CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C Full Speed USB (12 Mbps) Peripheral Controller with Integrated Hub Datasheet.pdf

CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Full Speed USB (12 Mbps) Peripheral
Controller with Integrated Hub
Full Speed USB (12 Mbps) Peripheral Controller with Integrated Hub
Features
■
■
■
Full speed USB peripheral microcontroller with an integrated
USB hub
❐ Well suited for USB compound devices such as a keyboard
hub function
8-bit USB optimized microcontroller
❐ Harvard architecture
❐ 6 MHz external clock source
❐ 12 MHz internal CPU clock
❐ 48 MHz internal Hub clock
Improved output drivers to reduce electromagnetic interference
(EMI)
■
Operating voltage from 4.0 V–5.5 V DC
■
Operating temperature from 0 °C–70 °C
■
CY7C66013C available in 48-pin SSOP (-PVXC) packages
■
CY7C66113C available in 56-pin QFN or 56-pin SSOP (-PVXC)
packages
■
Industry standard programmer support
Functional Overview
Internal memory
❐ 256 bytes of RAM
❐ 8 kB of PROM
■
Integrated Master and Slave I2C compatible controller
(100 kHz) enabled through General Purpose I/O (GPIO) pins
■
Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI) for data transfer
to external devices
■
I/O ports
❐ Three GPIO ports (Port 0 to 2) capable of sinking 8 mA per
pin (typical)
❐ An additional GPIO port (Port 3) capable of sinking 12 mA
per pin (typical) for high current requirements: LEDs
❐ Higher current drive achievable by connecting multiple GPIO
pins together to drive a common output
❐ Each GPIO port is configured as inputs with internal pull ups
or open drain outputs or traditional CMOS outputs
❐ A Digital to Analog Conversion (DAC) port with
programmable current sink outputs is available on the
CY7C66113C device
❐ Maskable interrupts on all I/O pins
■
12-bit free running timer with one microsecond clock ticks
■
Watchdog Timer (WDT)
■
Internal Power on Reset (POR)
■
USB Specification compliance
❐ Conforms to USB Specification, Version 1.1
❐ Conforms to USB HID Specification, Version 1.1
❐ Supports one or two device addresses with up to five user
configured endpoints
• Up to two 8-byte control endpoints
• Up to four 8-byte data endpoints
• Up to two 32-byte data endpoints
❐ Integrated USB transceivers
❐ Supports four downstream USB ports
❐ GPIO pins provide individual power control outputs for each
downstream USB port
❐ GPIO pins provide individual port over current inputs for each
downstream USB port
Cypress Semiconductor Corporation
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
■
The CY7C66013C and CY7C66113C are compound devices
with a full speed USB microcontroller in combination with a USB
hub. Each device is suited for combination peripheral functions
with hubs such as a keyboard hub function. The 8-bit one time
programmable microcontroller with a 12 Mbps USB Hub
supports as many as four downstream ports.
GPIO
The CY7C66013C features 29 GPIO pins to support USB and
other applications. The I/O pins are grouped into four ports
(P0[7:0], P1[7:0], P2[7:0], P3[4:0]) where each port is configured
as inputs with internal pull ups, open drain outputs, or traditional
CMOS outputs. Ports 0 to 2 are rated at 8 mA per pin (typical)
sink current. Port 3 pins are rated at 12 mA per pin (typical) sink
current, which allows these pins to drive LEDs. Multiple GPIO
pins are connected together to drive a single output for more
drive current capacity. Additionally, each I/O pin is used to
generate a GPIO interrupt to the microcontroller. All of the GPIO
interrupts all share the same “GPIO” interrupt vector.
The CY7C66113C has 31 GPIO pins (P0[7:0], P1[7:0], P2[7:0],
P3[6:0]).
DAC
•
The CY7C66113C has an additional port P4[7:0] that features an
additional eight programmable sink current I/O pins (DAC).
Every DAC pin includes an integrated 14 kΩ pull up resistor.
When a ‘1’ is written to a DAC I/O pin, the output current sink is
disabled and the output pin is driven HIGH by the internal pull up
resistor. When a ‘0’ is written to a DAC I/O pin, the internal pull
up is disabled and the output pin provides the programmed
amount of sink current. A DAC I/O pin is used as an input with
an internal pull up by writing a ‘1’ to the pin.
The sink current for each DAC I/O pin is individually programmed
to one of sixteen values using dedicated Isink registers. DAC bits
DAC[1:0] is used as high current outputs with a programmable
sink current range of 3.2 to 16 mA (typical). DAC bits DAC[7:2]
have a programmable current sink range of 0.2 to 1.0 mA
(typical). Multiple DAC pins are connected together to drive a
single output that requires more sink current capacity. Each I/O
pin is used to generate a DAC interrupt to the microcontroller.
Also, the interrupt polarity for each DAC I/O pin is individually
programmable.
198 Champion Court
•
San Jose, CA 95134-1709
•
408-943-2600
Revised March 21, 2014
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Clock
Interrupts
The microcontroller uses an external 6 MHz crystal and an
internal oscillator to provide a reference to an internal PLL based
clock generator. This technology allows the customer application
to use an inexpensive 6 MHz fundamental crystal that reduces
the clock related noise emissions (EMI). A PLL clock generator
provides the 6, 12, and 48 MHz clock signals for distribution
within the microcontroller.
The microcontroller supports eleven maskable interrupts in the
vectored interrupt controller. Interrupt sources include the 128 μs
(bit 6) and 1.024 ms (bit 9) outputs from the free-running timer,
five USB endpoints, the USB hub, the DAC port, the GPIO ports,
and the I2C compatible master mode interface. The timer bits
cause an interrupt (if enabled) when the bit toggles from LOW ‘0’
to HIGH ‘1.’ The USB endpoints interrupt after the USB host has
written data to the endpoint FIFO or after the USB controller
sends a packet to the USB host. The DAC ports have an
additional level of masking that allows the user to select which
DAC inputs causes a DAC interrupt. The GPIO ports also have
a level of masking to select which GPIO inputs causes a GPIO
interrupt. For additional flexibility, the input transition polarity that
causes an interrupt is programmable for each pin of the DAC
port. Input transition polarity is programmed for each GPIO port
as part of the port configuration. The interrupt polarity can be
rising edge (‘0’ to ‘1’) or falling edge (‘1’ to ‘0’).
Memory
The CY7C66013C and CY7C66113C have 8 kB of PROM.
Power on Reset, Watchdog, and Free Running Timer
These parts include POR logic, a WDT, and a 12-bit free-running
timer. The POR logic detects when power is applied to the
device, resets the logic to a known state, and begins executing
instructions at PROM address 0x0000. The WDT is used to
ensure that the microcontroller recovers after a period of
inactivity. The firmware may become inactive for a variety of
reasons, including errors in the code or a hardware failure such
as waiting for an interrupt that never occurs.
I2C and HAPI Interface
The microcontroller communicates with external electronics
through the GPIO pins. An I2C compatible interface
accommodates a 100 kHz serial link with an external device.
There is also a HAPI to transfer data to an external device.
Timer
The free-running 12-bit timer clocked at 1 MHz provides two
interrupt sources, 128 μs and 1.024 ms. The timer is used to
measure the duration of an event under firmware control by
reading the timer at the start of the event and after the event is
complete. The difference between the two readings indicates the
duration of the event in microseconds. The upper four bits of the
timer are latched into an internal register when the firmware
reads the lower eight bits. A read from the upper four bits actually
reads data from the internal register, instead of the timer. This
feature eliminates the need for firmware to try to compensate if
the upper four bits increment immediately after the lower eight
bits are read.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
USB
The CY7C66013C and CY7C66113C include an integrated USB
Serial Interface Engine (SIE) that supports the integrated
peripherals and the hub controller function. The hardware
supports up to two USB device addresses with one device
address for the hub (two endpoints) and a device address for a
compound device (three endpoints). The SIE allows the USB
host to communicate with the hub and functions integrated into
the microcontroller. The part includes a 1:4 hub repeater with one
upstream port and four downstream ports. The USB Hub allows
power management control of the downstream ports by using
GPIO pins assigned by the user firmware. The user has the
option of ganging the downstream ports together with a single
pair of power management pins, or providing power
management for each port with four pairs of power management
pins.
Page 2 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Logic Block Diagram
External 6 MHz crystal
USB
Transceiver
D+[0] Upstream
D–[0] USB Port
PLL
USB
Transceiver
D+[1]
D–[1]
USB
Transceiver
D+[2]
D–[2]
USB
SIE
USB
Transceiver
D+[3]
D–[3]
Interrupt
Controller
USB
Transceiver
D+[4]
D–[4]
48 MHz
Clock
Divider
12 MHz
8-bit
CPU
12 MHz
Repeater
RAM
256 byte
8-bit Bus
PROM
8 KB
Downstream USB Ports
6 MHz
12-bit
Timer
Watchdog
Timer
Power-On
Reset
GPIO
PORT 0
GPIO
PORT 1
GPIO/
HAPI
PORT 2
GPIO
PORT 3
P0[0]
Power management under firmware
control using GPIO pins
P0[7]
P1[0]
P1[7]
P2[0:1,7]
P2[2]; Latch_Empty
P2[3]; Data_Ready
P2[4]; STB
P2[5]; OE
P2[6]; CS
P3[0]
P3[4]
High Current
Outputs
GPIO
PORT 3
P3[5] Additional
P3[6] High Current
Outputs
DAC
PORT
DAC[0]
I2C
Interface
DAC[7]
CY7C66113C only
SCLK
SDATA
*I2C-compatible interface enabled by firmware through
P2[1:0] or P1[1:0]
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 3 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Contents
Pin Configurations ........................................................... 5
Product Summary Tables ................................................ 9
Pin Assignments .......................................................... 9
I/O Register Summary ................................................. 9
Instruction Set Summary ........................................... 11
Programming Model ....................................................... 12
14-bit Program Counter (PC) .................................... 12
8-bit Accumulator (A) ................................................. 13
8-bit Temporary Register (X) ..................................... 13
8-bit Program Stack Pointer (PSP) ............................ 13
8-bit Data Stack Pointer (DSP) .................................. 13
Address Modes ......................................................... 14
Clocking .......................................................................... 14
Reset ................................................................................ 15
Power on Reset ......................................................... 15
Watchdog Reset ........................................................ 15
Suspend Mode ................................................................ 16
General Purpose I/O (GPIO) Ports ................................ 16
GPIO Configuration Port ........................................... 18
GPIO Interrupt Enable Ports ..................................... 19
DAC Port .......................................................................... 20
DAC Isink Registers .................................................. 21
DAC Port Interrupts ................................................... 21
12-bit Free-Running Timer ............................................. 22
I2C and HAPI Configuration Register ........................... 23
I2C Compatible Controller .............................................. 23
Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI) ............... 26
Processor Status and Control Register ....................... 27
Interrupts ......................................................................... 28
Interrupt Vectors ........................................................ 29
Interrupt Latency ....................................................... 30
USB Bus Reset Interrupt ........................................... 30
Timer Interrupt ........................................................... 30
USB Endpoint Interrupts ............................................ 30
USB Hub Interrupt ..................................................... 30
DAC Interrupt ............................................................ 31
GPIO and HAPI Interrupt ........................................... 31
I2C Interrupt ............................................................... 32
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
USB Overview ................................................................. 32
USB Serial Interface Engine ...................................... 32
USB Enumeration ...................................................... 32
USB Hub .......................................................................... 33
Connecting and Disconnecting a USB Device .......... 33
Enabling and Disabling a USB Device ...................... 34
Hub Downstream Ports Status and Control .............. 35
Downstream Port Suspend and Resume .................. 36
USB Upstream Port Status and Control .................... 38
USB SIE Operation ......................................................... 39
USB Device Addresses ............................................. 39
USB Device Endpoints .............................................. 39
USB Control Endpoint Mode Registers ..................... 39
USB Non Control Endpoint Mode Registers ............. 41
USB Endpoint Counter Registers .............................. 41
Endpoint Mode and Count Registers Update and
Locking Mechanism .......................................................... 42
USB Mode Tables ........................................................... 44
Register Summary .......................................................... 48
Sample Schematic .......................................................... 50
Absolute Maximum Ratings .......................................... 51
Electrical Characteristics ............................................... 51
Switching Characteristics .............................................. 52
Ordering Information ...................................................... 55
Ordering Code Definitions ......................................... 55
Package Diagrams .......................................................... 56
Quad Flat Package No Leads (QFN) Package
Design Notes ................................................................... 58
Acronyms ........................................................................ 59
Document Conventions ................................................. 59
Units of Measure ....................................................... 59
Document History Page ................................................. 60
Sales, Solutions, and Legal Information ...................... 61
Worldwide Sales and Design Support ....................... 61
Products .................................................................... 61
PSoC Solutions ......................................................... 61
Page 4 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Pin Configurations
Figure 1. CY7C66013C 48-pin SSOP and CY7C66113C 56-pin SSOP
TOP VIEW
CY7C66113C
CY7C66013C
XTALOUT
1
48
VCC
XTALOUT
1
56
VCC
XTALIN
2
47
P1[1]
XTALIN
2
55
P1[1]
VREF
3
46
P1[0]
VREF
3
54
P1[0]
P1[3]
4
45
P1[2]
P1[3]
4
53
P1[2]
P1[5]
5
44
P1[4]
P1[5]
5
52
P1[4]
P1[7]
6
43
P1[6]
P1[7]
6
51
P1[6]
P3[1]
7
42
P3[0]
P3[1]
7
50
P3[0]
D+[0]
8
41
D–[3]
D+[0]
8
49
D–[3]
9
48
D+[3]
D–[0]
9
40
D+[3]
D–[0]
P3[3]
10
39
P3[2]
P3[3]
10
47
P3[2]
GND
11
38
GND
GND
11
46
P3[4]
D+[1]
12
37
P3[4]
P3[5]
12
45
D–[4]
D–[1]
13
36
D–[4]
D+[1]
13
44
D+[4]
P2[1]
14
35
D+[4]
D–[1]
14
43
P3[6]
D+[2]
15
34
P2[0]
P2[1]
15
42
P2[0]
D–[2]
16
33
P2[2]
D+[2]
16
41
P2[2]
P2[3]
17
32
GND
D–[2]
17
40
GND
P2[5]
18
31
P2[4]
P2[3]
18
39
P2[4]
P2[7]
19
30
P2[6]
P2[5]
19
38
P2[6]
GND
20
29
VPP
P2[7]
20
37
DAC[0]
P0[7]
21
28
P0[0]
DAC[7]
21
36
VPP
P0[5]
22
27
P0[2]
P0[7]
22
35
P0[0]
P0[3]
23
26
P0[4]
P0[5]
23
34
P0[2]
P0[1]
24
25
P0[6]
P0[3]
24
33
P0[4]
P0[1]
25
32
P0[6]
DAC[5]
26
31
DAC[2]
DAC[3]
27
30
DAC[4]
DAC[1]
28
29
DAC[6]
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 5 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Figure 2. CY7C66113C 56-pin QFN
D+[0]
P3[1]
P1[7]
P1[5]
P1[3]
Vref
XTALIN
XTALOUT
Vcc
P1[1]
P1[0]
P1[2]
P1[4]
P1[6]
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
48
47
46
45
44
43
D-[0]
1
42
P3[0]
P3[3]
2
41
D–[3]
GND
3
40
D+[3]
P3[5]
4
39
P3[2]
D+[1]
5
38
P3[4]
D–[1]
6
37
D–[4]
P2[1]
7
36
D+[4]
D+[2]
8
35
P3[6]
D–[2]
9
34
P2[0]
P2[3]
10
33
P2[2]
P2[5]
11
32
GND
P2[7]
12
31
P2[4]
DAC[7]
13
30
P2[6]
P0[7]
14
29
DAC[0]
CY7C66113C
56-pin QFN
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
P0[5]
P0[3]
P0[1]
DAC[5]
DAC[3]
DAC[1]
DAC[6]
DAC[4]
DAC[2]
P0[6]
P0[4]
P0[2]
P0[0]
Vpp
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 6 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Figure 3. CY7C66113C DIE
(3398, 4194)
Cypress Logo
Pin 1
Pin 60
Pin 15
Pin 30
Pin 45
(0,0)
DIE STEP: 3398 x 4194 microns
Die Size: 3322 x 4129 microns
Die Thickness: 14 mils = 355.6 microns
Pad Size: 80 x 80 microns
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 7 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 1. Pad Coordinates in Microns (0,0) to Bond Pad Centers
Pad No.
Pin Name
X
Y
Pad #
Pin Name
X
Y
1
XtalOut
1274.2
3588.8
37
DAC6
2000.6
210.6
2
XtalIn
1132.8
3588.8
38
DAC4
2103.6
210.6
3
Vref
889.85
3588.8
39
DAC2
2206.6
210.6
4
Port11b
684.65
3588.8
40
Port06
2308.4
210.6
5
Port13
581.65
3588.8
41
Port04
2411.4
210.6
6
Port15
478.65
3588.8
42
Port02
2514.4
210.6
7
Vss
375.65
3588.8
43
Port00
2617.4
210.6
8
Port17
0
3408.35
44
Vpp
2992.4
25.4
9
Port31
0
3162.05
45
DAC0
2992.4
151.75
10
Du+
0
3060.55
46
Port26
2992.4
306.15
11
Du–
0
2752.4
47
DD+6
2992.4
407.65
12
Port33
0
2650.95
48
DD–6
2992.4
715.75
13
Vss
0
2474.6
49
Port24
2992.4
817.25
14
Port35
0
2368.45
50
Vss
2992.4
923.4
15
DD+1
0
2266.95
51
Port22
2992.4
1086.75
16
DD–1
0
1958.85
52
DD+5
2992.4
1188.25
17
Port37
0
1857.35
53
DD–5
2992.4
1496.35
18
Vref
0
1680.4
54
Port20
2992.4
1597.85
19
Port21
0
1567.4
55
Vref
2992.4
1710.8
20
DD+2
0
1465.95
56
Port36
2992.4
1874.75
21
DD–2
0
1157.85
57
DD+4
2992.4
1976.25
22
Port23
0
1056.35
58
DD–4
2992.4
2284.35
23
Vss
0
880
59
Port34
2992.4
2385.85
24
Port25
0
773.85
60
Vss
2992.4
2492
25
DD+7
0
672.35
61
Port32
2992.4
2655.35
26
DD–7
0
364.25
62
DD+3
2992.4
2756.85
27
Port27
0
262.75
63
DD–3
2992.4
3064.95
28
DAC7
0
100.75
64
Port30
2992.4
3166.45
29
Vss
0
0
65
Port16
2992.4
3412.25
30
Port07
375.2
210.6
66
Port14
2634.2
3588.8
31
Port05
478.2
210.6
67
Port12
2531.2
3588.8
32
Port03
581.2
210.6
68
Port10
2428.2
3588.8
33
Port01
684.2
210.6
69
Port11
2325.2
3588.8
34
DAC5
788.4
210.6
70
VCC
2221.75
3588.8
35
DAC3
891.4
210.6
71
PadOpt
2121.75
3588.8
36
DAC1
994.4
210.6
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 8 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Product Summary Tables
Pin Assignments
Table 2. Pin Assignments
Name
I/O
48-pin
56-pin QFN
56-pin SSOP
Description
D+[0], D–[0]
I/O
8, 9
56, 1
8, 9
Upstream port, USB differential data.
D+[1], D–[1]
I/O
12, 13
5, 6
13, 14
Downstream port 1, USB differential data.
D+[2], D–[2]
I/O
15, 16
8, 9
16, 17
Downstream port 2, USB differential data.
D+[3], D–[3]
I/O
40, 41
40, 41
48, 49
Downstream port 3, USB differential data.
44, 45
Downstream port 4, USB differential data.
D+[4], D–[4]
I/O
35, 36
36, 37
P0[7:0]
I/O
21, 25, 22, 26,
23, 27, 24, 28
14, 15, 16, 17, 22, 32, 23, 33, GPIO Port 0.
24, 25, 26, 27 24, 34, 25, 35
P1[7:0]
I/O
6, 43, 5, 44, 4,
45, 47, 46
52, 53, 54, 43, 6, 51, 5, 52, 4, GPIO Port 1.
44, 45, 46, 47 53, 55, 54
P2[7:0]
I/O
19, 30, 18, 31,
17, 33, 14, 34
7, 10, 11, 12, 20, 38, 19, 39, GPIO Port 2.
