AGERE DSP16410CG

Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
1 Features
!
Twin DSP16000 dual-MAC cores perform up to
780 million MACs per second at 195 MHz
!
Low power:
— 1.575 V internal supply for power efficiency
— 3.3 V I/O pin supply for compatibility
!
194K x 16 on-chip RAM
!
Centralized direct memory access unit (DMAU):
— Transparent peripheral-to-memory and memoryto-memory transfers
— Better utilization of DSP MIPS
— Simplifies management of system data flow
!
16-bit parallel interface unit (PIU) with direct memory access (DMA) provides host access to all DSP
memory
!
Two enhanced serial I/O units (SIU0 and SIU1) with
DMA:
— Compatible with TDM highways such as T1/E1
and ST-bus
— Hardware support for µ-law and A-law companding
!
Core messaging units (MGU0 and MGU1) for interprocessor communication
!
On-chip, programmable, PLL clock synthesizer
eliminates need for high-speed clock input
!
Two 7-bit control I/O interfaces (BIOs) for increased
flexibility and lower system costs
!
32-bit system and external memory interface
(SEMI) supports 16-bit or 32-bit synchronous or
asynchronous memories
!
Two IEEE ® 1149.1 test ports (JTAG boundary
scan)
!
Full-speed, in-circuit emulation hardware for each
core with eight address and two data watchpoint
units for efficient application development
!
Supported by DSP16410CG software and hardware development tools
!
208-ball PBGA package for small footprint
(17 mm x 17 mm; 1.0 mm ball pitch)
2 Description
The DSP16410CG, also known as the DSP16410C,
is a digital signal processor (DSP) optimized for communications infrastructure applications. Large, onchip memory enables it to be programmed to perform
numerous fixed-point signal processing functions,
including equalization, channel coding, or speech
coding. This is the first Agere wireless product to feature twin DSP16000 dual-MAC DSP cores and
enhanced DMA capabilities. Together, these features
deliver the performance required for second- and
third-generation infrastructure equipment.
The DSP16410CG achieves best-in-class signal processing performance while maintaining efficient software code density, low power consumption, and small
physical size.
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
Table of Contents
Contents
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2
Page
Features ......................................................................................................................................................... 1
Description...................................................................................................................................................... 1
Notation Conventions ...................................................................................................................................14
Hardware Architecture ..................................................................................................................................14
4.1 DSP16410CG Architectural Overview ..................................................................................................14
" 4.1.1 DSP16000 Cores ........................................................................................................................17
" 4.1.2 Clock Synthesizer (PLL) .............................................................................................................17
" 4.1.3 Triport RAMs (TPRAM〈0—1〉).....................................................................................................17
" 4.1.4 Shared Local Memory (SLM) ......................................................................................................17
" 4.1.5 Internal Boot ROMs (IROM〈0—1〉) .............................................................................................17
" 4.1.6 Messaging Units (MGU〈0—1〉) ...................................................................................................17
" 4.1.7 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI)..........................................................................18
" 4.1.8 Bit Input/Output Units (BIO〈0—1〉) ..............................................................................................18
" 4.1.9 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and TIMER1_〈0—1〉) ...................................................................18
" 4.1.10 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU)...........................................................................................18
" 4.1.11 Interrupt Multiplexers (IMUX〈0—1〉)............................................................................................18
" 4.1.12 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) ........................................................................................................18
" 4.1.13 Serial Interface Units (SIU〈0—1〉) ...............................................................................................18
" 4.1.14 Test Access Ports (JTAG〈0—1〉).................................................................................................18
" 4.1.15 Hardware Development Systems (HDS〈0—1〉) ..........................................................................18
4.2 DSP16000 Core Architectural Overview...............................................................................................19
" 4.2.1 System Control and Cache (SYS) ..............................................................................................19
" 4.2.2 Data Arithmetic Unit (DAU) .........................................................................................................19
" 4.2.3 Y-Memory Space Address Arithmetic Unit (YAAU) .....................................................................20
" 4.2.4 X-Memory Space Address Arithmetic Unit (XAAU).....................................................................20
" 4.2.5 Core Block Diagram....................................................................................................................21
4.3 Device Reset ........................................................................................................................................23
" 4.3.1 Reset After Powerup or Power Interruption ................................................................................23
" 4.3.2 RSTN Pin Reset..........................................................................................................................23
" 4.3.3 JTAG Controller Reset ................................................................................................................24
4.4 Interrupts and Traps..............................................................................................................................25
" 4.4.1 Hardware Interrupt Logic ............................................................................................................25
" 4.4.2 Hardware Interrupt Multiplexing ..................................................................................................28
" 4.4.3 Clearing Core Interrupt Requests ...............................................................................................30
