller.
5.11 Timing Diagrams
Figure 5-5 EMAFE Write Cycle Timing Parameter Definitions
50
Figure 5-6 EMAFE Write Cycle Timing Diagram
Figure 5-7 EMAFE Read Cycle Timing Parameter Definitions
51
Figure 5-8 EMAFE Read Cycle Timing Diagram
52
6 Expansion Connectors
6.1 Overview
The two expansion connectors provide access to the ADSP-21065L’s interface pins. These pins let the user
watch data transmissions. In addition, the host interface, interrupt, and pwm_event pins are also available on
this connector.
Table 6-1 Expansion Connectors
Connector 1 (J2)
Connector 2 (J4)
Pin
Name
Name
Pin
Pin
Name
Name
Pin
1
DGND
Vin
2
1
DGND
Vin
2
3
D0
D1
4
3
A0
A1
4
5
D2
D3
6
5
A2
A3
6
7
D4
D5
8
7
A4
A5
8
9
D6
D7
10
9
A6
A7
10
11
DGND
D8
12
11
DGND
A8
12
13
D9
D10
14
13
A9
A10
14
15
D11
D12
16
15
A11
A12
16
17
D13
D14
18
17
A13
A14
18
19
D15
D16
20
19
A15
A16
20
21
DGND
D17
22
21
DGND
A17
22
23
D18
D19
24
23
A18
A19
24
25
D20
Vin
26
25
A20
Vin
26
27
D21
D22
28
27
A21
A22
28
29
D23
D24
30
29
A23
DMAR2
30
31
DGND
D25
32
31
DGND
DMAG2
32
33
D26
D27
34
33
PWM_EVENT0 PWM_EVENT1 34
35
D28
D29
36
35
IRQ0
IRQ1
36
37
D30
D31
38
37
IRQ2
EXT_CLK
38
39
MS0
MS1
40
39
NU
NU
40
Table 6-1. Expansion Connectors (Cont.)
53
Connector 1 (J2)
Connector 2 (J4)
Pin
Name
Name
Pin
Pin
Name
Name
Pin
41
DGND
MS2
42
41
DGND
NU
42
43
MS3
RD
44
43
NU
NU
44
45
WR
ACK
46
45
NU
NU
46
47
HBR
HBG
48
47
NU
NU
48
49
SW
CS
50
49
DGND
NU
50
51
DGND
Vin
52
51
NU
Vin
52
53
REDY
SBTS
54
53
NU
NU
54
55
BR2
BR1
56
55
NU
NU
56
57
RESET
CPA
58
57
NU
NU
58
59
DMAG1
DMAR1
60
59
DGND
NU
60
6.2 EMAFE Expansion
WARNING: Using the EMAFE interface connector to connect to a MAFE board can damage the
ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite, the MAFE, or both.
This section describes the Enhanced Modular Analog Front End (EMAFE) Daughter Card interface for the
ADSP-21065L digital signal processor evaluation board. The EMAFE interface includes additional signal
definitions for the I2S capabilities of the ADSP-21065L processor. The EMAFE allows an upgrade path
for evaluating present and future codec's and ADC's (18xx, AD7xxx, multimedia codec, etc.) with the
ADSP-21065L evaluation board. Only the analog front end will be placed on a daughter board. Each
EMAFE daughter board will have its own back plate to allow different input connections (i.e. RCA jack,
Mic in, speaker out, etc.). The daughter board is attached to the ADSP-21065L evaluation board by a
single 96 pin right angle mounted male connector and two mechanical standoffs to give stability to the
entire arrangement when the daughter board and evaluation board are attached. The evaluation board has a
96 pin right angle mounted female connector. The signal lines that need to be routed to the EMAFE
daughter board from the evaluation board should be kept to a minimum to reduce noise. Signals routed to
the EMAFE daughter board from the ADSP-21065L evaluation board are defined below. Please note,
Analog Devices does not provide a daughter board, the user must design this board.
54
Figure 6-1 Physical Layout of ADSP-21065L DSP evaluation board and EMAFE daughter board
EMAFE Signal Description: The EMAFE 96 pin connector routes the following signals from the evaluation
board to the EMAFE daughter board.
•
16 Data lines.
•
8 Address lines.
•
3 Parallel Bus Control lines.
•
16 Synchronous Serial Port lines.
•
1 Interrupt output.
•
1 Flag input.
The EMAFE 96 pin connector also has the following power connections routed from the ADSP-21065L
evaluation board to the EMAFE daughter board.
Table 6-2 Evaluation Board Power Connections
Pin
Power Connection
VDD1
Digital power ( +5V, 150 mA).
VDD2
Digital power ( +3.3V, 150 mA).
55
The EMAFE connector provides a standard interface for connecting analog input/output daughter boards.
The connector has 96 pins arranged in three rows of 32 pins. The pinout is given in Table 6-3 and a
description of each of the pins is listed alphabetically in Tables 6-4 through 6-6.
Table 6-3 EMAFE Connector
Pin
Row A
Row B
Row C
1
DGND
DGND
VDD1
2
NU
VDD1
NU
3
VDD2
VDD2
NU
4
NU
NU
DGND
5
NU
DGND
NU
6
MD0
VDD1
MD1
7
MD2
NU
MD3
8
MD4
NU
MD5
9
DGND
DGND
DGND
10
MD6
NU
MD7
11
MD8
NU
MD9
12
MD10
NU
MD11
13
VDD1
VDD1
VDD1
14
MD12
NU
MD13
15
MD14
DGND
MD15
16
MFLAG
NU
MIRQ
17
DGND
DGND
DGND
18
NU
VDD2
MA0
19
MA1
CLK_OUT
MA2
20
MA3
CHN_IN
MA4
21
DGND
DGND
DGND
22
MA5
CS1
MA6
23
MA7
DGND
MCS
24
MRD
CS0
MWR
25
VDD1
VDD1
VDD1
26
TXCLK0
DGND
RXCLK0
27
TFS0
NU
RFS0
28
TXD0
VDD2
RXD0
29
DGND
DR0B
DGND
30
TXCLK1
DT0B
RXCLK1
31
TFS1
DR1B
RFS1
32
TXD1
DT1B
RXD1
56
6.2.1 EMAFE Connector Interface Signal Descriptions
Table 6-4 EMAFE Connector Interface Signal Description Row A
PIN
NAME
DESCRIPTION
A1
DGND
Digital Ground
A2
NU
Not Used
A3
VDD2
+3.3 Digital Power
A4
NU
Not Used
A5
NU
Not Used
A6
MD0
Parallel Data Bit 0 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D16)
A7
MD2
Parallel Data Bit 2 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D18)
A8
MD4
Parallel Data Bit 4 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D20)
A9
DGND
Digital Ground
A10
MD6
Parallel Data Bit 6 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D22)
A11
MD8
Parallel Data Bit 8 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D24)
A12
MD10
Parallel Data Bit 10 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D26)
A13
VDD1
Digital Power (5v)
A14
MD12
Parallel Data Bit 12 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D28)
A15
MD14
Parallel Data Bit 14 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D30)
A16
MFLAG
Flag Input
A17
DGND
Digital Ground
A18
NU
Not Used
A19
MA1
Parallel Address Bit 1 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D17)
A20
MA3
Parallel Address Bit 3 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D19)
A21
DGND
Digital Ground
A22
MA5
Parallel Address Bit 5 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D21)
A23
MA7
Parallel Address Bit 7 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D23)
A24
MRD*
Module Read (Asserted Low)
A25
VDD1
Digital Power (5v)
A26
TXCLK0
Transmit Clock, Port 0
A27
TFS0
Transmit Frame Sync, Port 0
A28
TXD0
Transmit Data, Port 0
A29
DGND
Digital Ground
A30
TXCLK1
Transmit Clock, Port 1
A31
TFS1
Transmit Frame Sync, Port 1
A32
TXD1
Transmit Data, Port 1
57
Table 6-5 EMAFE Connector Interface Signal Description Row B
PIN
NAME
DESCRIPTION
B1
DGND
Digital Ground
B2
VDD1
Digital Power (5V)
B3
VDD2
Digital Power (3.3V)
B4
NU
Not Used
B5
DGND
Digital Ground
B6
VDD1
Digital Power (5V)
B7
NU
Not Used
B8
NU
Not Used
B9
DGND
Digital Ground
B10
NU
Not Used
B11
NU
Not Used
B12
NU
Not Used
B13
VDD1
Digital Power (5v)
B14
NU
Not Used
B15
DGND
Digital Ground
B16
NU
Not Used
B17
DGND
Digital Ground
B18
VDD2
Digital Power (3.3v)
B19
CLK_OUT
CODEC Chain Clock
B20
CHN_IN
CODEC Chain Input
B21
DGND
Digital Ground
B22
CS1
CODEC CS1
B23
DGND
Digital Ground
B24
CS0
CODEC CS0
B25
VDD1
Digital Power (5V)
B26
DGND
Digital Ground
B27
NU
Not Used
B28
VDD2
Digital Power (3.3V)
B29
DR0B
ADSP-21065L I2S, SECONDARY DATA RECEIVE 0 SIGNAL
B30
DT0B
ADSP-21065L I2S, SECONDARY DATA TRANSMIT 0 SIGNAL
B31
DR1B
ADSP-21065L I2S, SECONDARY DATA TRANSMIT 1 SIGNAL
B32
DT1B
ADSP-21065L I2S, SECONDARY DATA RECEIVE 1 SIGNAL
58
Table 6-6 EMAFE Connector Interface Signal Description Row C
PIN
NAME
DESCRIPTION
C1
VDD1
Digital Power (5V)
C2
NC
Not Used
C3
NC
Not Used
C4
DGND
Digital Ground
C5
NC
Not Used
C6
MD1
Parallel Data Bit 1 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D17)
C7
MD3
Parallel Data Bit 3 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D19)
C8
MD5
Parallel Data Bit 5 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D21)
C9
DGND
Digital Ground
C10
MD7
Parallel Data Bit 7 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D23)
C11
MD9
Parallel Data Bit 9 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D25)
C12
MD11
Parallel Data Bit 11 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D27)
C13
VDD1
Digital Power (5v)
C14
MD13
Parallel Data Bit 13 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D29)
C15
MD15
Parallel Data Bit 15 (BUFFERED ADSP-21065L D31)
C16
MIRQ*
Interrupt Output (Asserted Low)
C18
MA0
Parallel Address Bit 0 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D16)
C19
MA2
Parallel Address Bit 2 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D18)
C20
MA4
Parallel Address Bit 4 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D20)
C21
DGND
Digital Ground
C22
MA6
Parallel Address Bit 6 (LATCHED ADSP-21065L D22)
C23
MCS*
Module Select (Asserted Low)
C24
MWR*
Module Write (Asserted Low)
C25
VDD1
Digital Power (5v)
C26
RXCLK0
Receive Clock, Port 0
C27
RFS0
Receive Frame Sync, Port 0
C28
RXD0
Receive Data, Port 0
C29
DGND
Digital Ground
C30
RXCLK1
Receive Clock, Port 1
C31
RFS1
Receive Frame Sync, Port 1
C32
RXD1
Receive Data, Port 1
59
7 Reference
7.1 Overview
This chapter is a reference for VisualDSP++. Because the debugger is dynamic, menu selections,
commands, and dialogs change depending on the target being used. This chapter provides
information on all of the menu selections, commands, and dialogs when the target is the ADSP21065L evaluation board. For all other debugger commands, see the VisualDSP++ Guide &
Reference. Note that grayed out commands are unavailable with this target.