30, 31, 33, 34 18, 41, 15, 42
P3[6:0]
I/O
37, 10, 39, 7, 42 55, 2, 4, 35,
38, 39, 42,
DAC[7:0]
I/O
n/a
13, 18, 19, 20, 21, 29, 26, 30, Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) Port with programmable
21, 22, 23, 29 27, 31, 28, 37 current sink outputs. DAC[1:0] offer a programmable range of
3.2 to 16 mA typical. DAC[7:2] have a programmable sink
current range of 0.2 to 1.0 mA typical.
IN
2
50
2
6 MHz crystal or external clock input.
OUT 1
49
1
6 MHz crystal out.
Programming voltage supply, tie to ground during normal
operation.
XTALIN
XTALOUT
43, 12, 46, 10, GPIO Port 3, capable of sinking 12 mA (typical).
47, 7, 50
VPP
29
28
36
VCC
48
48
56
Voltage supply.
GND
11, 20, 32, 38
3, 32
11, 40
Ground.
3
51
3
External 3.3 V supply voltage for the differential data output
buffers and the D+ pull up.
VREF
IN
I/O Register Summary
I/O registers are accessed via the I/O Read (IORD) and I/O Write (IOWR, IOWX) instructions. IORD reads data from the selected port
into the accumulator. IOWR performs the reverse; it writes data from the accumulator to the selected port. Indexed I/O Write (IOWX)
adds the contents of X to the address in the instruction to form the port address and writes data from the accumulator to the specified
port. Specifying address 0 such as IOWX 0h indicates the I/O register is selected solely by the contents of X.
All undefined registers are reserved. It is important not to write to reserved registers as this may cause an undefined operation or
increased current consumption during operation. When writing to registers with reserved bits, the reserved bits must be written with ‘0.’
Table 3. I/O Register Summary
I/O Address
Read/Write
Port 0 Data
Register Name
0x00
R/W
GPIO Port 0 Data
16
Port 1 Data
0x01
R/W
GPIO Port 1 Data
17
Port 2 Data
0x02
R/W
GPIO Port 2 Data
17
Port 3 Data
0x03
R/W
GPIO Port 3 Data
17
Port 0 Interrupt Enable
0x04
W
Interrupt Enable for Pins in Port 0
19
Port 1 Interrupt Enable
0x05
W
Interrupt Enable for Pins in Port 1
19
Port 2 Interrupt Enable
0x06
W
Interrupt Enable for Pins in Port 2
19
Port 3 Interrupt Enable
0x07
W
Interrupt Enable for Pins in Port 3
19
GPIO Configuration
0x08
R/W
GPIO Port Configurations
18
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Function
Page
Page 9 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 3. I/O Register Summary (continued)
Register Name
I/O Address
Read/Write
Function
Page
2
2
HAPI and I C Configuration
0x09
R/W
HAPI Width and I C Position Configuration
23
USB Device Address A
0x10
R/W
USB Device Address A
39
EP A0 Counter Register
0x11
R/W
USB Address A, Endpoint 0 Counter
41
EP A0 Mode Register
0x12
R/W
USB Address A, Endpoint 0 Configuration
40
EP A1 Counter Register
0x13
R/W
USB Address A, Endpoint 1 Counter
41
EP A1 Mode Register
0x14
R/W
USB Address A, Endpoint 1 Configuration
41
EP A2 Counter Register
0x15
R/W
USB Address A, Endpoint 2 Counter
41
EP A2 Mode Register
0x16
R/W
USB Address A, Endpoint 2 Configuration
41
USB Status & Control
0x1F
R/W
USB Upstream Port Traffic Status and Control
38
Global Interrupt Enable
0x20
R/W
Global Interrupt Enable
28
Endpoint Interrupt Enable
0x21
R/W
USB Endpoint Interrupt Enables
28
Interrupt Vector
0x23
R
Pending Interrupt Vector Read/Clear
30
Timer (LSB)
0x24
R
Lower 8 Bits of Free-running Timer (1 MHz)
22
Timer (MSB)
0x25
R
Upper 4 Bits of Free-running Timer
22
WDT Clear
0x26
W
Watchdog Timer Clear
15
I2C Control & Status
0x28
R/W
I2C Status and Control
24
0x29
R/W
I2C
24
0x30
R/W
DAC Data
I2C
Data
DAC Data
Data
20
DAC Interrupt Enable
0x31
W
Interrupt Enable for each DAC Pin
21
DAC Interrupt Polarity
0x32
W
Interrupt Polarity for each DAC Pin
21
0x38-0x3F
W
Input Sink Current Control for each DAC Pin
21
0x40
R/W
USB Device Address B (not used in 5-endpoint mode)
39
DAC Isink
USB Device Address B
EP B0 Counter Register
0x41
R/W
USB Address B, Endpoint 0 Counter
41
EP B0 Mode Register
0x42
R/W
USB Address B, Endpoint 0 Configuration, or
USB Address A, Endpoint 3 in 5-endpoint Mode
40
EP B1 Counter Register
0x43
R/W
USB Address B, Endpoint 1 Counter
41
EP B1 Mode Register
0x44
R/W
USB Address B, Endpoint 1 Configuration, or
USB Address A, Endpoint 4 in 5-endpoint Mode
41
Hub Port Connect Status
0x48
R/W
Hub Downstream Port Connect Status
33
Hub Port Enable
0x49
R/W
Hub Downstream Ports Enable
34
Hub Port Speed
0x4A
R/W
Hub Downstream Ports Speed
34
Hub Port Control (Ports [4:1])
0x4B
R/W
Hub Downstream Ports Control
35
Hub Port Suspend
0x4D
R/W
Hub Downstream Port Suspend Control
36
Hub Port Resume Status
0x4E
R
Hub Downstream Ports Resume Status
37
Hub Ports SE0 Status
0x4F
R
Hub Downstream Ports SE0 Status
36
Hub Ports Data
0x50
R
Hub Downstream Ports Differential Data
36
Hub Downstream Force Low
0x51
R/W
Hub Downstream Ports Force LOW
35
Processor Status & Control
0xFF
R/W
Microprocessor Status and Control Register
27
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 10 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Instruction Set Summary
Refer to the CYASM Assembler User’s Guide for more details.
Table 4. Instruction Set Summary
Mnemonic
Operand
HALT
Opcode
Cycles
Mnemonic
Operand
Opcode
Cycles
00
7
NOP
01
4
INC A
acc
6
INC X
x
22
4
7
INC [expr]
direct
23
7
4
INC [X+expr]
index
24
8
6
DEC A
acc
25
4
06
7
DEC X
x
26
4
07
4
DEC [expr]
direct
27
7
ADD A,expr
data
ADD A,[expr]
direct
02
ADD A,[X+expr]
index
03
ADC A,expr
data
04
ADC A,[expr]
direct
05
ADC A,[X+expr]
index
SUB A,expr
data
20
4
21
4
SUB A,[expr]
direct
08
6
DEC [X+expr]
index
28
8
SUB A,[X+expr]
index
09
7
IORD expr
address
29
5
SBB A,expr
data
0A
4
IOWR expr
address
2A
5
SBB A,[expr]
direct
0B
6
POP A
2B
4
SBB A,[X+expr]
index
0C
7
POP X
2C
4
OR A,expr
data
0D
4
PUSH A
2D
5
OR A,[expr]
direct
0E
6
PUSH X
2E
5
OR A,[X+expr]
index
0F
7
SWAP A,X
2F
5
AND A,expr
data
10
4
SWAP A,DSP
AND A,[expr]
direct
11
6
MOV [expr],A
direct
30
5
31
5
AND A,[X+expr]
index
12
7
MOV [X+expr],A
index
32
6
XOR A,expr
data
13
4
OR [expr],A
direct
33
7
XOR A,[expr]
direct
14
6
OR [X+expr],A
index
34
8
XOR A,[X+expr]
index
15
7
AND [expr],A
direct
35
7
CMP A,expr
data
16
5
AND [X+expr],A
index
36
8
CMP A,[expr]
direct
17
7
XOR [expr],A
direct
37
7
CMP A,[X+expr]
index
18
8
XOR [X+expr],A
index
38
8
MOV A,expr
data
19
4
IOWX [X+expr]
index
39
6
MOV A,[expr]
direct
1A
5
CPL
3A
4
MOV A,[X+expr]
index
1B
6
ASL
3B
4
MOV X,expr
data
1C
4
ASR
3C
4
MOV X,[expr]
direct
1D
5
RLC
3D
4
reserved
1E
RRC
3E
4
XPAGE
1F
4
RET
3F
8
MOV A,X
40
4
DI
70
4
MOV X,A
41
4
EI
72
4
MOV PSP,A
CALL
addr
60
4
RETI
73
8
50-5F
10
JC
addr
C0-CF
5
JMP
addr
80-8F
5
JNC
addr
D0-DF
5
CALL
addr
90-9F
10
JACC
addr
E0-EF
7
JZ
addr
A0-AF
5
INDEX
addr
F0-FF
14
JNZ
addr
B0-BF
5
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 11 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Programming Model
14-bit Program Counter (PC)
The 14-bit PC allows access to up to 8 kB of PROM available
with the CY7C66x13C architecture. The top 32 bytes of the ROM
in the 8K part are reserved for testing purposes. The program
counter is cleared during reset, such that the first instruction
executed after a reset is at address 0x0000h. Typically, this is a
jump instruction to a reset handler that initializes the application
(see Interrupt Vectors on page 29).
The lower eight bits of the program counter are incremented as
instructions are loaded and executed. The upper six bits of the
program counter are incremented by executing an XPAGE
instruction. The last instruction executed within a 256-byte
“page” of sequential code should be an XPAGE instruction. The
assembler directive “XPAGEON” causes the assembler to insert
XPAGE instructions automatically. Because instructions are
either one or two bytes long, the assembler may occasionally
need to insert a NOP followed by an XPAGE to execute correctly.
The address of the next instruction to be executed, the carry flag,
and the zero flag are saved as two bytes on the program stack
during an interrupt acknowledge or a CALL instruction. The
program counter, carry flag, and zero flag are restored from the
program stack during a RETI instruction. Only the program
counter is restored during a RET instruction.
The program counter is not accessed directly by the firmware.
The program stack is examined by reading SRAM from location
0x00 and up.
Program Memory Organization
Table 5. Program Memory Space with Interrupt Vector Table
After
Reset
Address
14-bit PC
0x0000
Program execution begins here after a reset
0x0002
USB bus reset interrupt vector
0x0004
128 μs timer interrupt vector
0x0006
1.024 ms timer interrupt vector
0x0008
USB address A endpoint 0 interrupt vector
0x000A USB address A endpoint 1 interrupt vector
0x000C USB address A endpoint 2 interrupt vector
0x000E
USB address B endpoint 0 interrupt vector
0x0010
USB address B endpoint 1 interrupt vector
0x0012
Hub interrupt vector
0x0014
DAC interrupt vector
0x0016
GPIO/HAPI interrupt vector
0x0018
I2C interrupt vector
0x001A Program Memory begins here
0x1FDF 8 kB (-32) PROM ends here.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 12 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
8-bit Accumulator (A)
The accumulator is the general purpose register for the
microcontroller.
8-bit Temporary Register (X)
The “X” register is available to the firmware for temporary storage
of intermediate results. The microcontroller performs indexed
operations based on the value in X. Refer to the section, Indexed
on page 14 for additional information.
8-bit Program Stack Pointer (PSP)
During a reset, the Program Stack Pointer (PSP) is set to 0x00
and “grows” upward from this address. The PSP may be set by
firmware, using the MOV PSP,A instruction. The PSP supports
interrupt service under hardware control and CALL, RET, and
RETI instructions under firmware control. The PSP is not
readable by the firmware.
During an interrupt acknowledge, interrupts are disabled and the
14-bit program counter, carry flag, and zero flag are written as
two bytes of data memory. The first byte is stored in the memory
addressed by the PSP, then the PSP is incremented. The second
byte is stored in memory addressed by the PSP, and the PSP is
incremented again. The overall effect is to store the program
Table 6. SRAM Areas
After Reset
8-bit DSP
8-bit PSP
counter and flags on the program “stack” and increment the PSP
by two.
The Return From Interrupt (RETI) instruction decrements the
PSP, then restores the second byte from memory addressed by
the PSP. The PSP is decremented again and the first byte is
restored from memory addressed by the PSP. After the program
counter and flags are restored from stack, the interrupts are
enabled. The overall effect is to restore the program counter and
flags from the program stack, decrement the PSP by two, and
re-enable interrupts.
The Call Subroutine (CALL) instruction stores the program
counter and flags on the program stack and increments the PSP
by two.
The Return From Subroutine (RET) instruction restores the
program counter but not the flags from the program stack and
decrements the PSP by two.
Data Memory Organization
The CY7C66x13C microcontrollers provide 256 bytes of data
RAM. Normally, the SRAM is partitioned into four areas: program
stack, user variables, data stack, and USB endpoint FIFOs. The
following is one example of where the program stack, data stack,
and user variables areas are located.
Address
Program Stack Growth
0x00
(Move DSP[1])
8-bit DSP
Data Stack Growth
User Selected
User variables
USB FIFO space for up to two addresses and five endpoints[2]
0xFF
8-bit Data Stack Pointer (DSP)
The Data Stack Pointer (DSP) supports PUSH and POP
instructions that use the data stack for temporary storage. A
PUSH instruction pre-decrements the DSP, then writes data to
the memory location addressed by the DSP. A POP instruction
reads data from the memory location addressed by the DSP,
then post-increments the DSP.
During a reset, the DSP is reset to 0x00. A PUSH instruction
when DSP equals 0x00 writes data at the top of the data RAM
(address 0xFF). This writes data to the memory area reserved
for USB endpoint FIFOs. Therefore, the DSP should be indexed
at an appropriate memory location that does not compromise the
Program Stack, user defined memory (variables), or the USB
endpoint FIFOs.
For USB applications, the firmware should set the DSP to an
appropriate location to avoid a memory conflict with RAM
dedicated to USB FIFOs. The memory requirements for the USB
endpoints are described in USB Device Endpoints on page 39.
Example assembly instructions to do this with two device
addresses (FIFOs begin at 0xD8) are shown:
■
MOV A,20h; Move 20 hex into Accumulator (must be D8h or
less)
■
SWAP A,DSP; swap accumulator value into DSP register.
Notes
1. Refer to 8-bit Data Stack Pointer (DSP) for a description of DSP.
2. Endpoint sizes are fixed by the Endpoint Size Bit (I/O register 0x1F, Bit 7), see Table 47.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 13 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Address Modes
The CY7C66013C and CY7C66113C microcontrollers support
three addressing modes for instructions that require data
operands: data, direct, and indexed.
Data (Immediate)
“Data” address mode refers to a data operand that is actually a
constant encoded in the instruction. As an example, consider the
instruction that loads A with the constant 0xD8:
MOV A, 0D8h.
This instruction requires two bytes of code where the first byte
identifies the “MOV A” instruction with a data operand as the
second byte. The second byte of the instruction is the constant
“0xD8”. A constant may be referred to by name if a prior “EQU”
statement assigns the constant value to the name. For example,
the following code is equivalent to the example described earlier:
DSPINIT: EQU 0D8h
MOV A, DSPINIT.
Direct
“Direct” address mode is used when the data operand is a
variable stored in SRAM. In that case, the one byte address of
the variable is encoded in the instruction. As an example,
consider an instruction that loads A with the contents of memory
address location 0x10:
MOV A, [10h].
Normally, variable names are assigned to variable addresses
using “EQU” statements to improve the readability of the
assembler source code. As an example, the following code is
equivalent to the example described earlier:
buttons: EQU 10h
MOV A, [buttons].
Clocking
Figure 4. Clock Oscillator On-Chip Circuit
XTALOUT
(pin 1)
XTALIN
(pin 2)
To Internal PLL
30 pF
30 pF
The XTALIN and XTALOUT are the clock pins to the
microcontroller. The user connects an external oscillator or a
crystal to these pins. When using an external crystal, keep PCB
traces between the chip leads and crystal as short as possible
(less than 2 cm). A 6 MHz fundamental frequency parallel
resonant crystal is connected to these pins to provide a reference
frequency for the internal PLL. The two internal 30 pF load caps
appear in series to the external crystal and would be equivalent
to a 15 pF load. Therefore, the crystal must have a required load
capacitance of about 15–18 pF. A ceramic resonator does not
allow the microcontroller to meet the timing specifications of full
speed USB and so a ceramic resonator is not recommended with
these parts.
An external 6 MHz clock is applied to the XTALIN pin if the
XTALOUT pin is left open. Grounding the XTALOUT pin when
driving XTALIN with an oscillator does not work because the
internal clock is effectively shorted to ground.
Indexed
“Indexed” address mode allows the firmware to manipulate
arrays of data stored in SRAM. The address of the data operand
is the sum of a constant encoded in the instruction and the
contents of the “X” register. Normally, the constant is the “base”
address of an array of data and the X register contains an index
that indicates which element of the array is actually addressed:
array: EQU 10h
MOV X, 3
MOV A, [X+array].
This has the effect of loading A with the fourth element of the
SRAM “array” that begins at address 0x10. The fourth element
would be at address 0x13.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 14 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Reset
The CY7C66x13C supports two resets: POR and a Watchdog
Reset (WDR). Each of these resets causes:
■
All registers to be restored to their default states.
■
The USB device addresses to be set to 0.
■
All interrupts to be disabled.
■
The PSP and DSP to be set to memory address 0x00.
The occurrence of a reset is recorded in the Processor Status
and Control Register, as described in Processor Status and
Control Register on page 27. Bits 4 and 6 are used to record the
occurrence of POR and WDR, respectively. Firmware
interrogates these bits to determine the cause of a reset.
Program execution starts at ROM address 0x0000 after a reset.
Although this looks similar to interrupt vector 0, there is an
important difference. Reset processing does NOT push the
program counter, carry flag, and zero flag onto program stack.
The firmware reset handler should configure the hardware
before the “main” loop of code. Attempting to execute a RET or
RETI in the firmware reset handler causes unpredictable
execution results.
Power on Reset
When VCC is first applied to the chip, the POR signal is asserted
and the CY7C66x13C enters a “semi-suspend” state. During the
semi-suspend state, which is different from the suspend state
defined in the USB specification, the oscillator and all other
blocks of the part are functional, except for the CPU. This
semi-suspend time ensures that both a valid VCC level is reached
and that the internal PLL has time to stabilize before full
operation begins. When the VCC rises above approximately
2.5 V, and the oscillator is stable, the POR is deasserted and the
on-chip timer starts counting. The first 1 ms of suspend time is
not interruptible, and the semi-suspend state continues for an
additional 95 ms unless the count is bypassed by a USB Bus
Reset on the upstream port. The 95 ms provides time for VCC to
stabilize at a valid operating voltage before the chip executes
code.
If a USB Bus Reset occurs on the upstream port during the 95 ms
semi-suspend time, the semi-suspend state is aborted and
program execution begins immediately from address 0x0000. In
this case, the Bus Reset interrupt is pending but not serviced
until firmware sets the USB Bus Reset Interrupt Enable bit (bit 0
of register 0x20) and enables interrupts with the EI command.
The POR signal is asserted whenever VCC drops below
approximately 2.5 V, and remains asserted until VCC rises above
this level again. Behavior is the same as described earlier.
Watchdog Reset
The WDR occurs when the internal WDT rolls over. Writing any
value to the write only Watchdog Restart Register at address
0x26 clears the timer. The timer rolls over and WDR occurs if it
is not cleared within tWATCH (8 ms minimum) of the last clear.
Bit 6 of the Processor Status and Control Register is set to record
this event (the register contents are set to 010X0001 by the
WDR). A WDT Reset lasts for 2 ms, after which the
microcontroller begins execution at ROM address 0x0000.
The USB transmitter is disabled by a WDR because the USB
Device Address Registers are cleared (see USB Device
Addresses on page 39). Otherwise, the USB Controller responds
to all address 0 transactions.
It is possible to set the WDR bit of the Processor Status and
Control Register (0xFF) following a POR event. If a firmware
interrogates the Processor Status and Control Register for a set
condition on the WDR bit, the WDR bit should be ignored if the
POR (bit 3 of register 0xFF) bit is set.
Figure 5. Watchdog Reset
tWATCH
Last write to
WDT
Register
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
2 ms
No write to WDT
register, so WDR
goes HIGH
Execution begins at
Reset Vector 0x0000
Page 15 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Suspend Mode
The CY7C66x13C is placed into a low power state by setting the
Suspend bit of the Processor Status and Control register. All logic
blocks in the device are turned off except the GPIO interrupt logic
and the USB receiver. The clock oscillator, PLL, and the
free-running and WDTs are shut down. Only the occurrence of
an enabled GPIO interrupt or non idle bus activity at a USB
upstream or downstream port wakes the part from suspend. The
Run bit in the Processor Status and Control Register must be set
to resume a part out of suspend.
