AN79953 Getting Started with PSoC® 4.pdf

AN79953
Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Authors: Ranjith M, Nidhin M S
Associated Part Family: All PSoC 4 Parts
Related Application Notes: AN54181, AN77759
Software Version: PSoC Creator™3.3 SP2 or higher
To get the latest version of this application note, please visit http://www.cypress.com/AN79953.
More code examples? We heard you.
To access an ever-growing list of hundreds of PSoC code examples, please visit our code examples web page.
You can also explore the PSoC 4 video library here.
®
®
®
AN79953 introduces you to PSoC 4, an ARM Cortex -M0/M0+ based programmable system-on-chip. It helps you
explore the PSoC 4 architecture and development tools and shows you how to create your first project using PSoC
Creator™, the development tool for PSoC 4. This application note also guides you to more resources to accelerate indepth learning about PSoC 4.
Contents
1
2
Introduction ...............................................................1
PSoC Resources ......................................................2
2.1
PSoC Creator ..................................................2
2.2
Code Examples ...............................................3
2.3
PSoC Creator Help ..........................................4
2.4
Technical Support ............................................4
3
PSoC 4 Feature Set .................................................5
4
PSoC is More Than an MCU ....................................7
4.1
The Concept of PSoC Creator Components ....8
5
My First PSoC 4 Design ...........................................9
5.1
Before You Begin.............................................9
1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
About the Design ........................................... 10
Part 1: Create the Design .............................. 10
Part 2: Program the Device ........................... 19
Convert Project to Bootloadable for
CY8CKIT-049 ................................................ 20
5.6
Bootload Your CY8CKIT-049 ......................... 20
5.7
More PSoC 4 Code Examples ....................... 22
6
Summary ................................................................ 30
Document History............................................................ 31
Worldwide Sales and Design Support ............................. 32
Introduction
PSoC 4 is a true programmable embedded system-on-chip, integrating custom analog and digital peripheral
functions, memory, and an ARM Cortex-M0 or Cortex-M0+ microcontroller on a single chip.
This type of system is different from most mixed-signal embedded systems, which use a combination of a
microcontroller unit (MCU) and external analog and digital peripherals. Such systems typically require many
integrated circuits in addition to the MCU, such as opamps, ADCs, and (ASICs).
PSoC 4 provides a low-cost alternative to the combination of MCU and external ICs. In addition to reducing overall
system cost, the programmable analog and digital subsystems allow great flexibility, in-field tuning of the design, and
speedy time to market.
®
The capacitive touch-sensing feature in PSoC 4, known as CapSense , offers unprecedented signal-to-noise ratio;
best-in-class waterproofing; and a wide variety of sensor types such as buttons, sliders, track pads, and proximity
sensors.
PSoC 4 offers a best-in-class current consumption of 150 nA while retaining SRAM, programmable logic, and the
ability to wake up from an interrupt. PSoC 4 consumes only 20 nA while maintaining wakeup capability in its nonretention power mode.
The PSoC 4 family of devices also contains PSoC 4 BLE, which integrates a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) radio
system. For more details on PSoC 4 BLE, see AN91267.
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-79953 Rev. *M
1
Getting Started with PSoC® 4
2
PSoC Resources
Cypress provides a wealth of data at www.cypress.com to help you to select the right PSoC device, and to help you
to quickly and effectively integrate the device into your design. For a comprehensive list of resources, see KBA86521,
How to Design with PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP. The following is an abbreviated list for PSoC 4:





2.1
Overview: PSoC Portfolio, PSoC Roadmap

Product Selectors: PSoC 1, PSoC 3,
PSoC 4, or PSoC 5LP. In addition, PSoC
Creator includes a device selection tool.
Technical Reference Manuals (TRM): Provide
detailed descriptions of the architecture and
registers in each PSoC 4 device family.

PSoC Training Videos: These videos provide
step-by-step instructions on how to get started
build complex designs with PSoC.

Development Kits: CY8CKIT-040, CY8CKIT-041,
CY8CKIT-042, CY8CKIT-044 CY8CKIT-046 and
CY8CKIT-046 PSoC 4 Pioneer Kits are easy-touse and inexpensive development platforms.
These include connectors for Arduino-compatible
®
shields and Digilent Pmod™ daughter cards.

CY8CKIT-043 and CY8CKIT-049 are very lowcost prototyping platform for sampling PSoC 4200
devices.

The MiniProg3 device provides an interface for
flash programming and debug.
Datasheets: Describe and provide electrical
specifications
for
the
PSoC 4000,
PSoC 4100, and PSoC 4200, PSoC 4xx7
BLE,
PSoC 4100M,
PSoC 4200M,
PSoC 4200L, PSoC 4000S, PSoC 4100S
device families.
CapSense Design Guide: Learn how to
design capacitive touch-sensing applications
with the PSoC 4 family of devices.
Application Notes and Code Examples
cover a broad range of topics, from basic to
advanced level. PSoC Creator provides more
code examples – see Code Examples.
PSoC Creator
PSoC Creator is a free Windows-based Integrated Development Environment (IDE). It enables concurrent hardware
and firmware design of PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP systems. See Figure 1 – with PSoC Creator, you can:
1.
2.
Drag and drop Components to build your
hardware system design
3.
Configure Components with config tools
4.
Explore the library of 100+ Components
Co-design your application firmware with the
5. Review Component datasheets
PSoC hardware
Figure 1. PSoC Creator Features
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
2.2
Code Examples
PSoC Creator includes a large number of code example projects.
These projects are available from the PSoC Creator Start Page,
as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 2. Code Examples in PSoC
Creator
Example projects can speed up your design process by starting
you off with a complete design, instead of a blank page. The
example projects also show how PSoC Creator Components can
be used for various applications. Code examples and datasheets
are included, as shown in Figure 3.
In the Find Example Project dialog shown in Figure 3, you have
several options:

Filter for examples based on architecture or device family,
i.e., PSoC 3, PSoC 4 or PSoC 5LP; category; or keyword

Select from the menu of examples offered based on the
Filter Options

Review the datasheet
Documentation tab)

Review the code example for the selection. You can copy
and paste code from this window to your project, which can
help speed up code development, or

Create a new project (and a new workspace if needed)
based on the selection. This can speed up your design
process by starting you off with a complete, basic design.
You can then adapt that design to your application.
for
the
selection
(on
the
Figure 3. Code Example Projects with Sample Code
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
2.3
PSoC Creator Help
Visit the PSoC Creator home page to download the latest version of PSoC Creator. Then, launch PSoC Creator and
navigate to the following items:
2.4

Quick Start Guide: Choose Help > Documentation > Quick Start Guide. This guide gives you the basics for
developing PSoC Creator projects.