7.2 Settings Menu Commands
All of the commands that pertain to the EZ-KIT Lite board are contained in the Settings and
Demo menus. The Settings menu provides access to the following commands:
Figure 7-1 Settings Menu Commands
7.2.1 Test Communications
Tests the PC, EZ-KIT Lite communications. Responses are Communications Success or
various error messages sent to the Output window. In most cases resetting the EZ-KIT
Lite reestablishes communication.
7.3 Baud Rate and COM Port
Sets up the baud rate of the current COM port and UART. Choices
are 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, and 115200. The default rate is
115200. (NOTE: Using a baud rate of 9600 causes the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite to
operate very slowly and can also cause it to hang.)
Selects a PC communications port for the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite
board. Choices are COM (1-4). The default setting is COM 1.
60
To change the baud rate and COM port should follow these
instructions:
1. Bring up the VisualDSP++ Configurator from the Windows Start menu. Click
Start->Run, then type Icecfg.
Figure 7-2 VisualDSP++ Configurator
61
2. In the Platform Templates box, high light the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite via
COM port, click Copy button. Figure 7-3 will appear
Figure 7-3 Platform Properties
3. Click the Baud Rate and COM Port drop-down list to change the settings.
Click OK to save the settings.
7.2.2 Codec
Sets several options for codec operation. These commands are:
Update — Updates and refreshes the menu changes you selected.
Sample Rate — Opens the Sample Rate dialog (Figure 7-2 ) that lets you
select a sample rate from 7000 to 48000 Hz.
62
Figure 7-2 Sample Rate Dialog
Source — Choose Microphone or Line In
Figure 7-3 Source Setting
Gain Select — Select a gain from 0.0 to 22.5 in 1.5 increments
63
7.3 Demo Menu Commands
The Demo menu has one command–Demo Control. This command opens a dialog box that lets
the user change several operating functions of the FFT and BP demos. Figure 7-3 shows the
dialog box that accompanies the FFT demo. Select the Demo Control command for a demo which
has no dialogs, an error message that says “This demo does not require user input” will appear.
Click OK and continue with the demo.
Figure 7-4 FFT Demo Dialog
Table 7-1 FFT Demo Dialog Description
Dialog Field
Description
Source
Select the source for the FFT; the codec or a random number generator.
Domain
Splits the original DFT using one of the following methods:
DIT (Decimation in Time) or DIF (Decimation in Frequency)
Window
A filter to use on the Fourier transform.
Scaling
Scaling refers to how and how much data is captured while the FFT is running. Dynamic
Scaling is a snapshot of current FFT high and low (limits) (activity).
Cumulative Scaling shows FFT activity over time (limits) (activity).
64
Figure 7-5 Bandpass Demo Controls Dialog
The dialog fields for the Bandpass demo are as follows:
Input Source — Select input from the AD1819, or noise from the DSP.
Filter Range — Change the filter applied to the demo.
65
APPENDIX A RESTRICTIONS & CPLD CODE
LISTING
The following restrictions apply to configuration level release 2.01 of the ADSP-21065L evaluation
board. For information on any ADSP-21065L silicon anomalies, see the anomaly sheet that
accompanied this product.
1.
Breakpoints set in the last three instructions of a do-loop are allowed, but cause your code to run
incorrectly.
2.
Breakpoints set after a delayed branch instruction and before the branch occurs causes your code
to run incorrectly.
3.
Using the single stepping function
three instructions of a do-loop.
4.
The host loses contact with the monitor while the user program is running if the user program
disables the UART interrupt or changes the UART interrupt vector.
5.
The host loses contact with the monitor while the program is running and in an ISR when nesting
is turned off.
6.
The host loses contact with the monitor while the program is running and in the timer ISR,
provided the highest priority timer vector is used.
7.
The current version of the EZ-KIT monitor does not let you view hardware stack information.
8.
Do not use the reset button while the debugger is open unless the debugger requests you to.This
will cause the debugger to crash.
9.
The IMDW0 bit in the SYSCON register must be set to 1 to keep communication with the host.
The IMDW0 bit determines if data accesses made to block 0 are 48-bit three column accesses (1)
or 32-bit two column accesses (0). The monitor program requires three column data accesses to
memory block 0. If The IMDW0 bit is set to 0, the monitor accesses incorrect memory locations
within block 0. (See User's Manual for further discussion of IMDW0).
steps through a delayed branch instruction and the last
10. The setting of IMDW0 will have no effect on C-programming as long as RND32 is not set for 40
bit floating point precision.
11. Do not run more than one ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite session in the debugger at any one time.
You may run an EZ-KIT Lite session and a simulator or ICE session at the same time or you can
open two debugger interfaces to run more than one EZ-KIT Lite session.
12. The product as documented describes the debugger's Settings, Codec Sample Rate
menu
66
command as follows: "Opens the Sample Rate dialog that lets you select a sample rate from 7000
to 48000 Hz." The default sample rate is 48000. Do NOT change the sample from this setting. If
you need to change sample rates for your program, you will need to write your own CODEC
driver. Information on doing this is provided in Chapter 3 of the ADSP-21065L EZ-KIT Lite
Evaluation System Manual.
A.1 CPLD File
Listing A-1 shows the Cypress WARP file used to program the CPLD on the board. The CPLD is a
CY7371i-83AC, which is a 32-macrocell CPLD with in-circuit programmability. The functions
performed are:
1.
Extends the EPROM read cycles (board silicon revision 0.0 only). The access cycles used by the
ADSP-21065L when booting, are too short for the EPROM; therefore, the CPLD deasserts the
ACK line long enough to extend the cycle to an appropriate time for the EPROM.
2.
Translates the read and write cycles into cycles that are appropriate for the UART. The timing
requirements between the chip select, read/write lines, and data accesses are different between the
ADSP-21065L and the UART. The CPLD corrects for these differences. Additionally, there is a
minimum time restraint between subsequent access to the UART. The CPLD accounts for this
needed time delay.
3.
Translates ADSP-21065L read and write cycles into cycles appropriate for the EMAFE.
67
Listing A
CPLD File
-- ********************************************************************
-- ** Copyright(c) 1998 Analog Devices, Inc. All Rights Reserved
-- ********************************************************************
-- ** Revision History
-- ** ----------------- ** 05/26/98 Original
-- ** 05/27/98 inverted ack output to ack_bar
-- ** Allows addition of open collector buffer to be added
-- ** 05/29/98 Changed address of UART
-- ** 08/15/98 Locked pins to prevent changes on next rev.s
-- ** 09/22/98 Changed ACK functionality (driven only when
needed)
-- ** Added Codec reset functionality
-- ** 09/28/98 Changed functionality of Codec Reset (1usec low)
-- **
-- **
-- ********************************************************************
-- ** 21065L.VHD
-- ** ----------- **
VHDL code for the CPLD on the ASPL-21065L evaluation board
-- **
-- **
Addresses:
A3 A2 A1 A0
-- **
UART:
0
0
1
-
-- **
EMAFE_Address:
0
0
0
0
-- **
EMAFE_Data:
0
0
0
1
-- **
CODEC_RESET:
0
1
0
0
-- **
-- **
Note: The ACK line is only driven when needed.
-- **
-- **
When the codec reset is written, the codec_rst line
goes low for > 1usec.