The clock oscillator restarts immediately after exiting suspend
mode. The microcontroller returns to a fully functional state 1 ms
after the oscillator is stable. The microcontroller executes the
instruction following the I/O write that placed the device into
suspend mode before servicing any interrupt requests.
The GPIO interrupt allows the controller to wake up periodically
and poll system components while maintaining a very low
average power consumption. To achieve the lowest possible
current during suspend mode, all I/O should be held at VCC or
Gnd. This also applies to internal port pins that may not be
bonded in a particular package.
Typical code for entering suspend is given here:
... ; All GPIO set to low power state (no
floating pins)
... ; Enable GPIO interrupts if desired
for wakeup
mov a, 09h; Set suspend and run bits
iowr FFh; Write to Status and Control
Register – Enter suspend, wait for USB activity
(or GPIO Interrupt)
nop ; This executes before any ISR
General Purpose I/O (GPIO) Ports
Figure 6. Block Diagram of a GPIO Pin
VCC
GPIO
CFG
mode
2-bits
OE
Data
Out
Latch
Control
Internal
Data Bus
Q1
Q2
14 kΩ
GPIO
PIN
Port Write
Q3*
Port Read
Data
In
Latch
STRB
(Latch is Transparent
except in HAPI mode)
Data
Interrupt
Latch
Control
Reg_Bit
Interrupt
Enable
Interrupt
Controller
*Port 0,1,2: Low Isink
Port 3: High Isink
There are up to 31 GPIO pins (P0[7:0], P1[7:0], P2[7:0], and P3[6:0]) for the hardware interface. The number of GPIO pins changes
based on the package type of the chip. Each port is configured as inputs with internal pull ups, open drain outputs, or traditional CMOS
outputs. Port 3 offers a higher current drive, with typical current sink capability of 12 mA. The data for each GPIO port is accessible
through the data registers. Port data registers are shown in Table 7 on page 17 through Table 10 on page 17, and are set to 1 on reset.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 16 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 7. Port 0 Data
Port 0 Data
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x00
0
Bit Name
P0.7
P0.6
P0.5
P0.4
P0.3
P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Table 8. Port1 Data
Port 1Data
Bit #
ADDRESS 0x01
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Bit Name
P1.7
P1.6
P1.5
P1.4
P1.3
P1.2
P1.1
P1.0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Table 9. Port 2 Data
Port 2 Data
Bit #
ADDRESS 0x02
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Bit Name
P2.7
P2.6
P2.5
P2.4
P2.3
P2.2
P2.1
P2.0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
Table 10. Port 3 Data
Port 3 Data
Bit #
5
4
ADDRESS 0x03
0
7
6
Bit Name
Reserved
P3.4
P3.5
P3.6
CY7C66113C CY7C66113C
only
only
P3.3
P3.2
P3.1
P3.0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
-
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Special care should be taken with any unused GPIO data bits.
An unused GPIO data bit, either a pin on the chip or a port bit
that is not bonded on a particular package, must not be left
floating when the device enters the suspend state. If a GPIO data
bit is left floating, the leakage current caused by the floating bit
may violate the suspend current limitation specified by the USB
specifications. If a ‘1’ is written to the unused data bit and the port
is configured with open drain outputs, the unused data bit
remains in an indeterminate state. Therefore, if an unused port
bit is programmed in open-drain mode, it must be written with a
‘0.’ Notice that the CY7C66013C always requires that P3[7:5] be
written with a ‘0.’ When the CY7C66113C is used the P3[7]
should be written with a ‘0.’
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
In normal non HAPI mode, reads from a GPIO port always return
the present state of the voltage at the pin, independent of the
settings in the Port Data Registers. If HAPI mode is activated for
a port, reads of that port return latched data as controlled by the
HAPI signals (see Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI)
on page 26). During reset, all of the GPIO pins are set to a high
impedance input state (‘1’ in open drain mode). Writing a ‘0’ to a
GPIO pin drives the pin LOW. In this state, a ‘0’ is always read
on that GPIO pin unless an external source overdrives the
internal pull down device.
Page 17 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
GPIO Configuration Port
Every GPIO port is programmed as inputs with internal pull ups, outputs LOW or HIGH, or Hi-Z (floating, the pin is not driven internally).
In addition, the interrupt polarity for each port is programmed. The Port Configuration bits (Table 11) and the Interrupt Enable bit
(Table 9 on page 17 through Table 16 on page 19) determine the interrupt polarity of the port pins.
Table 11. GPIO Configuration Register
GPIO Configuration
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x08
0
Bit Name
Port 3
Config Bit 1
Port 3
Config Bit 0
Port 2
Config Bit 1
Port 2
Config Bit 0
Port 1
Config Bit 1
Port 1
Config Bit 0
Port 0
Config Bit 1
Port 0
Config Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
As shown in Table 12, a positive polarity on an input pin
represents a rising edge interrupt (LOW to HIGH), and a negative
polarity on an input pin represents a falling edge interrupt (HIGH
to LOW).
The GPIO interrupt is generated when all of the following
conditions are met: the Interrupt Enable bit of the associated Port
Interrupt Enable Register is enabled, the GPIO Interrupt Enable
bit of the Global Interrupt Enable Register (Table 31 on page 28)
is enabled, the Interrupt Enable Sense (bit 2,
Table 30 on page 27) is set, and the GPIO pin of the port sees
an event matching the interrupt polarity.
The driving state of each GPIO pin is determined by the value
written to the pin’s Data Register (Table 7 on page 17 through
Table 10 on page 17) and by its associated Port Configuration
bits as shown in the GPIO Configuration Register (Table 9 on
page 17). These ports are configured on a per port basis, so all
pins in a given port are configured together. The possible port
configurations are detailed in Table 12. As shown in this table,
when a GPIO port is configured with CMOS outputs, interrupts
from that port are disabled.
During reset, all the bits in the GPIO Configuration Register are
written with ‘0’ to select Hi-Z mode for all GPIO ports as the
default configuration.
Table 12. GPIO Port Output Control Truth Table and Interrupt Polarity
Port Config Bit 1 Port Config Bit 0
Data Register Output Drive Strength Interrupt Enable Bit
Output LOW
1
0
1
Resistive
1
– (Falling Edge)
1
0
0
Output LOW
0
Disabled
1
Output HIGH
1
Disabled
0
1
0
Output LOW
0
Disabled
1
Hi-Z
1
– (Falling Edge)
0
0
0
Output LOW
0
Disabled
1
Hi-Z
1
+ (Rising Edge)
Q1, Q2, and Q3 discussed here are the transistors referenced in
Figure 6 on page 16. The available GPIO drive strength are:
■
Output HIGH Mode: The pin’s Data Register is set to 1 and the
Port Configuration Bits[1:0] is set to ‘10’
In this mode, Q1 and Q3 are OFF. Q2 is ON. The GPIO is
pulled up through Q2. The GPIO pin is capable of sourcing
current.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Disabled
Resistive Mode: The pin’s Data Register is set to 1 and the Port
Configuration Bits[1:0] is set to ‘11’
Q2 and Q3 are OFF. Q1 is ON. The GPIO pin is pulled up with
an internal 14 kΩ resistor. In resistive mode, the pin may serve
as an input. Reading the pin’s Data Register returns a logic
HIGH if the pin is not driven LOW by an external source.
Output LOW Mode: The pin’s Data Register is set to ‘0’
Writing ‘0’ to the pin’s Data Register puts the pin in output
LOW mode, regardless of the contents of the Port
Configuration Bits[1:0]. In this mode, Q1 and Q2 are OFF. Q3
is ON. The GPIO pin is driven LOW through Q3.
■
■
0
Interrupt Polarity
1
■
Hi-Z Mode: The pin’s Data Register is set to1 and Port
Configuration Bits[1:0] is set either ‘00’ or ‘01’
Q1, Q2, and Q3 are all OFF. The GPIO pin is not driven
internally. In this mode, the pin may serve as an input.
Reading the Port Data Register returns the actual logic value
on the port pins.
Page 18 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
GPIO Interrupt Enable Ports
Each GPIO pin is individually enabled or disabled as an interrupt source. The Port 0–3 Interrupt Enable registers provide this feature
with an interrupt enable bit for each GPIO pin. When HAPI mode is enabled the GPIO interrupts are blocked, including ports not used
by HAPI, so GPIO pins are not used as interrupt sources.
During a reset, GPIO interrupts are disabled by clearing all of the GPIO interrupt enable ports. Writing a ‘1’ to a GPIO Interrupt Enable
bit enables GPIO interrupts from the corresponding input pin. All GPIO pins share a common interrupt, as discussed in GPIO and
HAPI Interrupt on page 31.
Table 13. Port 0 Interrupt Enable
Port 0 Interrupt Enable
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
P0.6 Intr
Enable
P0.5 Intr
Enable
P0.4 Intr
Enable
P0.3 Intr
Enable
P0.2 Intr
Enable
P0.1 Intr
Enable
ADDRESS 0x04
0
Bit Name
P0.7 Intr
Enable
P0.0 Intr
Enable
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Table 14. Port 1 Interrupt Enable
Port 1 Interrupt Enable
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x05
0
Bit Name
P1.7 Intr
Enable
P1.6 Intr
Enable
P1.5 Intr
Enable
P1.4 Intr
Enable
P1.3 Intr
Enable
P1.2 Intr
Enable
P1.1 Intr
Enable
P1.0 Intr
Enable
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Table 15. Port 2 Interrupt Enable
Port 2 Interrupt Enable
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
P2.6 Intr
Enable
P2.5 Intr
Enable
P2.4 Intr
Enable
P2.3 Intr
Enable
P2.2 Intr
Enable
P2.1 Intr
Enable
ADDRESS 0x06
0
Bit Name
P2.7 Intr
Enable
P2.0 Intr
Enable
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
Table 16. Port 3 Interrupt Enable
Port 3 Interrupt Enable
Bit #
7
6
5
4
ADDRESS 0x07
0
Bit Name
Reserved P3.6 Intr
Enable
CY7C66113C
only
P3.5 Intr
P3.4 Intr
Enable
Enable
CY7C66113C
only
P3.3 Intr
Enable
P3.2 Intr
Enable
P3.1 Intr
Enable
P3.0 Intr
Enable
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 19 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
DAC Port
The CY7C66113C features a programmable sink current 8-bit port, which is also known as DAC port. Each of these port I/O pins have
a programmable current sink. Writing a ‘1’ to a DAC I/O pin disables the output current sink (Isink DAC) and drives the I/O pin HIGH
through an integrated 14 kΩ resistor. When a ‘0’ is written to a DAC I/O pin, the Isink DAC is enabled and the pull up resistor is disabled.
This causes the Isink DAC to sink current to drive the output LOW. Figure 7 shows a block diagram of the DAC port pin.
Figure 7. Block Diagram of a DAC Pin
VCC
Data
Out
Latch
Internal
Data Bus
Q1
Suspend
(Bit 3 of Register 0xFF)
14 kΩ
DAC
I/O Pin
DAC Write
4 bits
Isink
Register
Isink
DAC
Internal
Buffer
Interrupt Logic
DAC Read
Interrupt
Enable
Interrupt
Polarity
to Interrupt
Controller
The amount of sink current for the DAC I/O pin is programmable
over 16 values based on the contents of the DAC Isink Register
(Table 18 on page 21) for that output pin. DAC[1:0] are high
current outputs that are programmable from 3.2 mA to 16 mA
(typical). DAC[7:2] are low current outputs, programmable from
0.2 mA to 1.0 mA (typical).
When the suspend bit in Processor Status and Control Register
(Table 30 on page 27) is set, the Isink DAC block of the DAC
circuitry is disabled. Special care should be taken when the
CY7C66113C device is placed in the suspend. The DAC Port
Data Register (Table 17) should normally be loaded with all ‘1’s
(Table 30 on page 27) before setting the suspend bit. If any of
the DAC bits are set to ‘0’ when the device is suspended, that
DAC input floats. The floating pin could result in excessive
current consumption by the device, unless an external load
places the pin in a deterministic state.
Table 17. DAC Port Data
DAC Port Data
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x30
0
Bit Name
DAC[7]
DAC[6]
DAC[5]
DAC[4]
DAC[3]
DAC[2]
DAC[1]
DAC[0]
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Bit [1..0]: High Current Output 3.2 mA to 16 mA typical
1 = I/O pin is an output pulled HGH through the 14 kΩ resistor.
0 = I/O pin is an input with an internal 14 kΩ pull up resistor.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Bit [7..2]: Low Current Output 0.2 mA to 1 mA typical
1 = I/O pin is an output pulled HGH through the 14 kΩ resistor.
0 = I/O pin is an input with an internal 14 kΩ pull up resistor.
Page 20 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
DAC Isink Registers
Each DAC I/O pin has an associated DAC Isink register to program the output sink current when the output is driven LOW. The first
Isink register (0x38) controls the current for DAC[0], the second (0x39) for DAC[1], and so on until the Isink register at 0x3F, controls
the current to DAC[7].
Table 18. DAC Sink Register
DAC Sink Register
Bit #
7
Bit Name
Reserved
5
4
3
2
1
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Isink[3]
Isink[2]
Isink[1]
Isink[0]
W
W
W
W
0
0
0
0
Read/Write
Reset
-
ADDRESS 0x38 –0x3F
0
6
-
-
-
Bit [3..0]: Isink [x] (x= 0..3)
Writing all ‘0’s to the Isink register causes 1/5 of the max current
to flow through the DAC I/O pin. Writing all ‘1’s to the Isink
register provides the maximum current flow through the pin. The
other 14 states of the DAC sink current are evenly spaced
between these two values.
Bit [7..4]: Reserved
DAC Port Interrupts
A DAC port interrupt is enabled or disabled for each pin individually. The DAC Port Interrupt Enable register provides this feature with
an interrupt enable bit for each DAC I/O pin. All of the DAC Port Interrupt Enable register bits are cleared to ‘0’ during a reset. All DAC
pins share a common interrupt, as explained in DAC Interrupt on page 31.
Table 19. DAC Port Interrupt Enable
DAC Port Interrupt
Bit #
7
ADDRESS 0x31
0
6
5
4
3
2
1
Enable Bit 5
Enable Bit 4
Enable Bit 3
Enable Bit 2
Enable Bit 1
Bit Name
Enable Bit 7
Enable Bit 6
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7..0]: Enable bit x (x= 0..7)
1 = Enables interrupts from the corresponding bit position;
0 = Disables interrupts from the corresponding bit position
As an additional benefit, the interrupt polarity for each DAC pin
is programmable with the DAC Port Interrupt Polarity register.
Writing a ‘0’ to a bit selects negative polarity (falling edge) that
Enable Bit 0
causes an interrupt (if enabled) if a falling edge transition occurs
on the corresponding input pin. Writing a ‘1’ to a bit in this register
selects positive polarity (rising edge) that causes an interrupt (if
enabled) if a rising edge transition occurs on the corresponding
input pin. All of the DAC Port Interrupt Polarity register bits are
cleared during a reset.
Table 20. DAC Port Interrupt Polarity
DAC I/O Interrupt Polarity
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x32
0
Bit Name
Polarity Bit 7 Polarity Bit 6 Polarity Bit 5 Polarity Bit 4 Polarity Bit 3 Polarity Bit 2 Polarity Bit 1 Polarity Bit 0
Read/Write
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7..0]: Polarity bit x (x= 0..7)
1= Selects positive polarity (rising edge) that causes an
interrupt (if enabled); 0 = Selects negative polarity (falling
edge) that causes an interrupt (if enabled).
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 21 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
12-bit Free-Running Timer
The 12-bit timer operates with a 1 μs tick, provides two interrupts (128 μs and 1.024 ms) and allows the firmware to directly time events
that are up to 4 ms in duration. The lower eight bits of the timer is read directly by the firmware. Reading the lower 8 bits latches the
upper four bits into a temporary register. When the firmware reads the upper four bits of the timer, it is actually reading the count stored
in the temporary register. The effect of this is to ensure a stable 12-bit timer value is read, even when the two reads are separated in
time.
Table 21. Timer LSB Register
Timer LSB
Bit #
ADDRESS 0x24
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Bit Name
Timer Bit 7
Timer Bit 6
Timer Bit 5
Timer Bit 4
Timer Bit 3
Timer Bit 2
Timer Bit 1
Timer Bit 0
Read/Write
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [7:0]: Timer lower eight bits
Table 22. Timer MSB Register
Timer MSB
Bit #
ADDRESS 0x25
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Timer Bit 11
Timer Bit 10
Timer Bit 9
Read/Write
-
-
-
-
R
R
R
R
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Timer Bit 8
Bit [3:0]: Timer higher nibble
Bit [7:4]: Reserved
Figure 8. Timer Block Diagram
1.024 ms interrupt
128 μs interrupt
11 10 9
L
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1 MHz clock
L2 L1 L0
D3 D2 D1 D0 D7 D6 D5 D4 D3 D2 D1 D0
8
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
To Timer Registers
Page 22 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
I2C and HAPI Configuration Register
Internal hardware supports communication with external devices through two interfaces: a two wire I2C compatible, and a HAPI for
1, 2, or 3 byte transfers. The I2C compatible and HAPI functions, share a common configuration register (see Table 23)[3]. All bits of
this register are cleared on reset.
Table 23. HAPI/I2C Configuration Register
I2C Configuration
Bit #
7
Bit Name
I2C Position
ADDRESS 0x09
0
6
5
4
3
2
1
Reserved
LEMPTY
Polarity
DRDY
Polarity
Latch
Empty
Data
Ready
HAPI Port
Width Bit 1
HAPI Port
Width Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
-
R/W
R/W
R
R
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bits [7,1:0] of the HAPI and I2C Configuration Register control
the pin out configuration of the HAPI and I2C compatible
interfaces. Bits [5:2] are used in HAPI mode only, and are
described in Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI) on
page 26. Table 24 shows the HAPI port configurations, and
Table 25 shows I2C pin location configuration options. These I2C
compatible options exist due to pin limitations in certain
packages, and to allow simultaneous HAPI and I2C compatible
operation.
HAPI operation is enabled whenever either HAPI Port Width Bit
(Bit 1 or 0) is non zero. This affects GPIO operation as described
in Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI) on page 26. The
I2C compatible interface must be separately enabled.
Table 24. HAPI Port Configuration
Port Width (Bit 0 and 1, Figure 23)
HAPI Port Width
11
24 Bits: P3[7:0], P1[7:0], P0[7:0]
10
16 Bits: P1[7:0], P0[7:0]
01
8 Bits: P0[7:0]
00
No HAPI Interface
Table 25. I2C Port Configuration
I2C Position (Bit 7, Table 23 on page 23)
I2C Port Width (Bit 1, Table 23 on page 23)
I2C Position
Don’t Care
1
I2C on P2[1:0], 0:SCL, 1:SDA
0
0
I2C on P1[1:0], 0:SCL, 1:SDA
1
0
I2C on P2[1:0], 0:SCL, 1:SDA
I2C Compatible Controller
The I2C compatible block provides a versatile two wire
communication with external devices, supporting master, slave,
and multi-master modes of operation. The I2C compatible block
functions by handling the low level signaling in hardware, and
issuing interrupts as needed to allow firmware to take
appropriate action during transactions. While waiting for
firmware response, the hardware keeps the I2C compatible bus
idle if necessary.
The I2C compatible interface generates an interrupt to the
microcontroller at the end of each received or transmitted byte,
when a stop bit is detected by the slave when in receive mode,
or when arbitration is lost. Details of the interrupt responses are
given in Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI) on page 26.
The I2C compatible interface consists of two registers, an I2C
Data Register (Table 14 on page 19) and an I2C Status and
Control Register (Table 27 on page 24). The Data Register is
implemented as separate read and write registers. Generally, the
I2C Status and Control Register are only monitored after the I2C
interrupt, as all bits are valid at that time. Polling this register at
other times could read misleading bit status if a transaction is
underway.
The I2C SCL clock is connected to bit 0 of GPIO port 1 or GPIO
port 2, and the I2C SDA data is connected to bit 1 of GPIO port 1
or GPIO port 2. Refer to I2C and HAPI Configuration Register on
page 23 for the bit definitions and functionality of the HAPI and
I2C Configuration Register, which is used to set the locations of
the configurable I2C pins. When the I2C compatible functionality
is enabled by setting bit 0 of the I2C Status & Control Register,
the two LSB ([1:0]) of the corresponding GPIO port is placed in
Open Drain mode, regardless of the settings of the GPIO
Configuration Register. The electrical characteristics of the I2C
compatible interface is the same as that of GPIO ports 1 and 2.