" 4.4.4 Host Interrupt Output ..................................................................................................................30
" 4.4.5 Globally Enabling and Disabling Hardware Interrupts.................................................................30
" 4.4.6 Individually Enabling, Disabling, and Prioritizing Hardware Interrupts ........................................31
" 4.4.7 Hardware Interrupt Status ...........................................................................................................32
" 4.4.8 Interrupt and Trap Vector Table...................................................................................................32
" 4.4.9 Software Interrupts......................................................................................................................34
" 4.4.10 INT[3:0] and TRAP Pins..............................................................................................................34
" 4.4.11 Nesting Interrupts........................................................................................................................35
" 4.4.12 Interrupts and Cache Usage .......................................................................................................37
" 4.4.13 Interrupt Polling...........................................................................................................................37
4.5 Memory Maps .......................................................................................................................................38
" 4.5.1 Private Internal Memory ..............................................................................................................39
" 4.5.2 Shared Internal I/O......................................................................................................................39
" 4.5.3 Shared External I/O and Memory ...............................................................................................39
" 4.5.4 X-Memory Map ...........................................................................................................................40
" 4.5.5 Y-Memory Maps ..........................................................................................................................41
" 4.5.6 Z-Memory Maps ..........................................................................................................................42
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Table of Contents (continued)
Contents
Page
" 4.5.7 Internal I/O Detailed Memory Map ..............................................................................................43
" 4.6 Triport Random-Access Memory (TPRAM) ..........................................................................................44
" 4.7 Shared Local Memory (SLM) ................................................................................................................45
" 4.8 Interprocessor Communication .............................................................................................................46
" 4.8.1 Core-to-Core Interrupts and Traps ..............................................................................................47
" 4.8.2 Message Buffer Data Exchange .................................................................................................47
" 4.8.2.1 Message Buffer Write Protocol ...................................................................................48
" 4.8.2.2 Message Buffer Read Protocol ...................................................................................48
" 4.8.3 DMAU Data Transfer...................................................................................................................49
" 4.9 Bit Input/Output Units (BIO〈0—1〉) .......................................................................................................50
" 4.10 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and TIMER1_〈0—1〉) ............................................................................53
" 4.11 Hardware Development System (HDS〈0—1〉) .....................................................................................56
" 4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉)...............................................................................................................57
" 4.12.1 Port Identification ........................................................................................................................57
" 4.12.2 Emulation Interface Signals to the DSP16410CG.......................................................................58
" 4.12.2.1 TCS 14-Pin Header.....................................................................................................58
" 4.12.2.2 JCS 20-Pin Header .....................................................................................................59
" 4.12.2.3 HDS 9-Pin, D-Type Connector....................................................................................60
" 4.12.3 Multiprocessor JTAG Connections..............................................................................................61
" 4.12.4 Boundary Scan ...........................................................................................................................62
" 4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU).....................................................................................................64
" 4.13.1 Overview .....................................................................................................................................64
" 4.13.2 Registers .....................................................................................................................................67
" 4.13.3 Data Structures ...........................................................................................................................83
" 4.13.3.1 One-Dimensional Data Structure (SWT Channels).....................................................83
" 4.13.3.2 Two-Dimensional Data Structure (SWT Channels) .....................................................84
" 4.13.3.3 Memory-to-Memory Block Transfers (MMT Channels) ...............................................86
" 4.13.4 The PIU Addressing Bypass Channel.........................................................................................86
" 4.13.5 Single-Word Transfer Channels (SWT).......................................................................................87
" 4.13.6 Memory-to-Memory Transfer Channels (MMT)...........................................................................90
" 4.13.7 Interrupts and Priority Resolution................................................................................................92
" 4.13.8 Error Reporting and Recovery ....................................................................................................94
" 4.13.9 Programming Examples..............................................................................................................95
" 4.13.9.1 SWT Example 1: A Two-Dimensional Array ...............................................................95
" 4.13.9.2 SWT Example 2: A One-Dimensional Array ...............................................................97