-- **
-- ********************************************************************
library ieee;
use ieee.std_logic_1164.all;
use work.std_arith.all;
entity interface is port (
reset
: in std_logic;
-- asynchronous reset
clk
: in std_logic;
-- Clock input
addr
: in std_logic_vector(3 down to 0);
wr_bar, rd_bar, cs_bar
: in std_logic;
68
bms_bar
: in std_logic;
u_en_bar, u_rd_bar, u_wr_bar
ack
-- Wait (EPROM) input
: out std_logic;
: out std_logic;
-- UART Outputs
-- to DSP
e_cs_bar, e_rd_bar, e_wr_bar,
e_addr
: out std_logic;
-- EMAFE Outputs
codec_rst_bar
: out std_logic);
-- CODEC Reset
attribute pin_avoid of interface:entity is "1 13 21 33";
-- avoiding programming contol pins
-- Need to lock pin numbers, to prevent accidental changes
attribute pin_numbers of interface:entity is
"reset:26 clk:7 wr_bar:29 rd_bar:9 cs_bar:15 "
& "addr(3):11 addr(2):12 addr(1):14 addr(0):27 "
& "bms_bar:10 u_en_bar:30 u_rd_bar:32 u_wr_bar:22 "
& "ack:18 e_cs_bar:36 e_rd_bar:23 e_wr_bar:24 e_addr:37 "
& "codec_rst_bar:8 ";
end interface;
architecture state_machine of interface is
type StateType is (IDLE, CS1, CS2, WR1, WR2, WR3, WR4, WR_D1, ENDW1,
ENDW2, ENDW3, ENDW4, CS3, CS4, CS5, CS6, RD1,
RD2, RD3, RD4, ENDR1);
signal present_state, next_state : StateType;
signal u_ack
: std_logic;
-- ACK signal generated from UART
signal u_ack_v : std_logic;
-- UART ACK valid signal
signal w_ack
: std_logic;
-- ACK signal generated from EPROM
signal w_ack_v
: std_logic;
-- EPROM ACK valid signal
signal uart_ctrl_d: std_logic_vector(2 downto 0);
-- (u_rd_bar_d,
--
u_en_bar_d, u_wr_bar_d)
-- next state of uart
--
control signals
type WAIT_STATE is (WAIT0, WAIT1, WAIT2, WAIT3, WAIT4, WAIT5,
WAIT6);
signal present_wstate, next_wstate : WAIT_STATE;
begin
-- *************************************************
--
UART Control logic
-- *************************************************
uart_state:process(present_state, cs_bar, rd_bar, wr_bar, addr)
variable rd : std_logic;
variable wr : std_logic;
69
variable cs : std_logic;
begin
rd := not rd_bar;
wr := not wr_bar;
cs := not cs_bar;
case present_state is
when IDLE => u_ack <= '1';
u_ack_v <= '0';
if ((cs = '1') AND ((rd OR wr) = '1')
AND (std_match(addr, "001-"))) then
-- Proceed only if next_state <= CS1;
-- addressed and rd/wr
else
next_state <= IDLE;
-- Not needed; for clarity
end if;
when CS1 =>
u_ack <= '1';
u_ack_v <= '0';
if ((cs = '1') AND ((rd OR wr) = '1')
AND (std_match(addr, "001-"))) then
-- Proceed only if next_state <= CS2;
--
addressed and rd/wr
else
next_state <= IDLE;
-- Improper cycle
end if;
when CS2 => u_ack <= '0';
-- Signal extended cycle
u_ack_v <= '1';
if (wr = '1') then
next_state <= WR1;
-- Write cycle
else
next_state <= CS3;
-- Read cycle
end if;
when WR1 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= WR2;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when WR2 =>u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= WR3;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when WR3 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= WR4;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when WR4 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= WR_D1;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when WR_D1 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= ENDW1;
-- Continue Write Cycle
70
when ENDW1 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= ENDW2;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when ENDW2 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= ENDW3;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when ENDW3 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= ENDW4;
-- Continue Write Cycle
when ENDW4 => u_ack <= '1';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= IDLE;
-- End Write Cycle
when CS3 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= CS4;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when CS4 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= CS5;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when CS5 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= CS6;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when CS6 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= RD1;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when RD1 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= RD2;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when RD2 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= RD3;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when RD3 => u_ack <= '0';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= RD4;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when RD4 => u_ack <= '1';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= ENDR1;
-- Continue Read Cycle
when ENDR1 => u_ack <= '1';
u_ack_v <= '1';
next_state <= IDLE;
-- End Read Cycle
end case;
end process uart_state;
with next_state select
--
uart_ctrl_d <= "111" when IDLE,
"101" when CS1,
"101" when CS2,
"100" when WR1,
71
"100" when WR2,
"100" when WR3,
"100" when WR4,
"101" when WR_D1,
"111" when ENDW1,
"111" when ENDW2,
"111" when ENDW3,
"111" when ENDW4,
"101" when CS3,
"101" when CS4,
"101" when CS5,
"101" when CS6,
"001" when RD1,
"001" when RD2,
"001" when RD3,
"001" when RD4,
"101" when ENDR1,
"---" when others;
-- *************************************************
--
State/Reset Control
-- *************************************************
state_clocked:process(reset, clk)
begin
if (reset = '1') then
present_state <= IDLE;
-- UART State
u_rd_bar <= '1';
-- UART State
u_en_bar <= '1';
-- UART State
u_wr_bar <= '1';
-- UART State
present_wstate <= WAIT0;
-- Wait State
elsif rising_edge(clk) then
present_state <= next_state;
-- UART State
u_rd_bar <= uart_ctrl_d(2);
-- UART State
u_en_bar <= uart_ctrl_d(1);
-- UART State
u_wr_bar <= uart_ctrl_d(0);
-- UART State
present_wstate <= next_wstate;
-- Wait State
end if;
end process state_clocked;
ack <= '1' when (reset = '1') else
(u_ack AND w_ack) when ((u_ack_v = '1')
OR (w_ack_v = '1')) else
'Z';
-- Generate ACK
-- *************************************************
--
EMAFE Control logic
-- *************************************************
-- Control the buffering of data to and from the EMAFE
-- interface
72
e_rd_bar <= rd_bar;
e_wr_bar <= wr_bar;
e_cs_bar <= '0' when ((addr = "0001") AND (cs_bar = '0')) else '1';
e_addr
<= '0' when ((addr = "0000") AND (cs_bar = '0')AND
(wr_bar = '0')) else '1';
-- *************************************************
--
Wait Generator for EPROM
-- *************************************************
-- Delay the accesses to the EPROM since the DSP will try to
-- access it at 30 MHz.
wait_state: process(rd_bar, bms_bar, present_wstate)-- State selection and ack
control
variable rd : std_logic;
variable bms : std_logic;
begin
rd := not rd_bar;
bms := not bms_bar;
case present_wstate is
when WAIT0 =>
if ((bms = '1') AND (RD = '1')) then -- Check for EPROM RD
w_ack <= '0';
-- Yes .. Delay
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT1;
else
-- No, ignore
w_ack <= '1';
w_ack_v <= '0';
end if;
when WAIT1 =>
-- Continue Delay
w_ack <= '0';
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT2;
when WAIT2 =>
-- Continue Delay
w_ack <= '0';
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT3;
when WAIT3 =>
-- Continue Delay
w_ack <= '0';
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT4;
when WAIT4 =>
-- Continue Delay
w_ack <= '0';
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT5;
73
when WAIT5 =>
-- Continue Delay
w_ack <= '0';
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT6;
when WAIT6 =>
-- Release Delay
w_ack <= '1';
w_ack_v <= '1';
next_wstate <= WAIT0;
end case;
end process wait_state;
-- *************************************************
--
Codec Reset
-- *************************************************
cdc_rst: process(clk, addr, cs_bar, reset)
variable cdc_cnt: std_logic_vector(4 downto 0);
begin
if (reset = '1') then
cdc_cnt := (others => '0');
codec_rst_bar <= '0';
elsif (rising_edge(clk)) then
if (cdc_cnt = "00000") then
-- If reset
-- reset counter
-- pass reset to codec
-- otherwise (key on rising edge)
--
if counter hasn't started
if ((addr = "0100") AND (cs_bar = '0')) then -- check if reset
cdc_cnt := cdc_cnt + 1;
-- Start counter
codec_rst_bar <= '0';
-- Reset codec
else
codec_rst_bar <= '1';
-- if not reset
-- hold reset high
end if;
else
-- if counter has started
cdc_cnt := cdc_cnt + 1;
-- increment counter
codec_rst_bar <= '0';
-- Reset codec
end if;
end if;
end process cdc_rst;
end;
To use the CODEC controls, reference the buffer.asm and .ldf files provided with the demos. These files
provide access to the necessary variables by overlapping the locations of the variables.