Note that the IOL (max) is 2 mA at VOL = 2.0 V for ports 1 and 2.
Note
3. I2C compatible function must be separately enabled.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 23 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
All control of the I2C clock and data lines is performed by the I2C
compatible block.
Table 26. I2C Data Register
I2C Data
Bit #
ADDRESS 0x29
0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Bit Name
I2C Data 7
I2C Data 6
I2C Data 5
I2C Data 4
I2C Data 3
I2C Data 2
I2C Data 1
I2C Data 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
I2
Bits [7..0]: C Data
Contains 8-bit data on the I2C Bus.
Table 27. I2C Status and Control Register
I2C Status and Control
Bit #
7
Bit Name
6
5
ADDRESS 0x28
0
4
3
2
1
MSTR Mode Continue/Bu Xmit Mode
sy
ACK
Addr
ARB
Lost/Restart
Received
Stop
I2C Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
The I2C Status and Control register bits are defined in Table 28, with a more detailed description following.
Table 28. I2C Status and Control Register Bit Definitions
Bit
Name
Description
0
I2C Enable
When set to ‘1’, the I2C compatible function is enabled. When cleared, I2C GPIO pins operate
normally.
1
Received Stop
Reads 1 only in slave receive mode, when I2C Stop bit detected (unless firmware did not ACK the
last transaction).
2
ARB Lost/Restart
Reads 1 to indicate master has lost arbitration. Reads 0 otherwise.
Write to 1 in master mode to perform a restart sequence (also set Continue bit).
3
Addr
Reads 1 during first byte after start/restart in slave mode, or if master loses arbitration.
Reads 0 otherwise. This bit should always be written as 0.
4
ACK
In receive mode, write 1 to generate ACK, 0 for no ACK.
In transmit mode, reads 1 if ACK was received, 0 if no ACK received.
5
Xmit Mode
Write to 1 for transmit mode, 0 for receive mode.
6
Continue/Busy
Write 1 to indicate ready for next transaction.
Reads 1 when I2C compatible block is busy with a transaction, 0 when transaction is complete.
7
MSTR Mode
Write to 1 for master mode, 0 for slave mode. This bit is cleared if master loses arbitration.
Clearing from 1 to 0 generates Stop bit.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 24 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Bit 4: ACK
Bit 7: MSTR Mode
I2
Setting this bit to 1 causes the C compatible block to initiate a
master mode transaction by sending a start bit and transmitting
the first data byte from the data register (this typically holds the
target address and R/W bit). Subsequent bytes are initiated by
setting the Continue bit, as described later in this section.
This bit is set or cleared by firmware during receive operation to
indicate if the hardware should generate an ACK signal on the
I2C compatible bus. Writing a 1 to this bit generates an ACK
(SDA LOW) on the I2C compatible bus at the ACK bit time.
During transmits (Xmit Mode = 1), this bit should be cleared.
Clearing this bit (set to 0) causes the GPIO pins to operate
normally. In master mode, the I2C compatible block generates
the clock (SCK), and drives the data line as required depending
on transmit or receive state. The I2C compatible block performs
any required arbitration and clock synchronization. IN the event
of a loss of arbitration, this MSTR bit is cleared, the ARB Lost bit
is set, and an interrupt is generated by the microcontroller. If the
chip is the target of an external master that wins arbitration, then
the interrupt is held off until the transaction from the external
master is completed.
Bit 3: Addr
When MSTR Mode is cleared from 1 to 0 by a firmware write, an
I2C Stop bit is generated.
Bit 6: Continue/Busy
This bit is written by the firmware to indicate that the firmware is
ready for the next byte transaction to begin. In other words, the
bit has responded to an interrupt request and has completed the
required update or read of the data register. During a read this
bit indicates if the hardware is busy and is locking out additional
writes to the I2C Status and Control register. This locking allows
the hardware to complete certain operations that may require an
extended period of time. Following an I2C interrupt, the I2C
compatible block does not return to the Busy state until firmware
sets the Continue bit. This allows the firmware to make one
control register write without the need to check the Busy bit.
Bit 5: Xmit Mode
This bit is set by firmware to enter transmit mode and perform a
data transmit in master or slave mode. Clearing this bit sets the
part in receive mode. Firmware generally determines the value
of this bit from the R/W bit associated with the I2C address
packet. The Xmit Mode bit state is ignored when initially writing
the MSTR Mode or the Restart bits, as these cases always cause
transmit mode for the first byte.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
This bit is set by the I2C compatible block during the first byte of
a slave receive transaction, after an I2C start or restart. The Addr
bit is cleared when the firmware sets the Continue bit. This bit
allows the firmware to recognize when the master has lost
arbitration, and in slave mode it allows the firmware to recognize
that a start or restart has occurred.
Bit 2: ARB Lost/Restart
This bit is valid as a status bit (ARB Lost) after master mode
transactions. In master mode, set this bit (along with the
Continue and MSTR Mode bits) to perform an I2C restart
sequence. The I2C target address for the restart must be written
to the data register before setting the Continue bit. To prevent
false ARB Lost signals, the Restart bit is cleared by hardware
during the restart sequence.
Bit 1: Receive Stop
This bit is set when the slave is in receive mode and detects a
stop bit on the bus. The Receive Stop bit is not set if the firmware
terminates the I2C transaction by not acknowledging the
previous byte transmitted on the I2C compatible bus. For
example, in receive mode if firmware sets the Continue bit and
clears the ACK bit.
Bit 0: I2C Enable
Set this bit to override GPIO definition with I2C compatible
function on the two I2C compatible pins. When this bit is cleared,
these pins are free to function as GPIOs. In I2C compatible
mode, the two pins operate in open drain mode, independent of
the GPIO configuration setting.
Page 25 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface (HAPI)
The CY7C66x13C processor provides a hardware assisted parallel interface for bus widths of 8, 16, or 24 bits, to accommodate data
transfer with an external microcontroller or similar device. Control bits for selecting the byte width are in the HAPI and I2C Configuration
Register (Table 23 on page 23), bits 1 and 0.
Signals are provided on Port 2 to control the HAPI interface. Table 29 describes these signals and the HAPI control bits in the HAPI
and I2C Configuration Register. Enabling HAPI causes the GPIO setting in the GPIO Configuration Register (Table 9 on page 17) to
be overridden. The Port 2 output pins are in CMOS output mode and Port 2 input pins are in input mode (open drain mode with Q3
OFF in Figure 6 on page 16).
Table 29. Port 2 Pin and HAPI Configuration Bit Definitions
Pin
Name
Direction
Description (Port 2 Pin)
P2[2]
LatEmptyPin
Out
Ready for more input data from external interface.
P2[3]
DReadyPin
Out
Output data ready for external interface.
P2[4]
STB
In
Strobe signal for latching incoming data.
P2[5]
OE
In
Output Enable, causes chip to output data.
P2[6]
CS
In
Chip Select (Gates STB and OE).
Bit
Name
R/W
R
Description (HAPI and I2C Configuration Register)
Asserted after firmware writes data to Port 0, until OE driven LOW.
2
Data Ready
3
Latch Empty
R
Asserted after firmware reads data from Port 0, until STB driven LOW.
4
DRDY Polarity
R/W
Determines polarity of Data Ready bit and DReadyPin:
If 0, Data Ready is active LOW, DReadyPin is active HIGH.
If 1, Data Ready is active HIGH, DReadyPin is active LOW.
5
LEMPTY Polarity
R/W
Determines polarity of Latch Empty bit and LatEmptyPin:
If 0, Latch Empty is active LOW, LatEmptyPin is active HIGH.
If 1, Latch Empty is active HIGH, LatEmptyPin is active LOW.
HAPI Read by External Device from CY7C66x13C
HAPI Write by External Device to CY7C66x13C
In this case (see Figure 14 on page 53), firmware writes data to
the GPIO ports. If 16-bit or 24-bit transfers are being made, Port
0 is written last, because writes to Port 0 asserts the Data Ready
bit and the DReadyPin to signal the external device that data is
available.
In this case (see Figure 16 on page 55), the external device
drives the STB and CS pins active (LOW) when it drives new
data onto the port pins. When this happens, the internal latches
become full, which causes the Latch Empty bit to be deasserted.
When STB is returned HIGH (inactive), the HAPI and GPIO
interrupt is generated. Firmware then reads the parallel ports to
empty the HAPI latches. If 16-bit or 24-bit transfers are being
made, Port 0 should be read last because reads from Port 0
assert the Latch Empty bit and the LatEmptyPin to signal the
external device for more data.
The external device then drives the OE and CS pins active
(LOW), which causes the HAPI data to be output on the port pins.
When OE is returned HIGH (inactive), the HAPI/GPIO interrupt
is generated. At that point, firmware is reload the HAPI latches
for the next output, again writing Port 0 last.
The Data Ready bit reads the opposite state from the external
DReadyPin on pin P2[3]. If the DRDY Polarity bit is 0, DReadyPin
is active HIGH, and the Data Ready bit is active LOW.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
The Latch Empty bit reads the opposite state from the external
LatEmptyPin on pin P2[2]. If the LEMPTY Polarity bit is 0,
LatEmptyPin is active HIGH, and the Latch Empty bit is active
LOW.
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Processor Status and Control Register
Table 30. Processor Status and Control Register
Processor Status and Control
Bit #
7
6
Bit Name
IRQ
Pending
Watchdog
Reset
ADDRESS 0xFF
0
5
4
3
2
1
USB Bus
Reset
Interrupt
Power On
Reset
Suspend
Interrupt
Enable
Sense
Reserved
Run
Read/Write
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
Bit 0: Run
Bit 5: USB Bus Reset Interrupt
This bit is manipulated by the HALT instruction. When Halt is
executed, all the bits of the Processor Status and Control
Register are cleared to 0. Since the run bit is cleared, the
processor stops at the end of the current instruction. The
processor remains halted until an appropriate reset occurs
(power on or Watchdog). This bit should normally be written as
a ‘1.’
The USB Bus Reset Interrupt bit is set when the USB Bus Reset
is detected on receiving a USB Bus Reset signal on the upstream
port. The USB Bus Reset signal is a single ended zero (SE0) that
lasts from 12 to 16 μs. An SE0 is defined as the condition in which
both the D+ line and the D– line are LOW at the same time.
Bit 6: WDR
Bit 1 is reserved and must be written as a zero.
The WDR is set during a reset initiated by the WDT. This
indicates the WDT went for more than tWATCH (8 ms minimum)
between Watchdog clears. This occurs with a POR event.
Bit 2: Interrupt Enable Sense
Bit 7: IRQ Pending
This bit indicates whether interrupts are enabled or disabled.
Firmware has no direct control over this bit as writing a zero or
one to this bit position has no effect on interrupts. A ‘0’ indicates
that interrupts are masked off and a ‘1’ indicates that the
interrupts are enabled. This bit is further gated with the bit
settings of the Global Interrupt Enable Register (Table 31 on
page 28) and USB End Point Interrupt Enable Register (Table 32
on page 28). Instructions DI, EI, and RETI manipulate the state
of this bit.
The IRQ pending, when set, indicates that one or more of the
interrupts is recognized as active. An interrupt remains pending
until its interrupt enable bit is set (Table 31 on page 28, Table 32
on page 28) and interrupts are globally enabled. At that point, the
internal interrupt handling sequence clears this bit until another
interrupt is detected as pending.
Bit 1: Reserved
Bit 3: Suspend
Writing a ‘1’ to the Suspend bit halts the processor and cause the
microcontroller to enter the suspend mode that significantly
reduces power consumption. A pending, enabled interrupt or
USB bus activity causes the device to come out of suspend. After
coming out of suspend, the device resumes firmware execution
at the instruction following the IOWR which put the part into
suspend. An IOWR attempting to put the part into suspend is
ignored if USB bus activity is present. See Suspend Mode on
page 16 for more details on suspend mode operation.
Bit 4: Power on Reset
The POR is set to ‘1’ during a power on reset. The firmware
checks bits 4 and 6 in the reset handler to determine whether a
reset was caused by a power on condition or a Watchdog
timeout. A POR event may be followed by a WDR before
firmware begins executing, as explained here.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
During power up, the Processor Status and Control Register is
set to 00010001, which indicates a POR (bit 4 set) has occurred
and no interrupts are pending (bit 7 clear). During the 96 ms
suspend at start up (explained in Power on Reset on page 15),
a WDR also occurs unless this suspend is aborted by an
upstream SE0 before 8 ms. If a WDR occurs during the power
up suspend interval, firmware reads 01010001 from the Status
and Control Register after power up. Normally, the POR bit
should be cleared so a subsequent WDR is clearly identified. If
an upstream bus reset is received before firmware examines this
register, the Bus Reset bit may also be set.
During a WDR, the Processor Status and Control Register is set
to 01XX0001, which indicates a WDR (bit 6 set) has occurred
and no interrupts are pending (bit 7 clear). The WDR does not
effect the state of the POR and the Bus Reset Interrupt bits.
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CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Interrupts
Interrupts are generated by the GPIO and DAC pins, the internal timers, I2C compatible or HAPI operation, the internal USB hub, or
on various USB traffic conditions. All interrupts are maskable by the Global Interrupt Enable Register and the USB End Point Interrupt
Enable Register. Writing a ‘1’ to a bit position enables the interrupt associated with that bit position.
Table 31. Global Interrupt Enable Register
Global Interrupt Enable Register
Bit #
7
6
Bit Name
Reserved
I2C
Read/Write
Reset
ADDRESS 0X20
5
4
3
2
1
0
Interrupt GPIO
Enable
Interrupt
Enable
DAC
Interrupt
Enable
USB Hub
Interrupt
Enable
1.024 ms
Interrupt
Enable
128 μs
Interrupt
Enable
USB Bus
RST
Interrupt
Enable
-
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
-
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit 4: DAC Interrupt Enable
Bit 0: USB Bus RST Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable DAC Interrupt; 0 = Disable DAC interrupt.
1 = Enable Interrupt on a USB Bus Reset;
0 = Disable interrupt on a USB Bus Reset
(Refer to USB Bus Reset Interrupt on page 30).
Bit 5: GPIO Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on falling and rising edge on any
GPIO; 0 = Disable Interrupt on falling and rising edge on
any GPIO. (Refer to sections GPIO and HAPI Interrupt on
page 31, GPIO Configuration Port on page 18, and GPIO
Interrupt Enable Ports on page 19.)
Bit 1: 128 μs Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Timer interrupt every 128 μs;
0 = Disable Timer Interrupt for every 128 μs.
Bit 2: 1.024 ms Interrupt Enable
Bit 6: I2C Interrupt Enable
1= Enable Timer interrupt every 1.024 ms;
0 = Disable Timer Interrupt every 1.024 ms.
1 = Enable Interrupt on I2C related activity;
0 = Disable I2C related activity interrupt.
(Refer to I2C Interrupt on page 32.)
Bit 3: USB Hub Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on a Hub status change;
0 = Disable interrupt due to hub status change.
(Refer to USB Hub Interrupt on page 30.)
Bit 7: Reserved.
Table 32. USB Endpoint Interrupt Enable Register
USB Endpoint Interrupt Enable
ADDRESS 0X21
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
EPB1
Interrupt
Enable
EPB0
Interrupt
Enable
EPA2
Interrupt
Enable
EPA1
Interrupt
Enable
EPA0
Interrupt
Enable
Read/Write
-
-
-
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
-
-
-
0
0
0
0
0
Bit 0: EPA0 Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint A0;
0 = Disable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint A0.
Bit 1: EPA1 Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint A1;
0 = Disable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint A1.
Bit 2: EPA2 Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint A2;
0 = Disable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint A2.
Bit 3: EPB0 Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint B0;
0 = Disable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint B0.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Bit 4: EPB1 Interrupt Enable
1 = Enable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint B1;
0 = Disable Interrupt on data activity through endpoint B1.
Bit [7..5]: Reserved
During a reset, the contents the Global Interrupt Enable Register
and USB End Point Interrupt Enable Register are cleared,
effectively, disabling all interrupts.
The interrupt controller contains a separate flip flop for each
interrupt. See Figure 9 on page 29 for the logic block diagram of
the interrupt controller. When an interrupt is generated, it is first
registered as a pending interrupt. It stays pending until it is
serviced or a reset occurs. A pending interrupt only generates an
interrupt request if it is enabled by the corresponding bit in the
interrupt enable registers. The highest priority interrupt request
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CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
is serviced following the completion of the currently executing
instruction.
When servicing an interrupt, the hardware does the following:
1. Disables all interrupts by clearing the Global Interrupt Enable
bit in the CPU (the state of this bit is read at Bit 2 of the
Processor Status and Control Register, Table 30 on page 27).
2. Clears the flip flop of the current interrupt.
3. Generates an automatic CALL instruction to the ROM
address associated with the interrupt being serviced (that is,
the Interrupt Vector).
The instruction in the interrupt table is typically a JMP instruction
to the address of the Interrupt Service Routine (ISR). The user
re-enables interrupts in the interrupt service routine by executing
an EI instruction. Interrupts are nested to a level limited only by
the available stack space.
The Program Counter value and the Carry and Zero flags (CF,
ZF) are stored onto the Program Stack by the automatic CALL
instruction generated as part of the interrupt acknowledge
process. The user firmware is responsible for ensuring that the
processor state is preserved and restored during an interrupt.
The PUSH A instruction should typically be used as the first
command in the ISR to save the accumulator value and the POP
A instruction should be used to restore the accumulator value
just before the RETI instruction. The program counter CF and ZF
are restored and interrupts are enabled when the RETI
instruction is executed.
The DI and EI instructions are used to disable and enable
interrupts, respectively. These instructions affect only the Global
Interrupt Enable bit of the CPU. If desired, EI is used to re-enable
interrupts while inside an ISR, instead of waiting for the RETI that
exists the ISR. While the global interrupt enable bit is cleared,
the presence of a pending interrupt is detected by examining the
IRQ Sense bit (Bit 7 in the Processor Status and Control
Register).
Interrupt Vectors
The Interrupt Vectors supported by the USB Controller are listed
in Table 33 on page 30. The lowest numbered interrupt (USB Bus
Reset interrupt) has the highest priority, and the highest
numbered interrupt (I2C interrupt) has the lowest priority.
Figure 9. Interrupt Controller Function Diagram
CLR
1
D
USB Reset Int
Q
CLK
Enable [0]
(Reg 0x20)
CLR
Q
D
1
AddrA ENP2 Int
Enable [2]
(Reg 0x21)
CLK
USB Reset Clear Interrupt
Vector
USB Reset IRQ
128-μs CLR
128-μs IRQ
1-ms CLR
1-ms IRQ
IRQout
AddrA EP0 CLR
AddrA EP0 IRQ
AddrA EP1 CLR
AddrA EP1 IRQ
AddrA EP2 CLR
AddrA EP2 IRQ
AddrB EP0 CLR
AddrB EP0 IRQ
AddrB EP1 CLR
AddrB EP1 IRQ
Hub CLR
Hub IRQ
DAC CLR
DAC IRQ
To CPU
CPU
IRQ Sense
IRQ
Global
Interrupt
Enable
Bit
CLR
Int Enable
Sense
Controlled by DI, EI, and
RETI Instructions
Interrupt
Acknowledge
GPIO/HAPI CLR
GPIO/HAPI IRQ
I2C CLR
CLR
1
I2C Int
D
Q
Enable [6]
(Reg 0x20)
CLK
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
I2C IRQ
Interrupt Priority Encoder
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CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Although Reset is not an interrupt, the first instruction executed after a reset is at PROM address 0x0000h—which corresponds to the
first entry in the Interrupt Vector Table. Because the JMP instruction is two bytes long, the interrupt vectors occupy two bytes.
Table 33. Interrupt Vector Assignments
Interrupt Vector Number
Not Applicable
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
ROM Address
0x0000
0x0002
0x0004
0x0006
0x0008
0x000A
0x000C
0x000E
0x0010
0x0012
0x0014
0x0016
0x0018
Interrupt Latency
Interrupt latency is calculated from the following equation:
Interrupt latency = (Number of clock cycles remaining in the
current instruction) + (10 clock cycles for the CALL instruction) +
(5 clock cycles for the JMP instruction).
For example, if a five clock cycle instruction such as JC is being
executed when an interrupt occurs, the first instruction of the
Interrupt Service Routine executes a minimum of 16 clocks
(1+10+5) or a maximum of 20 clocks (5+10+5) after the interrupt
is issued. For a 12 MHz internal clock (6 MHz crystal), 20 clock
periods is 20/12 MHz = 1.667 μs.
