AN70707 EZ-USB FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist.pdf

AN70707
EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Author: Hussein Osman
Associated Project: No
Associated Part Family: CYUSB3014, CYUSB3035
Software Version: N/A
Related Application Notes: For a complete list, click here.
To get the latest version of this application note, or the associated project file, please
visit http://www.cypress.com/go/AN70707.
AN70707 discusses recommended practices for EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ hardware design and the critical items that
a developer must consider. The Cypress EZ-USB FX3 is the next generation USB 3.0 peripheral controller. With its
highly integrated and flexible features, developers can add USB 3.0 functionality to any system. All recommendations
apply to FX3 and FX3S, unless specifically mentioned otherwise. For complete list of USB SuperSpeed Code
Examples, visit http://www.cypress.com/101781.
Contents
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1
Introduction ............................................................... 1
Related Resources ................................................... 2
2.1
EZ-USB FX3 Software Development Kit .......... 3
2.2
GPIF™ II Designer .......................................... 3
Power System .......................................................... 4
3.1
Overview .......................................................... 4
Power Modes............................................................ 5
4.1
Device Supply Decoupling ............................... 6
4.2
Inrush Current and Power Supply Design ........ 6
Clocking .................................................................... 9
5.1
Crystal.............................................................. 9
5.2
Watchdog Timer ............................................ 12
GPIF II Interface ..................................................... 12
USB ........................................................................ 12
Low-Performance Peripherals (LPP) ...................... 12
8.1
I2C Interface ................................................... 12
8.2
JTAG.............................................................. 13
8.3
I2S .................................................................. 13
8.4
SPI and UART ............................................... 13
8.5
Selection of SPI Flash ................................... 14
Booting ................................................................... 14
EMI and ESD Considerations ................................. 15
FX3 Device Package Dimensions .......................... 16
Electrical Design Consideration.............................. 16
12.1
USB 3.0 SuperSpeed Design Guidelines ...... 16
13 FX3S Hardware Design Considerations ................. 26
13.1
S-Port Interface ............................................. 26
14
Schematics and Layout Review Checklist.......... 29
15 Summary ................................................................ 30
16 References ............................................................. 30
A
Appendix A – PCB Layout Tips .............................. 31
Document History............................................................ 32
Worldwide Sales and Design Support ............................. 34
Products .......................................................................... 34
PSoC® Solutions ............................................................. 34
Cypress Developer Community....................................... 34
Technical Support ........................................................... 34
9
10
11
12
Introduction
Cypress’s EZ-USB® FX3™ is the next-generation USB 3.0 peripheral controller, providing integrated and flexible
features. FX3 has a fully-configurable, parallel, general programmable interface called GPIF II, which can connect to
any processor, ASIC, or FPGA. It provides easy and glueless connectivity to popular interfaces, such as
asynchronous SRAM, asynchronous and synchronous address data multiplexed interfaces, and parallel ATA. FX3
has an embedded 32-bit ARM926EJ-S microprocessor for powerful data processing and for building custom
applications. It implements an architecture that enables 375-MBps data transfer from GPIF II to the USB interface.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
An integrated USB 2.0 OTG controller enables applications in which FX3 may serve dual roles; for example, FX3 may
function as an OTG Host to MSC as well as HID-class devices. FX3 contains 512 KB or 256 KB of on-chip SRAM for
code and data. FX3 also provides interfaces to connect to serial peripherals such as UART, SPI, I2C, and I2S. FX3
comes with application development tools. The software development kit comes with application examples for
accelerating time to market.
In addition to these features, FX3S has an integrated storage controller and can support up to two independent mass
storage devices. It can support SD 3.0 and eMMC 4.41 memory cards. It can also support SDIO on these ports.
Feature differences between FX3 and FX3S are listed in Table 1.
You should follow several guidelines for trace width, stack up, and other layout considerations to make sure the
system will perform as expected.
A reference schematic for the SuperSpeed Explorer Kit is available at CYUSB3KIT-003 EZ-USB® FX3™ SuperSpeed
Explorer Kit. A reference schematic for the EZ-USB FX3 DVK is available at CYUSB3KIT-001 EZ-USB® FX3™.
Contact [email protected] for the EZ-USB FX3S DVK schematics.
Table 1. Feature Differences between FX3 and FX3S
Feature
EZ-USB FX3
EZ-USB FX3S
GPIF
8/16/32-bit
8/16-bit
Storage ports
No
1 or 2 ports (SD3.0, eMMC4.41, SDIO3.0)
USB 3.0, USB2.0 Device
Yes
Yes
HS-OTG
Yes
Yes
CPU
ARM9, 200 MHz
ARM9, 200 MHz
Embedded SRAM
256KB/512KB
256KB/512KB
Serial Interfaces*
I2C, SPI, I2S, UART
I2C, SPI, I2S, UART
Boot Options
I2C, SPI, USB, GPIF-based
All FX3 boot options + eMMC-based boot options
Package
121-pin BGA, 10x10mm
121-pin BGA, 10x10mm
*All serial interfaces might not be available under all configuration options. Refer to the pin description section in the
datasheet for details.
Note: If you are designing hardware using EZ-USB® CX3, please refer KBA91295 for frequently asked questions on
CX3 hardware and refer AN90369 for the guidelines on routing MIPI CSI-2 Signals.
2
Related Resources
Cypress provides a wealth of data at www.cypress.com to help you to select the right FX3 device for your design, and
to help you to quickly and effectively integrate the device into your design. For a comprehensive list of resources, see
the knowledge base article KBA87889, How to design with FX3/FX3S.



Overview: USB Portfolio, USB Roadmap
USB 3.0 Product Selectors: FX3, FX3S, CX3, HX3, West Bridge Benicia
Application notes: Cypress offers a large number of USB application notes covering a broad range of topics, from
basic to advanced level. Recommended application notes for getting started with FX3 are:





AN75705 - Getting Started with EZ-USB FX3
AN76405 - EZ-USB FX3 Boot Options
AN70707 - EZ-USB FX3/FX3S Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
AN65974 - Designing with the EZ-USB FX3 Slave FIFO Interface
AN75779 - How to Implement an Image Sensor Interface with EZ-USB FX3 in a USB Video Class (UVC)
Framework
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist









2.1
AN73609 - EZ-USB FX2LP/ FX3 Developing Bulk-Loop Example on Linux
AN77960 - Introduction to EZ-USB FX3 High-Speed USB Host Controller
AN76348 - Differences in Implementation of EZ-USB FX2LP and EZ-USB FX3 Applications
AN89661 - USB RAID 1 Disk Design Using EZ-USB FX3S
AN90369 - How to Interface a MIPI CSI-2 Image Sensor With EZ-USB® CX3
USB Hi-Speed
USB Full-Speed
USB SuperSpeed
EZ-USB FX3 Technical Reference Manual
Development Kits:



AN68829 - Slave FIFO Interface for EZ-USB FX3: 5-Bit Address Mode
Technical Reference Manual (TRM):


AN84868 - Configuring an FPGA over USB Using Cypress EZ-USB FX3
Code Examples:




AN86947 - Optimizing USB 3.0 Throughput with EZ-USB FX3
CYUSB3KIT-003, EZ-USB FX3 SuperSpeed Explorer Kit
CYUSB3KIT-001, EZ-USB FX3 Development Kit
Models: IBIS
EZ-USB FX3 Software Development Kit
Cypress delivers the complete software and firmware stack for FX3, in order to easily integrate SuperSpeed USB into
any embedded application. The Software Development Kit (SDK) comes with tools, drivers and application examples,
which help accelerate application development.
2.2
GPIF™ II Designer
The GPIF II Designer is a graphical software that allows designers to configure the GPIF II interface of the EZ-USB
FX3 USB 3.0 Device Controller.
The tool allows users the ability to select from one of five Cypress supplied interfaces, or choose to create their own
GPIF II interface from scratch. Cypress has supplied industry standard interfaces such as Asynchronous and
Synchronous Slave FIFO, Asynchronous and Synchronous SRAM, and Asynchronous SRAM. Designers who
already have one of these pre-defined interfaces in their system can simply select the interface of choice, choose
from a set of standard parameters such as bus width (x8, 16, x32) endianess, clock settings, and compile the
interface. The tool has a streamlined three step GPIF interface development process for users who need a
customized interface. Users are able to first select their pin configuration and standard parameters. Secondly, they
can design a virtual state machine using configurable actions. Finally, users can view output timing to verify that it
matches the expected timing. Once the three step process is complete, the interface can be compiled and integrated
with FX3.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
3
Power System
3.1
Overview
The EZ-USB FX3 device power domains are shown in Figure 1. A description and the voltage settings on each of
these domains are provided in Table 2.
Figure 1. EZ-USB FX3 Power Domains Diagram
V1p2
VDD
L9
VIO1
0.01uF
0.1uF
0.01uF
CYUSB301x
B1
VIO4
VIO4
0.1uF
0.1uF
2.2uF
A2
VIO3
0.1uF
AVDD
MPZ2012S601A
U3RXVDDQ
B5
V1p2
C11
VIO5
0.1uF
VIO5
B6
CVDDQ
U3TXVDDQ
0.01uF
0.1uF
MPZ2012S601A
22uF
V1p2
VIO2
E3
VIO3
A7
0.01uF
F1
VIO2
0.1uF
0.01uF
0.1uF
0.01uF
0.1uF
0.1uF
0.01uF
0.1uF
0.01uF
22uF
0.1uF
J11
B10
0.1uF
0.1uF
L7
E9
F11
L5
V1p2
VIO1
H11
0.01uF
H1
C3
MPZ2012S601A
0.01uF
0.1uF
CVDDQ
VSS
AVSS
U3VSS
0.1uF
22uF
MPZ2012S601A
Table 2. EZ-USB FX3 Power Domains Description
Parameter
Description
Min
Typical
Max
Unit
VDD
Core voltage supply
1.15
1.2
1.25
V
AVDD
Analog voltage supply
1.15
1.2
1.25
V
VIO1
GPIF II I/O power domain
1.7
1.8, 2.5 and 3.3
3.6
V
VIO2
IO2 power domain
1.7
1.8, 2.5 and 3.3
3.6
V
VIO3
IO3 power domain
1.7
1.8, 2.5 and 3.3
3.6
V
1.7
1.8, 2.5 and 3.3
3.6
V
VIO4
2
UART/SPI/I S power domain
2
VIO5
I C and JTAG supply domain
1.15
1.2, 1.8, 2.5 and 3.3
3.6
V
VBATT
USB voltage supply
3.2
3.7
6
V
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
4
Parameter
Description
Min
Typical
Max
Unit
VBUS
USB voltage supply
4.0
5
6
V
CVDDQ
Clock voltage supply
1.7
1.8, 3.3
3.6
V
U3TXVDDQ
USB3.0 1.2V supply
1.15
1.2
1.25
V
U3RXVDDQ
USB3.0 1.2V supply
1.15
1.2
1.25
V
Power Modes
EZ-USB FX3 supports the following power modes:
Normal mode: This is the full-functional operating mode. In this mode the internal CPU clock and the internal PLLs
are enabled.

The I/O power supplies VIO2, VIO3, VIO4, and VIO5 may be turned off when the corresponding interface is not
in use. VIO1 may not be turned off at any time if the GPIF II interface is used in the application.

The USB I/O requires a 3.3-V regulated power supply. This supply is internally driven from either the VBUS or
VBATT external supplies. VBATT/VBUS can be turned OFF if USB is not used. If USB port is used one or both
supplies must be present.

VBATT can be connected to the system battery or a stable 3.2 V–6 V voltage rail from the PMIC. If VBUS and
VBATT are both present and in their specified ranges, VBUS becomes the primary supply to the USB I/O unless
there is a software/firmware override. If VBUS is less than 4.1 V then FX3 behaves as if no VBUS is connected
to it. If this happens when the FX3 is powered then FX3 does not enumerate at all. If this happens somewhere
during the operation of FX3 then the FX3 firmware will turn off the USB PHY and disconnect from the host.

EZ-USB FX3 can withstand up to 6 V on the VBUS pin; in applications where this supply can see higher
voltages, it is necessary to have an external overvoltage protection (OVP) device to protect the EZ-USB FX3
device. One example of such an application is a Battery Charging application, Battery Charging v1.2 Spec. In this
application, the charger (such as a wall/dedicated charger) can supply up to 9 V to the VBUS.

VBUS pin can be connected to an in-system supply rail that is switched on/off depending on VBUS detect by
another processor. A typical scenario is a PMIC that detects VBUS and switches ON a regulated 3.3-V supply to
EZ-USB FX3 as a result. In such a case, the system must use the software override to use VBATT as the
primary supply.