74
APPENDIX B BILL OF MATERIALS
75
Item
Qty
1
25
Ref
Part Desc
C1, C4, C7, C11, C13, C22, C24, C38, C42, 0.01uF
Pkg
Specification
Manufacturer/Source:P/N
SMT0805
Ceramic, 10%, T&R, 50 V
AVX: 08055E103KATMA
Panasonic: ECU-1H103KBG
C60, C62, C74, C75, C91, C92, C95, C105,
C119, C122, C124, C127, C129, C130,
C134, C135
2
2
C109, C110
22 pF
SMT0805
Ceramic, 5%, 50 V
Digi-Key: PCC220CNCT-ND
3
2
C114, C115
270 pF
SMT0805
Ceramic, 5%, 50 V
Digi-Key: PCC271CGCT-ND
4
4
C139, C140, C141, C142
100pF
SMT0805
Ceramic, 5%, 50 V
Digi-Key: PCC101CGCT-ND
5
10
C2, C15, C77, C79, C82, C85, C87, C89,
1uF
SMT1812
X7R Ceramic, 20%, 50 V
AVX: 18125C105MAT2A
6
18
10uF
EIA3216
Tantalum, 10%, 10 V
Kemet: T491A106K010AS
Panasonic: ECU-V1H220JCN
Panasonic: ECU-V1H101JCG
C112, C113
C3, C9, C16, C17, C20, C47, C51, C57,
C69, C97, C98, C99, C100, C111, C120,
C126, C133, C138
7
2
C39, C117
0.047uF
SMT1206
Z5U, 10%, 50 V
Digikey: PCC473BCT-ND
8
6
C44, C49, C50, C54, C81, C86
220 pF
SMT0805
Ceramic, 5%, 50 V
Digi-Key: PCC221CGCT-ND
9
1
C5
100 uF
SMTX
Panasonic: ECU-V1Hr73KBW
Tantalum, Low ESR, 20%, 20 Kemit: T494X107K020AS
V
10
1
C55
27 pF
SMT0805
NPO, 5%, 50 V
Digikey: PCC270CGCT-ND
11
1
C56
47 pF
SMT0805
Ceramic, 5%, 50 V
Digi-Key: PCC470CGCT-ND
12
7
C59, C64, C65, C66, C67, C68, C76
1 uF
EIA3216
Tantalum, T&R, 16 V
AVX: TAJA105K016R
13
46
C6, C8, C10, C12, C14, C18, C19, C21,
0.1 uF
SMT0805
Z5U, 20%, 50 V
Panasonic: ECU-V1H270JCG
Digi-Key: PCT3105CT-ND
C23, C25, C37, C40, C41, C43, C45, C46,
Allied: 231-1294
Murata: GRM40Z5U104M050BL
C48, C52, C53, C58, C61, C63, C70, C71,
76
C72, C73, C93, C94, C96, C101, C102,
C103, C104, C106, C107, C108, C116,
C118, C121, C123, C125, C128, C131,
C132, C136, C137
14
4
C78, C80, C88, C90
1000 pF
SMT0805
Z5U, 10%, 50 V
Digikey: PCC102BNCT-ND
15
2
C83, C84
0.33 uF
SMT3216
Tantalum, 20%, 35 V
Digikey: PCS6334CT-ND
16
6
D1, D2, D3, D4, D5, D6
LED-Green
SMT, Gull Wing
Low Current, Diffused, T&R, HP: HLMP-7040 #11
17
1
D7
Red LED
SMT0805
Panasonic: ECS-T1VY334R
2mA, 1.5 V
Ultra Bright Red, 50 mW,
Panasonic: LNJ208R8ARAF
20mA, 3V
18
1
D8
Rectifier
D0-214AA
Max. fv=1.15V @ 1.0A,
Microsemi: S2A
2ADC, 2.0uSec, 50 V
19
1
20
2
21
9
FB1
Common Mode SMT
0.06 Ohm-DC, 1.5A, 50Vdc
Choke Coil
(EIA 2020 pkg)
Murata: PLM250S40B1
FB3, FB13
EMI Filter
SMT1206
0.025 Ohm-DC, 3A
Murata: BLM31P500S
FB4, FB5, FB6, FB7, FB8, FB9, FB10,
EMI Filter
603
Bead Inductor, 200 mA
Murata: BLM11A601SPB
FB11, FB12
22
2
HQ1, HQ2
SMT Heat Sink TO-263AB
Conduction through Drain Pad AAVID: 573300D00010
23
1
J1
2.5mm Jack
SMT
Male, Rt. Angle
Kycon: KLD-SMT-0202-B
24
1
J10
CON7x2M
.100 TH
Male
Samtec: TSW-17-07-T-D
25
2
J2, J4
CON30x2M
.100 TH
Male
Samtec: TSW-130-07-T-D
26
1
J3
DB9F
TH
Fem. Rt. Angle PCB, w/
Keltron: DNR-09SCJB-SG
grounding board locks
Kycon: K22-E9S-NJ
27
1
J5
CON5x2M
.100 TH
Male Breakaway
Molex: 10-89-1101
28
1
J6
CON32x3F
.100 TH
Female Right Angle
Samtec: SSW-132-T-02-T-T-RA
29
2
J7, J8
STEREO JACK TH
3.5mm, 500VDC, horizontal
Switchcraft: 35RAPC4BHN2
30
1
J9
CON7M
.100 TH
Male
Samtec: TSW-17-07-T-S
31
8
JP1, JP2, JP3, JP4, JP5, JP6, JP7, JP8
CON3M
2mm SMT
Male, 3 A
Samtec: TMM-103-01-S-S-SM
77
32
2
Q1, Q2
PMOS FET
TO-263AB
33
4
R1, R2, R3, R4
39 Ohm
SMT0805
P-channel MOSFET, 60W, -
Fairchild: NDB6020P
24A, -20V
Thick Film, 5%, 1/8 W
Digi-Key: P39ACT-ND
Panasonic: ERJ-6GEY/J390
34
8
R11, R13, R16, R18, R28, R30, R33, R46
100 Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W
Digi-Key: P100ACT-ND
Panasonic: ERJ-6GEYJ101
35
7
R19, R20, R21, R22, R23, R24, R25
910 Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W, 100 V Bourns: CR0805-911-JVCA
36
5
R34, R36, R42, R44, R76
1K Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W, 100 V Bourns: CR0805-102-JVCA
Panasonic: ERJ-6GEYJ102
37
4
R35, R37, R43, R45
47K Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W
Digi-Key: P47KACT-ND
38
2
R38, R41
20K Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W
Allied: 297-9552
39
2
R39, R40
5.1K
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W
Digi-Key: P5.1KACT-ND
40
1
R5
1M Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W
Digi-Key: P1.0MACT-ND
41
2
R52, R53
33 Ohm x 8
SOP-16
Isolated, 5%, 200 mW
Digi-Key: P20KACT-ND
CTS: 767-163-R33
Digikey: 767-163-R33-ND
42
1
R54
10K x 15
SOP-16
Bussed, 2%, 100 mW, 50V
CTS: 767-161-R10K
43
1
R6
1.5K Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W, 100 V Bourns: CR0805-152-JVCA
44
25
R7, R8, R9, R10, R12, R14, R15, R17, R26, 10K Ohm
SMT0805
Thick Film, 5%, 1/10 W, 100 V Bourns: CR0805-103-JVCA
Digikey: 767-161-R10K-ND
Panasonic: ERJ-6GEYJ103
R27, R29, R31, R32, R47, R48, R49, R50,
R51, R57, R64, R72, R75, R78, R79, R80
45
1
R73
0.025 Ohm
SMT1206
SMT, 1%, 1/4 W
Dale: WSL1206R025FB25
46
1
R74
0.05 Ohm
SMT1206
SMT, 1%, 1/4 W
Dale: WSL1206R050FB25
47
8
SJP1, SJP2, SJP3, SJP4, SJP5, SJP6, SJP10, SHUNT2
2mm
Open Top, Gold Plating
Samtec: 2SN-BK-G
0.1
Open Top w/ Handle
AMP: 881545-1
SMT
Momentary SPST (washable)
C&K: KT11P2JM
SJP11
48
2
SJP7, SJP8
SHUNT2
49
8
SW1, SW2, SW3, SW4, SW5, SW6, SW7, SWITCH
SW8
78
50
1
TP1
51
1
U1
HEADER 1X1 .100 TH
Male, single
Samtec: TSW-101-07-L-S
Voltage
SO-8
10A, 3.3V
Analog Devices: ADP3310AR-3.3
16-pin SOIC
Triple, 10-ns delay, +/- 2ns,
Dallas Semi: DS1013S-10
Regulator
52
1
U10
53
1
U12
Silicon Delay
Line
74LVCH162
5.0V
TSSOP-48
16-Bit Xcvr, w/ Bus Hold, 5V- IDT: IDT74LVCH16245APA
Tolerant, +/-24 mA, 1.5-4.1 ns, Phillips: 74LVCH16245A DGG
45A
3.3 V
54
1
U13
Audio OpAmp 8-Pin SOIC
Dual - Single Supply (+4V to
Analog Devices: SSM2135S
+36V)
55
1
U14
74LCX574
TSSOP-20
Octal Edge Trigg D Flip-Flops Fairchild: 74LCX574MTC
w/ 3-State out puts, 5V-
Motorola: MC74LCX574DT
Tolerant, +/-24 mA, 1.5-8.5 ns,
3.3 V
56
1
U15
57
1
U16
SoundPort
48-pin TQFP
AC ‘97 Compliant, 5.0V
Analog Devices: AD1819A JST
TSSOP-14
Quad bus buffers w/ 3-state
Fairchild: 74LCX125MTC
outputs, w/ Bus Hold, 5V-
Motorola: MC74LCX125DT
Codec
74LCX125
Tolerant, +/-24 mA, 1.5-6.0 ns,
3.3 V
58
59
1
1
U17
U18
EPROM
SHARC DSP
32-pin DIP
208-pin PQFP
EPROM 2Mb (256Kx8), 200ns, SGS: M27V201-200F6
3.3V
Macronix: MX27L2000 DC-20
Processor, 60MHz, 3.3V
Analog Devices: ADSP-21065L KS240X
60
2
U19, U20
61
1
U2
62
1
U3
SDRAM
Voltage
50-pin TSOP
SO-8
SDRAM 16Mb (1Mx16),
Micron: MT48LC1M16A1TG S-10
83MHz, 3.3V
NEC: uPD4516161AG5-A10
10A, 5V
Analog Devices: ADP3310AR-5
Regulator
Voltage Monitor 8-pin SOIC
uProcessor Supervisor, 200ms, Analog Devices: ADM708TAR
3.3V
79
63
3
U4, U11, U21
74LCX14
TSSOP-14
64
1
U5
ADM232A
Narrow SOIC-16
Schmitt Trigger Inverter, 5V-
Fairchild: 74LCX14MTC
Tolerant, 3.3 V
Toshiba: 74LCX14FT
RS232 Driver/Receiver, 2 Tx / Analog Devices: ADM232AARN
2 Rx, 5 V
65
1
U6
PC16550DV
PLCC-44
UART, w/ FIFOs, 1.5M baud, National Semi: PC16550D
5V
66
1
U7
74LPT245
SOP-20
Octal Bus Transceiver w/ Bus Digikey: PI74LPT245AS-ND
Hold, 5V-Tolerant, +32/-64
Pericom: PI74LPT245AS
mA, 1.0-4.0 ns, 3.3 V
67
1
U8
74F06
SOP-14
Open collector Hex inverter,
Phillips: N74F06D
3.5ns, 5.0 V
68
1
U9
32-Macro cell
44-Pin TQFP
CPLD
69
1
X1
18.432 MHz
In-Circuit Programmable, 5.0V, Cypress: CY7C371i-83AC
75mA, 12ns, 5.0V/3.3V
SMT
Crystal, Parallel, 50 ppm,
Epson: MA-505-18.432M-C2
18.432MHz
70
1
X2
24.576 MHz
SMT
Crystal, Parallel, 50 ppm,
Epson: MA-505-24.576M-C2
24.576MHz
71
1
Y1
30.0 MHz
4-Pin DIP-8 Can
72
1
Z1
Socket, DIP-32 DIP-32
73
4
Z2, Z3, Z4, Z5
Button Bumper Rubber
Oscillator, 50 ppm, 20 mA,
M-Tron: M3A14FAD30.0000
30.0 MHz, 3.3V
SaRonix: NCH089B-30.0000
Machine Pin
Andon: 101-632-01S-P29
Augat: 832-AG12D-ES
Allied: 217-4165
Russel: BUT-4165
80
APPENDIX C SCHEMATICS
NOTE: TRST is incorrectly documented in the schematic as active high. It should be active low
(!TRST). Also REDY is incorrectly documented in the schematic as active low (!REDY). It
should be active high active.