USB Bus Reset Interrupt
The USB Controller recognizes a USB Reset when a Single
Ended Zero (SE0) condition persists on the upstream USB port
for 12–16 μs. SE0 is defined as the condition in which both the
D+ line and the D– line are LOW. A USB Bus Reset may be
recognized for an SE0 as short as 12 μs, but is always
recognized for an SE0 longer than 16 μs. When a USB Bus
Reset is detected, bit 5 of the Processor Status and Control
Register (Table 30 on page 27) is set to record this event. In
addition, the controller clears the following registers:
SIE Section:
USB Device Address Registers (0x10,
0x40)
Hub Section:
Hub Ports Connect Status (0x48)
Hub Ports Enable (0x49)
Hub Ports Speed (0x4A)
Function
Execution after Reset begins here
USB Bus Reset interrupt
128 μs timer interrupt
1.024 ms timer interrupt
USB Address A Endpoint 0 interrupt
USB Address A Endpoint 1 interrupt
USB Address A Endpoint 2 interrupt
USB Address B Endpoint 0 interrupt
USB Address B Endpoint 1 interrupt
USB Hub interrupt
DAC interrupt
GPIO and HAPI interrupt
I2C interrupt
A USB Bus Reset Interrupt is generated at the end of the USB
Bus Reset condition when the SE0 state is deasserted. If the
USB reset occurs during the start up delay following a POR, the
delay is aborted as described in Power on Reset on page 15.
Timer Interrupt
There are two periodic timer interrupts: the 128 μs interrupt and
the 1.024 ms interrupt. The user should disable both timer
interrupts before going into the suspend mode to avoid possible
conflicts between servicing the timer interrupts first or the
suspend request first.
USB Endpoint Interrupts
There are five USB endpoint interrupts, one per endpoint. A USB
endpoint interrupt is generated after the USB host writes to a
USB endpoint FIFO or after the USB controller sends a packet
to the USB host. The interrupt is generated on the last packet of
the transaction. For example, on the host’s ACK during an IN, or
on the device ACK during on OUT. If no ACK is received during
an IN transaction, no interrupt is generated.
USB Hub Interrupt
A USB hub interrupt is generated by the hardware after a
connect/disconnect change, babble, or a resume event is
detected by the USB repeater hardware. The babble and resume
events are additionally gated by the corresponding bits of the
Hub Port Enable Register (Table 36 on page 34). The connect
and disconnect event on a port does not generate an interrupt if
the SIE does not drive the port (that is, the port is being forced).
Hub Ports Suspend (0x4D)
Hub Ports Resume Status (0x4E)
Hub Ports SE0 Status (0x4F)
Hub Ports Data (0x50)
Hub Downstream Force (0x51).
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
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DAC Interrupt
GPIO and HAPI Interrupt
Each DAC I/O pin generates an interrupt, if enabled. The
interrupt polarity for each DAC I/O pin is programmable. A
positive polarity is a rising edge input while a negative polarity is
a falling edge input. All of the DAC pins share a single interrupt
vector, which means the firmware needs to read the DAC port to
determine which pin or pins caused an interrupt.
Each of the GPIO pins generates an interrupt, if enabled. The
interrupt polarity is programmed for each GPIO port as part of
the GPIO configuration. All of the GPIO pins share a single
interrupt vector, which means the firmware needs to read the
GPIO ports with enabled interrupts to determine which pin or pins
caused an interrupt. A block diagram of the GPIO interrupt logic
is shown in Figure 10.
Refer to GPIO Configuration Port on page 18 and GPIO Interrupt
Enable Ports on page 19 for more information about setting
GPIO interrupt polarity and enabling individual GPIO interrupts.
If one DAC pin has triggered an interrupt, no other DAC pins
causes a DAC interrupt until that pin has returned to its inactive
(non trigger) state or the corresponding interrupt enable bit is
cleared. The USB Controller does not assign interrupt priority to
different DAC pins and the DAC Interrupt Enable Register is not
cleared during the interrupt acknowledge process.
Figure 10. GPIO Interrupt Structure
Port
Configuration
Register
GPIO
Pin
1 = Enable
0 = Disable
OR Gate
(1 input per
GPIO pin)
M
U
X
GPIO Interrupt
Flip Flop
1
D
Q
CLR
Interrupt
Priority
Encoder
IRQout
Interrupt
Vector
Port Interrupt
Enable Register
IRA
1 = Enable
0 = Disable
Global
GPIO Interrupt
Enable
(Bit 5, Register 0x20)
If one port pin has triggered an interrupt, no other port pins cause
a GPIO interrupt until that port pin has returned to its inactive
(non trigger) state or its corresponding port interrupt enable bit is
cleared. The USB Controller does not assign interrupt priority to
different port pins and the Port Interrupt Enable Registers are not
cleared during the interrupt acknowledge process.
When HAPI is enabled, the HAPI logic takes over the interrupt
vector and blocks any interrupt from the GPIO bits, including
ports and bits not used by HAPI. Operation of the HAPI interrupt
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
is independent of the GPIO specific bit interrupt enables, and is
enabled or disabled only by bit 5 of the Global Interrupt Enable
Register (0x20) when HAPI is enabled. The settings of the GPIO
bit interrupt enables on ports and bits not used by HAPI still effect
the CMOS mode operation of those ports and bits. The effect of
modifying the interrupt bits while the Port Config bits are set to
‘10’ is shown in Table 12 on page 18. The events that generate
HAPI interrupts are described in Hardware Assisted Parallel
Interface (HAPI) on page 26.
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I2C Interrupt
The I2C interrupt occurs after various events on the I2C
compatible bus to signal the need for firmware interaction. This
generally involves reading the I2C Status and Control Register
(Table 27 on page 24) to determine the cause of the interrupt,
loading and reading the I2C Data Register as appropriate, and
finally writing the Processor Status and Control Register
(Table 30 on page 27) to initiate the subsequent transaction. The
interrupt indicates that status bits are stable and it is safe to read
and write the I2C registers.
When enabled, the I2C compatible state machines generate
interrupts on completion of the following conditions. The
referenced bits are in the I2C Status and Control Register.
USB Overview
The USB hardware includes a USB Hub repeater with one
upstream and four downstream ports. The USB Hub repeater
interfaces to the microcontroller through a full speed Serial
Interface Engine. An external series resistor of Rext must be
placed in series with all upstream and downstream USB outputs
to meet the USB driver requirements of the USB specification.
The CY7C66x13C microcontroller provides the functionality of a
compound device consisting of a USB hub and permanently
attached functions.
USB Serial Interface Engine
The SIE allows the CY7C66x13C microcontroller to
communicate with the USB host through the USB repeater
portion of the hub. The SIE simplifies the interface between the
microcontroller and USB by incorporating hardware that handles
the following USB bus activity independently of the
microcontroller:
■
In slave receive mode, after the slave receives a byte of data:
The Addr bit is set, if this is the first byte since a start or restart
signal was sent by the external master. Firmware must read or
write the data register as necessary, then set the ACK, Xmit
MODE, and Continue/Busy bits appropriately for the next byte.
■
In slave receive mode, after a stop bit is detected: The
Received Stop bit is set, if the stop bit follows a slave receive
transaction where the ACK bit was cleared to 0, no stop bit
detection occurs.
■
Bit stuffing and unstuffing
■
Checksum generation and checking
■
ACK/NAK/STALL
In slave transmit mode, after the slave transmits a byte of data:
The ACK bit indicates if the master that requested the byte
acknowledged the byte. If more bytes are to be sent, firmware
writes the next byte into the Data Register and then sets the
Xmit MODE and Continue/Busy bits as required.
■
Token type identification
■
Address checking.
■
■
■
■
In master transmit mode, after the master sends a byte of
data. Firmware should load the Data Register if necessary, and
set the Xmit MODE, MSTR MODE, and Continue/Busy bits
appropriately. Clearing the MSTR MODE bit issues a stop
signal to the I2C compatible bus and return to the idle state.
In master receive mode, after the master receives a byte of
data: Firmware should read the data and set the ACK and
Continue/Busy bits appropriately for the next byte. Clearing the
MSTR MODE bit at the same time causes the master state
machine to issue a stop signal to the I2C compatible bus and
leave the I2C compatible hardware in the idle state.
When the master loses arbitration: This condition clears the
MSTR MODE bit and sets the ARB Lost/Restart bit immediately
and then waits for a stop signal on the I2C compatible bus to
generate the interrupt.
The Continue/Busy bit is cleared by hardware prior to interrupt
conditions 1 to 4. When the Data Register is read or written,
firmware should configure the other control bits and set the
Continue/Busy bit for subsequent transactions. Following an
interrupt from master mode, firmware should perform only one
write to the Status and Control Register that sets the
Continue/Busy bit, without checking the value of the
Continue/Busy bit. The Busy bit may otherwise be active and I2C
register contents may be changed by the hardware during the
transaction, until the I2C interrupt occurs.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Firmware is required to handle the following USB interface tasks:
■
Coordinate enumeration by responding to SETUP packets
■
Fill and empty the FIFOs
■
Suspend and Resume coordination
■
Verify and select DATA toggle values.
USB Enumeration
The internal hub and any compound device function are
enumerated under firmware control. The hub is enumerated first,
followed by any integrated compound function. After the hub is
enumerated, the USB host reads hub connection status to
determine which (if any) of the downstream ports need to be
enumerated. The following is a brief summary of the typical
enumeration process of the CY7C66x13C by the USB host. For
a detailed description of the enumeration process, refer to the
USB specification.
In this description, “Firmware” refers to embedded firmware in
the CY7C66x13C controller.
1. The host computer sends a SETUP packet followed by a
DATA packet to USB address 0 requesting the Device
descriptor.
2. Firmware decodes the request and retrieves its Device
descriptor from the program memory tables.
3. The host computer performs a control read sequence and
Firmware responds by sending the Device descriptor over the
USB bus, via the on-chip FIFOs.
4. After receiving the descriptor, the host sends a SETUP packet
followed by a DATA packet to address 0 assigning a new USB
address to the device.
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5. Firmware stores the new address in its USB Device Address
Register (for example, as Address B) after the no data control
sequence completes.
6. The host sends a request for the Device descriptor using the
new USB address.
7. Firmware decodes the request and retrieves the Device
descriptor from program memory tables.
8. The host performs a control read sequence and Firmware
responds by sending its Device descriptor over the USB bus.
9. The host generates control reads from the device to request
the Configuration and Report descriptors.
10.When the device receives a Set Configuration request, its
functions may now be used.
11.Following enumeration as a hub, Firmware optionally
indicates to the host that a compound device exists (for
example, the keyboard in a keyboard/hub device).
12.The host carries out the enumeration process with this
additional function as though it were attached downstream
from the hub.
13.When the host assigns an address to this device, it is stored
as the other USB address (for example, Address A).
USB Hub
A USB hub is required to support:
■
Connectivity behavior: service connect and disconnect
detection
■
Bus fault detection and recovery
■
Full and low speed device support.
to a downstream port is through a differential signal pair (D+ and
D–). Each downstream port provided by the hub requires
external RUDN resistors from each signal line to ground, so that
when a downstream port has no device connected, the hub
reads a LOW (zero) on both D+ and D–. This condition is used
to identify the “no connect” state.
The hub must have a resistor RUUP connected between its
upstream D+ line and VREG to indicate it is a full speed USB
device.
The hub generates an EOP at EOF1, in accordance with the
USB 1.1 Specification, Section 11.2.2.
Connecting and Disconnecting a USB Device
A low speed (1.5 Mbps) USB device has a pull up resistor on the
D– pin. At connect time, the bias resistors set the signal levels
on the D+ and D– lines. When a low speed device is connected
to a hub port, the hub sees a LOW on D+ and a HIGH on D–.
This causes the hub repeater to set a connect bit in the Hub Ports
Connect Status register for the downstream port. Then the hub
repeater generates a Hub Interrupt to notify the microcontroller
that there is a change in the Hub downstream status.
A full speed (12 Mbps) USB device has a pull up resistor from
the D+ pin, so the hub sees a HIGH on D+ and a LOW on D–. In
this case, the hub repeater sets a connect bit in the Hub Ports
Connect Status register, clears a bit in the Hub Ports Speed
register (for full speed), and generates a Hub Interrupt to notify
the microcontroller of the change in Hub status. The firmware
sets the speed of this port in the Hub Ports Speed Register (see
Table 35 on page 34).
Connects are recorded by the time a non SE0 state lasts for more
than 2.5 μs on a downstream port.
These features are mapped onto a hub repeater and a hub
controller. The hub controller is supported by the processor
integrated into the CY7C66013C and CY7C66113C
microcontrollers. The hardware in the hub repeater detects
whether a USB device is connected to a downstream port and
the interface speed of the downstream device. The connection
When a USB device is disconnected from the Hub, the
downstream signal pair eventually floats to a single ended zero
state. The hub repeater recognizes a disconnect when the SE0
state on a downstream port lasts from 2.0 to 2.5 μs. On a
disconnect, the corresponding bit in the Hub Ports Connect
Status register is cleared, and the Hub Interrupt is generated.
Table 34. Hub Ports Connect Status
Hub Ports Connect Status
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x48
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Port 4
Connect
Status
Port 3
Connect
Status
Port 2
Connect
Status
Port 1
Connect
Status
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Port x Connect Status (where x = 1..4)
Bit [7..4]: Reserved.
When set to 1, Port x is connected; When set to 0, Port x is
disconnected.
The Hub Ports Connect Status register is cleared to zero by reset
or USB bus reset, then set to match the hardware configuration
by the hub repeater hardware. The Reserved bits [7..4] should
always read as ‘0’ to indicate no connection.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 33 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 35. Hub Ports Speed
Hub Ports Speed
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x4A
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Port 4 Speed Port 3 Speed Port 2 Speed Port 1 Speed
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Port x Speed (where x = 1..4)
Bit [7..4]: Reserved.
Set to 1 if the device plugged in to Port x is Low speed; Set to 0
if the device plugged in to Port x is Full speed.
The Hub Ports Speed register is cleared to zero by reset or bus
reset. This must be set by the firmware on issuing a port reset.
The Reserved bits [7..4] should always read as ‘0.’
Enabling and Disabling a USB Device
After a USB device connection is detected, firmware must
update status change bits in the hub status change data
structure that is polled periodically by the USB host. The host
responds by sending a packet that instructs the hub to reset and
enable the downstream port. Firmware then sets the bit in the
Hub Ports Enable register, Table 36, for the downstream port.
The hub repeater hardware responds to an enable bit in the Hub
Ports Enable register by enabling the downstream port, so that
USB traffic flows to and from that port.
If a port is marked enabled and is not suspended, it receives all
USB traffic from the upstream port, and USB traffic from the
downstream port is passed to the upstream port (unless babble
is detected). Low speed ports do not receive full speed traffic
from the upstream port.
When firmware writes to the Hub Ports Enable register to enable
a port, the port is not enabled until the end of any packet currently
being transmitted. If there is no USB traffic, the port is enabled
immediately.
When a USB device disconnection is detected, firmware must
update status bits in the hub change status data structure that is
polled periodically by the USB host. In suspend, a connect or
disconnect event generates an interrupt (if the hub interrupt is
enabled) even if the port is disabled.
Table 36. Hub Ports Enable Register
Hub Ports Enable Register
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x49
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Port 4
Enable
Port 3
Enable
Port 2
Enable
Port 1
Enable
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Port x Enable (where x = 1..4)
Set to 1 if Port x is enabled; Set to 0 if Port x is disabled.
cleared) if babble is detected on that downstream port. Babble is
defined as:
Bit [7..4]: Reserved.
■
The Hub Ports Enable register is cleared to zero by reset or bus
reset to disable all downstream ports as the default condition. A
port is also disabled by internal hub hardware (enable bit
Any non idle downstream traffic on an enabled downstream
port at EOF2
■
Any downstream port with upstream connectivity established
at EOF2 (that is, no EOP received by EOF2).
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 34 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Hub Downstream Ports Status and Control
Data transfer on hub downstream ports is controlled according
to the bit settings of the Hub Downstream Ports Control Register
(Table 37). Each downstream port is controlled by two bits, as
defined in Table 38. The Hub Downstream Ports Control
Register is cleared upon reset or bus reset, and the reset state
is the state for normal USB traffic. Any downstream port being
forced must be marked as disabled (Table 36 on page 34) for
proper operation of the hub repeater.
Firmware uses this register for driving bus reset and resume
signaling to downstream ports. Controlling the port pins through
this register uses standard USB edge rate control according to
the speed of the port, set in the Hub Port Speed Register.
The downstream USB ports are designed for connection of USB
devices, but also serves as output ports under firmware control.
This allows unused USB ports to be used for functions such as
driving LEDs or providing additional input signals. Pulling up
these pins to voltages above VREF may cause current flow into
the pin.
This register is not reset by bus reset. These bits must be cleared
before going into suspend.
Table 37. Hub Downstream Ports Control Register
Hub Downstream Ports Control Register
ADDRESS 0x4B
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Bit Name
Port 4
Control Bit 1
Port 4
Control Bit 0
Port 3
Control Bit 1
Port 3
Control Bit 0
Port 2
Control Bit 1
Port 2
Control Bit 0
Port 1
Control Bit 1
Port 1
Control Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Table 38. Control Bit Definition for Downstream Ports
Control Bits
Bit1
0
0
1
1
Control Action
Bit 0
0
1
0
1
Not Forcing (Normal USB Function)
Force Differential ‘1’ (D+ HIGH, D– LOW)
Force Differential ‘0’ (D+ LOW, D– HIGH)
Force SE0 state
An alternate means of forcing the downstream ports is through the Hub Ports Force Low Register (Table 39). With these registers the
pins of the downstream ports are individually forced LOW, or left unforced. Unlike the Hub Downstream Ports Control Register, above,
the Force Low Register does not produce standard USB edge rate control on the forced pins. However, this register allows downstream
port pins to be held LOW in suspend. This register is used to drive SE0 on all downstream ports when unconfigured, as required in
the USB 1.1 specification.
Table 39. Hub Ports Force Low Register
Hub Ports Force Low
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x51
0
Bit Name
Force Low
D+[4]
Force Low
D-[4]
Force Low
D+[3]
Force Low
D–[3]
Force Low
D+[2]
Force Low
D–[2]
Force Low
D+[1]
Force Low
D–[1]
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
The data state of downstream ports are read through the HUB Ports SE0 Status Register (Table 40 on page 36) and the Hub Ports
Data Register (Table 41 on page 36). The data read from the Hub Ports Data Register is the differential data only and is independent
of the settings of the Hub Ports Speed Register (Table 35 on page 34). When the SE0 condition is sensed on a downstream port, the
corresponding bits of the Hub Ports Data Register hold the last differential data state before the SE0. Hub Ports SE0 Status Register
and Hub Ports Data Register are cleared upon reset or bus reset.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 35 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 40. Hub Ports SE0 Status Register
Hub Ports SE0 Status
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x4F
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Port 4
SE0 Status
Port 3
SE0 Status
Port 2
SE0 Status
Port 1
SE0 Status
Read/Write
-
-
-
-
R
R
R
R
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Port x SE0 Status (where x = 1..4)
Bit [7..4]: Reserved.
Set to 1 if a SE0 is output on the Port x bus; Set to 0 if a Non-SE0
is output on the Port x bus.
Table 41. Hub Ports Data Register
Hub Ports Data
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x50
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Port 4 Diff.
Data
Port 3 Diff.
Data
Port 2 Diff.
Data
Port 1 Diff.
Data
Read/Write
-
-
-
-
R
R
R
R
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Port x Diff Data (where x = 1..4)
Bit [7..4]: Reserved.
Set to 1 if D+ > D– (forced differential 1, if signal is differential,
i.e. not a SE0 or SE1). Set to 0 if D– > D+ (forced differential 0,
if signal is differential, i.e., not a SE0 or SE1);
Downstream Port Suspend and Resume
The Hub Ports Suspend Register (Table 42) and Hub Ports
Resume Status Register (Table 49 on page 41) indicate the
suspend and resume conditions on downstream ports. The
suspend register must be set by firmware for any ports that are
selectively suspended. Also, this register is only valid for ports
that are selectively suspended.
If a port is marked as selectively suspended, normal USB traffic
is not sent to that port. Resume traffic is also prevented from
going to that port, unless the Resume comes from the selectively
suspended port. If a resume condition is detected on the port,
hardware reflects a Resume back to the port, sets the Resume
bit in the Hub Ports Resume Register, and generates a hub
interrupt. If a disconnect occurs on a port marked as selectively
suspended, the suspend bit is cleared.