Simple Component example projects: Choose File > Open > Example projects. These example projects
demonstrate how to configure and use PSoC Creator Components.

System Reference Guide: Choose Help > System Reference > System Reference Guide. This guide lists
and describes the system functions provided by PSoC Creator.

Component datasheets: Right-click a Component and select “Open Datasheet.” Visit the PSoC 4 Component
Datasheets page for a list of all PSoC 4 Component datasheets.

PSoC Creator Training Videos: These videos provide step-by-step instructions on how to get started with PSoC
Creator.

Document Manager: PSoC Creator provides a document manager to help you to easily find and review
document resources. To open the document manager, choose the menu item Help > Document Manager.
Technical Support
If you have any questions, our technical support team is happy to assist you. You can create a support request on the
Cypress Technical Support page.
If you are in the United States, you can talk to our technical support team by calling our toll-free number:
+1-800-541-4736. Select option 8 at the prompt.
You can also use the following support resources if you need quick assistance.


Self-help
Local Sales Office Locations
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
3
PSoC 4 Feature Set
PSoC 4 has an extensive set of features, which include a CPU and memory subsystem, a digital subsystem, an
analog subsystem, and system resources, as shown in Figure 4. The following sections give brief descriptions of
each feature. For more information, see the PSoC 4 family device datasheets, technical reference manuals (TRMs),
and application notes listed in PSoC Resources.
Figure 4. PSoC 4 Architecture (PSoC 4200L)
CPU Subsystem
PSoC 4200L
SWD/TC
32-bit
FLASH
256 KB
SRAM
32 KB
ROM
8 KB
DataWire/
DMA
Read Accelerator
SRAM Controller
ROM Controller
Initiator/MMIO
48 MHz
FAST MUL
NVIC, IRQMUX
System Resources
x1
x8
CTBm
2x OpAmp
x2
FS-PHY
Port Interface & Digital System Interconnect (DSI)
High Speed I/O Matrix, 1x Programmable I/O
Power Modes
Active/Sleep
DeepSleep
Hibernate
CHG-DET
SARMUX
USB-FS
UDB
WCO
...
512B
2x CAN
UDB
2x LP Comparator
SAR ADC
(12-bit)
LCD
Programmable
Digital
Programmable
Analog
4x SCB-I2C/SPI/UART
Reset
Reset Control
XRES
Peripheral Interconnect (MMIO)
PCLK
2x CapSense
Clock
Clock Control
WDT
IMO
ILO
ECO
2x PLL
System Interconnect (Multi Layer AHB)
Peripherals
IOSS GPIO (13x ports)
Power
Sleep Control
WIC
POR
LVD
REF
BOD
PWRSYS
NVLatches
8x TCPWM
AHB-Lite
SPCIF
Cortex
M0
80x GPIOs, 14x GPIO_OVT, 2x SIO
IO Subsystem
Table 1 shows the features available for the biggest device in different families. Depending on the device, all or a
subset of these features may be available. Refer to the PSoC 4 Product Selector Guide for details.
Table 1.PSoC 4 Device Families
Device Family
Features
CY8C4000
CY8C4000S
CY8C4100
CY8C4100S
CY8C4200
CY8C4200M
CY8C4200L
CPU
16-MHz
Cortex-M0
48-MHz
Cortex-M0+
with singlecycle multiply
24-MHz
Cortex-M0
with singlecycle multiply
48-MHz
Cortex-M0+
with singlecycle multiply
48-MHz
Cortex-M0
with singlecycle multiply
48-MHz
Cortex-M0
with singlecycle multiply
48-MHz
Cortex-M0
with singlecycle multiply
DMA
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
Eight channels
32 channels
Flash memory
16 KB
32 KB
32 KB
64 KB
32 KB
128 KB
256 KB
SRAM
2 KB
4 KB
4 KB
8 KB
4 KB
16 KB
32 KB
GPIOs
20
36
36
36
36
55
96
CapSense
16 sensors
35 sensors
35 sensors
35 sensors
35 sensors
54 sensors
94 sensors
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Device Family
Features
CY8C4000
CY8C4000S
CY8C4100
CY8C4100S
CY8C4200
CY8C4200M
CY8C4200L
ADC
None
10-bit 46-ksps
Single-slope
ADC
12-bit, 806ksps SAR
ADC with
sequencer
12-bit, 1MSPS SAR
ADC with
sequencer
12-bit, 1MSPS SAR
ADC with
sequencer
12-bit, 1MSPS SAR
ADC with
sequencer
12-bit, 1MSPS SAR
ADC with
sequencer
Opamps
None
None
Two
programmable
opamps
Two
programmable
opamps
Two
programmable
opamps
Two
programmable
opamps
Four
programmable
opamps
Comparators
1 CSD
comparator
with fixed
threshold (1.2
V)
Two lowpower
comparators
with wakeup
feature
Two lowpower
comparators
with wakeup
feature
Two lowpower
comparators
with wakeup
feature
Two lowpower
comparators
with wakeup
feature
Two lowpower
comparators
with wakeup
feature
Two lowpower
comparators
with wakeup
feature
IDACs*
One 7-bit and
one 8-bit
Two 7-bit
One 7-bit and
one 8-bit
Two 7-bit
One 7-bit and
one 8-bit
Two 7-bit and
two 8-bit
Two 7-bit and
two 8-bit
Four UDBs,
each with
eight
macrocells
and one
datapath
Eight UDBs,
each with
eight
macrocells
and one
datapath
Programmable
logic blocks
(UDBs)
None
None
None
None
Four UDBs,
each with
eight
macrocells
and one
datapath
Smart IO ports
None
2
None
2
None
None
1
Power supply
range
1.71 V to
5.5 V
1.71 V to
5.5 V
1.71 V to
5.5 V
1.71 V to
5.5 V
1.71 V to
5.5 V
1.71 V to
5.5 V
1.71 V to
5.5 V
Deep-Sleep at
2.5 µA
Deep-Sleep at
1.3 µA,
Hibernate at
150 nA, Stop
at 20 nA
Deep-Sleep at
1.3 µA,
Hibernate at
150 nA, Stop
at 20 nA
Deep-Sleep at
1.3 µA,
Hibernate at
150 nA, Stop
at 20 nA
Low-power
modes
Deep-Sleep at
2.5 µA
Deep-Sleep at
2.5 µA
Deep-Sleep at
1.3 µA,
Hibernate at
150 nA, Stop
at 20 nA
Segment LCD
drive
None
4 COM
segment LCD
drive
4 COM
segment LCD
drive
4 COM
segment LCD
drive
4 COM
segment LCD
drive
4 COM
segment LCD
drive