EZ-USB FX3 does not contain a charge pump and therefore, cannot source the VBUS supply when used as an
OTG-A device. When EZ-USB FX3 is used in an OTG-A mode, an external charge pump, either standalone or
integrated in a PMIC, must be used to power VBUS.
Suspend mode with USB 3.0 PHY enabled (L1): Power supply for the wakeup source and core power must be
retained. All other power domains can be turned off/on individually.
Suspend mode with USB 3.0 PHY disabled (L2): Power supply for the wakeup source and core power must be
retained. All other power domains can be turned off/on individually.
Standby mode (L3): Power supply for the wakeup source and core power must be retained. All other power domains
can be turned off/on individually.
Core power down mode (L4): Core power is turned off. All other power domains can be turned off/on individually.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
4.1
Device Supply Decoupling
Power supply decoupling is critical in ensuring that system noise does not propagate into the device through the
power supply. Improper decoupling can lead to jittery signaling, especially on the USB bus, which results in higher
CRC error rate and more retries. Decoupling capacitors should be ceramic type of a stable dielectric. It is important to
have the decoupling caps as close to the power pins as possible and short trace runs for the power and ground
connections on the FX3 device to solid power and ground planes. Figure 2 shows a sample of decoupling caps
placement.
Figure 2. Decoupling Caps Placement
Decoupling
Caps placed
close to the
device
The specific recommendation for the ceramic capacitor nearest to each FX3 power pin is given in Table 3.
Table 3. Power Domain Decoupling Requirements
Power Domain (Pin Numbers)
Capacitors for group
VDD (B10, J11)
VDD (H1, L7, F11, L5)
0.01 µF and 0.1 µF
22 µF
VDD (C3, E9)
0.1 µF
0.01 µF
AVDD (A7)
2.2 µF
0.1 µF
U3RXVDDQ (A2)
22 µF
0.1 µF
U3TXVDDQ (B5)
22 µF
0.1 µF
CVDDQ (B6)
VIO1 (L9, H11)
4.2
Capacitors per pin
0.01 µF and 0.1 µF
0.01 µF
0.1 µF
VIO2 (F1)
0.01 µF and 0.1 µF
VIO3 (E3)
0.01 µF and 0.1 µF
VIO4 (B1)
0.01 µF and 0.1 µF
VIO5 (C11)
0.01 µF and 0.1 µF
VBUS (E11)
0.1 µF
Inrush Current and Power Supply Design
When the USB3.0 SuperSpeed PHY is enabled for the first time, or a reset event; an initial inrush current is expected
on the 1.2 V U3RXVDDQ and U3TXVDDQ supplies for ~10 µs. The magnitude of this current can be as high as
800 mA. In order that this inrush current does not cause the common 1.2 V supply to droop to unacceptable levels,
care must be taken in the design of the power supply network for these supplies.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
If the same 1.2 V supply is also used for the VDD core supply, care must be taken to insure that the level on this
supply does not fall too low, as this has the potential to trip the on-chip power-on reset (POR) circuit that will reset the
entire chip. The POR circuit can fire if the 1.2-V core VDD voltage falls down to less than 0.83V for more than 200 ns.
The 1.2-V power network must be designed such that the VDD does not drop below 0.83V when an inrush event
occurs. Proper combination of decoupling capacitors (as specified in the datasheet), inductor chokes and regulator
output impedance are required to make this possible.
The following example waveforms show the inrush current (Figure 4) and resultant drop in VDD levels (Figure 5)
when the current spike occurs. The results were obtained from a non-optimized power supply design using
TPS76801QDpower regulator, 2.2-µF decoupling caps, and chokes as shown in Figure 3.
Figure 3. Non-Optimized Power Supply Design
Regulator
TPS76801QD
Lchoke
U3RXVDDQ
0.1µF
2.2µF
Lchoke
V1P2
U3TXVDDQ
0.1µF
2.2µF
Lchoke
VDD
0.1µF
2.2µF
FX3
Figure 4. Inrush Current (80 mV / 0.1 Ω = 800 mA)
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Figure 5. 1.2-V Power Domain Voltage Drop (200 mV)
In contrast, an optimized power design shown in Figure 6 below designed using the same regulator (TPS76801QD),
with the modification of using a 22-µF decoupling capacitor and removing the choke from VDD supply, shows a
reduction in the inrush (Figure 7) and an improvement in the power supply drop (Figure 8).
Figure 6. Optimized Power Supply Design
Regulator
TPS76801QD
Lchoke
U3RXVDDQ
0.1µF
22µF
Lchoke
V1P2
U3TXVDDQ
0.1µF
22µF
VDD
0.1µF
22µF
FX3
Figure 7. Inrush Current (320 mA)
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Figure 8. 1.2-V Power Domain Voltage Drop (112 mV)
Customers can choose any regulator with similar specifications.
It is always a good practice to isolate different power supplies from each other. If you are shorting IO power supplies
(VIO1-5) to CVDDQ, it is always recommended to isolate CVDDQ using a choke (as shown in Figure 1). This will help
in reducing the PHY errors. Also, operating VIO1 at lower voltages (1.8 V) helps in reducing the PHY errors.
5
Clocking
The EZ-USB FX3 device can use:
1)
2)
5.1
either a 19.2-MHz crystal or
any of 19.2 MHz, 26 MHz 38.4 MHz, or 52 MHz clock as the clocking source.
Crystal
Figure 9 shows the connection of the crystal.
Figure 9. Crystal Circuit
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
The 19.2-MHz crystal requirements are listed in Table 4.
Table 4. Crystal Requirements
Parameter
Specification
Unit
±100
ppm
–40 to 85
°F
Tolerance
Temp Range
Use
Drive level
mW
Equation 1
The power dissipation of the crystal depends on:
1)
2)
3)
the drive level of the XTALOUT pin (for FX3, this is 1.32 V),
the desired frequency (19.2 MHz), and
the equivalent resistance of the crystal.
Equation 1. Power dissipation of the crystal
 2
 =  2  = ( )  = 2[ (0 +  )  ]2 
||
Where:
f is the crystal frequency,
C0 is the shunt capacitance of the crystal obtained from the crystal datasheet
CL is the load capacitance, for CL calculation, refer to the next section
R is the crystal ESR obtained from the data sheet of the crystal
Vx is the maximum voltage on XTALOUT pin – 1.32 V
Use of a crystal with a drive level less than the crystal’s power dissipation may result in accelerated aging or even
burnout of the crystal.
Examples of compatible crystals are shown in Table 5. Note that only the NX3225SA was characterized with the
EZ-USB FX3, and the rest for the crystals are provided as examples using Equation 1.
Table 5. Crystal Selection
Device
Max R1 (Ω)
From Datasheet
CL Eqv (pF)
C0 (pF)
Estimate
Drive Level Using
Equation 1 (uW)
Max Drive Level
(Spec) uW
Epson FA-20H
80
11
nil
123
200
NX2520SA
60
12
nil
110
200
NX3225SA
80
9
1.26
107
200
Note: Do not connect any series resistor to the XTALOUT and XTALIN pins of the crystal. Placing a series resistor
will add resistance to the crystal ESR, resulting in increased crystal power dissipation and startup time.
5.1.1
C r y s t a l E f f e c t i ve L o a d C a p a c i t o r C a l c u l a t i o n
Load capacitance CL plays a critical role in providing an accurate clock source to FX3. The capacitors C1 and C2 (as
shown in Figure 9) must be chosen carefully based on the load capacitance value of the crystal.
The load capacitance is calculated using the following equation:
Equation 2. Load capacitance of a crystal
 =
1 ∗ 2
+ 
1 + 2
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
CS is the stray capacitance of XTALOUT and XTALIN traces on the PCB. Usually the value of CS is around 2-5 pF as
long as you follow good layout practice and keep the trace from the crystal to the pins on the FX3 as short as
possible.
For the crystal used in FX3 development kit, CL = 9 pF. PCB CS = 3 pF. From Equation 2, C1 = C2 = 12 pF.
5.1.2
Clock
Clock inputs to EZ-USB FX3 must meet the phase noise and jitter requirements specified in the following table.
Table 6. Clock Requirements
Specification
Parameter
Description
Units
Min
Max
100 Hz Offset
–
–75
dB
1 kHz Offset
–
–104
dB
10 kHz Offset.
–
–120
dB
100 kHz Offset
–
–128
dB
1 MHz Offset
–
–130
dB
Maximum
frequency
deviation
–
150
ppm
Duty cycle
30
70
%
Overshoot
–
3
%
Undershoot
–
–3
%
Rise time/fall
time
–
3
ns
Phase noise
Based on the clocking option that is used, the frequency select, FSLC[2:0], lines can be tied to power, through a
weak pull-up resistor, or to ground.
Table 7 shows the values of FSLC[2:0] for the different clocking options.
ASEMB-19.200MHZ-LY-T is a recommended Clock oscillator part.
Table 7. Frequency Select Configuration
Crystal/Clock
Frequency
FSLC[2]
FSLC[1]
FSLC[0]
0
0
0
19.2 MHz crystal
1
0
0
19.2 MHz input clock
1
0
1
26 MHz input clock
1
1
0
38.4 MHz input clock
1
1
1
52 MHz input clock
CVDDQ supply is the supply associated with the clock input. It should be set to the same voltage level as the external
clock input (if any).
If only external clock input is used, the XTALIN and XTALOUT pins can be left unconnected. If only crystal clocking is
used, the CLKIN pin can be left unconnected.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
5.2
Watchdog Timer
A 32.768-kHz clock input can be used for the watchdog timer operation during Standby mode. This may be optionally
supplied by an external source.
Table 8. Wachdog Timer Requirements
6
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Duty Cycle
40
60
%
Frequency Deviation
–
±200
ppm
GPIF II Interface
EZ-USB FX3 offers a high-performance general programmable interface, GPIF II. This interface enables functionality
similar to but more advanced than FX2LP’s GPIF and Slave FIFO interfaces. Refer to the application note AN75779 –
Interfacing an Image Sensor to EZ-USB® FX3™ in a USB video class (UVC) Framework , for more details on the
GPIF interface.
Following are some general design guidelines for the EZ-USB FX3’s GPIF II interface.