The Device Remote Wakeup bit (bit 7) of the Hub Ports Suspend
Register controls whether or not the resume signal is propagated
by the hub after a connect or a disconnect event. If the Device
Remote Wakeup bit is set, the hub automatically propagates the
resume signal after a connect or a disconnect event. If the
Device Remote Wakeup bit is cleared, the hub does not
propagate the resume signal. The setting of the Device Remote
Wakeup flag has no impact on the propagation of the resume
signal after a downstream remote wakeup event. The hub
automatically propagates the resume signal after a remote
wakeup event, regardless of the state of the Device Remote
wakeup bit. The state of this bit has no impact on the generation
of the hub interrupt. These registers are cleared on reset or USB
bus reset.
Table 42. Hub Ports Suspend Register
Hub Ports Suspend
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x4D
0
Bit Name
Device
Remote
Wakeup
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Port 4
Selective
Suspend
Port 3
Selective
Suspend
Port 2
Selective
Suspend
Port 1
Selective
Suspend
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Port x Selective Suspend (where x = 1..4)
Bit 7: Device Remote Wakeup.
Set to 1 if Port x is Selectively Suspended; Set to 0 if Port x Do
not suspend.
When set to 1, Enable hardware upstream resume signaling for
connect and disconnect events during global resume.
When set to 0, Disable hardware upstream resume signaling for
connect and disconnect events during global resume.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 36 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 43. Hub Ports Resume Status Register
Hub Ports Resume
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS 0x4E
0
Bit Name
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Resume 4
Resume 3
Resume 2
Resume 1
Read/Write
-
-
-
-
R
R
R
R
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bit [0..3]: Resume x (where x = 1..4)
When set to 1 Port x requesting to be resumed (set by hardware);
default state is 0;
Bit [7..4]: Reserved.
The Reserved bits [7..4] should always read as ‘0’.
Resume from a selectively suspended port, with the hub not in
suspend, typically involves these actions:
1. Hardware detects the Resume, drives a K to the port, and
generates the hub interrupt. The corresponding bit in the
Resume Status Register (0x4E) reads ‘1’ in this case.
2. Firmware responds to hub interrupt, and reads register 0x4E
to determine the source of the Resume.
3. Firmware begins driving K on the port for 10 ms or more
through register 0x4B.
4. Firmware clears the Selective Suspend bit for the port (0x4D),
which clears the Resume bit (0x4E). This ends the hardware
driven Resume, but the firmware driven Resume continues.
To prevent traffic being fed by the hub repeater to the port
during or just after the Resume, firmware should disable this
port.
5. Firmware drives a timed SE0 on the port for two low speed bit
times as appropriate.
Note Firmware must disable interrupts during this SE0 so the
SE0 pulse is not inadvertently lengthened and appears as a
bus reset to the downstream device.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
6. Firmware drives a J on the port for one low speed bit time,
then it idles the port.
7. Firmware re-enables the port.
Resume when the hub is suspended typically involves these
actions:
1. Hardware detects the Resume, drives a K on the upstream
(which is then reflected to all downstream enabled ports), and
generates the hub interrupt.
2. The part comes out of suspend and the clocks start.
3. When the clocks are stable, firmware execution resumes. An
internal counter ensures that this takes at least 1 ms.
Firmware should check for Resume from any selectively
suspended ports. If found, the Selective Suspend bit for the
port should be cleared; no other action is necessary.
4. The Resume ends when the host stops sending K from
upstream. Firmware should check for changes to the Enable
and Connect Registers. If a port has become disabled but is
still connected, an SE0 is detected on the port. The port is
treated as being reset, and is reported to the host as newly
connected.
Firmware chooses to clear the Device Remote Wakeup bit (if set)
to implement firmware timed states for port changes. All allowed
port changes wake the part. Then, the part uses internal timing
to determine whether to take action or return to suspend. If
Device Remote Wakeup is set, automatic hardware assertions
take place on Resume events.
Page 37 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
USB Upstream Port Status and Control
USB status and control is regulated by the USB Status and Control Register, as shown in Table 44. All bits in the register are cleared
during reset.
Table 44. USB Status and Control Register
USB Status and Control
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
ADDRESS
0
Bit Name
Endpoint
Size
Endpoint
Mode
D+
Upstream
D– Upstream Bus Activity
Control
Action
Bit 2
Control
Action
Bit 1
Control
Action
Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0x1F
Bits[2..0]: Control Action
Set to control action as per Table 45.The three control bits allow
the upstream port to be driven manually by firmware. For normal
USB operation, all of these bits must be cleared. Table 45 shows
how the control bits affect the upstream port.
Table 45. Control Bit Definition for Upstream Port
Control Bits
Control Action
000
Not Forcing (SIE Controls Driver)
001
Force D+[0] HIGH, D–[0] LOW
010
Force D+[0] LOW, D–[0] HIGH
011
Force SE0; D+[0] LOW, D–[0] LOW
100
Force D+[0] LOW, D–[0] LOW
101
Force D+[0] HiZ, D–[0] LOW
110
Force D+[0] LOW, D–[0] HiZ
111
Force D+[0] HiZ, D–[0] HiZ
Bit 3: Bus Activity
Bit 6: Endpoint Mode
This is a “sticky” bit that indicates if any non idle USB event has
occurred on the upstream USB port. Firmware should check and
clear this bit periodically to detect any loss of bus activity. Writing
a ‘0’ to the Bus Activity bit clears it, while writing a ‘1’ preserves
the current value. In other words, the firmware clears the Bus
Activity bit, but only the SIE can set it.
This bit used to configure the number of USB endpoints. See
USB Device Endpoints on page 39 for a detailed description.
Bit 7: Endpoint Size
Bits 4 and 5: D– Upstream and D+ Upstream
The hub generates an EOP at EOF1 in accordance with the
USB 1.1 Specification.
These bits give the state of each upstream port pin individually:
1 = HIGH, 0 = LOW.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
This bit used to configure the number of USB endpoints. See
USB Device Endpoints on page 39 for a detailed description.
Page 38 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
USB SIE Operation
USB Device Addresses
The CY7C66x13C SIE supports operation as a single device or
a compound device. This section describes the two device
addresses, the configurable endpoints, and the endpoint
function.
The USB Controller provides two USB Device Address
Registers: A (addressed at 0x10)and B (addressed at 0x40).
Upon reset and under default conditions, Device A has three
endpoints and Device B has two endpoints. The USB Device
Address Register contents are cleared during a reset, setting the
USB device addresses to zero and disabling these addresses.
Table 46 shows the format of the USB Address Registers.
Table 46. USB Device Address Registers
USB Device Address (Device A, B)
Bit #
7
6
Bit Name
Device
Address
Enable
Device
Address
Bit 6
ADDRESSES
1
5
4
3
2
Device
Address
Bit 5
Device
Address
Bit 4
Device
Address
Bit 3
Device
Address
Bit 2
0x10(A) and 0x40(B)
0
Device
Address
Bit 1
Device
Address
Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bits[6..0]: Device Address
Bit 7: Device Address Enable
Firmware writes this bits during the USB enumeration process to
the non zero address assigned by the USB host.
Must be set by firmware before the SIE responds to USB traffic
to the Device Address.
USB Device Endpoints
The CY7C66x13C controller supports up to two addresses and five endpoints for communication with the host. The configuration of
these endpoints, and associated FIFOs, is controlled by bits [7,6] of the USB Status and Control Register (see Table 44 on page 38).
Bit 7 controls the size of the endpoints and bit 6 controls the number of addresses. These configuration options are detailed in Table 47.
Endpoint FIFOs are part of user RAM (as shown in Data Memory Organization on page 13).
Table 47. Memory Allocation for Endpoints
USB Status And Control Register (0x1F) Bits [7, 6]
[0,0]
[1,0]
Two USB Addresses: A (3 End- Two USB Addresses: A (3 Endpoints) & B (2 Endpoints)
points) &B (2 Endpoints)
[0,1]
[1,1]
One USB Address:
A (5 Endpoints)
One USB Address:
A (5 Endpoints)
Label
Start Address
Size
Label
Start Address
Size
Label
Start Address
Size
Label
Start Address
Size
EPB1
0xD8
8
EPB0
0xA8
8
EPA4
0xD8
8
EPA3
0xA8
8
EPB0
0xE0
8
EPB1
0xB0
8
EPA3
0xE0
8
EPA4
0xB0
8
EPA2
0xE8
8
EPA0
0xB8
8
EPA2
0xE8
8
EPA0
0xB8
8
EPA1
0xF0
8
EPA1
0xC0
32
EPA1
0xF0
8
EPA1
0xC0
32
EPA0
0xF8
8
EPA2
0xE0
32
EPA0
0xF8
8
EPA2
0xE0
32
When the SIE writes data to a FIFO, the internal data bus is
driven by the SIE; not the CPU. This causes a short delay in the
CPU operation. The delay is three clock cycles per byte. For
example, an 8-byte data write by the SIE to the FIFO generates
a delay of 2 μs (3 cycles/byte * 83.33 ns/cycle * 8 bytes).
USB Control Endpoint Mode Registers
other endpoints are unidirectional, but selectable by the user as
IN or OUT endpoints.
The endpoint mode registers are cleared during reset. When
USB Status And Control Register Bits [6,7] are set to [0,0] or
[1,0], the endpoint 0 EPA0 and EPB0 mode registers use the
format shown in Table 48 on page 40.
All USB devices are required to have a control endpoint 0 (EPA0
and EPB0) that is used to initialize and control each USB
address. Endpoint 0 provides access to the device configuration
information and allows generic USB status and control accesses.
Endpoint 0 is bidirectional to both receive and transmit data. The
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 39 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 48. USB Endpoint 0 Mode Registers
USB Device Endpoint Zero Mode (A0, B0)
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
2
ADDRESSES
1
0x12(A0) and 0x42(B0)
0
Bit Name
Endpoint 0
SETUP
Received
Endpoint 0 IN Endpoint 0
Received
OUT
Received
ACK
Mode Bit 3
Mode Bit 2
Mode Bit 1
Mode Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bits[3..0]: Mode
These sets the mode which control how the control endpoint
responds to traffic.
Bit 4: ACK
This bit is set whenever the SIE engages in a transaction to the
register’s endpoint that completes with an ACK packet.
Bit 5: Endpoint 0 OUT Received
1 = Token received is an OUT token. 0 = Token received is not
an OUT token. This bit is set by the SIE to report the type of token
received by the corresponding device address is an OUT token.
The bit must be cleared by firmware as part of the USB
processing.
Bit 6: Endpoint 0 IN Received
1 = Token received is an IN token. 0 = Token received is not an
IN token. This bit is set by the SIE to report the type of token
received by the corresponding device address is an IN token.
The bit must be cleared by firmware as part of the USB
processing.
Bit 7: Endpoint 0 SETUP Received
1 = Token received is a SETUP token. 0 = Token received is not
a SETUP token. This bit is set ONLY by the SIE to report the type
of token received by the corresponding device address is a
SETUP token. Any write to this bit by the CPU clears it (set it to
0). The bit is forced HIGH from the start of the data packet phase
of the SETUP transaction until the start of the ACK packet
returned by the SIE. The CPU should not clear this bit during this
interval, and subsequently, until the CPU first does an IORD to
this endpoint 0 mode register. The bit must be cleared by
firmware as part of the USB processing.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Note In 5-endpoint mode (USB Status And Control Register Bits
[7,6] are set to [0,1] or [1,1]), Register 0x42 serves as non control
endpoint 3, and has the format for non control endpoints shown
in Table 49 on page 41.
Bits[6:0] of the endpoint 0 mode register are locked from CPU
write operations whenever the SIE has updated one of these bits,
which the SIE does only at the end of the token phase of a
transaction (SETUP... Data... ACK, OUT... Data... ACK, or IN...
Data... ACK). The CPU unlocks these bits by doing a subsequent
read of this register. Only endpoint 0 mode registers are locked
when updated. The locking mechanism does not apply to the
mode registers of other endpoints.
Because of these hardware locking features, firmware must
perform an IORD after an IOWR to an endpoint 0 register. This
verifies that the contents have changed as desired, and that the
SIE has not updated these values.
While the SETUP bit is set, the CPU cannot write to the endpoint
zero FIFOs. This prevents firmware from overwriting an incoming
SETUP transaction before firmware has a chance to read the
SETUP data. Refer to Table 47 on page 39 for the appropriate
endpoint zero memory locations.
The Mode bits (bits [3:0]) control how the endpoint responds to
USB bus traffic. The mode bit encoding is shown in Table 38 on
page 35. Additional information on the mode bits are found in
Table 52 on page 45 and Table 51 on page 44.
Note The SIE offers an “Ack out - Status in” mode and not an
“Ack out - Nak in” mode. Therefore, if following the status stage
of a Control Write transfer a USB host were to immediately start
the next transfer, the new Setup packet could override the data
payload of the data stage of the previous Control Write.
Page 40 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
USB Non Control Endpoint Mode Registers
The format of the non control endpoint mode registers is shown in Table 49.
Table 49. USB Non Control Endpoint Mode Registers
USB Non Control Device Endpoint Mode
Bit #
7
6
5
Bit Name
STALL
Reserved
Reserved
ADDRESSES 0x14, 0x16, 0x44
1
0
4
3
2
ACK
Mode Bit 3
Mode Bit 2
Mode Bit 1
Mode Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bits[3..0]: Mode
Bits[6..5]: Reserved
These sets the mode which control how the control endpoint
responds to traffic. The mode bit encoding is shown in Table 38
on page 35.
Must be written zero during register writes.
Bit 4: ACK
This bit is set whenever the SIE engages in a transaction to the
register’s endpoint that completes with an ACK packet.
Bit 7: STALL
If this STALL is set, the SIE stalls an OUT packet if the mode bits
are set to ACK-IN, and the SIE stalls an IN packet if the
mode bits are set to ACK-OUT. For all other modes, the STALL
bit must be a LOW.
USB Endpoint Counter Registers
There are five Endpoint Counter registers, with identical formats for both control and non control endpoints. These registers contain
byte count information for USB transactions, and bits for data packet status. The format of these registers is shown in Table 50.
Table 50. USB Endpoint Counter Registers
USB Endpoint Counter
Bit #
7
6
5
4
3
ADDRESSES
2
0x11, 0x13, 0x15, 0x41, 0x43
1
0
Bit Name
Data 0/1
Toggle
Data Valid
Byte Count
Bit 5
Byte Count
Bit 4
Byte Count
Bit 3
Byte Count
Bit 2
Byte Count
Bit 1
Byte Count
Bit 0
Read/Write
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Bits[5..0]: Byte Count
Bit 7: Data 0/1 Toggle
These counter bits indicate the number of data bytes in a
transaction. For IN transactions, firmware loads the count with
the number of bytes to be transmitted to the host from the
endpoint FIFO. Valid values are 0 to 32, inclusive. For OUT or
SETUP transactions, the count is updated by hardware to the
number of data bytes received, plus two for the CRC bytes. Valid
values are 2 to 34, inclusive.
This bit selects the DATA packet’s toggle state: 0 for DATA0, 1
for DATA1. For IN transactions, firmware must set this bit to the
desired state. For OUT or SETUP transactions, the hardware
sets this bit to the state of the received Data Toggle bit.
Bit 6: Data Valid
This bit is set on receiving a proper CRC when the endpoint FIFO
buffer is loaded with data during transactions. This bit is used
OUT and SETUP tokens only. If the CRC is not correct, the
endpoint interrupt occurs, but Data Valid is cleared to a zero.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Whenever the count updates from a SETUP or OUT transaction
on endpoint 0, the counter register locks and cannot be written
by the CPU. Reading the register unlocks it. This prevents
firmware from overwriting a status update on incoming SETUP
or OUT transactions before firmware has a chance to read the
data. Only endpoint 0 counter register is locked when updated.
The locking mechanism does not apply to the count registers of
other endpoints.
Page 41 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Endpoint Mode and Count Registers Update and
Locking Mechanism
The contents of the endpoint mode and counter registers are
updated, based on the packet flow diagram in
Figure 11 on page 43. Two time points, UPDATE and SETUP,
are shown in the same figure. The following activities occur at
each time point:
SETUP:
The SETUP bit of the endpoint 0 mode register is forced HIGH
at this time. This bit is forced HIGH by the SIE until the end of the
data phase of a control write transfer. The SETUP bit can not be
cleared by firmware during this time.
The affected mode and counter registers of endpoint 0 are
locked from any CPU writes when they are updated. These
registers are unlocked by a CPU read, only if the read operation
occurs after the UPDATE. The firmware needs to perform a
register read as a part of the endpoint ISR processing to unlock
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
the effected registers. The locking mechanism on mode and
counter registers ensures that the firmware recognizes the
changes that the SIE might have made since the previous I/O
read of that register.
UPDATE:
1. Endpoint Mode Register – All the bits are updated (except the
SETUP bit of the endpoint 0 mode register).
2. Counter Registers – All bits are updated.
3. Interrupt – If an interrupt is to be generated as a result of the
transaction, the interrupt flag for the corresponding endpoint
is set at this time. For details on what conditions are required
to generate an endpoint interrupt,
refer to Table 52 on page 45.
4. The contents of the updated endpoint 0 mode and counter
registers are locked, except the SETUP bit of the endpoint 0
mode register which was locked earlier.
Page 42 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Figure 11. Token and Data Packet Flow Diagram
1. IN Token
Host To Device
S
Y
N
C
IN
A
D
D
R
E
N
D
P
Device To Host
C
R
C
5
D
A
T
A
1/0
S
Y
N
C
Token Packet
H
O
S
T
IN
A
D
D
R
E
N
D
P
C
R
C
16
S
Y
N
C
A
C
K
Hand
Shake
Packet
Data Packet
Host To Device
S
Y
N
C
Data
Host To Device
UPDATE
Device To Host
C
R
C
5
S
Y
N
C
Token Packet
NAK/STALL
Data Packet
UPDATE
2. OUT or SETUP Token without CRC error
S
Y
N
C
O
U
T
/
Set
up
A
D
D
R
E
N
D
P
Device To Host
Host To Device
Host To Device
C
R
C
5
S
Y
N
C
Token Packet
D
A
T
A
1/0
Data
C
R
C
16
Data Packet
UPDATE
SETUP
S
Y
N
C
D
E
V
I
C
E
ACK,
NAK,
STAL
Hand
Shake
Packet
3. OUT or SETUP Token with CRC error
Host To Device
S
Y
N
C
O
U
T
/
Set
up
A
D
D
R
E
N
D
P
Token Packet
Host To Device
C
R
C
5
S
Y
N
C
D
A
T
A
1/0
Data
C
R
C
16
Data Packet
UPDATE only if FIFO is
written
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 43 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
USB Mode Tables
Table 51. USB Register Mode Encoding
Mode
Disable
Mode SETUP
Bits
0000
ignore
IN
ignore
OUT
Comments
ignore Ignore all USB traffic to this endpoint
Nak In/Out
0001
accept NAK
NAK
Forced from Setup on Control endpoint, from modes other than 0000
Status Out Only
0010
accept stall
check
For Control endpoints
For Control endpoints
Stall In/Out
0011
accept stall
stall
Ignore In/Out
0100
accept ignore
ignore For Control endpoints
Isochronous Out
0101
ignore
always For Isochronous endpoints
Status In Only
0110
accept TX 0 Byte stall
Isochronous In
0111
ignore
TX count ignore For Isochronous endpoints
Nak Out
1000
ignore
ignore
NAK
Is set by SIE on an ACK from mode 1001 (Ack Out)
1001
1001
ignore
ignore
ignore
ignore
ACK
stall
On issuance of an ACK this mode is changed by SIE to 1000 (NAK Out)
Nak Out-Status In
1010
accept TX 0 Byte NAK
Is set by SIE on an ACK from mode 1011 (Ack Out-Status In)
Ack Out-Status In
1011
accept TX 0 Byte ACK
On issuance of an ACK this mode is changed by SIE to 1010 (NAK Out
– Status In)
Nak In
Ack
Ack
Out(STALL[4]=0)
Out(STALL[4]=1)
ignore
For Control Endpoints
1100
ignore
NAK
IN(STALL[4]=0)
[4]=1)
ignore Is set by SIE on an ACK from mode 1101 (Ack In)
Ack
Ack IN(STALL
1101
1101
ignore
ignore
TX count ignore On issuance of an ACK this mode is changed by SIE to 1100 (NAK In)
stall
ignore
Nak In – Status Out
1110
accept NAK
Ack In – Status Out
1111
accept TX Count check
check
Is set by SIE on an ACK from mode 1111 (Ack In – Status Out)
On issuance of an ACK this mode is changed by SIE to 1110 (NAK In –
Status Out)
Mode
This lists the mnemonic given to the different modes that are set
in the Endpoint Mode Register by writing to the lower nibble (bits
0..3). The bit settings for different modes are covered in the
column marked “Mode Bits.” The Status IN and Status OUT
represent the Status stage in the IN or OUT transfer involving the
control endpoint.