8 COM
segment LCD
drive
Serial
communication
One I2C
Two serial
communicatio
n blocks
(SCBs) with
programmable
I2C, SPI, or
UART
Two SCBs
with
programmable
I2C, SPI, or
UART
Three SCBs
with
programmable
I2C, SPI, or
UART
Two SCBs
with
programmable
I2C, SPI, or
UART
Two SCBs
with
programmable
I2C, SPI, or
UART
Four SCBs
with
programmable
I2C, SPI, or
UART
Timer Counter
Pulse-Width
Modulator
(TCPWM)
1
5
4
5
4
8
8
Controller Area
Network (CAN)
None
None
None
None
None
2
2
Universal Serial
Bus (USB)
None
None
None
None
None
None
Full Speed
USB Device
with eight
endpoints
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Device Family
Features
Clocks
Power supply
monitoring
CY8C4000
CY8C4000S
24-MHz / 32MHz internal
main oscillator
(IMO)
24-MHz to 48MHz IMO
40-kHz ILO
32-kHz
internal lowspeed
oscillator (ILO)
32-kHZ watch
crystal
oscillator
(WCO)
Power-on
reset (POR)
Brown-out
detection
(BOD)
POR, BOD
CY8C4100
CY8C4100S
CY8C4200
CY8C4200M
CY8C4200L
3-MHz to 48MHz IMO
3-MHz to 24MHz IMO
32-kHz ILO
24-MHz to 48MHz IMO
40-kHz ILO
32-kHZ WCO
3-MHz to 48MHz IMO
32-kHz ILO
3-MHz to 48MHz IMO
32-kHz ILO
32-kHZ WCO
4-MHz to 33MHz external
crystal
oscillator
(ECO)
32-kHz ILO
32-kHZ WCO
POR, BOD,
Low-voltage
detection
(LVD)
POR, BOD
POR, BOD,
LVD
POR, BOD,
LVD
POR, BOD,
LVD
*IDACs are available only when CapSense is not in use. Refer to the respective PSoC 4 Technical Reference Manual
for more details.
4
PSoC is More Than an MCU
Figure 5 shows that a typical MCU contains a CPU (such as 8051 or an ARM Cortex) with a set of peripheral
functions such as ADCs, DACs, UARTs, SPIs, and general I/O, all linked to the CPU’s register interface. Within the
MCU, the CPU is the “heart” of the device – the CPU manages everything from setup to data movement to timing.
Without the CPU, the MCU cannot function.
Figure 6 shows that PSoC is quite different. With PSoC, the CPU, analog, digital, and I/O are equally important
resources in a programmable system. It is the system’s interconnect and programmability that is the heart of PSoC –
not the CPU. The peripheral analog and digital are interconnected with a highly configurable matrix of signal and data
bus meshing that allows you to create custom designs that meet your application requirements. You can program
PSoC to emulate an MCU, but you cannot program an MCU to emulate PSoC.
Figure 5. Block Diagram of a Typical MCU
Port A
Port B
UART
ADC
SPI
CPU
ARM
DAC
I2C
Timer
PWM
Port C
www.cypress.com
Port D
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Figure 6. PSoC Block Diagram
Gen IO
Digital System
(with Programmable Logic)
Digital System
Gen IO
Gen IO
Gen IO
PWMs
SCBs
(I2C, SPI,
UART,
LIN)
CTBm
(Opamps)
Low
Power
Comparat
or
UDBs
ARM Cortex M0/M0+
Gen IO
Gen IO
Segment
LCD
Drive
USB
Analog System
System Interconnect
Analog System
CAN
SAR ADC
and MUX
CapSense
(IDACs, Comparators, Touch Sensing)
Gen IO
Gen IO
A typical MCU requires CPU firmware to process state machines, use a timer for timing, and drive an output pin.
Thus, the functional path is almost always through the CPU. However, with PSoC, asynchronous parallel processing
is possible. You can configure a PSoC to have elements that operate independently from the CPU. The projects
included with this application note demonstrate this concept. The PSoC is configured to make an LED blink without
writing any code for the CPU.
4.1
The Concept of PSoC Creator Components
One other important thing about PSoC is the availability of PSoC Creator IDE. In PSoC Creator, different PSoC
resources are organized as graphical elements called Components which can be dragged and dropped on to a
schematic to quickly build designs. Every peripheral in PSoC is available as a pre-validated PSoC Creator
Component – PWM Component, ADC Component, DAC Component, CapSense Component, UART Component and
so on. The availability of pre-validated Components in the PSoC Creator significantly reduces the development time.
It also allows you to quickly make changes in the design using graphical options.
For example, configuring a PWM to blink an LED in a typical microcontroller involves the following:
1.
Locate the registers corresponding to the PWM block.
2.
Calculate the values to be written to the PWM registers based on the required PWM period and duty cycle.
3.
Write many lines of code to configure the PWM registers, set the pin drive mode and to connect the PWM output
to the pin. Many MCUs do not offer alternate pins to connect to the internal blocks.
To implement the same functionality in PSoC is a trivial exercise as you will find out later in this application note.
Later, if you need to reconfigure the same PWM block to a Timer, you do not need anything more than a few mouse
clicks in PSoC Creator!
The PSoC also has programmable digital blocks known as Universal Digital Blocks (UDBs). PSoC Creator also
provides several Components made out of UDBs like UART, SPI, I2S, Timer, PWM, Counter, Digital Gates (AND,
OR, NOT, XOR etc), and many more. You can even create your own custom state machines and digital logic using
the UDBs in PSoC Creator. The method to create your own custom PSoC Creator Components is provided in the
®
PSoC Creator™ Component Author Guide.
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5
My First PSoC 4 Design
This section does the following:



Demonstrates how PSoC can be programmed to do more than a traditional MCU
Shows how to build a simple PSoC design and install it in a development kit
Provides detailed steps that make it easy to learn PSoC design techniques and how to use the PSoC Creator
IDE
5.1
Before You Begin
5.1.1
H a ve yo u i n s t a l l e d P S o C C r e a t o r ?
Download and install PSoC Creator from the PSoC Creator home page. Note that the installation of the toolset may
take a long time – see the PSoC Creator Release Notes for more information.
5.1.2
D o yo u h a ve a D e ve l o p m e n t K i t ?
Testing this design requires one of the kits listed in Table 2, which has an integrated programmer.
Table 2. List of PSoC 4 Pioneer Kits and Supported Devices
Pioneer Kit
Supported Device Family
Part Number
CY8CKIT-040
PSoC 4000
CY8C4014LQI-422
CY8CKIT-041
PSoC 4000S
CY8C4045AZI-S413
CY8CKIT-041
PSoC 4100S
CY8C4146AZI-S433
CY8CKIT-042
PSoC 4200
CY8C4245AXI-483
CY8CKIT-043
PSoC 4200M
CY8C4247AZI-M485
CY8CKIT-044
PSoC 4200M
CY8C4247AZI-M485
CY8CKIT-046
PSoC 4200L
CY8C4248BZI-L489
CY8CKIT-042-BLE
PSoC 4200 BLE
CY8C4247LQI-BL483
If you have any of the above kits, jump to the section Part 1: Create the Design.
If you are using CY8CKIT-049, which has a USB-serial bootloader instead of a programmer, use the
CY8CKIT_049_Example provided along with this application note. You can download it from the AN79953 landing
page as a part of AN79953.zip. To know how to bootload this example project to your CY8CKIT-049, navigate to the
section Bootload Your CY8CKIT-049.
You can also evaluate the code examples provided with the kit instead of this design. See the “Code Examples”
section in the kit guide for details. Go to the CY8CKIT-049 kit webpage to download kit guide and code examples.
5.1.3
Want to see the project in action?
If you don’t want to go through the design process, you can get the completed PSoC Creator project at
http://www.cypress.com/go/AN79953. You can then jump to the Build and Program steps.
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5.2
About the Design
This design simply blinks two LEDs using a TCPWM Component, as shown in Figure 7. The TCPWM is configured in
PWM mode. The two complementary outputs of this PWM control the LEDs. The PWM operates at a very low
frequency and 50 percent duty cycle so that the toggling of the LEDs is visible. If you use a dual-color LED instead of
two separate LEDs, this project can toggle the color of the dual-color LED.
Figure 7. My First PSoC 4 Design
5.3
Part 1: Create the Design
This section takes you on a step-by-step guided tour of the design process. It starts with creating an empty project
and guides you through hardware and firmware design entry.
1.
Start PSoC Creator, and from the File menu choose New > Project, as shown in Figure 8.
Figure 8. Creating a New Project
2.
Select your development kit in the pop-up window. For example, if you have a CY8CKIT-042, select Kit:
CY8CKIT-042 (PSoC 4100 / PSoC 4200) and click Next. If you do not see your PSoC 4 development kit listed in
the menu, download and install the kit setup for your kit from the Cypress website.
Alternately, you can also select the target device radio button instead of the target hardware and select the
appropriate device and click Next.
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Figure 9. Create a New Empty PSoC 4 Project
3.
Select the option Empty Schematic from the next window and click Next.
Figure 10. Select Empty Schematic
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
4.
Provide a project name (for example, “My_First_Project”) and Workspace Name as shown in the figure below.
Choose an appropriate location for your new project, and click Finish.
5.
Creating a new project generates a project folder with a baseline set of files shown in the Workspace Explorer
(see Figure 11). To open the project schematic file, double-click TopDesign.cysch.
Figure 11. Opening TopDesign Schematic
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
6.
Drag one PWM (TCPWM mode) Component from the Component Catalog onto the schematic, as shown in
Figure 12.
Figure 12. Location of the PWM Component
7.
Double-click the PWM Component on the schematic to configure the Component properties, as shown in
Figure 13. Click the PWM tab, and set the Period value to 254 and the Compare value to 127 to generate a PWM
signal with a 50 percent duty cycle.
Set the Prescaler to 8x, to divide the input clock frequency by 8.
Figure 13. Configuring the PWM Component
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
8.
A PWM Component requires an input clock for its operation. Drag and drop a Clock Component onto the
schematic, and configure the Frequency to 800 Hz by double-clicking on the Component, as shown in Figure 14
and Figure 15.
Since the Prescaler value set in PWM Component is 8, the effective input clock of the PWM is only 100 Hz.
Therefore, the PWM period of 254 results in a PWM output time period of 2.54 seconds.
Figure 14. Location of the Clock Component
Figure 15. Configuring the Clock Component
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
9.
Drag and drop a Digital Output Pin Component. Change the name to LED_1 as shown in Figure 16 and
Figure 17. Add another Digital Output Pin Component and change its name to LED_2.
Figure 16. Location of the Digital Output Pin Component
Figure 17. Renaming a Pin Component
10. In the schematic window, select the wire tool as shown in Figure 18, or press W.
Figure 18. Selecting the Wire Tool
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
11. Wire the Components together, as shown in Figure 19.
Figure 19. Wiring the Schematic
12. Most Components are disabled at device reset (the major exception being the Clock Component, which is
automatically started as a default), and you must add code to the project to enable them. Open main.c from
Workspace Explorer and add code to the main() function, as provided in Code 1.
Code 1. Enabling the PWM Component
int main()
{
/* Enable and start the PWM */
PWM_1_Start();
for(;;)
{
}
}
13. Select Build My_First_Project from the Build menu. Notice in the Workspace Explorer window that PSoC
Creator automatically generates source code files for the PWM, Clock, and Digital Output Pin Components, as
shown in Figure 20.
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Figure 20. Generated Source Files
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