The maximum frequency of the GPIF II interface is 100 MHz. It is recommended that all lines on the GPIF II bus
could be length matched within 500 mils. The 500 mil requirements ensures that the delay between the signals
lie within 1% of the total period considering the typical propagation delays for stripline and microstrip traces in
PCBs (150 to 200 ps/inch). We also recommend using 22-Ω series termination resistors to avoid reflection on
these lines.

If the GPIF lines are to be routed for more than 5 inches or routed through a medium that can cause impedance
mismatch, we recommend doing signal integrity simulation using the EZ-USB FX3 IBIS model, and come up with
a termination.


GPIO[16] (PCLK) should be used as the GPIF II clock signal in all synchronous interfaces.

INT# signal cannot be used as a GPIO. This pin can be either left floating or pulled up to VIO1 if it is not used.
GPIO[32:30] (PMODE[2:0]) signals should be configured appropriately at FX3 boot-up. After boot-up, these
signals can be used as GPIOs.
Note: SPI interface lines are not available when GPIF II is configured in 32-bit mode. However it is still possible to
use SPI interface for booting and then configure GPIF II to 32-bit mode.
7
USB
OTG_ID pin can be left unconnected if FX3 is used as a USB device only. This pin must be connected to ground if
you are using FX3 as a dual role device.
8
Low-Performance Peripherals (LPP)
8.1
I2C Interface
EZ-USB FX3 has an I2C interface compatible with the I2C Bus Specification Revision 3. EZ-USB FX3’s I2C interface
is capable of operating as I2C Master only. For example, EZ-USB FX3 may boot from an EEPROM connected to the
I2C interface, as a selectable boot option. EZ-USB FX3’s I2C Master Controller also supports the multi-master mode
functionality.
The power supply for the I2C interface is VIO5, which is a separate power domain from the other serial peripherals.
This is to allow the I2C interface the flexibility to operate at a different voltage than the other serial interfaces.
The bus frequencies supported by the I2C controller are 100 kHz, 400 kHz, and 1 MHz. When VIO5 is 1.2V, the
maximum operating frequency supported is 100 kHz. When VIO5 is 1.8 V, 2.5 V, or 3.3 V; the operating frequencies
supported are 400 kHz and 1 MHz.
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If an external EEPROM is used on the I2C bus for firmware image booting, 2-kΩ pull-up resistors should be placed on
the SCL and SDA lines for proper operation as shown in Figure 10.
Figure 10. I2C Configuration
Note: Address pins A0, A1 and A2 of the EEPROM should be connected per the recommendations in the EEPROM
datasheet.
8.2
JTAG
EZ-USB FX3 has a JTAG interface to provide a standard five-pin interface for connecting to a JTAG debugger. This
feature enables the debugging of the firmware through the CPU core’s on-chip debug circuitry.
There is no need for external pull up/down on the JTAG signals as the JTAG signals TDI, TMC, TRST# have fixed
50 kΩ internal pull-ups and the TCK signal has a fixed 10 kΩ pull-down resistor.
Note that the FX3/FX3S does not support boundary scan. The JTAG interface available in these devices is for
debugging purpose only.
8.3
I2S
EZ-USB FX3 has an I2S port to support external audio codec devices. EZ-USB FX3 functions as an I2S master
(transmitter only). EZ-USB FX3 can generate the system clock as an output on the I2S_MCLK line or accept an
external system clock input on the same line.
8.4
SPI and UART
EZ-USB FX3 supports an SPI master interface on the serial peripherals port. The SPI GPIOs are shared with the
UART GPIOs. There should be no pull-up or pull-down on MOSI and MISO signals.
Figure 11 shows the correct SPI signal connection using the M25P40-VMN6TPB SPI device.
Figure 11. SPI Configuration
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8.5
Selection of SPI Flash
Use the following guidelines while selecting the SPI flash.