Mode Bits
These column lists the encoding for different modes by setting
Bits[3..0] of the Endpoint Mode register. This modes represents
how the SIE responds to different tokens sent by the host to an
endpoint. For instance, if the mode bits are set to “0001” (NAK
IN/OUT), the SIE responds with an
■
ACK on receiving a SETUP token from the host
■
NAK on receiving an OUT token from the host
■
NAK on receiving an IN token from the host
I2C
Refer to
Compatible Controller on page 23 for more
information on SIE functioning.
SETUP, IN, and OUT
These columns shows the SIE’s response to the host on
receiving a SETUP, IN, and OUT token depending on the mode
set in the Endpoint Mode Register.
A “Check” on the OUT token column, implies that on receiving
an OUT token the SIE checks to see whether the OUT packet is
of zero length and has a Data Toggle (DTOG) set to ‘1.’ If the
DTOG bit is set and the received OUT Packet has zero length,
the OUT is ACKed to complete the transaction. If either of this
condition is not met the SIE responds with a STALLL or just
ignore the transaction.
A “TX Count” entry in the IN column implies that the SIE transmit
the number of bytes specified in the Byte Count (bits 3..0 of the
Endpoint Count Register) to the host in response to the IN token
received.
A “TX0 Byte” entry in the IN column implies that the SIE transmit
a zero length byte packet in response to the IN token received
from the host.
An “Ignore” in any of the columns means that the device does
not send any handshake tokens (no ACK) to the host.
An “Accept” in any of the columns means that the device
responds with an ACK to a valid SETUP transaction to the host.
Comments
Some Mode Bits are automatically changed by the SIE in
response to certain USB transactions. For example, if the Mode
Bits [3:0] are set to '1111' which is ACK IN-Status OUT mode as
shown in Table 47 on page 39, the SIE changes the endpoint
Mode Bits [3:0] to NAK IN-Status OUT mode (1110) after ACK’ing
Note
4. STALL bit is bit 7 of the USB Non Control Device Endpoint Mode registers. For more information, refer to USB Non Control Endpoint Mode Registers on page 41.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 44 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
and OUTs). Any mode set to accept a SETUP sends an ACK
handshake to a valid SETUP token.
a valid status stage OUT token. The firmware needs to update
the mode for the SIE to respond appropriately. See Table 38 on
page 35 for more details on what modes are changed by the SIE.
A disabled endpoint remains disabled until changed by firmware,
and all endpoints reset to the disabled mode (0000). Firmware
normally enables the endpoint mode after a SetConfiguration
request.
The control endpoint has three status bits for identifying the
token type received (SETUP, IN, or OUT), but the endpoint must
be placed in the correct mode to function as such. Non control
endpoints should not be placed into modes that accept SETUPs.
Note that most modes that control transactions involving an
ending ACK, are changed by the SIE to a corresponding mode
which NAKs subsequent packets following the ACK. Exceptions
are modes 1010 and 1110.
Any SETUP packet to an enabled endpoint with mode set to
accept SETUPs are changed by the SIE to 0001 (NAKing INs
Table 52. Decode Table for Table 53
Properties of
Incoming Packets
3
2
1
0
Token
count
buffer
Changes to the Internal Register made by the SIE on receiving an incoming
packet from the host
dval
DTOG
DVAL
COUNT
Setup
In
Out
ACK
3
2
1
Interrupt
0
Response
Int
Byte Count (bits 0..5, Figure 17-4)
Endpoint Mode
encoding
Data Valid (bit 6, Figure 17-4)
Received Token
(SETUP/IN/OUT)
SIE’s Response
to the Host
Data0/1 (bit7 Figure 17-4)
PID Status Bits
(Bit[7..5], Figure 17-2)
The validity of the received data
Endpoint Mode bits
Changed by the SIE
The quality status of the DMA buffer
The number of received bytes
Legend:
TX: transmit
UC : unchanged
RX: receive
TX0:Transmit 0 length packet
Acknowledge phase completed
available for Control endpoint only
x: don’t care
The response of the SIE are summarized as follows:
■
The SIE only responds to valid transactions, and ignores invalid
ones.
■
The SIE generates an interrupt when a valid transaction is
completed or when the FIFO is corrupted. FIFO corruption
occurs during an OUT or SETUP transaction to a valid internal
address, that ends with a invalid CRC.
■
An incoming Data packet is valid if the count is < Endpoint Size
+ 2 (includes CRC) and passes all error checking.
■
An IN is ignored by an OUT configured endpoint and visa versa.
■
The IN and OUT PID status is updated at the end of a
transaction.
■
The SETUP PID status is updated at the beginning of the Data
packet phase.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
■
The entire Endpoint 0 mode register and the Count register are
locked to CPU writes at the end of any transaction to that
endpoint in which an ACK is transferred. These registers are
only unlocked by a CPU read of the register, which should be
done by the firmware only after the transaction is complete.
This represents about a 1 μs window in which the CPU is locked
from register writes to these USB registers. Normally the
firmware should perform a register read at the beginning of the
Endpoint ISRs to unlock and get the mode register information.
The interlock on the Mode and Count registers ensures that
the firmware recognizes the changes that the SIE might have
made during the previous transaction. Note that the setup bit
of the mode register is NOT locked. This means that before
writing to the mode register, firmware must first read the register
to make sure that the setup bit is not set (which indicates a
setup was received, while processing the current USB request).
This read unlocks the register. So care must be taken not to
overwrite the register elsewhere.
Page 45 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 53. Details of Modes for Differing Traffic Conditions (see Table 52 on page 45 for the decode legend)
Properties of Incoming Packet
Mode Bits token count buffer
dval
See Table 33 Setup <= 10 data
valid
See Table 33 Setup > 10 junk
x
See Table 33 Setup x
junk
invalid
Properties of Incoming Packet
Mode Bits token count buffer
dval
DISABLED
0 0 0 0 x
x
UC
x
Nak In/Out
0 0 0 1 Out
x
UC
x
0 0 0 1 In
x
UC
x
Ignore In/Out
0 1 0 0 Out
x
UC
x
0 1 0 0 In
x
UC
x
Stall In/Out
0 0 1 1 Out
x
UC
x
0 0 1 1 In
x
UC
x
Properties of Incoming Packet
Mode Bits token count buffer
dval
Normal Out/premature status In
1 0 1 1 Out
<= 10 data
valid
1 0 1 1 Out
> 10 junk
x
1 0 1 1 Out
x
junk
invalid
1 0 1 1 In
x
UC
x
NAK Out/premature status In
1 0 1 0 Out
<= 10 UC
valid
1 0 1 0 Out
> 10 UC
x
1 0 1 0 Out
x
UC
invalid
1 0 1 0 In
x
UC
x
Status In/extra Out
0 1 1 0 Out
<= 10 UC
valid
0 1 1 0 Out
> 10 UC
x
0 1 1 0 Out
x
UC
invalid
0 1 1 0 In
x
UC
x
Properties of Incoming Packet
Mode Bits token count buffer
dval
Normal In/premature status Out
1 1 1 1 Out
2
UC
valid
1 1 1 1 Out
2
UC
valid
1 1 1 1 Out
!=2
UC
valid
1 1 1 1 Out
> 10 UC
x
1 1 1 1 Out
x
UC
invalid
1 1 1 1 In
x
UC
x
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
SETUP (if accepting SETUPs)
Changes made by SIE to Internal Registers and Mode Bits
DTOG DVAL COUNT Setup In Out ACK Mode Bits Response Intr
updates 1
updates 1
UC UC 1
0 0 0 1 ACK
yes
updates updates updates 1
UC UC UC No Change ignore
yes
updates 0
updates 1
UC UC UC No Change ignore
yes
Changes made by SIE to Internal Registers and Mode Bits
DTOG DVAL COUNT Setup In Out ACK Mode Bits Response Intr
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC
UC
No Change ignore
no
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC 1
1
UC
UC
UC
No Change NAK
No Change NAK
yes
yes
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC
UC UC
UC
UC
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
no
no
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC 1
UC No Change Stall
yes
UC
UC
UC
1
UC UC No Change Stall
yes
CONTROL WRITE
Changes made by SIE to Internal Registers and Mode Bits
DTOG DVAL COUNT Setup In Out ACK Mode Bits Response Intr
updates
updates
updates
UC
1
updates
0
UC
updates
updates
updates
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
1
1
1
UC
1
UC
UC
1
1 0 1 0 ACK
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
No Change TX 0
yes
yes
yes
yes
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
1
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
No Change NAK
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
No Change TX 0
yes
no
no
yes
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC 1
UC 0 0 1 1 Stall
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change ignore
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change ignore
UC
UC
UC
1
UC 1
No Change TX 0
CONTROL READ
Changes made by SIE to Internal Registers and Mode Bits
DTOG DVAL COUNT Setup In Out ACK Mode Bits Response
1
0
updates
UC
UC
UC
1
1
1
UC
UC
UC
updates
updates
updates
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
1
1
1
UC
UC
UC
1
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
No Change ACK
0 0 1 1 Stall
0 0 1 1 Stall
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
1 1 1 0 ACK (back)
yes
no
no
yes
Intr
yes
yes
yes
no
no
yes
Page 46 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 53. Details of Modes for Differing Traffic Conditions (see Table 52 on page 45 for the decode legend) (continued)
Nak In/premature status Out
1 1 1 0 Out
2
1 1 1 0 Out
2
1 1 1 0 Out
!=2
1 1 1 0 Out
> 10
1 1 1 0 Out
x
1 1 1 0 In
x
Status Out/extra In
0 0 1 0 Out
2
0 0 1 0 Out
2
0 0 1 0 Out
!=2
0 0 1 0 Out
> 10
0 0 1 0 Out
x
0 0 1 0 In
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
valid
valid
valid
x
invalid
x
1
0
updates
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
valid
valid
valid
x
invalid
x
1
0
updates
UC
UC
UC
1
1
1
UC
UC
UC
updates
updates
updates
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
1
1
1
UC
UC
UC
1
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
updates UC
UC 1
1
No Change ACK
1
updates UC
UC 1
UC 0 0 1 1 Stall
1
updates UC
UC 1
UC 0 0 1 1 Stall
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change ignore
UC
UC
UC
1
UC UC No Change ignore
UC
UC
UC
1
UC UC 0 0 1 1 Stall
OUT ENDPOINT
Changes made by SIE to Internal Registers and Mode Bits
DTOG DVAL COUNT Setup In Out ACK Mode Bits Response
Properties of Incoming Packet
Mode Bits token count buffer
dval
Normal Out/erroneous In
1 0 0 1 Out
<= 10 data
valid
1 0 0 1 Out
> 10 junk
x
1 0 0 1 Out
x
junk
invalid
1 0 0 1 In
x
UC
x
updates
updates
updates
UC
1
updates
0
UC
updates
updates
updates
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
1
1
UC
1
UC
UC
UC
1
0
0
1
In
x
NAK Out/erroneous In
1 0 0 0 Out
<= 10
1 0 0 0 Out
> 10
1 0 0 0 Out
x
1 0 0 0 In
x
Isochronous endpoint (Out)
0 1 0 1 Out
x
0 1 0 1 In
x
No Change ACK
0 0 1 1 Stall
0 0 1 1 Stall
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
No Change NAK
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
valid
x
invalid
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
UC
UC
UC
yes
yes
yes
no
no
yes
Intr
1 0 0 0 ACK
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
(STALL[4] =
0)
No Change Stall
(STALL[4] =
1)
yes
yes
yes
no
No Change NAK
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
No Change ignore
yes
no
no
no
updates updates updates updates updates UC
UC 1
1
No Change RX
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change ignore
IN ENDPOINT
Properties of Incoming Packet
Changes made by SIE to Internal Registers and Mode Bits
Mode Bits token count buffer
dval
DTOG DVAL COUNT Setup In Out ACK Mode Bits Response
Normal In/erroneous Out
1 1 0 1 Out
x
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change ignore
(STALL[4] =
0)
1 1 0 1 Out
x
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change stall
(STALL[4] =
1)
1 1 0 1 In
x
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
UC 1
1 1 0 0 ACK (back)
NAK In/erroneous Out
1 1 0 0 Out
x
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC UC No Change ignore
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
yes
yes
yes
no
no
yes
no
yes
no
Intr
no
no
yes
no
Page 47 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Table 53. Details of Modes for Differing Traffic Conditions (see Table 52 on page 45 for the decode legend) (continued)
1 1 0 0 In
x
Isochronous endpoint (In)
0 1 1 1 Out
x
0 1 1 1 In
x
UC
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
1
UC
UC
No Change NAK
yes
UC
UC
x
x
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC
UC UC
1
UC
UC
UC
No Change ignore
No Change TX
no
yes
Register Summary
USB- Endpoint A0, AI AND A2 Configuration Endpoint A0, AI
HAPI GPIO CONFIGURATION PORTS 0, 1, 2 AND 3
CS
and A2 Configuration I2C
Addr
Register Name
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Read/Write/ Default/
Both[5, 6, 7] Reset [8]
0x00
Port 0 Data
P0.7
P0.6
P0.5
P0.4
P0.3
P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
bbbbbbbb
11111111
0x01
Port 1 Data
P1.7
P1.6
P1.5
P1.4
P1.3
P1.2
P1.1
P1.0
bbbbbbbb
11111111
0x02
Port 2 Data
P2.7
P2.6
P2.5
P2.4
P2.3
P2.2
P2.1
P2.0
bbbbbbbb
11111111
0x03
Port 3 Data
Reserved P3.6
P3.5
P3.4
P3.3
P3.2
P3.1
P3.0
bbbbbbbb
-1111111
CY7C66113C CY7C66113C
only
only
0x04
Port 0 Interrupt
Enable
P0.7 Intr
Enable
P0.6 Intr
Enable
P0.5 Intr
Enable
P0.4 Intr
Enable
P0.3 Intr
Enable
P0.2 Intr
Enable
P0.1 Intr
Enable
P0.0 Intr
Enable
wwwwwwww 00000000
0x05
Port 1 Interrupt
Enable
P1.7 Intr
Enable
P1.6 Intr
Enable
P1.5 Intr
Enable
P1.4 Intr
Enable
P1.3 Intr
Enable
P1.2 Intr
Enable
P1.1 Intr
Enable
P1.0 Intr
Enable
wwwwwwww 00000000
0x06
Port 2 Interrupt
Enable
P2.7 Intr
Enable
P2.3 Intr
Enable
P2.2 Intr
Enable
P2.1 Intr
Enable
P2.0 Intr
Enable
wwwwwwww 00000000
Port 3 Interrupt
Enable
P2.5 Intr
Enable
P3.5 Intr
Enable
P2.4 Intr
Enable
0x07
P2.6 Intr
Enable
Reserved P3.6 Intr
Enable
P3.4 Intr
Enable
P3.3 Intr
Enable
P3.2 Intr
Enable
P3.1 Intr
Enable
P3.0 Intr
Enable
wwwwwwww 00000000
CY7C66113C CY7C66113C
only
only
0x08
GPIO
Configuration
Port 3
Port 3
Port 2
Port 2
Port 1
Port 1
Port 0
Port 0
bbbbbbbb
Config Bit Config Bit Config Bit Config Bit Config Bit Config Bit Config Bit Config Bit
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
00000000
0x09
HAPI/I2C
Configuration
I2 C
Position
0x10
USB Device
Address A
Device
Device
Address A Address
Enable
A Bit 6
Device
Address
A Bit 5
0x11
EP A0 Counter
Register
Data 0/1
Toggle
Byte
Count
Bit 5
0x12
EP A0 Mode
Register
0x13
Reserved LEMPTY DRDY
Polarity
Polarity
Latch
Empty
Data
Ready
Port Width Port Width b-bbrrbb
bit 1
bit 0
00000000
Device
Address
A Bit 4
Device
Address
A Bit 3
Device
Address
A Bit 2
Device Ad- Device
dress
Address
A Bit 1
A Bit 0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Byte
Count
Bit 4
Byte
Count
Bit 3
Byte
Count
Bit 2
Byte Count Byte
Bit 1
Count
Bit 0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Endpoint0 Endpoint0 Endpoint0 ACK