14. Open the file My_First_Project.cydwr (Design-Wide Resource file) from Workspace Explorer and click the Pins
tab. You can use this tab to select the device pins for the outputs LED_1 and LED_2.
Figure 21 shows the pin configuration to connect the LED_1 and LED_2 pins to the green and red LEDs in the
CY8CKIT-042 PSoC 4 Pioneer Kit. Refer to Table 3 if you are using a different PSoC 4 kit.
Figure 21. Pin Selection
Table 3. Pin Mapping Table across Pioneer Kits
CY8CKIT-040
(PSoC 4000)
CY8CKIT-041
(PSoC 4000S /
PSoC 4100S)
CY8CKIT-042
(PSoC 4200)
CY8CKIT-042BLE
(PSoC 4200
BLE)
CY8CKIT-044
(PSoC 4200M)
CY8CKIT-046
(PSoC 4200L)
Green LED
(Active LOW)
P1[1]
P2[6]
P0[2]
P3[6]
P2[6]
P5[3]
Red LED
(Active LOW)
P3[2]*
P3[4]**
P1[6]
P2[6]
P0[6]
P5[2]
Function
*PSoC 4000 parts have fixed pins for complementary PWM outputs – P1[1] and P1[6]. You cannot use any other pins
for PWM outputs. Refer to the device datasheet for more details. If you are using the CY8CKIT-040, you can use the
green LED connected to P1[1], as LED1. To use the red LED as LED2, connect P3[2] from header J4 to P1[6] from
header J3, using a wire. Alternately, you can connect an external LED to P1[6] as LED2.
**Similar to the note above, If you are using the CY8CKIT-041, you can use the green LED connected to P2[6], as
LED1 and the complementary PWM output P2[7] for LED2. To use the red LED as LED2, connect P3[4] from header
J2 to P2[7] from header J3, using a wire. Alternately, you can connect an external LED to P2[7] as LED2.
Note: CY8CKIT-043 and CY8CKIT-049 have only one LED connected to P1[6]. If you are using CY8CKIT-049, you
can connect an external LED to pin P0[2].
15. Finally, rebuild the project as Step 12 explains.
16. Continue to the next section if you are not using a CY8CKIT-049. If you are using a CY8CKIT-049, navigate to
the section Convert Project to Bootloadable for CY8CKIT-049.
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5.4
Part 2: Program the Device
This section shows how to program the device. If you are using CY8CKIT-040, CY8CKIT-041, CY8CKIT-042,
CY8CKIT-044, or CY8CKIT-046 connect the kit board to your computer using the USB cable.
1.
Select the PSoC Creator menu item Debug > Select Debug Target, as shown in Figure 22.
Figure 22. Selecting Debug Target
2.
In the Select Debug Target dialog box, click Port Acquire, and then click Connect, as shown in Figure 23. Click
OK to close the dialog box.
Figure 23. Connecting to a Device
3.
Choose the menu item Debug > Program to program the device with the project, as shown in Figure 24.
Figure 24. Programming the Device
4.
You can view the programming status on the status bar (lower-left corner of the window), as shown in Figure 25.
Figure 25. Programming Status
5.
After the device is programmed, verify the operation of the project by viewing the toggling of the LEDs.
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5.5
Convert Project to Bootloadable for CY8CKIT-049
1.
Navigate to the TopDesign schematic by double-clicking the TopDesign.cysch in Workspace Explorer.
2.
Drag and drop a Bootloadable Component from the Component Catalog to the TopDesign Schematic.
3.
Double- click the Bootloadable Component and click the Dependencies tab to select the .hex and .elf files from
the UART Bootloader project included with the kit (\CY8CKIT-049-42xx\Firmware\SCB_Bootloader\
UART_Bootloader.cydsn\CortexM0\ARM_GCC_484\Debug\). This is done to point the bootloadable project to
the bootloader running in the kit. Click Apply and then OK.
Figure 26. Adding UART Bootloader Dependency
4.
5.6
Finally, rebuild the project by selecting the option Build My_First_Project from the Build menu.
Bootload Your CY8CKIT-049
The CY8CKIT-049 is a little different from the other PSoC 4 development kits. The CY8CKIT-049 does not have an
on-board programmer and needs to be bootloaded. See AN73854 for additional details on bootloading. To bootload
the example project provided with this application note to the CY8CKIT-049, perform these steps:
1.
Connect the CY8CKIT-049-4xxx prototyping board to the PC. When connecting the kit to the port, depress the
SW1 button as it is plugged in. You will notice that the blue LED begins to blink rapidly; this indicates that the
PSoC 4 is in 'Bootloader Mode' and is ready to be loaded with the latest firmware. This must be done each time
you bootload the PSoC 4.
2.
Select Tools > Bootloader Host to open the Bootloader Host tool.
Figure 27. Launch Bootloader Host Tool
The Bootloader Host tool opens.
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Figure 28. Bootloader Host Tool
3.
Click Filters and select the Show UART Devices option from the Port Filters window, and then click OK. This
lists all COM devices connected to the computer.
Note: The PID of the Bootloader is F13B. You may enter this PID in the Port filters window to list only the Kit
Bootloader.
Figure 29. Port Filters
The Bootloader Host tool will now display all of the available UART based COM ports.
4.
Click the COM port from the list of available ports and enter the UART configuration such as Baud Rate, Data
Bits, Stop Bits, and Parity for the USB-UART configuration on the USB-Serial device.
The values for the UART are: 115200 baud rate, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity
5.
Click File > Open and navigate to the My_First_Project.cyacd file generated in the CortexM0 folder in your
project directory, and then click Open.
Figure 30. Opening the Generated File
6.
Click the Program button to flash the part with your new application code. The status window provides output
message and a status bar indicates the programming progress. When bootloading is complete, your application
executes with the latest version of the application code.
Figure 31. Program the Device With Application Code
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5.7
More PSoC 4 Code Examples
You can find more PSoC 4 code examples in the Cypress website. The following figure shows a cumulative
representation of different blocks available in devices of the PSoC 4 family. Examples corresponding to each block
are categorized in the following section. Click on any of the PSoC 4 block to navigate to the corresponding code
example link.
®
PSoC 4
MCU Subsystem
Programmable Analog
Blocks
I/O Subsystem
GPIO
SAR
ADC
Opamp
GPIO
CortexM0/M0+
48 MHz
CAN
Full-Speed
USB 2.0
RTC
DMA
www.cypress.com
CSD
8-bit IDAC
7-bit IDAC
Programmable Digital
Blocks
UDB
GPIO
Smart IO (available on some ports)