Flash size: 1 Kbit to 32 Mbit in size are supported.
Voltage: 1.7 V–3.6 V are supported.
Command set: SPI flash should support the following commands to support FX3 boot.





Read data: 03h with 3 byte addressing
Read Status register: 05h
Write Enable: 06h
Write data (Page Program): 02h
Sector Erase: D8h
An SPI flash can be used for FX3 boot as long as the read commands match. If there are any differences in the write
commands, then programming of that SPI flash will not be successful with the default Cypress provided programmer
utility (USB Control Center Utility). It requires rebuilding the firmware binary file used by the utility with the modified
write commands for successful programming of the SPI flash. Hence Cypress recommends using a SPI flash
compatible with the above read/write command set.
9
Booting
EZ-USB FX3 can be either the main processor in a system or a co-processor to another main processor. The booting
option you use depends on the specific system implementation. PMODE[2:0] configures the boot option and can be
connected directly to the main processor or hardwired on the board depending on the booting option that will be used.
The following table shows the levels of the PMODE[2:0] signals required for the different booting options.
Table 9. PMODE Signals Setting
PMODE[2:0]
Boot from
Z00
Sync ADMUX (16-bit)
Z01
Async ADMUX (16-bit)
Z11
USB boot
Z0Z
Async SRAM (16-bit)
Z1Z
I2C, on failure, USB boot is enabled
1ZZ
I2C only
0Z1
SPI, on failure, USB boot is enabled
000*
S0-port (eMMC). On failure, USB boot is enabled – FX3S only
100*
S0-port (eMMC) – FX3S only
Note: Z = HI-Z, Open drain, No connect, *Applies to FX3S only
We recommend adding pull-up and pull-down options (using 10 KΩ) on the PMODE[2:0] signals and load the
combination needed for preferred booting option. This will give the flexibility to debug the system during early
development.
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10
EMI and ESD Considerations
You must consider EMI and ESD on a case-by-case basis relative to the product enclosure, deployment environment,
and regulatory statutes. This application note does not give specific recommendations regarding EMI,EZ-USB FX3
meets EMI requirements outlined by FCC 15B (USA) and EN55022 (Europe) for consumer electronics. EZ-USB FX3
can tolerate reasonable EMI, which is conducted by the aggressor, outlined by these specifications and continue to
function as expected. However this application note gives general EMI and ESD considerations. Refer to
Appendix A – PCB Layout Tips for general information on PCB layout techniques. You can also refer ‘Appendix A:
PCB Layout Tips of AN61290 - PSoC® 3 and PSoC 5 Hardware Design Considerations’, which has a list of layout
tips to improve EMI/EMC.
EZ-USB FX3 has built-in ESD protection on the D+, D-, and GND pins on the USB interface. The ESD protection
levels provided on these ports are:

±2.2-kV human body model (HBM) based on ±6-kV Contact Discharge and ±8-kV Air Gap Discharge based on
IEC61000-4-2 level 3A

±8-kV Contact Discharge and ±15-kV Air Gap Discharge based on IEC61000-4-2 level 4C.
This protection ensures the device will continue to function after ESD events up to the levels stated.
The SSRX+, SSRX-, SSTX+, SSTX- pins have only up to ±2.2-kV human body model (HBM) internal ESD protection.
You can include additional protection to these pins by using high performance, low capacitance external ESD devices
(SP3010-04UTG), as shown in Figure 12. To prevent an effect on the performance of this bus, the added capacitance
should not exceed 0.5 pF.
Figure 12. Low Capacitance External USB SuperSpeed (SS) ESD Protection
In terms of EMI, all signal and clock traces emit electromagnetic (EM) radiation when they switch from one level to
another. To meet the various standards in different countries, these emissions must be minimized. You can use
several techniques to lower EM emissions:




Consider putting the power and ground planes as the outside layers with signal layers underneath.
Always have solid copper fills beneath integrated circuits and clocks.
Ensure an adequate ground return path for all signals.
Minimize the trace length of high speed, high current traces.
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11
FX3 Device Package Dimensions
EZ-USB FX3 is packaged on a 10 x 10 mm, 0.8 mm pitch ball grid array (BGA). The recommended pad size is
0.241 mm (9.5 mil).
Figure 13. EZ-USB FX3 Package Dimension
12
Electrical Design Consideration
USB 3.0 protocol enhances USB speed up to 5 Gbps. By including SuperSpeed (SS) lines along with High Speed
(HS) lines, it is backward compatible with the USB 2.0 specification. Both buses require a greater level of attention to
electrical design. Careful attention to component selection, supply decoupling, signal line impedance, and noise are
required when designing for SuperSpeed USB. These physical issues are mostly affected by the PCB design. Refer
to Appendix A – PCB Layout Tips for general information on PCB layout techniques.
12.1
USB 3.0 SuperSpeed Design Guidelines
EZ-USB FX3 has SuperSpeed USB lines and High-Speed USB lines. Use the following best practices when
designing with these busses:

Minimize the trace length of USB lines as much as possible (<3 inches). These should be routed first to make
sure certain recommendations on this list are achievable. Long traces affect the transmitter quality and introduce
intersymbol interference (ISI) on the receive side.

The polarity can be swapped on the USB 3.0 differential pairs. Polarity detection is done automatically by the
USB 3.0 PHY during link training, as define in the USB3.0 specification section 6.4.2, and does not require any
additional changes to device Firmware. Given the different USB connectors pin-out, the polarity inversion
mechanism can be utilized to ensure that USB traces do not cross each other.

Tie the R_USB2 pin to ground through a 1% 6.04-kΩ precision resistor. R_USB3 pin should be tied to ground
through a 1% 200-Ω precision resistor.
Figure 14. USB2 and USB3 Reference Resistors
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist

USB 3.0 traces require additional AC coupling capacitors (0.1 µF) placed on the SS_TX lines. Place these
capacitors symmetrically and close to the EZ-USB FX3 device.
Figure 15. SuperSpeed TX Line Decoupling Caps

At least one immediate plane underneath these AC coupling capacitors should have a cut out in the shape of
these capacitors to avoid extra capacitance on the lines because of the capacitor pads. Figure 16 shows the
proper layout of the decoupling caps.
Figure 16. SuperSpeed TX decoupling Caps Layout
Plane cut out under caps
Recommended
Not recommended


Keep the USB signal line impedance at 90 Ω differential (±7%).