" 4.13.9.3 MMT Example.............................................................................................................99
" 4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI)..................................................................................100
" 4.14.1 External Interface ......................................................................................................................101
" 4.14.1.1 Configuration.............................................................................................................102
" 4.14.1.2 Asynchronous Memory Bus Arbitration.....................................................................103
" 4.14.1.3 Enables and Strobes.................................................................................................104
" 4.14.1.4 Address and Data .....................................................................................................106
" 4.14.2 16-Bit External Bus Accesses ...................................................................................................108
" 4.14.3 32-Bit External Bus Accesses ...................................................................................................108
" 4.14.4 Registers ...................................................................................................................................109
" 4.14.4.1 ECON0 Register ....................................................................................................... 110
" 4.14.4.2 ECON1 Register ....................................................................................................... 111
" 4.14.4.3 Segment Registers ................................................................................................... 112
" 4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory ............................................................................................................. 114
" 4.14.5.1 Functional Timing...................................................................................................... 114
" 4.14.5.2 Extending Access Time Via the ERDY Pin ............................................................... 118
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
Table of Contents (continued)
Contents
Page
" 4.14.5.3 Interfacing Examples ................................................................................................120
" 4.14.6 Synchronous Memory ...............................................................................................................122
" 4.14.6.1 Functional Timing......................................................................................................122
" 4.14.6.2 Interfacing Examples ................................................................................................124
" 4.14.7 Performance .............................................................................................................................126
" 4.14.7.1 System Bus...............................................................................................................126
" 4.14.7.2 External Memory, Asynchronous Interface ...............................................................127
" 4.14.7.3 External Memory, Synchronous Interface .................................................................129
" 4.14.7.4 Summary of Access Times .......................................................................................131
" 4.14.8 Priority .......................................................................................................................................132
" 4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) ................................................................................................................133
" 4.15.1 Registers ...................................................................................................................................133
" 4.15.2 Hardware Interface ...................................................................................................................137
" 4.15.2.1 Enables and Strobes.................................................................................................138
" 4.15.2.2 Address and Data Pins .............................................................................................139
" 4.15.2.3 Flags, Interrupt, and Ready Pins ..............................................................................140
" 4.15.3 Host Data Read and Write Cycles ............................................................................................141
" 4.15.4 Host Register Read and Write Cycles.......................................................................................143
" 4.15.5 Host Commands .......................................................................................................................145
" 4.15.5.1 Status/Control/Address Register Read Commands..................................................146
" 4.15.5.2 Status/Control/Address Register Write Commands ..................................................146
" 4.15.5.3 Memory Read Commands ........................................................................................147
" 4.15.5.4 Flow Control for Memory Read Commands..............................................................148
" 4.15.5.5 Memory Write Commands ........................................................................................149
" 4.15.5.6 Flow Control for Control/Status/Address Register and Memory Write Commands...149
" 4.15.6 Host Command Examples ........................................................................................................150
" 4.15.6.1 Download of Program or Data ..................................................................................150
" 4.15.6.2 Upload of Data ..........................................................................................................150
" 4.15.7 PIU Interrupts ............................................................................................................................151
" 4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) ...................................................................................................................152
" 4.16.1 Hardware Interface ...................................................................................................................154
" 4.16.2 Pin Conditioning Logic, Bit Clock Selection Logic, and Frame Sync Selection Logic ...............155
" 4.16.3 Basic Input Processing .............................................................................................................157
" 4.16.4 Basic Output Processing...........................................................................................................158
" 4.16.5 Clock and Frame Sync Generation ...........................................................................................159
" 4.16.6 ST-Bus Timing Examples..........................................................................................................164
" 4.16.7 SIU Loopback ...........................................................................................................................166