Serial Wire Debug
CMP
Programmable Interconnect and Routing
SRAM
Advanced High-Performance Bus (AHB)
Flash
GPIO
GPIO
GPIO
GPIO
GPIO
GPIO
TCPWM
GPIO
SCB – I2C, SPI, UART
Segment LCD Drive
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GPIO
GPIO
22
Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5.7.1
CPU – ARM Cortex M0 / Cortex M0+
®
The PSoC 4 ARM Cortex-M0 core is a 32-bit CPU optimized for low-power operation. It has an efficient three-stage
pipeline, a fixed 4-GB memory map, and supports the ARMv6-M Thumb instruction set. The Cortex-M0 also features
a single-cycle 32- bit multiply instruction and low-latency interrupt handling. Other subsystems tightly linked to the
CPU core include a nested vectored interrupt controller (NVIC), a SYSTICK timer, and debug. The ARM Cortex-M0+
which is available on PSoC 4000S and PSoC 4100S is an optimized superset of the Cortex-M0 with a core pipeline of
just two stages resulting in better power efficiency.
Table 4. CPU Subsystem Application Notes
Document Number
5.7.2
Document Name
®
AN90799
PSoC 4 Interrupts
AN89610
PSoC® 4 and PSoC 5LP ARM Cortex Code Optimization
M e m o r y - F l a s h a n d S R AM
The PSoC 4 has a flash module with a flash accelerator, tightly coupled to the CPU to improve average access times
from the flash block. The flash accelerator delivers 85% of single-cycle SRAM access performance on average. Part
of the flash module can be used to emulate EEPROM operation if required. SRAM memory is retained during
Hibernate.
Table 5. Emulated EEPROM Code Examples
Document Number
CE95313
5.7.3
Document Name
Emulated EEPROM memory with PSoC 3/4/5LP
DMA
A DMA engine, with 32 channels, is provided on PSoC 4200L that can do 32-bit transfers between peripherals or
memory.
Table 6. PSoC 4 DMA Component Datasheet
Document Number
001-96043
5.7.4
Document Name
PSoC 4 Direct Memory Access (DMA) Channel Component Datasheet
S ys t e m R e s o u r c e s – C l o c k s , R T C , P o w e r S ys t e m
The PSoC 4 system resources consist of the power system, clock system, reset, and voltage reference. The power
system provides assurance that voltage levels are as required for each respective mode and either delay mode entry
(on power-on reset (POR), for example) until voltage levels are as required for proper function or generate resets
(brown-out detect (BOD)) or interrupts (low voltage detect (LVD)).
The PSoC 4 clock system is responsible for providing clocks to all subsystems that require clocks and for switching
between different clock sources without glitching. In addition, the clock system ensures that no meta-stable conditions
occur. The clock system for the PSoC 4200L consists of a Watch Crystal Oscillator (WCO) running at 32 kHz, the
IMO (3 to 48 MHz) and the ILO (32-kHz nominal) internal oscillators, and provision for an external clock. Refer to the
device datasheet of the respective PSoC 4 device for the exact clock resources available on the chip.
Table 7. System Resources Application Notes
Document Number
Document Name
®
AN86233
PSoC 4 Low-Power Modes and Power Reduction Techniques
AN90114
PSoC® 4000 Family Low-Power System Design Techniques
AN96667
PSoC® Real-Time Clock Based on Power-Line Frequency
Table 8. RTC Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE96926
PSoC® Real-Time Clock Based on Power Line Frequency
CE95915
Implementing an RTC with PSoC® 4100/PSoC 4200 Devices
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Table 9. System Resources Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95322
Hibernate and Wake Up with PSoC 4
CE95321
Hibernate and Stop Power Modes with PSoC 4
Table 10. WDT Code Examples
Document Number
5.7.5
Document Name
CE95401
Watchdog timer example using LCD with PSoC 4
CE95400
Watchdog timer interrupts and device reset for CY8CKIT-040 with PSoC 4000
S AR A D C
The 12-bit 1 MSample/second SAR ADC can operate at a maximum clock rate of 18 MHz and requires a minimum of
18 clocks at that frequency to do a 12-bit conversion.
Table 11. SAR ADC Application Note
Document Number
AN60590
Document Name
®
PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP – Temperature Measurement with a Diode
Table 12. SAR ADC Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95275
Sequencing SAR ADC and Die temperature sensor with PSoC 4
CE95272
SAR ADC in Differential Mode using Pre-Amplifier with PSoC 4
Table 13. PSoC Creator SAR ADC Component Datasheet
Document Number
001-96792
5.7.6
Document Name
PSoC 4 Sequencing Successive Approximation ADC (ADC_SAR_Seq)
CapSense and IDAC
The PSoC 4 has a CapSense block that allows you to detect finger touches. The CapSense block can be used to
implement user interfaces like buttons, linear and radial sliders, track pads, and proximity sensors.
Each CapSense block has two IDACs which can be used for general purposes if CapSense is not being used.
Table 14. CapSense Application Notes
Document Number
Document Name
®
®
AN85951
PSoC 4 CapSense Design Guide
AN92239
Proximity Sensing with CapSense®
Table 15. CapSense Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95297
1.2 Volt Comparator (CSD Comp) using Analog Multiplexer with PSoC 4
CE95289
CapSense Proximity with PSoC 4
CE95288
CapSense Low Power with PSoC 4
CE95286
CapSense CSD using Tuner with PSoC 4
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Document Number
Document Name
CE95285
CapSense CSD with PSoC 4
CE95327
8-Bit Current Digital to Analog Converter (IDAC8) with PSoC 4
Table 16. PSoC Creator CapSense and IDAC Component Datasheets
Document Number
5.7.7
Document Name
001-96069
PSoC 4 Capacitive Sensing (CapSense® CSD)
001-96067
PSoC 4 Capacitive Sensing (CapSense® Gesture)
001-96481
PSoC 4 Current Digital to Analog Converter
Programmable Analog – Opamp and Low Power Comparators
The PSoC 4 has up to four opamps with comparator modes, which allow most common analog functions to be
performed on-chip eliminating external components; PGAs, voltage buffers, filters, trans-impedance amplifiers, and
other functions can be realized with external passives saving power, cost, and space. The PSoC 4 also have up to 2
low-power comparators, which can also operate in the Deep Sleep and Hibernate modes. This allows the analog
system blocks to be disabled while retaining the ability to monitor external voltage levels during low-power modes.
Table 17. Opamp Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95341
Operational Amplifier (OpAmp) with PSoC 4