81
SJP6
12
2
10
3
Shunt
8
6
4
1
B
TMS
BTMS
CLKIN
EMU
Key
GND
9
Shunt Shunt
7
XTAL2
CLKIN
4
5
When not used jumper pins
7 - 8
9 - 10
3
1
C119
C120
10uF
0.1uF
C118
+
C123
C124
C125
0.01uF
C122
C127
C126
10uF
0.1uF
C121
+
2
JP7
1-2
1-2
2-3
2-3
JP8
1-2
2-3
1-2
2-3
Single Processor
Processor 1
Processor 2
INVALID
TP1
1
Initially both should be
installed
WR#
MS0#
MS1#
MS2#
MS3#
RD#
WR#
SW#
RD#
JP8
SW#
ACK
2
SJP10
3
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
1
BR1#
BR2#
BR1#
BR2#
ID0
ID1
HBR#
CS#
REDY#
Shunt
JP7
SJP11
1
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] x.com
Title
3
HBR#
HBG#
CS#
REDY#
2
1
Shunt
C
Size
B
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
Proc. Main
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Date
Wed nesday, November 18, 1998
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
10K
A
BTCK
SJP7 SJP8
+3.3Vcc
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
D16
D17
D18
D19
D20
D21
D22
D23
D24
D25
D26
D27
D28
D29
D30
D31
MS0#
MS1#
MS2#
MS3#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
TCK
R72
3
31
30
HBR
HBG
CS
REDY
40
52
55
63
BR1
BR2
ID0
ID1
BMSTR
27
28
144
143
53
59
58
64
69
RD
WR
SW
ACK
MS0
MS1
MS2
MS3
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
D16
D17
D18
D19
D20
D21
D22
D23
D24
D25
D26
D27
D28
D29
D30
D31
70
71
74
75
195
194
193
190
189
188
185
184
183
180
179
178
175
174
173
171
170
169
166
165
164
162
161
160
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A20
A21
A22
A23
D[0..31]
TRST BTRST
11
+3.3Vcc
204
196
187
186
181
177
168
167
159
155
154
150
139
135
129
125
119
114
106
99
94
89
81
73
72
68
62
60
57
49
41
35
33
25
14
10
3
DSP_CLK
+3.3Vcc
R54
16
BTDI
EZ-ICE
102
103
115
142
202
203
208
146
148
147
151
149
145
TDO
TDI
TRST
TCK
TMS
EMU
152
BSEL
153
BMS
26
24
22
23
19
18
DR1A
DR1B
RCLK1
RFS1
DT1A
DT1B
TCLK1
TFS1
16
17
15
13
11
12
8
7
DT0A
DT0B
TCLK0
TFS0
5
6
4
2
DR0A
DR0B
RCLK0
RFS0
65
157
RESET
PWM_EVENT0
PWM_EVENT1
GND36
GND35
GND34
GND33
GND32
GND31
GND30
GND29
GND28
GND27
GND26
GND25
GND24
GND23
GND22
GND21
GND20
GND19
GND18
GND17
GND16
GND15
GND14
GND13
GND12
GND11
GND10
GND9
GND8
GND7
GND6
GND5
GND4
GND3
GND2
GND1
GND0
ADSP-21065L
A[0..23]
TDI
13
0.1uF
Jumper3
GND
0.01uF
1
J10
TDO
10K
14
0.01uF
10K
Initially JP6 = 2-3
JP6
0.1uF
PWM_EVENT0
PWM_EVENT1
33 Ohm
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
R64
RESET#
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
33 Ohm
R53
PROM_CS#
10K
16
DR1A
15
DR1B
14
13 RXCLK1
RFS1
12
DT1A
11
DT1B
10
TXCLK1
9
TFS1
16
DR0A
15
DR0B
14
13 RXCLK0
RFS0
12
DT0A
11
DT0B
10
TXCLK0
9
TFS0
CPA#
R52
R57
+3.3Vcc
2
CPA
10K
R51
Host Boot
EPROM Boot
0.01uF
+3.3Vcc
E
NC0
NC1
NC2
NC3
NC4
NC5
NC6
CODEC_ON#
FLAG[4..9]
FLAG0
FLAG1
FLAG2
FLAG3
FLAG4
FLAG5
FLAG6
FLAG7
FLAG8
FLAG9
MFLAG
197
198
199
201
138
137
136
134
80
79
78
76
FLAG0
FLAG1
FLAG2
FLAG3
FLAG4
FLAG5
FLAG6
FLAG7
FLAG8
FLAG9
FLAG10
FLAG11
205
206
207
IRQ0
IRQ1
IRQ2
56
SBTS
DMAR2
DMAG2
39
51
IRQ0#
IRQ1#
IRQ2#
DMAR1#
DMAG1#
38
50
VDD32
VDD31
VDD30
VDD29
VDD28
VDD27
VDD26
VDD25
VDD24
VDD23
VDD22
VDD21
VDD20
VDD19
VDD18
VDD17
VDD16
VDD15
VDD14
VDD13
VDD12
VDD11
VDD10
VDD9
VDD8
VDD7
VDD6
VDD5
VDD4
VDD3
VDD2
VDD1
VDD0
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A20
A21
A22
A23
2
+3.3Vcc
82
83
84
86
87
88
90
91
92
96
97
98
100
101
104
107
108
109
111
112
113
116
117
118
121
122
123
126
127
128
132
133
3
200
192
191
182
176
172
163
158
156
141
140
131
130
124
120
110
105
95
93
85
77
67
66
61
54
45
36
32
29
21
20
9
1
D
JP6
1-2
2-3
+3.3Vcc
R50
10K
10K
+3.3Vcc
R49
DMAR1
DMAG1
SDA10
RAS
CAS
SDWE
DQM
SDCKE
SDCLK0
SDCLK1
U18
SDA10
RAS#
CAS#
SDWE#
DQM
SDCKE
SDCLK0
10K
+3.3Vcc
C
SBTS#
48
42
43
44
46
47
37
34
4
SDCLK0
SDCKE
DQM
SDWE#
CAS#
RAS#
SDA10
+3.3Vcc R48
FLAG[0..3]
+3.3Vcc
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
J9
B
DMAR2#
DMAG2#
A
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
7
of
8
A
B
C
D
E
U12
2OE
2DIR
D[0..15]
EMAFE_ADDR
11
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
CLK
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
Vcc
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
Q7
Q8
GND
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
MA0
MA1
MA2
MA3
MA4
MA5
MA6
MA7
2B1
2B2
2B3
2B4
2B5
2B6
2B7
2B8
MD0
MD1
MD2
MD3
MD4
MD5
MD6
MD7
13
14
16
17
19
20
22
23
MD8
MD9
MD10
MD11
MD12
MD13
MD14
MD15
4
Vcc1
Vcc2
Vcc3
Vcc4
4
10
15
21
28
34
39
45
GND1
GND2
GND3
GND4
GND5
GND6
GND7
GND8
10
C91
C92
C93
C94
+3.3Vcc
Bypass Caps for
U14
+3.3Vcc
7
18
31
42
+3.3Vcc
0.1uF
2A1
2A2
2A3
2A4
2A5
2A6
2A7
2A8
Bypass Caps for
U12
2
3
5
6
8
9
11
12
0.1uF
36
35
33
32
30
29
27
26
1B1
1B2
1B3
1B4
1B5
1B6
1B7
1B8
C105
C106
MD[0..15]
+3.3Vcc
20
3
OE
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
1A1
1A2
1A3
1A4
1A5
1A6
1A7
1A8
0.01uF
U14
1
47
46
44
43
41
40
38
37
0.01uF
4
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
0.1uF
25
24
EMAFE_RD#
1OE
1DIR
0.01uF
48
1
EMAFE_CS#
74LVTH16245A
74LVT574
3
+3.3Vcc
1K
MA[0..7]
The ADSP-21065L must be
programmed to use a Hold
Time Cycle on MS1 for
proper operation of this
circuit
R76
U11F
13
74LCX14
12
IRQ1#
MD5
CHAIN_CLK
CHAIN_IN
CODEC_CS0
CODEC_CS1
U8F
12
MD6
13
74F06
EMAFE_CS#
EMAFE_RD#
EMAFE_WR#
MD0
MD1
MD2
MD3
MD4
MD7
MD8
MD9
MD10
MD11
MD12
2
+5Vcc
+5Vcc
+5Vcc
+3.3Vcc
+5Vcc
RXD1
DT1B
TXD1
RFS1
DR1B
TFS1
RXCLK1
DT0B
TXCLK1
DGND
DR0B
DGND
RXD0
VDD2
TXD0
RFS0
NC
TFS0
RXCLK0
DGND
TXCLK0
VDD1
VDD1
VDD1
MWR
CS0
MRD
MCS
DGND
MA7
MA6
CS1
MA5
DGND
DGND
DGND
MA4
CHN_IN
MA3
MA2
CLK_OUT
MA1
MA0
VDD2
NC
DGND
DGND
DGND
MIRQ
NC
MFLAG
MD15
DGND
MD14
MD13
NC
MD12
VDD1
VDD1
VDD1
MD11
NC
MD10
MD9
NC
MD8
MD7
NC
MD6
DGND
DGND
DGND
MD5
NC
MD4
MD3
NC
MD2
MD1
VDD1
MD0
NC
DGND
NC
DGND
NC
NC
NC
VDD2
VDD2
NC
VDD1
NC
VDD1
DGND
DGND
C32
B32
A32
C31
B31
A31
C30
B30
A30
C29
B29
A29
C28
B28
A28
C27
B27
A27
C26
B26
A26
C25
B25
A25
C24
B24
A24
C23
B23
A23
C22
B22
A22
C21
B21
A21
C20
B20
A20
C19
B19
A19
C18
B18
A18
C17
B17
A17
C16
B16
A16
C15
B15
A15
C14
B14
A14
C13
B13
A13
C12
B12
A12
C11
B11
A11
C10
B10
A10
C9
B9
A9
C8
B8
A8
C7
B7
A7
C6
B6
A6
C5
B5
A5
C4
B4
A4
C3
B3
A3
C2
B2
A2
C1
B1
A1
SPORT1
MFLAG
+3.3Vcc
TXCLK1
RXCLK1
TFS1
DR1B
RFS1
DT1A
DT1B
DR1A
MD13
MD14
MA0
MA1
MA2
MA3
MA4
MA5
MA6
MA7
SPORT0
MD15
2
TXCLK0
RXCLK0
TFS0
RFS0
DT0A
DR0A
DR0B
DT0B
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
1
1
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
Title
J6
Size
B
EMAFE
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
EMA FE-CODEC
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Wed nesday, November 18, 1998
Date
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
A
B
C
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
6
of
8
A
B
C
D
E
A[0..19]
U19
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
4
SDA10
Z1
Non-schematic
Component
J5 and J4 should be adjusted
depending on size of EPROM.