" 4.16.8 Basic Frame Structure ..............................................................................................................166
" 4.16.9 Assigning SIU Logical Channels to DMAU Channels ...............................................................167
"4.16.10 Frame Error Detection and Reporting .......................................................................................168
"4.16.11 Frame Mode..............................................................................................................................168
"4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in Two Subframes or Less ...........................................169
"4.16.13 Channel Mode—Up to 128 Channels in a Maximum of Eight Subframes ................................175
"4.16.14 SIU Examples ...........................................................................................................................178
" 4.16.14.1 Single-Channel I/O....................................................................................................178
" 4.16.14.2 ST-Bus Interface .......................................................................................................179
"4.16.15 Registers ...................................................................................................................................182
" 4.17 Internal Clock Selection ......................................................................................................................198
" 4.18 Clock Synthesis ..................................................................................................................................199
" 4.18.1 PLL Operating Frequency .........................................................................................................199
" 4.18.2 PLL LOCK Flag Generation ......................................................................................................199
4
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Table of Contents (continued)
Contents
Page
"
"
"
"
4.18.3 PLL Registers ...........................................................................................................................200
4.18.4 PLL Programming Examples ....................................................................................................201
4.18.5 Powering Down the PLL ...........................................................................................................201
4.18.6 Phase-Lock Loop (PLL) Frequency Accuracy and Jitter...........................................................201
" 4.19 External Clock Selection .....................................................................................................................202
" 4.20 Power Management............................................................................................................................203
" 5 Processor Boot-Up and Memory Download ...............................................................................................206
" 5.1 IROM Boot Routine and Host Download Via PIU ...............................................................................206
" 5.2 EROM Boot Routine and DMAU Download........................................................................................207
" 6 Software Architecture .................................................................................................................................208
" 6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference .........................................................................................................208
" 6.1.1 Conditions Based on the State of Flags ....................................................................................224
" 6.2 Registers.............................................................................................................................................225
" 6.2.1 Directly Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers......................................................225
" 6.2.2 Memory-Mapped Registers.......................................................................................................229
" 6.2.3 Register Encodings ...................................................................................................................233
" 6.2.4 Reset States..............................................................................................................................247
" 6.2.5 RB Field Encoding ....................................................................................................................250
" 7 208-Ball PBGA Package Ball Assignments ................................................................................................251
" 8 Signal Descriptions .....................................................................................................................................254
" 8.1 System Interface .................................................................................................................................255
" 8.2 BIO Interface.......................................................................................................................................255
" 8.3 System and External Memory Interface..............................................................................................255
" 8.4 SIU0 Interface .....................................................................................................................................258
" 8.5 SIU1 Interface .....................................................................................................................................259
" 8.6 PIU Interface .......................................................................................................................................260
" 8.7 JTAG0 Test Interface ..........................................................................................................................261
" 8.8 JTAG1 Test Interface ..........................................................................................................................261
" 8.9 Power and Ground..............................................................................................................................262
" 9 Device Characteristics ................................................................................................................................263
" 9.1 Absolute Maximum Ratings ................................................................................................................263
" 9.2 Handling Precautions..........................................................................................................................263
" 9.3 Recommended Operating Conditions.................................................................................................263
" 9.3.1 Package Thermal Considerations .............................................................................................264
" 10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements ..............................................................................................265