CE95340
Amplifier with Dynamic Gain Switching with PSoC 4
Table 18. Comparator Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95360
Scanning Comparator using common mode with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95293
Analog Voltage Comparator with PSoC 4
CE95338
Multiplexed Analog Comparator with PSoC 4
CE95333
Low Power Comparator with PSoC 4
Table 19. PSoC Creator Opamp and Low Power Comparator Component Datasheet
Document Number
5.7.8
Document Name
001-92541
PSoC 4 Operational Amplifier (Opamp)
001-92647
PSoC 4 Low Power Comparator
001-90677
1.2 Volt Comparator (CSD Comp)
TCPWM
®
The Timer, Counter, and Pulse Width Modulator (TCPWM) block in PSoC 4 implements the 16-bit timer, counter,
pulse width modulator (PWM), and quadrature decoder functionality. The block can be used to measure the period
and pulse width of an input signal (timer), find the number of times a particular event occurs (counter), generate PWM
signals, or decode quadrature signals.
Table 20. TCPWM Application Notes
Document Number
AN93637
www.cypress.com
Document Name
®
PSoC 4 Sensorless Field-Oriented Control (FOC)
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Table 21. TCPWM Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95354
Quadrature Decoder with PSoC 4
CE95351
Fixed Function PWM with PSoC 4
CE95349
Pseudo Random Sequence (PRS) generator with PSoC ¾/5LP
CE95385
TCPWM Timer/Counter Operation with PSoC 4
CE95380
TCPWM configuration with PSoC 4
Table 22. PSoC Creator TCPWM Component Datasheet
Document Number
001-92448
5.7.9
Document Name
PSoC 4 Timer Counter Pulse Width Modulator (TCPWM)
SCB – I2C, SPI, UART
The PSoC 4 has four SCBs, which can each implement an I2C, UART, or SPI interface.
Table 23. SCB Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE96999
Basic LIN Slave Implementation in PSoC® 4
CE95325
I2C LCD with PSoC 4
CE95366
UART Transmit and Receive using a Serial Communication Block (SCB) with PSoC 4
CE95365
SPI Transmit and Receive using a Serial Communication Block (SCB) with PSoC 4
CE95364
I2C Slave using a Serial Communication Block (SCB) with PSoC 4
CE95363
I2C Master using a Serial Communication Block (SCB) with PSoC 4
CE95362
Cypress EzI2C communication using a Serial Communication Block (SCB) with PSoC 4
CE95345
PMBus Slave in Thermal Management Application with PSoC 4
CE95389
UART Transmit with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95388
UART Receive with PSoC 3/4/5LP
Table 24. PSoC Creator SCB Component Datasheet
Document Number
001-96075
Document Name
PSoC 4 Serial Communication Block (SCB)
5.7.10 UDB
Universal Digital Blocks (UDBs) are programmable digital blocks that can be used to create custom digital logic apart
from the resources that are already present in PSoC. PSoC Creator provides Components for PWM, Counter, UART,
SPI, I2S and many other commonly used digital blocks which are made out of UDBs.
Apart from these, the UDBs can also be used to create a state machine or a custom communication protocol. They
can also be used to add logic gates to your design like OR, AND, XOR etc.
The PSoC 4 has up to eight UDBs; the UDB array also provides a switched Digital System Interconnect (DSI) fabric
that allows signals from peripherals and ports to be routed to and through the UDBs for communication and control.
Table 25. UDB Application Notes
Document Number
Document Name
®
AN82156
PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP – Designing PSoC Creator™ Components with UDB Datapaths
AN82250
PSoC® 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP – Implementing Programmable Logic Designs with Verilog
www.cypress.com
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Document Number
Document Name
AN60024
PSoC® 3, PSoC 4, PSoC 5LP Switch Debouncer and Glitch Filter
AN62510
Implementing State Machines with PSoC® 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP
Table 26. UDB Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95319
Hardware Glitch Filter with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95348
Precise Illumination Signal Modulation (PrISM) with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95298
Switch Debouncer with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95294
7-bit Down Counter with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95334
Lookup table (LUT) with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95386
TMP05 temperature sensor interface with PSoC 3/4/5LP
5.7.11 CAN
The PSoC 4 CAN peripheral is a fully functional Controller Area Network (CAN) supporting communication baud rates
up to 1 Mbps. There are two independent CAN 2.0B blocks in PSoC 4200M and PSoC 4200L, which are certified
CAN conformant.
Table 27. CAN Code Examples
Document Number
CE97311
Document Name
®
PSoC 4 M: CAN Simplex Communication with CapSense®
Table 28. PSoC Creator CAN Component Datasheet
Document Number
001-85034
Document Name
Controller Area Network (CAN)
5 . 7 . 1 2 U n i ve r s a l S e r i a l B u s ( U S B )
PSoC 4 has a Full-speed USB 2.0 compliant device interface. It has one control endpoint and eight other endpoints.
The interface has a USB transceiver and can be operated form the IO obviating the need for a crystal oscillator.
5 . 7 . 1 3 S e g m e n t L C D D r i ve
PSoC 4 has an LCD controller, which can drive up to eight commons and up to 56 segments. Any pin can be either a
common or a segment pin. It uses full digital methods to drive the LCD segments requiring no generation of internal
LCD voltages.
Table 29. Segment LCD Application Note
Document Number
AN87391
Document Name
®
PSoC 4 Segment LCD Direct Drive
Table 30. Segment LCD Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95369
Segment LCD with PSoC 4
001-88604
PSoC 4 Segment LCD (SegLCD)
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Document No. 001-79953 Rev. *M
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5.7.14 GPIOs
PSoC 4 has upto 98 GPIOs in the 124-ball VFBGA package. The pins are organized in logical entities called ports,
which are 8-bit in width.
Table 31. GPIO Application Notes
Document Number
AN86439
Document Name
®
PSoC 4 – Using GPIO Pins
Table 32. PSoC Creator Pins Component Datasheet
Document Number
001-92674
Document Name
Pins
5.7.15 Smart IO™
PSoC 4 has a Smart IO Component associated with some of its ports and provides a programmable logic fabric
interposed between a GPIO port and the connections to it from various peripherals and sources. Smart IO is a fabric