J5
1-2
1-2
2-3
2-3
J4
1-2
2-3
1-2
2-3
Rev.s 0.0 and 0.1 of the ADSP-21065L begin
accessing the EPROM at 0x020000. Later
Rev.s begin at 0x000000. To ensure that
the EPROM will work with all revisions
place code at both places.
18
17
16
15
MS3#
MS3#
RAS#
CAS#
SDWE#
Sock et for EPROM
128K x 8, 256K x 8
512K x 8
Not Used
1M x 8
A13
SDA10
36
14
DQM
34
35
SDCKE
SDCLK0
+3.3Vcc
1
25
7
13
38
44
U17
SJP4 SJP5
3
Shunt Shunt
+3.3Vcc
JP4
1
2
3
Jumper3
A18
A19
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
JP5
31
1
1
2
3
PROM_CS#
2
RD#
22
Jumper3
RD#
PROM_CS#
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
27
26
23
25
4
28
29
3
2
30
24
16
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
Q0
Q1
Q2
Q3
Q4
Q5
Q6
Q7
13
14
15
17
18
19
20
21
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
DQMH
DQML
NC2
NC1
2
3
5
6
8
9
11
12
39
40
42
43
45
46
48
49
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
4
37
33
CKE
CLK
Vcc0
Vcc1
Vccq0
Vccq1
Vccq2
Vccq3
Vss0
Vss1
Vssq0
Vssq1
Vssq2
Vssq3
26
50
4
10
41
47
3
A13
SDA10
Vpp
MS3#
21
22
23
24
27
28
29
30
31
32
20
19
18
17
16
15
E
+3.3Vcc
Vcc
CS
RAS
CAS
WE
DQ0
DQ1
DQ2
DQ3
DQ4
DQ5
DQ6
DQ7
DQ8
DQ9
DQ10
DQ11
DQ12
DQ13
DQ14
DQ15
U20
P
Vss
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
BA
MT48 LC1M16A1
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
G
21
22
23
24
27
28
29
30
31
32
20
19
32
36
14
M27V201
34
35
+3.3Vcc
+3.3Vcc
1
25
7
13
38
44
0.1uF
C128
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
BA
CS
RAS
CAS
WE
DQMH
DQML
DQ0
DQ1
DQ2
DQ3
DQ4
DQ5
DQ6
DQ7
DQ8
DQ9
DQ10
DQ11
DQ12
DQ13
DQ14
DQ15
NC2
NC1
2
3
5
6
8
9
11
12
39
40
42
43
45
46
48
49
D16
D17
D18
D19
D20
D21
D22
D23
D24
D25
D26
D27
D28
D29
D30
D31
37
33
2
CKE
CLK
Vcc0
Vcc1
Vccq0
Vccq1
Vccq2
Vccq3
Vss0
Vss1
Vssq0
Vssq1
Vssq2
Vssq3
26
50
4
10
41
47
MT48 LC1M16A1
D[0..31]
+3.3Vcc
C132
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
C133
10uF
C131
0.1uF
+3.3Vcc
C130
0.1uF
1
0.01uF
0.01uF
C129
1
+
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
C137
C138
10uF
C136
0.1uF
C135
0.1uF
0.01uF
0.01uF
Title
C134
Size
B
+
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
Memory
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Date
Wed nesday, November 18, 1998
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
A
B
C
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
8
of
8
A
B
C
D
E
+3.3Vcc
+3.3Vcc
+5Vcc
+3.3Vcc
C25
Ferrite Bead
0.047uF
C24
0.01uF
C23
0.1uF
C22
0.01uF
C21
0.1uF
+
0.01uF
C14
8
0.1uF
10uF
C13
0.1uF
C12
0.01uF
C11
0.01uF
C10
0.1uF
C20
0.1uF
10uF
+
14
Y1
FB4
C9
C38
1
VCC
OUT
NC
GND
C39
R1
5
39 Ohm
4
U21A
1
R2
2
DSP_CLK
39 Ohm
7
74LCX14
30.0000MHz
U21B
4
3
4
R3
4
PLD_CLK
39 Ohm
74LCX14
+3.3Vcc
C8 is used to minimize
noise on the board
where 5Vcc crosses the
+3.3Vcc plane.
0.1uF
0.1uF
+5VA
C37
C8
+5Vcc
U21C
5
9
EXT_CLK
39 Ohm
74LCX14
U21D
Heat sink
R4
6
U21E
8
11
U21F
10
13
12
HQ1
74LCX14
3.3V, 1.0A
3
74LCX14
573300
74LCX14
3
+3.3Vcc
Pin 1 is the center pin
0.025 Ohm
+
U1
4
8
Vin
10uF
C3
0.1uF
C5
0.01uF
C2
1uF
R75
100uF
PLM250S40
DC Jack
10K
VIN_2
S2A
C4
C6
+
+3.3Vcc
U3
3
2
Gate
3
1
C1
3
2
+3.3Vcc
NDB6020P
Vout
GND
4
R73
1
VIN_1
D8
IS
1
Q1
Vin
FB1
0.01uF
J1
7
EN
nc0
nc1
2
SW1
5
1
2
2
6
3
4
1
4
PUSHB UTTON1
ADP3310-3.3
3
Vcc
RESET
RESET
RST
RESET#
8
7
MR
PFI
PFO
GND
nc
5
6
ADM708T
2
2
Heat sink
HQ2
5.0V, 0.5A
573300
Z2
Locate Ferrite Bead across
voltage split in plane
Z3
Q2
EN
C17
C19
10uF
+
0.1uF
10uF
C18
+
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
Gate
3
7
Rubber Foot
Vin
GND
8
1
U2
4
Rubber Foot
C16
Z5
1
FB3
Ferrite Bead
0.05 Ohm
0.1uF
Rubber Foot
C15
IS
Z4
1uF
Rubber Foot
+5VA
+5Vcc
NDB6020P
R74
1
Vout
nc0
nc1
5
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
2
6
Title
Size
B
ADP3310-5.0
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
PWR/RST
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Date
Th ursday, November 19, 1998
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
A
B
C
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
1
of
8
A
B
C
D
E
EMAFE
UART-CPLD
A[0..5]
D[0..7]
ACK
D[0..15]
EMAFE_WR#
EMAFE_RD#
EMAFE_CS#
EMAFE_ADDR
EMAFE_WR#
EMAFE_RD#
EMAFE_CS#
EMAFE_ADDR
WR#
RD#
CODEC_RST#
4
4
PROM_CS*
MS1#
PLD_CLK
RST
PLD_CLK
RST
IRQ0#
UART-CPLD
IRQ1#
MFLAG
TFS0
DT0A
DT0B
TXCLK0
RFS0
DR0A
DR0B
RXCLK0
I/O
3
A[0..23]
D[0..31]
IRQ0#
IRQ1#
IRQ2#
ACK
WR#
RD#
MS0#
MS1#
MS2#
MS3#
FLAG[0..3]
FLAG[4..9]
PWM_EVENT0
PWM_EVENT1
2
EXT_CLK
RESET#
IRQ0#
IRQ1#
IRQ2#
FLAG[0..3]
FLAG[4..9]
ACK
WR#
RD#
PWM_EVENT0
PWM_EVENT1
HBR#
HBG#
CS#
REDY#
SBTS#
SW#
CPA#
SBTS#
SW#
CPA#
DMAR1#
DMAG1#
DMAR2#
DMAG2#
Mem
Codec
CODEC_RST#
3
CHAIN_CLK
CHAIN_IN
CODEC_CS0
CODEC_CS1
CHAIN_CLK
CHAIN_IN
CODEC_CS0
CODEC_CS1
EMAFE
A[0..19]
D[0..31]
PROM_CS#
MS0#
MS1#
MS2#
MS3#
DT1A
TXCLK1
RFS1
DR1A
RXCLK1
RD#
PROM_CS#
MS3#
SDA10
RAS#
CAS#
SDWE#
DQM
SDCKE
SDCLK0
SDA10
RAS#
CAS#
SDWE#
DQM
SDCKE
SDCLK0
BR1#
BR2#
CODEC_ON#
Codec
Memory
TFS0
DT0A
DT0B
TXCLK0
RFS0
DR0A
DR0B
RXCLK0
DMAR1#
DMAG1#
DMAR2#
DMAG2#
I/O
EXT_CLK
DSP_CLK
PLD_CLK
A[0..23]
D[0..31]
A[0..23]
D[0..31]
FLAG[0..3]
FLAG[4..9]
MFLAG
HBR#
HBG#
CS#
REDY#
BR1#
BR2#
PWR/RST
TFS1
DT1A
DT1B
TXCLK1
RFS1
DR1A
DR1B
RXCLK1
DSP
2
TFS1
DT1A
DT1B
TXCLK1
RFS1
DR1A
DR1B
RXCLK1
DSP_CLK
RESET#
PLD_CLK
CODEC_ON#
Proc. Main
RESET#
RST
1
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
RST
PWR/RST
1
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
Title
Size
B
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
{Page Title}
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Date
Wed nesday, November 18, 1998
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
A
B
C
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
4
of
8
A
B
C
D
E
+5Vcc
Vcc
RI
DCD
DSR