SETUP IN
OUT
Received Received Received
Mode Bit 3 Mode Bit 2 Mode Bit 1 Mode Bit 0 bbbbbbbb
00000000
EP A1 Counter
Register
Data 0/1
Toggle
Data Valid Byte
Count
Bit 5
Byte
Count
Bit 4
Byte
Count
Bit 3
bbbbbbbb
00000000
0x14
EP A1 Mode
Register
STALL
-
ACK
Mode Bit 3 Mode Bit 2 Mode Bit 1 Mode Bit 0 bbbbbbbb
00000000
0x15
EP A2 Counter
Register
Data 0/1
Toggle
Data Valid Byte
Count
Bit 5
Byte
Count
Bit 4
Byte
Count
Bit 3
bbbbbbbb
00000000
0x16
EP A2 Mode
Register
STALL
-
ACK
Mode Bit 3 Mode Bit 2 Mode Bit 1 Mode Bit 0 bbbbbbbb
00000000
0x1F
USB Status and
Control
Endpoint Endpoint D+
D–
Bus
Size
Mode
Upstream Upstream Activity
Data
Valid
-
-
Byte
Count
Bit 2
Byte
Count
Bit 2
Control
Bit 2
Byte Count Byte
Bit 1
Count
Bit 0
Byte Count Byte
Bit 1
Count
Bit 0
Control
Bit 1
Control
Bit 0
bbrrbbbb
-0xx0000
Notes
5. B: Read and Write.
6. W: Write.
7. R: Read.
8. X: Unknown
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 48 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Register Summary
HUB PORT CONTROL, STATUS, SUSPEND RESUME, SE0, FORCE LOW ENDPOINT B0, B1 CONFIGURATION I2C
TIMER INTERRUPT
Addr
Register Name
(continued)
Bit 7
Bit 6
Bit 5
Bit 4
GPIO
Interrupt
Enable
DAC
Interrupt
Enable
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Read/Write/ Default/
Both[5, 6, 7] Reset [8]
USB Hub 1.024-ms 128 μs
Interrupt Interrupt Interrupt
Enable
Enable
Enable
USB Bus -bbbbbbb
RESET Interrupt Enable
-0000000
EPB0
Interrupt
Enable
EPA0
Interrupt
Enable
---00000
0x20
Global Interrupt
Enable
Reserved I2C
Interrupt
Enable
0x21
Endpoint Interrupt
Enable
Reserved Reserved Reserved EPB1
Interrupt
Enable
0x24
Timer (LSB)
Timer Bit 7 Timer Bit 6 Timer Bit 5 Timer Bit 4 Timer Bit 3 Timer Bit 2 Timer Bit 1 Timer Bit 0 rrrrrrrr
00000000
0x25
Timer (MSB)
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Timer Bit Timer Bit Time Bit 9 Timer Bit 8 ----rrrr
11
10
----0000
0x28
I2C Control and
Status
MSTR
Mode
0x29
I2C Data
I2C Data 7 I2C Data 6 I2C Data 5 I2C Data 4 I2C Data 3 I2C Data 2 I2C Data 1 I2C Data 0 bbbbbbbb
xxxxxxxx
0x40
USB Device
Address B
Device
Device
Device
Device
Device
Device
Device
Device
bbbbbbbb
Address B Address B Address B Address B Address B Address B Address B Address B
Bit 4
Bit 3
Bit 2
Bit 1
Bit 0
Enable
Bit 6
Bit 5
00000000
0x41
EP B0 Counter Reg- Data 0/1
ister
Toggle
0x42
EP B0 Mode
Register
0x43
EP B1 Counter Reg- Data 0/1
ister
Toggle
Data Valid Byte
Count
Bit 5
0x44
EP B1 Mode Regis- STALL
ter
-
0x48
Hub Port Connect
Status
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Port 4
Connect
Status
Port 3
Connect
Status
Port 2
Connect
Status
Port 1
Connect
Status
----bbbb
00000000
0x49
Hub Port Enable
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Port 4
Enable
Port 3
Enable
Port 2
Enable
Port 1
Enable
----bbbb
00000000
0x4A
Hub Port Speed
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Port 4
Speed
Port 3
Speed
Port 2
Speed
Port 1
Speed
----bbbb
00000000
0x4B
Hub Port Control
(Ports 4:1)
Port 4
Port 4
Port 3
Port 3
Port 2
Port 2
Port 1
Port 1
bbbbbbbb
Control Bit Control Bit Control Bit Control Bit Control Bit Control Bit Control Bit Control Bit
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0x4D
Hub Port Suspend Device
Remote
Wakeup
0x4E
Hub Port Resume
Status
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Resume 4 Resume 3 Resume 2 Resume 1 ----rrrr
00000000
0x4F
Hub Port SE0 Status Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Port 4
Port 3
Port 2
Port 1
----rrrr
SE0 Sta- SE0 Sta- SE0 Status SE0 Status
tus
tus
00000000
0x50
Hub Ports Data
00000000
0x51
Hub Port Force Low Force Low Force Low Force Low Force Low Force Low Force Low Force Low Force Low bbbbbbbb
D–[3]
D+[2]
D–[2]
D+[1]
D–[1]
(Ports 4:1)
D+[4]
D–[4]
D+[3]
00000000
0xFF
Process Status &
Control
00010001
Continue/ Xmit
Busy
Mode
ACK
Addr
EPA2
Interrupt
Enable
EPA1
Interrupt
Enable
ARB Lost/ Received I2C
Restart
Stop
Enable
---bbbbb
bbbbbbbb
Data Valid Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte
Byte Count Byte
bbbbbbbb
Count Bit 5 Count Bit 4 Count Bit 3 Count Bit 2 Bit 1
Count Bit 0
Endpoint 0 Endpoint 0 Endpoint 0 ACK
SETUP IN
OUT
Received Received Received
-
00000000
Byte
Count
Bit 4
Byte
Count
Bit 3
00000000
ACK
Mode Bit 3 Mode Bit 2 Mode Bit 1 Mode Bit 0 b--bbbbb
Byte
Count
Bit 2
Byte Count Byte
Bit 1
Count
Bit 0
bbbbbbbb
00000000
Reserved Reserved Reserved Port 4
Port 3
Port 2
Port 1
b---bbbb
Selective Selective Selective Selective
Suspend Suspend Suspend Suspend
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
WDR
00000000
Mode Bit 3 Mode Bit 2 Mode Bit 1 Mode Bit 0 bbbbbbbb
USB Bus Power-on Suspend Interrupt
Reset In- Reset
Enable
terrupt
Sense
Reserved Run
rbbbbrbb
00000000
00000000
Reserved Reserved Reserved Reserved Port 4
Port 3
Port 2
Port 1
----rrrr
Diff. Data Diff. Data Diff. Data Diff. Data
IRQ
Pending
00000000
Page 49 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Sample Schematic
Figure 12. Sample Schematic
3.3v Regulator
OUT
IN
GND
2.2 μF
USB-A
Vbus
D–
D+
GND
Vref
2.2 μF
Vref
1.5K
(RUUP)
USB-B
Vbus
DD+
GND
0.01 μF
Vbus
D0–
D0+
Vref
Vcc
22x2(Rext)
SHELL
Optional
0.01 μF
22x8(Rext)
D1–
D1+
4.7 nF
250 VAC
USB-A
Vbus
D–
D+
GND
D2–
XTALO
10M
6.000 MHz
D2+
XTALI
D3–
GND
GND
Vpp
D3+
D4–
D4+
15K(x8)
(RUDN)
POWER
MANAGEMENT
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
USB-A
Vbus
D–
D+
GND
USB-A
Vbus
D–
D+
GND
Page 50 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Absolute Maximum Ratings
DC Voltage Applied to Outputs
in High Z State .................................. –0.5 V to +VCC + 0.5 V
Exceeding maximum ratings may impair the useful life of the
device. These user guidelines are not tested.
Power Dissipation..................................................... 500 mW
Storage Temperature ............................... –65 °C to +150 °C
Ambient Temperature with Power Applied...... 0 °C to +70 °C
Static Discharge Voltage ......................................... > 2000 V
Latch Up Current .................................................. > 200 mA
Supply Voltage on VCC relative to VSS .........–0.5 V to +7.0 V
Max Output Sink Current into
Port 0, 1, 2, 3, and DAC[1:0] Pins .............................. 60 mA
DC Input Voltage .............................. –0.5 V to +VCC + 0.5 V
Max Output Sink Current into DAC[7:2] Pins.............. 10 mA
Max Output Source Current from Port 1, 2, 3, 4 ........ 30 mA
Electrical Characteristics
(Fosc = 6 MHz; Operating Temperature = 0 to 70 °C, VCC = 4.0 V to 5.25 V)
Parameter
Description
Conditions
Min
Max
Unit
3.15
3.45
V
–0.4
0.4
V
–
50
mA
General
VREF
Reference Voltage
Vpp
Programming Voltage (disabled)
ICC
VCC Operating Current
ISB1
Supply Current—Suspend Mode
–
50
μA
Iref
Vref Operating Current
No USB Traffic[9]
–
10
mA
Iil
Input Leakage Current
Any pin
–
1
μA
3.3 V ± 5%
No GPIO source current
USB Interface
Vdi
Differential Input Sensitivity
0.2
–
V
Vcm
Differential Input Common Mode Range
0.8
2.5
V
Vse
Single Ended Receiver Threshold
0.8
2.0
V
Cin
Transceiver Capacitance
–
20
pF
| (D+)–(D–) |
Ilo
Hi-Z State Data Line Leakage
0 V < Vin < 3.3 V
–10
10
μA
Rext
External USB Series Resistor
In series with each USB pin
19
21
Ω
RUUP
External Upstream USB pull up Resistor
1.5 kΩ ± 5%, D+ to VREG
1.425
1.575
kΩ
RUDN
External Downstream Pull down Resistors
15 kΩ ± 5%, downstream USB pins
14.25
15.75
kΩ
0
100
ms
2.8
3.6
V
Power-on Reset
tvccs
VCC Ramp Rate
Linear ramp 0 V to VCC[10]
USB Upstream/Downstream Port
VUOH
Static Output High
15 kΩ ± 5% to Gnd
VUOL
Static Output Low
1.5 kΩ ± 5% to VREF
ZO
USB Driver Output Impedance
Including Rext Resistor
–
0.3
V
28
44
Ω
8.0
24.0
kΩ
General Purpose I/O (GPIO)
Rup
pull up Resistance (typical 14 kΩ)
VITH
Input Threshold Voltage
All ports, LOW to HIGH edge
20%
40%
VCC
VH
Input Hysteresis Voltage
All ports, HIGH to LOW edge
2%
8%
VCC
VOL
Port 0,1,2,3 Output Low Voltage
IOL = 3 mA
IOL = 8 mA
–
0.4
2.0
V
V
Notes
9. Add 18 mA per driven USB cable (upstream or downstream). This is based on transitions every two full speed bit times on average.
10. Power on Reset occurs whenever the voltage on VCC is below approximately 2.5 V.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 51 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Electrical Characteristics
(Fosc = 6 MHz; Operating Temperature = 0 to 70 °C, VCC = 4.0 V to 5.25 V) (continued)
Parameter
VOH
Description
Conditions
Output High Voltage
IOH = 1.9 mA (all ports 0,1,2,3)
Min
Max
Unit
2.4
–
V
8.0
24.0
kΩ
DAC Interface
Rup
DAC Pull Up Resistance (typical 14 kΩ)
Isink0(0)
DAC[7:2] Sink Current (0)
Vout = 2.0 V DC
0.1
0.3
mA
Isink0(F)
DAC[7:2] Sink Current (F)
Vout = 2.0 V DC
0.5
1.5
mA
Isink1(0)
DAC[1:0] Sink Current (0)
Vout = 2.0 V DC
1.6
4.8
mA
Isink1(F)
DAC[1:0] Sink Current (F)
Vout = 2.0 V DC
8
24
mA
Irange
Programmed Isink Ratio: max/min
Vout = 2.0 V DC[11]
4
6
Tratio
Tracking Ratio DAC[1:0] to DAC[7:2]
Vout = 2.0 V[12]
14
22
IsinkDAC
DAC Sink Current
Vout = 2.0 V DC
1.6
4.8
mA
Ilin
Differential Nonlinearity
DAC Port[13]
0.6
LSB
Switching Characteristics
(FOSC = 6.0 MHz)
Parameter
Description
Min
Max
Unit
6 ± 0.25%
–
MHz
166.25
167.08
ns
Clock Source
fOSC
Clock Rate
tcyc
Clock Period
tCH
Clock HIGH time
0.45 tCYC
–
ns
tCL
Clock LOW time
0.45 tCYC
–
ns
4
20
ns
USB Full Speed
Signaling[14]
trfs
Transition Rise Time
tffs
Transition Fall Time
4
20
ns
trfmfs
Rise/Fall Time Matching; (tr/tf)
90
111
%
tdratefs
Full Speed Date Rate
12 ± 0.25%
–
Mb/s
–
0.8
μs
DAC Interface
tsink
Current Sink Response Time
HAPI Read Cycle Timing
tRD
Read Pulse Width
15
–
ns
tOED
OE LOW to Data Valid[15, 16]
–
40
ns
–
20
ns
0
60
ns
Z[16]
tOEZ
OE HIGH to Data High
tOEDR
OE LOW to Data_Ready Deasserted[15, 16]
Notes
11. Irange: Isinkn(15)/Isinkn(0) for the same pin.
12. Tratio = Isink1[1:0](n)/Isink0[7:2](n) for the same n, programmed.
13. Ilin measured as largest step size vs. nominal according to measured full scale and zero programmed values.
14. Per Table 7-6 of revision 1.1 of USB specification.
15. For 25 pF load.
16. Assumes chip select CS is asserted (LOW).
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 52 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Switching Characteristics
(FOSC = 6.0 MHz)
Parameter
Description
Min
Max
Unit
HAPI Write Cycle Timing
tWR
Write Strobe Width
15
–
ns
tDSTB
Data Valid to STB HIGH (Data Setup Time)[16]
5
–
ns
tSTBZ
STB HIGH to Data High Z (Data Hold Time)
[16]
15
–
ns
tSTBLE
STB LOW to Latch_Empty Deasserted[15, 16]
0
50
ns
8.192
14.336
ms
Timer Signals
twatch
WDT Period
Figure 13. Clock Timing
tCYC
tCH
CLOCK
tCL
Figure 14. USB Data Signal Timing
tr
tr
D+
90%
10%
D−
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
90%
10%
Page 53 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Figure 15. HAPI Read by External Interface from USB Microcontroller
Interrupt Generated
Int
CS (P2.6, input)
tRD
OE (P2.5, input)
DATA (output)
D[23:0]
tOED
STB (P2.4, input)
tOEZ
tOEDR
(Ready)
DReadyPin (P2.3, output)
(Shown for DRDY Polarity=0)
Internal Write
Internal Addr
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Port0
Page 54 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Figure 16. HAPI Write by External Device to USB Microcontroller
Interrupt Generated
Int
CS (P2.6, input)
tWR
STB (P2.4, input)
tSTBZ
DATA (input)
D[23:0]
tDSTB
OE (P2.5, input)
tSTBLE
LEmptyPin (P2.2, output)
(Shown for LEMPTY Polarity=0)
(not empty)
Internal Read
Internal Addr
Port0
Ordering Information
Ordering Code
PROM Size
Package Type
Operating Range
CY7C66013C-PVXC
8 KB
48-pin (300-Mil) SSOP
Commercial
CY7C66113C-PVXC
8 KB
56-pin (300-Mil) SSOP
Commercial
CY7C66113C-PVXCT
8 KB
56-pin (300-Mil) SSOP
Commercial
CY7C66113C-XC
8 KB
Die
Commercial
CY7C66113C-LTXC
8 KB
56-pin QFN
Commercial
CY7C66113C-LTXCT
8 KB
56-pin QFN
Commercial
Ordering Code Definitions
CY 7C66X13 -
X X X X X
X = blank or T (blank = Bulk; T = Tape and Reel)
X = Temperature Grade = C or A (C = Commercial grade; A = Automotive grade)
X = Pb-free
X = V or T
Package Type: X = P or L
P = 48-pin SSOP or 56-pin SSOP; L = 56-pin QFN
Part Identifier: 7C66X13 = 7C66013 or 7C66113
Company ID: CY = Cypress
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 55 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Package Diagrams
Figure 17. 48-pin Shrunk Small Outline Package O48
51-85061 *F
Figure 18. 56-pin Shrunk Small Outline Package O56
51-85062 *F
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 56 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Figure 19. 56-QFN 8 × 8 × 1.0 mm EPad 4.5 × 5.2 mm
001-53450 *D
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 57 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Quad Flat Package No Leads (QFN) Package
Design Notes
Electrical contact of the part to the Printed Circuit Board (PCB)
is made by soldering the leads on the bottom surface of the
package to the PCB. Hence, special attention is required to the
heat transfer area below the package to provide a good thermal
bond to the circuit board. A Copper (Cu) fill is to be designed into
the PCB as a thermal pad under the package. Heat is transferred
from the FX1 through the device’s metal paddle on the bottom
side of the package. Heat from here, is conducted to the PCB at
the thermal pad. It is then conducted from the thermal pad to the
PCB inner ground plane by a 5 x 5 array of via. A via is a plated
through hole in the PCB with a finished diameter of 13 mil. The
QFN’s metal die paddle must be soldered to the PCB’s thermal
pad. Solder mask is placed on the board top side over each via
to resist solder flow into the via. The mask on the top side also
minimizes outgassing during the solder reflow process.
For further information on this package design please refer to the
application note Surface Mount Assembly of AMKOR’s
MicroLeadFrame (MLF) Technology. This application note can
be downloaded from AMKOR’s website from the following URL
http://www.amkor.com/products/notes_papers/MLF_AppNote_
0902.pdf. The application note provides detailed information on
board mounting guidelines, soldering flow, rework process, etc.
Figure 20 displays a cross sectional area underneath the
package. The cross section is of only one via. The thickness of
the solder paste template should be 5 mil. It is recommended
that “No Clean” type 3 solder paste is used for mounting the part.
Nitrogen purge is recommended during reflow.
Figure 21 is a plot of the solder mask pattern. This pad is
thermally connected and is not electrically connected inside the
chip. To minimize EMI, this pad should be connected to the
ground plane of the circuit board.
Figure 20. Cross Section of the Area Underneath the QFN Package
0.017” dia
Solder Mask
Cu Fill
Cu Fill
PCB Material
Via hole for thermally connecting the
QFN to the circuit board ground plane.
0.013” dia
PCB Material
This figure only shows the top three layers of the
circuit board: Top Solder, PCB Dielectric, and
the Ground Plane
Figure 21. Plot of the Solder Mask (White Area)
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 58 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Acronyms
Document Conventions
The following table lists the acronyms that are used in this
document.
Units of Measure
Acronym
CPU
Description
The following table lists all the abbreviations used to measure
the PSoC devices.
central processing unit
Numeric Naming
EMI
electromagnetic interference
FIFO
First In, First Out
GPIO
general purpose input/output
HAPI
Hardware Assisted Parallel Interface
Hexadecimal numbers are represented with all letters in
uppercase with an appended lowercase 'h' (for example, '14h' or
'3Ah'). Hexadecimal numbers may also be represented by a '0x'
prefix, the C coding convention. Binary numbers have an
appended lowercase 'b' (for example, 01010100b' or
'01000011b'). Numbers not indicated by an 'h', 'b', or 0x are
decimal.
I/O
Input/Output
LED
light-emitting diode
LSB
least significant bit
MSB
most significant bit
PCB
printed circuit board
PLL
phase-locked loop
POR
power on reset
QFN
Quad Flat No leads
Symbol
Unit of Measure
°C
degree Celsius
cm
centi meter
mm
milli meter
kΩ
kilo ohms
µA
micro Amperes
PROM
programmable read only memory
RAM
random access memory
µs
micro seconds
SIE
Serial Interface Engine
mA
milli Amperes
SSOP
Shrink small-outline package
ms
milli seconds
Universal Serial Bus
ns
nano seconds
Ω
ohms
pF
pico Farad
MHz
Mega Hertz
V
Volts
mW
milli Watts
USB
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 59 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Document History Page
Document Title: CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C Full Speed USB (12 Mbps) Peripheral Controller with Integrated Hub
Document Number: 38-08024
Rev.
ECN No.
Submission
Date
Orig. of
Change
Description of Change
**
114525
3/27/02
DSG
Change from Spec number: 38-00591 to 38-08024
*A
124768
03/20/03
MON
Added register bit definitions; Added default bit state of each register.
Corrected the Schematic (location of the pull-up on D+). Added register
summary. Removed information on the availability of the part in PDIP package.
Modified Table 51 and provided more explanation regarding locking/unlocking
mechanism of the mode register. Removed any information regarding the speed
detect bit in Hub Port Speed register being set by hardware.
*B
417632
See ECN
BHA
Updated part number and ordering information. Added QFN Package Drawing
and Design Notes. Corrected bit names in Figures 9-3, 9-4, 9-5, 9-8, 9-9, 9-10,
10-5, 16-1, 18-1, 18-2, 18-3, 18-6, 18-7, 18-9, 18-10. Removed Hub Ports Force
Low register address 0x52. Added HAPI to Interrupt Vector Number 11 in Table
16-1. Corrected bit names in Section 21.0. Corrected Units in Table 24.0 for
RUUP, RUDN, REXT, and ZO. Added DIE diagram and related information. Added
HAPI to GPIO interrupt vector in Table 5-1 and figure 16-3
*C
1825466
See ECN
TLY/PYRS Changed Title from "CY7C66013, CY7C66113 Full Speed USB (12 Mbps)
Peripheral Controller with Integrated Hub" to "CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C Full
Speed USB (12 Mbps) Peripheral Controller with Integrated Hub"
Changed package description for CY7C66013C and CY7C66113C from -PVC
to -PVXC
*D
2720540
06/18/09
DPT/AESA Added 56 QFN 8x8x1 mm package diagram and ordering information
*E
2896318
03/18/10
AESA
Removed Part CY7C66113C-LFXC. Updated all package diagrams.
*F
3057657
10/13/10
AJHA
Added “Not recommended for new designs” watermark in the PDF.
No technical or content updates.
*G
3177081
02/18/2011
NXZ
Added Ordering Code Definitions.
Updated Package Diagrams.
Added Acronyms and Units of Measure.
Updated in new template.
*H
4313900
03/21/2014
AKSL
Updated 48-pin SSOP and 56-pin SSOP package diagrams.
Removed “Not recommended for new designs” watermark.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Page 60 of 61
CY7C66013C, CY7C66113C
Sales, Solutions, and Legal Information
Worldwide Sales and Design Support
Cypress maintains a worldwide network of offices, solution centers, manufacturer’s representatives, and distributors. To find the office
closest to you, visit us at Cypress Locations.
PSoC® Solutions
Products
Automotive
Clocks & Buffers
Interface
Lighting & Power Control
cypress.com/go/automotive
cypress.com/go/clocks
cypress.com/go/interface
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psoc.cypress.com/solutions
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© Cypress Semiconductor Corporation, 2002-2014. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Cypress Semiconductor Corporation assumes no responsibility for the use of
any circuitry other than circuitry embodied in a Cypress product. Nor does it convey or imply any license under patent or other rights. Cypress products are not warranted nor intended to be used for
medical, life support, life saving, critical control or safety applications, unless pursuant to an express written agreement with Cypress. Furthermore, Cypress does not authorize its products for use as
critical components in life-support systems where a malfunction or failure may reasonably be expected to result in significant injury to the user. The inclusion of Cypress products in life-support systems
application implies that the manufacturer assumes all risk of such use and in doing so indemnifies Cypress against all charges.
Any Source Code (software and/or firmware) is owned by Cypress Semiconductor Corporation (Cypress) and is protected by and subject to worldwide patent protection (United States and foreign),
United States copyright laws and international treaty provisions. Cypress hereby grants to licensee a personal, non-exclusive, non-transferable license to copy, use, modify, create derivative works of,
and compile the Cypress Source Code and derivative works for the sole purpose of creating custom software and or firmware in support of licensee product to be used only in conjunction with a Cypress
integrated circuit as specified in the applicable agreement. Any reproduction, modification, translation, compilation, or representation of this Source Code except as specified above is prohibited without
the express written permission of Cypress.
Disclaimer: CYPRESS MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WITH REGARD TO THIS MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Cypress reserves the right to make changes without further notice to the materials described herein. Cypress does not
assume any liability arising out of the application or use of any product or circuit described herein. Cypress does not authorize its products for use as critical components in life-support systems where
a malfunction or failure may reasonably be expected to result in significant injury to the user. The inclusion of Cypress’ product in a life-support systems application implies that the manufacturer
assumes all risk of such use and in doing so indemnifies Cypress against all charges.
Use may be limited by and subject to the applicable Cypress software license agreement.
Document Number: 38-08024 Rev. *H
Revised March 21, 2014
All products and company names mentioned in this document may be the trademarks of their respective holders.
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