" 10.1 Maintenance of Valid Logic Levels for Bidirectional Signals and Unused Inputs ................................267
" 10.2 Analog Power Supply Decoupling.......................................................................................................268
" 10.3 Power Dissipation ...............................................................................................................................269
" 10.3.1 Internal Power Dissipation ........................................................................................................269
" 10.3.2 I/O Power Dissipation................................................................................................................270
" 10.4 Power Supply Sequencing Issues ......................................................................................................272
" 10.4.1 Supply Sequencing Recommendations ....................................................................................272
" 10.4.2 External Power Sequence Protection Circuits ..........................................................................274
" 11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements ..................................................................................................275
" 11.1 Phase-Lock Loop ................................................................................................................................276
" 11.2 Wake-Up Latency ...............................................................................................................................277
" 11.3 DSP Clock Generation........................................................................................................................278
" 11.4 Reset Circuit .......................................................................................................................................279
" 11.5 Reset Synchronization ........................................................................................................................280
" 11.6 JTAG ...................................................................................................................................................281
" 11.7 Interrupt and Trap ...............................................................................................................................282
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
Table of Contents (continued)
Contents
Page
" 11.8 Bit I/O ..................................................................................................................................................283
" 11.9 System and External Memory Interface..............................................................................................284
" 11.9.1 Asynchronous Interface ............................................................................................................285
" 11.9.2 Synchronous Interface ..............................................................................................................288
" 11.9.3 ERDY Interface .........................................................................................................................290
"11.10 PIU ......................................................................................................................................................291
"11.11 SIU ......................................................................................................................................................295
" 12 Appendix—Naming Inconsistencies ...........................................................................................................305
" 13 Outline Diagram—208-Ball PBGA ..............................................................................................................306
" 14 Index ...........................................................................................................................................................307
6
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
List of Figures
Figure
Page
" Figure 1. DSP16410CG Block Diagram.............................................................................................................15
" Figure 2. DSP16000 Core Block Diagram .........................................................................................................21
" Figure 3. CORE0 and CORE1 Interrupt Logic Block Diagram...........................................................................26
" Figure 4. IMUX Block Diagram ..........................................................................................................................29
" Figure 5. Functional Timing for INT[3:0] and TRAP ...........................................................................................34
" Figure 6. X-Memory Map ...................................................................................................................................40
" Figure 7. Y-Memory Maps .................................................................................................................................41
" Figure 8. Z-Memory Maps..................................................................................................................................42
" Figure 9. Internal I/O Memory Map ....................................................................................................................43
" Figure 10. Interleaved Internal TPRAM ...............................................................................................................44
" Figure 11. Example Memory Arrangement ..........................................................................................................44
" Figure 12. Interprocessor Communication Logic in MGU0 and MGU1................................................................46
" Figure 13. Timer Block Diagram ..........................................................................................................................54
" Figure 14. TCS 14-Pin Connector........................................................................................................................58
" Figure 15. JCS 20-Pin Connector ........................................................................................................................59
" Figure 16. HDS 9-Pin Connector .........................................................................................................................60
" Figure 17. Typical Multiprocessor JTAG Connection with Single Scan Chain.....................................................61
" Figure 18. DMAU Interconnections and Channels...............................................................................................65
" Figure 19. DMAU Block Diagram .........................................................................................................................66
" Figure 20. One-Dimensional Data Structure for Buffering n Channels ................................................................83
" Figure 21. Two-Dimensional Data Structure for Double-Buffering n Channels....................................................84