CTS
SOUT
UART_RD#
UART_WR#
+5Vcc
0.1uF
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
20
RST
3
OUT1
OUT2
24
20
39
25
21
C53
28
+3.3Vcc
UART_EN#
16
18
19
R5
22
1M
X1
RD
WR
MR
SIN
C46
5
0.01uF
0.1uF
16
C45
C2+
V-
38
35
220 pF
0.1uF
37
36
6
0.1uF
C2-
FB6
J3
1
6
2
7
3
8
4
9
5
Ferrite Bead
11
43
42
41
40
10
T1_IN
T1_OUT
T2_IN
T2_OUT
14
TX
7
RTS#
13
CTS#
C49
FB7
12
13
11
9
U8A
R1_OUT
R1_IN
R2_OUT
R2_IN
Ferrite Bead
8
RX
C50
Female DB9
ADM232A
INTR
RD
WR
TXRDY
DDIS
RXRDY
ADS
CS2
NC0
NC1
NC2
NC3
XIN
33
1
27
26
32
2
74F06
FB8
Ferrite Bead
1
12
23
34
XOUT
Vdd
+3.3Vcc
Keep this trace away
from J3 connector
+5Vcc
Vss
3
C54
IRQ0#
44
PC16550
R6
C44
220 pF
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
BD0
BD1
BD2
BD3
BD4
BD5
BD6
BD7
+3.3Vcc
DTR
RTS
4
Ferrite Bead
C1-
220 pF
GND
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
CS0
CS1
FB5
2
220 pF
Y1
Y2
Y3
Y4
Y5
Y6
Y7
Y8
74LPT245A
Cap added to reduce
emissions since 3.3V
logic is talking to
5V part. Place cap
close to signal
lines
4
14
15
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
V+
3
+5Vcc
DIR
OE
C1+
10K
10
10
C43
C42
GND
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
RCLK
17
C41
15
U7
1
19
UART_RD#
UART_EN#
BAUDOUT
0.1uF
4
1
A0
A1
A2
0.1uF
U6
31
30
29
A0
A1
A2
D[0..7]
C40
VCC
U5
A[0..5]
R7
U8B
18.432MHz
C55
47pF
27pF
3
4
1.5K
C56
74F06
ACK
+3.3Vcc
U9
+5Vcc
15
29
9
10K
R8
PLD_CLK
RST
7
26
5
13
1
33
21
J5
+5Vcc
1
3
5
7
9
GND
SMODE
ISRVPP SCLK
ISR
SDI
5.0Vcc
NC
SDO
GND
2
4
6
8
10
UART_WR
UART_RD
UART_EN
EMAFE_WR
EMAFE_RD
EMAFE_CS
CS
WR
RD
EMAFE_ADDR
CLK
RESET
CODEC_RST
ISRen
SMODE
SCLK
SDI
SDO
+5Vcc
16
HEADER 5X2
Vccint
+3.3Vcc
1
38
6
17
28
39
Vccio
GND
GND
GND
GND
NC1
NC2
NC3
NC4
NC5
NC6
NC7
NC8
NC9
NC10
NC11
NC12
NC13
NC14
22
32
30
24
23
36
37
1
4
6
EMAFE_ADDR
B
C
NC
NC
NC
NC
GND
NC
NC
NC
NC
16
13
11
9
UART_WR#
UART_RD#
UART_EN#
C60
15
14
12
10
C61
+5Vcc
DS1013S
8
CODEC_RST#
2
3
4
19
20
25
31
34
35
40
41
42
43
44
C62
C63
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
1
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
Title
Size
B
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
I/O UAR T & CPLD
Documen t Number
65-0000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Date
Wed nesday, November 18, 1998
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
CY7C371i
A
2
3
5
7
8
EMAFE_WR#
EMAFE_RD#
EMAFE_CS#
IN1
IN2
IN3
2
Vcc
OUT1
OUT2
OUT3
0.1uF
MS1#
WR#
RD#
+5Vcc
A0
A1
A2
A3
BMS
U10
18
0.1uF
PROM_CS*
27
14
12
11
10
A0
A3
A4
A5
0.01uF
ACK
A[0..5]
0.01uF
2
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
5
of
8
A
B
D[0..31]
C
Vin
D
E
+3.3Vcc
General purpose LEDs
10K
Vin
REDY#
BR2#
RESET#
DMAG1#
3
10
+3.3Vcc
+3.3Vcc
+3.3Vcc
FLAG0
C64
1uF
100 Ohm
PUSHB UTTON1
+3.3Vcc
+
74LCX14
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
Green
Green
Green
Green
Green
Green
4
Vin
+3.3Vcc
C51
D22
D24
D25
D27
D29
D31
+
C52
SW5
1
2
3
4
1
+
R21
910
R22
910
R23
910
R24
910
FLAG4
FLAG5
FLAG6
FLAG7
FLAG8
FLAG9
FLAG1
2
C66
100 Ohm
R20
910
FLAG[4..9]
U11A
R18
PUSHB UTTON1
MS1#
MS2#
RD#
ACK
HBG#
CS#
R19
910
R17
74LCX14
+3.3Vcc
Power on LED
+3.3Vcc
R29
U11C
SW7
SBTS#
BR1#
CPA#
DMAR1#
1
2
5
100 Ohm
PUSHB UTTON1
+3.3Vcc
D7
R30
3
4
6
FLAG2
Red
10K
MS3#
WR#
HBR#
SW#
11
10K
MS0#
3
4
+3.3Vcc
FLAG[0..3]
C68
1uF
D26
D28
D30
1
2
+3.3Vcc
U4E
R13
10K
D18
D20
D21
D23
SW3
C48
1uF
D9
D11
D13
D15
D1
D3
D5
D7
D8
D10
D12
D14
D16
D17
D19
+
0.1uF
4
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
10uF
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
D0
D2
D4
D6
0.1uF
10uF
C47
J2
R12
74LCX14
+
HEADER 30X2
R31
9
R25
910
+3.3Vcc
Expansion
3
U11D
8
0.1uF
10uF
C58
+3.3Vcc
R79
U4C
3
4
5
74LCX14
3
4
100 Ohm
3
4
13
10K
+3.3Vcc
74F06
U8D
12
9
+3.3Vcc
R15
C69
8
IRQ1#
+
C70
C71
C72
+3.3Vcc
74LCX14
74F06
U11B
U8E
R26
C75
3
4
11
10
R27
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
IRQ2#
1
C67
+
74LCX14
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
74F06
Size
B
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
I/O MAFE & Switches
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Date
Th ursday, November 19, 1998
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
B
C74
+3.3Vcc
Title
A
C73
C65
+
R28
100 Ohm
PUSHB UTTON1
IRQ0#
+5Vcc
10K
1
2
1
6
2
C7
7
74LCX14
U4F
1uF
SW6
5
R14
HEADER 30X2
Expansion
7
+
R16
PUSHB UTTON1
8
U8C
0.01uF
SW4
C59
14
+3.3Vcc
R10
0.01uF
+3.3Vcc
2
74LCX14
0.1uF
100 Ohm
+5Vcc
U4D
9
PUSHB UTTON1
1
2
+3.3Vcc
14
R11
1
74LCX14
0.1uF
3
4
R9
10uF
1
2
U4A
6
+3.3Vcc
0.01uF
SW2
DMAR2#
DMAG2#
PWM_EVENT1
IRQ1#
EXT_CLK
R80
74LCX14
+3.3Vcc
A22
10K
10K
U4B
0.1uF
1uF
+
R78
0.1uF
C57
7
10K
Vin
PUSHB UTTON1
FLAG3
10
10K
PWM_EVENT0
IRQ0#
IRQ2#
C76
10K
A18
A20
A21
A23
2
100 Ohm
A1
A3
A5
A7
A8
A10
A12
A14
A16
A17
A19
+3.3Vcc
U11E
11
1uF
A9
A11
A13
A15
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
42
44
46
48
50
52
54
56
58
60
R33
3
4
10K
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
41
43
45
47
49
51
53
55
57
59
A0
A2
A4
A6
+
1
2
J4
1uF
A[0..23]
+3.3Vcc
14
SW8
Vin
10K
10K
74LCX14
+3.3Vcc
R32
C
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
3
of
8
A
B
C
D
E
+3.3Vcc
TXCLK1
11
C87
Shunt
0.1uF
0.1uF
0.1uF
0.1uF
Y2
A2
Y3
A3
Y4
A4
LINE_IN_R
CODEC_RST# 11
2
5
5
8
9
10
12
6
RESET
LINE_IN_L
SDATA_OUT
MIC1
SDATA_IN
MIC2
AD1819A
CD_R
GND Vcc
CD_L
14
39
40
41
43
44
74LCX125
DT1A
RFS1
NC0
NC1
NC2
NC3
NC4
CD_GND
VIDEO_R
VIDEO_L
R47
AUX_R
10K
0.1uF
C84
21
0.33uF
AFILT1
29
AFILT2
Shunt
JP2
Shunt
5.1K
5
3
1uF
2
SSM2135
22
1
Vref
JP1
20
U13A
1
0.33uF
18
3
2
1
SSM2135
5.1K
R38
19
C81
2
10
11
3
1
Ferrite Bead
FB11
3
C82
R39
2
Microphone/Line In
FB12
Ferrite Bead
C139
1uF
20K
PH ONEJACK STEREO SW
C140
Microphone In Circuit
17
220pF
3
J8
16
Place FB9, FB10, C?