Keep the crystal trace as short as possible. Place the crystal within 2 cm from FX3.






Place the capacitor used in the RC reset circuitry as close as possible to the reset pin of FX3.
Fill the space between the two differential pairs with ground. Maintain a minimum of 2W space between the
ground and the differential pairs, where W = trace width.
Do not place any Hi-Speed signal trace near to the crystal. If needed due to space constraints, fill the space with
ground.
Use split planes on the powerlayer for different power domains.
Keep the power traces away from Hi-Speed data and clock lines.
Power trace widths should be ≥25 mils to reduce inductance.
Keep power traces as short as possible. Use larger vias (at least 30-mil pad, 15-mil hole) on power traces.
Avoid any split in the immediate plane under the USB lines. The presence of split under the USB trace will result
in variation of characteristic impedance at that point.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist

Keep trace spacing between differential pairs consistent to avoid impedance mismatches as shown in the
following figure.
Figure 17. Differential Pairs Impedance Matching Techniques
Not recommended
Not recommended
Recommended

All SS signal lines should be routed entirely over a solid ground plane on an adjacent layer. Splitting the ground
plane underneath the SS signals increases loop inductance introduces impedance mismatches and increases
electrical emissions. Figure 18 shows a solid ground plain under the SuperSpeed signal.
Figure 18. Solid Ground Plain under the SuperSpeed Signal
SS trace
Signal layer
Ground layer

Differential SS pair trace lengths should be matched within 0.12 mm (5 mils). The HS D+ and D– signal trace
lengths should be matched within 1.25 mm (50 mils). Adjustment for HS signals should be made near the USB
receptacle, if necessary. Adjustments for SS Rx signals should be made near the USB receptacle, while
adjustments for SS Tx signals should be made near the device, if necessary. An example for length matching for
the SuperSpeed signal is shown in Figure 19.
Figure 19. SuperSpeed Signal Length Matching
Rx lines
USB3.0
Receptacle
Tx lines
USB3.0
device
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist

The number of layers on the PCB should at least be four. To maintain 90 Ω differential impedance, use a solid
reference power plane.

Whenever two pairs of USB traces cross each other in different layers, a ground layer should run all the way
between the two USB signal layers as illustrated in Figure 20.
Figure 20. Ground Insertion
Top signal
layer
SS traces on
top layer
Crossing
SS traces
on inner
layer
Ground layer
b/w signal
layers

Inner signal
layer
If signal routing has to be changed to another layer, continuous grounding has to be maintained to ensure
uniform impedance throughout. To achieve this, ground vias should be placed next to signal vias as shown in
Figure 21. The distance between the signal and ground vias should be at least 40 mils.
Figure 21. Ground Vias
Differential impedance
should be maintained
at 90 ohms in these
sections
Ground vias
Distance between each
via should be about 40
mils (center to center)
These four sections should
be routed as a single ended
trace. The impedance of
each individual trace should
be maintained at 45 ohms.

SS signal vias
Maintain constant trace width in differential pairs to avoid impedance mismatches as shown in Figure 22.
Figure 22. Differential Pairs Placements
g
W
S
W
g
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Table 10 defines the recommended parameters mentioned in the previous figure.
Table 10. USB Traces Specification
Dimension
Description
Value
S
Intra pair spacing
8 mils
W
Trace width
11 mils
g
Minimum gap b/w trace and other
planes
8 mils
However, variation in the above values could be ignored if the lines have a characteristic impedance of 90 Ω.
 Avoid stubs on all USB lines. If pads are needed on the lines for probing purposes, they should not extend out of
the trace in the form of a stub. An illustration is shown in Figure 23.
Figure 23. Probing Pads Placement
Probe pads
Recommended
Not recommended

Stubs
Void for vias on the SS signal lines should be common for the differential pair. Having a common void, as shown
in figure, maintains better impedance matching in comparison to separate vias.
Figure 24. Void Vias Placement For SS Traces
Void in plane
for vias
Distance between each
via pair should be about
40 mils.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist

Because the Micro B receptacle is a surface mount receptacle, the USB signals can be routed entirely on the
same layer as the EZ-USB FX3 device and the USB 3.0 Micro B receptacle, as shown in the Figure 25. In
addition, the layout is shown in Figure 26.
Figure 25. Micro-B receptacle Placement
FX3
USB trace running on
top layer only
Micro B
Figure 26. Micro-B Receptacle Layout

It is highly recommended that, when using a standard B receptacle (through hole receptacle), the USB signal
lines be connected to the receptacle pins on the opposite layer of where the receptacle is placed as shown in
Figure 27 and Figure 28. For example, if the standard B receptacle is placed on the top layer, the signal lines
should connect to the receptacle pins on the bottom layer. This prevents the unnecessary stubs due to the USB
receptacle pins. A diagram of the recommended layout versus the stub producing layout is illustrated in details in
Figure 29 and Figure 30 respectively. To avoid introduction of vias, the EZ-USB FX3 device can be placed on the
opposite layer of the standard B receptacle. In this case, the USB traces can be routed entirely on the same
layer.
Figure 27. Standard-B Receptacle Placement
USB trace is routed to bottom layer
to connect to the Std B receptacle
FX3
Std B
Figure 28. Standard-B Receptacle Layout
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Both routing schemes mentioned earlier are tested to work at SS trace length of up to three inches.
Figure 29. USB Signals Connected on the Opposite Side of the Standard Type-B USB Receptacle (Recommended
Layout)
Figure 30. USB Signals Connected on the Same Side of the Standard Type-B USB Receptacle (Not Recommended)
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist


Connect the “shield” pins on the USB 3.0 receptacle to ground through an LC circuit for AC isolation.
On the USB signal lines, use as few bends as possible. Do not use a 90o bend. Use 45o or rounded (curved)
bends if necessary. An illustration is shown in Figure 31.
Figure 31. USB Signal Bends

To avoid cross talk, do not place the differential pairs close to other differential pairs, clock signals, or any other
high-speed signals.
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist

Figure 32 shows an example of routing the USB signals from the EZ-USB FX3 device to the USB 3.0 Micro B
receptacle. Each differential pair should be kept uniform throughout the trace. Place AC coupling caps as close
to the device as possible. ESD devices should be placed as close to the receptacle as possible.
Figure 32. USB Signals Layout Example
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
12.1.1 8-Layer PCB Example
Figure 33 shows the layers present in the layout of SuperSpeed Explorer development kit.
Figure 33. Stackup Details for SuperSpeed Explorer development kit
1.3 MILS
COPPER + PLATING
4.3 MILS
FR-4
0.65 MILS
COPPER
4 MILS
FR-4
0.65 MILS
COPPER
9.5 MILS
FR-4
0.65 MILS
COPPER
18 MILS
0.65 MILS
9.5 MILS
0.65 MILS
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TOP
GROUND
SIGNAL
POWER
FR-4
COPPER
POWER
FR-4
COPPER
4 MILS
FR-4
0.65 MILS
COPPER
4.3 MILS
FR-4
1.3 MILS
COPPER + PLATING
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SIGNAL
GROUND
BOTTOM
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Figure 34 shows the layers present in the layout of FX3 development kit.
Figure 34. Stackup Details for FX3 development kit
1.2 MILS
COPPER + PLATING
8 MILS
FR-4
1.2 MILS
COPPER
8 MILS
FR-4
1.2 MILS
COPPER
8 MILS
FR-4
1.2 MILS
COPPER
8 MILS
1.2 MILS
8 MILS
1.2 MILS
13
TOP
GROUND
SIGNAL
POWER
FR-4
COPPER
POWER
FR-4
COPPER
8 MILS
FR-4
1.2 MILS
COPPER
8 MILS
FR-4
1.2 MILS
COPPER + PLATING
SIGNAL
GROUND
BOTTOM
FX3S Hardware Design Considerations
This section is specific only to EZ-USB FX3S. You need to consider the following guidelines in addition to the FX3
hardware design guidelines.
13.1
S-Port Interface
EZ-USB FX3S has two independent storage ports (S0-port and S1-port). Both storage ports support the following:



MMC-system specification, MMCA Technical Committee, Version 4.4
SD specification Version, 3.0
SDIO host controller compliant with SDIO specification Version 2.00 (Jan 30, 2007)
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
To satisfy the requirements of these specifications, the following guidelines should be followed while designing the
storage port circuitry on an EZ-USB FX3S system PCB.


All data lines, command, and clock lines should be length-matched.

In the case of SD card, the VDD should be tied to 3.3 V regardless of the I/O voltage used on the other SD lines,
as illustrated in Figure 35.

In case of an eMMC device, VCC should be tied to 3.3 V and VCC should be tied to the port I/O voltage supply
(VIO2 or VIO3). Figure 36 shows an eMMC device circuit.

Add a 10-kΩ pull-up resistor to the SD data signals, except for SD_D3, which is used as one of the card
insertion’s detect mechanism. A 470 kΩ is used to pull down SD_DQ3. SD_CLK is pulled up using only a 1-kΩ
resistor.

SD card voltage supply (VIO2 or VIO3) should be changed to 1.8 V dynamically when UHS-I memory card is
used.

Card insertion and removal detection is provided using the following mechanisms:
The trace lengths should not be more than 5 inches. These numbers are calculated based on the worst-case
timing parameters for SD cards, eMMC devices, and the EZ-USB FX3S device and should be taken only as a
recommendation.

SD-D3 data line: SD cards have an internal 10-kΩ pull-up resistor. When you insert or remove the card from
the SD/MMC connector, the voltage level at the SD_D3 pin changes and triggers an interrupt to the CPU.
Note that older generations of MMC cards do not support this card detection mechanism.

S0/S1_INS pin: Some SD/MMC connectors facilitate a micro switch for card insertion and removal detection.
This micro switch can be connected to S0/S1_INS. When you insert or remove the card from the SD/MMC
connector, it turns the micro switch on and off. This changes the voltage level at the pin that triggers the
interrupt to the CPU. Note that this S0/S1_INS pin is shared between the two S-Ports. Register configuration
determines which port gets to use this pin. This pin is mapped to the VIO3 power domain; if VIO2 and VIO3
are at different voltage levels, this pin cannot be used as S1_INS. The insertion/removal detection
mechanism is not used for eMMC devices because the devices are usually soldered on the board and do not
involve insertion/removal detection.
Figure 35 and Figure 36 show different implementation of the SD/MMC cards and eMMC devices.
Figure 35. SD/MMC Card Circuit
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Note:
1.
2.
VIO2S0_VIO3S1 – VIO2S0 or VIO3S1
This voltage supply can be either VIO2 or VIO3 based on the place where you connect the storage daughter card. It
will be VIO2 if you are connecting the storage daughter card to S0 port, VIO3 if you are connecting the storage
daughter card to S1 port.
When SD card is connected to S1 port then some of the serial interfaces are not available. Refer to pin description
section in FXS datasheet for details.
Figure 36. eMMC Device
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
14
Schematics and Layout Review Checklist
Table 11 is a checklist for all the important guidelines. Provide an answer to each checklist item to find out the extent
to which your hardware design meets these guidelines.
Table 11. Schematics and Layout Review Checklist
Sl. No
Schematic Checklist
1
Are the decoupling capacitors and bulk capacitors connected according to Table 3?
2
Does the crystal meet the specification in this application note?
3
Are the ferrite beads connected on AVDD, U3TXVDD, U3RXVDD, and CVDD?
4
Do the Power-on-Reset RC components meet the minimum reset time (1 ms)?
5
Do the USB precision resistors have 1% tolerance?
6
Are the I2C lines provided with pull-up resistors to the VIO5 domain?
7
Does the USB port shield terminated properly?
8
Do the SuperSpeed USB lines have ESD device connected?
9
Do the GPIF lines have 22-Ω series resistor connected?
10
Are the PMODE lines connected per Table 9?
11
Does the SPI flash meet the specification in this application note?
12
Did you make sure that the JTAG lines don’t have pull up resistors?
Sl. No
Layout Checklist
1
Is the crystal placed close to the chip (less than 2 cm)?
2
Are the decoupling capacitors and bulk capacitors placed close to the FX3 power pins?
3
Are the clock traces routed away from the high speed data lines and the power lines?
4
Are the power traces routed away from the high speed data lines and the clock lines?
5
Is the capacitor in the RC reset circuitry placed close to the reset pin of FX3?
6
Are the USB SS and HS signal lines having 90  differential impedance?
7
Are the USB SS and HS signal lines matched in length?
8
Are the USB data lines provided with solid ground plane underneath?
9
Are the SS traces provided with the guard traces along the USB data trace with stitching
vias?
10
Are the SS traces provided with the AC decoupling capacitors (0.1 µF) on the TX lines?
11
Are the USB traces kept as short as possible?
12
Is it ensured that there are no stubs on all the USB traces?
13
Is it ensured that there are no vias on the SS traces?
14
Do the USB traces have few bends and no 90-degree bends?
15
Do the two planes underneath the AC coupling capacitors have cut in shape of the capacitor?
16
Is it ensured that SS and HS USB traces are routed with consistent trace spacing?
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Answer (Yes/No/NA)
Answer (Yes/No/NA)
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
15
Summary
The recommended practices for EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ hardware design and the critical items that a developer
must consider have been discussed.
16
References
For more information, several references are available:


The Circuit Designer's Companion, Second Edition, (EDN Series for Design Engineers) by Tim Williams



Printed Circuits Handbook (McGraw Hill Handbooks), by Clyde Coombs
PCB Design for Real-World EMI Control (The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer
Science), by Bruce R. Archambeault and James Drewniak
EMC and the Printed Circuit Board: Design, Theory, and Layout Made Simple, by Mark I. Montrose
Signal Integrity Issues and Printed Circuit Board Design, by Douglas Brooks
About the Author
Name:
Hussein Osman.
Title:
Systems Engr Principal
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EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
A
Appendix A – PCB Layout Tips
There are many classic techniques for designing PCBs for low noise and EMC. Some of these techniques include:

Multiple layers: Although they are more expensive, it is best to use a multi-layer PCB with separate layers
dedicated to the VSS and VDD supplies. This gives good decoupling and shielding effects. Separate fills on these
layers should be provided for VSSA, VSSD, VDDA, and VDDD.
To reduce cost, a 2-layer or even a single-layer PCB can be used. In that case you must have a good layout for
all VSS and VDD.

Component Position: You should separate the different circuits on the PCB according to their electromagnetic
interference (EMI) contribution. This will help reduce cross-coupling on the PCB. For example, you should
separate noisy high current circuits, low voltage circuits, and digital components.

Ground and Power Supply: There should be a single point for gathering all ground returns. Avoid ground loops,
or minimize their surface area. All component-free surfaces of the PCB should be filled with additional grounding
to create a shield, especially when using 2-layer or single-layer PCBs.
The power supply should be close to the ground line to minimize the area of the supply loop. The supply loop can
act as an antenna and can be a major emitter or receiver of EMI.

Decoupling: The standard decoupler for external power is a 100 μF capacitor. Supplementary 0.1 μF capacitors
should be placed as close as possible to the VSS and VDD pins of the device, to reduce high frequency power
supply ripple.
Generally, you should decouple all sensitive or noisy signals to improve electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
performance. Decoupling can be both capacitive and inductive.

Signal Routing: When designing an application, the following areas should be closely studied to improve EMC
performance:



Noisy signals, for example signals with fast edge times
Sensitive and high impedance signals
Signals that capture events, such as interrupts and strobe signals
To increase EMC performance, keep the trace lengths as short as possible and isolate the traces with VSS traces. To
avoid crosstalk, do not route them near to or parallel to other noisy and sensitive traces.
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-70707 Rev.*L
31
EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Document History
Document Title: AN70707 - EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Document Number: 001-70707
Revision
ECN
Orig. of
Change
Submission
Date
Description of Change
**
3312933
HFO
07/14/2011
New application note.
*A
3381402
MRKA
09/23/2011
Updated trace adjustment diagram.
Updated via void diagram.
Updated AC coupling capacitors diagram.
*B
3490652
MRKA
01/11/2011
Added ‘Schematic design checklist’ before the recommendations
Added GPIF II Interface section
Updated decoupling capacitor recommendation table
Changed heading of the package detail section to ‘FX3 Package Dimensions’
Updated USB signal routing schemes using standard and micro B receptacles
*C
3729135
ROSM
09/18/2012
Replaced the “F” symbol in the Booting section with High-Z
Added Crystal and Clock specification and added a list of compatible crystals
Added Inrush Consideration and Power Supply Design section
Added decoupling cap placement sample
Added values for termination resistors
Added ESD part number and placement example
Updated the loading capacitance requirements for the external USB 3.0 ESD
Added Links to schematic and IBIS model
Added the location of USB3.0 Polarity Inversion section in the USB 3.0 Spec
Added GPIF example Application Notes numbers
Added I2C, SPI/UART, I2S Consideration
Added Images and tables numbers
Added table of Content section
Changed the VBUS min to 4.0 V
Changed to standby mode support for the32.768 kHz clock input
Added Appendix A
*D
3765036
OSG
10/03/2012
Updated Figure 21 Title
*E
3824291
ROSM
11/28/2012
Updated cap value column in Table 2
Updated VBUS/VBATT description
*F
3889052
RSKV
1/28/2013
Modified to cover details of FX3S
Changed title to include FX3S
Added Table 1
Figure 12 is modified
Added FX3S hardware design considerations section
*G
4320320
RSKV
04/11/2014
Figure 1 is modified to show the decoupling capacitors connected to each pin
Table 3 is modified
Crystal section is modified
Section for selecting SPI flash for FX3 boot is added
Figure 33 is added to show the stackup details of FX3 DVK
Schematics and Layout Review Checklistis added
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-70707 Rev.*L
32
EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
Revision
*H
ECN
Orig. of
Change
Submission
Date
Description of Change
4484378
RSKV
08/26/2014
Updated the value of bulk capacitors connected to U3TXVDDQ and U3RXVDDQ to
22 µF
Added schematic guidelines for the OTG_ID pin.
*I
4637368
PRJI
01/23/2015
Removed minimum trace length requirement for SD lines in S-Port Interface.
Changed VIO pin name to H11 in Figure 1.
Added recommended part for Crystal oscillator in Crystal Effective Load Capacitor
Calculation.
Updated the length matching requirement for GPIF II lines in GPIF II Interface.
*J
4650282
PRJI
02/17/2015
Updated Table 3.
Added a hyperlink to refer the list of USB SuperSpeed Code Examples, in the
Abstract (page 1).
*K
4849244
NIKL
07/23/2015
Added Related Resources.
Added Summary.
Updated to new template.
Completing Sunset Review.
*L
4933008
RAGO
10/05/2015
Updated Figure 1 in Overview.
Updated description in GPIF II Interface.
Updated description in Selection of SPI Flash under Low-Performance Peripherals
(LPP).
Updated description in EMI and ESD Considerations.
Updated Figure 35 and Figure 36 in S-Port Interface under FX3S Hardware Design
Considerations.
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-70707 Rev.*L
33
EZ-USB® FX3™/FX3S™ Hardware Design Guidelines and Schematic Checklist
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Document No. 001-70707 Rev.*L
34