of switches and LUTs that allows Boolean functions to be performed on signals being routed to the pins of a GPIO
port. The Smart IO Component should be used whenever simple logic operations and routing are required to be
performed on signals going to and coming from I/O pins. Each Smart IO Component is associated with a particular
GPIO port and consumes the port entirely. If the Component is not used, then the Smart IO functionality for that port
is bypassed.
Table 33. Smart IO Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
®
®
CE209974
PSoC 4 Breathing LED with Smart IO
CE209975
PSoC® 4 Clock Buffer with Smart IO®
CE209976
PSoC® 4 SPI Slave Select Inversion with Smart IO®
5.7.16 Program and Debug
The PSoC 4 Program and Debug interface provides a communication gateway for an external device to perform
programming or debugging. The external device can be a Cypress-supplied programmer and debugger, or a thirdparty device that supports PSoC 4 programming and debugging. The serial wire debug (SWD) interface is used as
the communication protocol between the external device and PSoC 4.
Table 34. Program and Debug Application Notes
Document Number
Document Name
®
AN84858
PSoC 4 Programming Using an External Microcontroller (HSSP)
KBA93541
Using the CY8CKIT-049 to Program Another PSoC 4
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
5 . 7 . 1 7 S ys t e m L e ve l Ap p l i c a t i o n N o t e s a n d C o d e E x a m p l e s
Table 35. System Design Application Notes
Document Number
Document Name
®
AN57821
PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP Mixed-Signal Circuit Board Layout Considerations
AN81623
PSoC® 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP Digital Design Best Practices
AN88619
PSoC® 4 Hardware Design Considerations
AN2155
PSoC® EMI Design Considerations
AN89056
PSoC® 4 – IEC 60730 Class B and IEC 61508 SIL Safety Software Library
AN80994
PSoC® 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP EMC Best Practices and Recommendations
Table 36. Fan Controller Application Note
Document Number
AN89346
Document Name
®
PSoC 4 Intelligent Fan Controller
Table 37. Bootloader Application Notes
Document Number
Document Name
®
AN68272
PSoC 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP UART Bootloader
AN73854
PSoC® 3, PSoC 4, and PSoC 5LP Introduction to Bootloaders
AN86526
PSoC® 4 I2C Bootloader
Table 38. Character LCD Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95291
Char LCD using Horizontal Bar Graph (Hbar) with PSoC 4
CE95290
Char LCD using Custom Font with PSoC 4
Table 39. Fan Controller Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95318
Firmware Fan Control with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95315
Auto Firmware Fan Control with Alert with PSoC 4
Table 40. Bootloader Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95281
Bootloader Project with PSoC 4
CE95280
Bootloadable Project with PSoC 4
Table 41. Miscellaneous Code Examples
Document Number
Document Name
CE95329
Compensation of ILO Trimming with PSoC 4
CE95296
Cyclic Redundancy Check with PSoC 3/4/5LP
CE95379
Software based UART transmit with PSoC 3/4/5LP
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Document No. 001-79953 Rev. *M
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Table 42. PSoC Creator System Level Component Datasheets
Document Number
6
Document Name
001-92648
Bootloader and Bootloadable
001-85137
Interrupt
001-96071
PSoC® Creator™ System Reference Guide (CY_Boot Component)
Summary
This application note explored the PSoC 4 architecture and development tools. PSoC 4 is a truly programmable
embedded system-on-chip, integrating configurable analog and digital peripheral functions, memory, and an ARM
Cortex-M0/M0+ microcontroller on a single chip. Because of the integrated features and low-leakage power modes,
PSoC 4 is an ideal choice for low-power and cost-effective embedded systems.
This application note also guided you to a comprehensive collection of resources to accelerate in-depth learning
about PSoC 4.
About the Authors
Name:
Nidhin M S
Title:
Applications Engineer Sr.
Background:
Nidhin graduated from GEC Thrissur with a Bachelor's degree in Electronics and Communication
Engineering. His technical interests are analog signal processing, low-power design, and capacitive
touch sensing.
Name:
Ranjith M
Title:
Applications Engineer Sr.
Background:
Ranjith graduated from GEC Thrissur with a Bachelor's degree in Electronics and Communication
Engineering. His technical interests are communication protocols, digital logic design, and device
programming.
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-79953 Rev. *M
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Getting Started with PSoC® 4
Document History
®
Document Title: AN79953 - Getting Started with PSoC 4
Document Number: 001-79953
Revision
ECN
Orig. of
Change
Submissio
n Date
**
3881879
RLIU
01/24/2013
*A
3968932
RLIU
04/11/2013
*B
3996226
MKEA
05/09/2013
*C
4219723
NIDH
12/19/2013
Description of Change
New Application Note
Demo project changed to leverage Pioneer kit.
Added architecture introduction.
Reformatted graphics. Updated links.
Updated attached Associated Project files.
Updated content across the entire document.
Updated in new template.
*G
4339565
NIDH
04/10/2014
*H
4514729
MKEA
09/25/2014
*I
4679544
NIDH
03/17/2015
Updated the projects and the respective section in the AN to support PSoC.
Creator 3.0 SP1 and PSoC 4000 device.
Added Code Examples section.
Minor edits and format changes throughout the document.
Added More Information section.
Removed detailed feature descriptions.
Updated for PSoC 4200M family of devices.
Updated PSoC Resources and PSoC is More Than an MCU.
*J
4826009
RNJT
09/10/2015
Added the following sections: Convert Project to Bootloadable for CY8CKIT-049,
Bootload Your CY8CKIT-049 and More PSoC 4 Code Examples.
Updated Figure 4.
*K
4922589
RNJT
09/16/2015
*L
5068160
RNJT
12/30/2015
*M
5127180
ARVI
02/05/2016
Updated for PSoC 4200L.
Updated the example projects to PSoC Creator 3.3.
Updated the example projects to PSoC Creator 3.3 SP1.
Updated for PSoC 4000S and PSoC 4100S.
Updated the example projects to PSoC Creator 3.3 SP2.
Updated Table 2, Table 3 to add PSoC 4200 BLE.
www.cypress.com
Document No. 001-79953 Rev. *M
31
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Document No. 001-79953 Rev. *M
32
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