and C? as close as
possible to J7
15
14
13
C79
R36
FB10
2
10
11
3
1
Ferrite Bead
37
1uF
1K
C80
R37
FB9
1nF
36
Ferrite Bead
J7
Line Out
2
47K
PHONEJACK STEREO S W
35
C142
C141
C77
1uF
R34
1K
C78
R35
C114
270pF
C113
270pF
C112
1uF
0.1uF
C85
R40
6
47K
1uF
C116
47nF
0.1uF
C111
+
U13B
7
1nF
C108
C110
10uF
+3.3Vcc
22pF
22pF
24.576MHz
C109
30
27
X2
Vref
Ferrite Bead
XTL_OUT
LINE_OUT_L
FILT_R
FB13
LINE_OUT_R
XTL_IN
31
3
23
CHAIN_CLK
FILT_L
2
MONO_OUT
32
48
PHONE
CHAIN_IN
CX3D
CHAIN_CLK
CS1
34
47
AUX_L
RX3D
CHAIN_IN
CS0
33
46
VREFOUT
CODEC_CS1
28
45
VREF
2
Digital and Analog
ground planes are
connect through a
single point, through
FB13, which should be
placed close to the
AD1819A.
CODEC_CS0
SJP1
20K
+5VA
24
C83
BIT_CLK
SJP2
R41
220pF
SYNC
+3.3Vcc
7
12
1K
1nF
8
AVDD2
PC_BEEP
C88
R43
38
42
AVDD1
AVSS2
25
26
AVSS1
DVSS1
4
1
DVDD1
DVDD2
100 Ohm
C86
+
A1
DVSS2
U15
7
1uF
3
1
4
10
13
R42
47K
+
10uF
C104
Place C82, C85,
R39, and R40 as
close as possible
to J8
100pF
8
10uF
C103
100pF
RXCLK1
10uF
C102
R46
1K
1nF
4
6
10uF
C101
+
DR1A
Y1
SJP3
9
1
C90
+
3
+
+
C98
+3.3Vcc
JP3
1OE
2OE
3OE
4OE
3
+5VA
C100
C99
2
47K
+5VA
R45
+5Vcc
4
100pF
0.1uF
1uF
+5Vcc
C97
U16
R44
C96
CODEC_ON#
JP3 = 1-2 if
EMAFE Interface
uses SPORT1
(AD1819 not
used)
Line In Circuit
C89
C95
0.01uF
4
100pF
Bypass Caps for
U16
C115
C117
Ana log Devices, Inc.
One Tech nology Way.
Norwood, MA 02062
C107
+5Vcc
1
1
Designed by Paragon Innovations, Inc .
email: [email protected] -tx.com
Cap added to reduce emissions
since 3.3V logic is talking to
5V part. Place cap close to
signal lines
Title
Size
B
ADSP-21065L EZ- LAB
CODEC
Documen t Number
65-000299- 02 (1125-01-001-0201)
Th ursday, November 19, 1998
Date
Drawn By Kris Stafford
Filename {Filename}
A
B
C
D
Rev
2.0
Approved
Sheet
E
2
of
8
INDEX
A
ADSP-21065L
interrupts............................................................ 26
Analog Front End
AD1819 ............................................................. 26
B
Bandpass demo dialog ........................................... 64
Baud Rate command.............................................. 61
baud rate settings ................................................... 21
Benchmarking example ......................................... 35
Blink.dxe ............................................................... 38
BMS pin
use with EPROM............................................... 40
board features .......................................................... 7
BP.dxe ................................................................... 37
Break Points/Single Step ....................................... 22
C
Check/Initialization ............................................... 20
Code listings
CPLD file........................................................... 67
CODEC
as analog front end............................................. 26
buffer initialization ............................................ 26
DMA.................................................................. 18
hardware specifications ..................................... 39
slot 16 mode ...................................................... 26
TDM schemes.................................................... 19
Codec command .................................................... 62
Codec Sample Rate dialog..................................... 62
CODEC Transmissions
data packets ....................................................... 27
Comm Port command ............................................ 62
Commands
Baud Rate .......................................................... 61
Codec................................................................. 62
Comm Port......................................................... 62
Demo menu ....................................................... 63
Test Communications ........................................ 61
Computer resources for the EZ-LAB board .......... 12
Contents of package .............................................. 11
CPLD Equations.................................................... 66
Customer support..................................................... 8
starting ............................................................... 32
Default Settings on the EZ-LAB ........................... 15
Demo menu commands ......................................... 63
Demo programs
overview ............................................................ 32
Demonstration programs
bandpass filter.................................................... 37
Blink .................................................................. 38
FFT .................................................................... 37
Peter Gunn theme .............................................. 37
Pluck.................................................................. 37
Primes ................................................................ 38
TT ...................................................................... 38
Demonstration Programs ....................................... 37
Dialogs
Bandpass demo.................................................. 64
Codec Sample Rate............................................ 62
FFT demo .......................................................... 63
DMA transfers ....................................................... 22
E
Electrostatic Discharge .......................................... 11
EMAFE Issues....................................................... 48
EMAFE Programming........................................... 31
EPROM operation ................................................. 46
EPROM tests ......................................................... 20
Error codes
POST routine ..................................................... 19
ESD ....................................................................... 11
European power specifications.............................. 42
EZ-KIT LITE board layout ................................... 40
EZ-LAB default settings........................................ 15
F
features .................................................................... 7
FFT demo dialog ................................................... 63
FFT.dxe ................................................................. 37
FLAG I/O pins....................................................... 16
FLAG0-3 ........................................................... 16
FLAG12............................................................. 17
FLAG4-10 ......................................................... 17
FLAG11................................................................. 17
G
Gunn.dxe ............................................................... 37
D
H
data packets ........................................................... 22
using in CODEC transmissions ......................... 27
Debugger
Hardware devices
CODEC ............................................................. 46
CPLD equations................................................. 66
82
EMAFE ............................................................. 43
EPROM ............................................................. 40
power supplies ................................................... 41
SDRAM............................................................. 48
UART ................................................................ 47
Hardware installation............................................. 13
I
IMASK register ..................................................... 17
Installing EZ-KIT LITE hardware......................... 13
Installing EZ-KIT LITE software.......................... 14
Interrupts
IRQ0 .................................................................. 17
IRQ1 .................................................................. 17
M
memory
SDRAM............................................................. 31
Memory checks ..................................................... 20
Memory map ......................................................... 23
Memory select lines.....................................See MSx
MODE2 register .................................................... 16
monitor program components................................ 21
Monitor program components ............................... 21
command processing ......................................... 21
halt loop ............................................................. 21
P
Package contents ................................................... 11
PC Configuration................................................... 12
Pluck.dxe ............................................................... 37
POST errors........................................................... 19
POST routines ....................................................... 19
Power On Self Test................................................ 16
Power Supplies ...................................................... 41
Power supply specifications
European............................................................ 42
Power-on reset....................................................... 19
Primes.dxe ............................................................. 38
Programming the EMAFE..................................... 31
R
Registers
IMASK .............................................................. 17
MODE1 ............................................................. 17
MODE2 ............................................................. 17
Resetting the board ................................................ 19
S
SDRAM................................................................. 48
SDRAM data mask.................................... See DQM
SDRAM interface
data transfer rate ................................................ 48
features .............................................................. 48
pin definitions............... See SDRAM interface pin
definitions
SDRAM memory................................................... 23
SDRAM pins . See SDRAM interface pin definitions
Selecting a target ................................................... 32
Serial communication ............................................ 19
SLOT-16 mode...................................................... 26
Software installation .............................................. 14
SPORTs ................................................................. 18
Standard Operation................................................ 16
Starting the debugger............................................. 32
Static discharge...................................................... 11
Supply current ....................................................... 42
Supply voltage ....................................................... 42
synchronous serial ports ........................................ 19
T
Target selection ..................................................... 32
Technical support .................................................... 8
Test Communications command ........................... 61
Timing changes ..................................................... 50
Transfers
CODEC ............................................................. 21
Tt.dxe..................................................................... 38
U
UART aliasing....................................................... 48
UART Check/Initialization
Internal Loop Back ............................................ 20
register write...................................................... 20
transmitted loop back......................................... 20
UART ISR segment............................................... 21
UART specifications ............................................. 47
V
VisualDSP .............................................ii, 12, 13, 14
Voltage
supply ................................................................ 42
83
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