" Figure 22. Memory-to-Memory Block Transfer ....................................................................................................86
" Figure 23. Example of a Two-Dimensional Double-Buffered Data Structure.......................................................95
" Figure 24. Example of One-Dimensional Data Structure .....................................................................................97
" Figure 25. Memory-to-Memory Block Transfer ....................................................................................................99
" Figure 26. SEMI Interface Block Diagram..........................................................................................................100
" Figure 27. Asynchronous Memory Cycles .........................................................................................................115
" Figure 28. Asynchronous Memory Cycles (RSETUP = 1, WSETUP = 1)..........................................................116
" Figure 29. Asynchronous Memory Cycles (RHOLD = 1, WHOLD = 1)..............................................................117
" Figure 30. Use of ERDY Pin to Extend Asynchronous Accesses ......................................................................118
" Figure 31. Example of Using the ERDY Pin ......................................................................................................119
" Figure 32. 32-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Asynchronous SRAMs ............................................................121
" Figure 33. 16-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Asynchronous SRAMs ............................................................121
" Figure 34. Synchronous Memory Cycles ...........................................................................................................123
" Figure 35. 16-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Pipelined, Synchronous ZBT SRAMs......................................124
" Figure 36. 32-Bit External Interface with 32-Bit Pipelined, Synchronous ZBT SRAMs......................................125
" Figure 37. 32-Bit PA Register Host and Core Access........................................................................................136
" Figure 38. PIU Functional Timing for a Data Read and Write Operation ...........................................................142
" Figure 39. PIU Functional Timing for a Register Read and Write Operation .....................................................144
" Figure 40. SIU Block Diagram ...........................................................................................................................153
" Figure 41. Pin Conditioning Logic, Bit Clock Selection Logic, and Frame Sync Selection Logic.......................156
" Figure 42. Default Serial Input Functional Timing ..............................................................................................157
" Figure 43. Default Serial Output Functional Timing ...........................................................................................158
" Figure 44. Frame Sync to Data Delay Timing ....................................................................................................161
" Figure 45. Clock and Frame Sync Generation with External Clock and Synchronization
(AGEXT = AGSYNC = IFSA = IFSK = 1 and Timing Requires No Resynchronization) ...................164
" Figure 46. Clock and Frame Sync Generation with External Clock and Synchronization
(AGEXT = AGSYNC = IFSA = IFSK = 1 and Timing Requires Resynchronization) .........................165
" Figure 47. Basic Frame Structure ......................................................................................................................166
" Figure 48. Basic Frame Structure with Idle Time ...............................................................................................167
" Figure 49. Channel Mode on a 128-Channel Frame .........................................................................................169
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
List of Figures (continued)
Figure
Page
" Figure 50. Subframe and Channel Selection in Channel Mode .........................................................................174
" Figure 51. Generating Interrupts on Subframe Boundaries ...............................................................................176
" Figure 52. ST-Bus Single-Rate Clock ................................................................................................................181
" Figure 53. ST-Bus Double-Rate Clock...............................................................................................................181
" Figure 54. Internal Clock Selection Logic ..........................................................................................................198
" Figure 55. Clock Synthesizer (PLL) Block Diagram ...........................................................................................199
" Figure 56. Power Management and Clock Distribution......................................................................................204
" Figure 57. Interpretation of the Instruction Set Summary Table ........................................................................209
" Figure 58. DSP16410CG Program-Accessible Registers for Each Core ..........................................................226
" Figure 59. Example Memory-Mapped Registers ...............................................................................................229
" Figure 60. 208-Ball PBGA Package Ball Grid Array Assignments (See-Through Top View) ............................251
" Figure 61. DSP16410CG Pinout by Interface ....................................................................................................254
" Figure 62. Plot of VOH vs. IOH Under Typical Operating Conditions ..................................................................266
" Figure 63. Plot of VOL vs. IOL Under Typical Operating Conditions ....................................................................266
" Figure 64. Analog Supply Bypass and Decoupling Capacitors..........................................................................268
" Figure 65. Power Supply Sequencing Recommendations.................................................................................273
" Figure 66. Power Supply Example.....................................................................................................................274
" Figure 67. Reference Voltage Level for Timing Characteristics and Requirements for Inputs and Outputs......275
" Figure 68. I/O Clock Timing Diagram.................................................................................................................278
" Figure 69. Powerup and Device Reset Timing Diagram ...................................................................................279
" Figure 70. Reset Synchronization Timing ..........................................................................................................280
" Figure 71. JTAG I/O Timing Diagram ...............................................................................................................281
" Figure 72. Interrupt and Trap Timing Diagram...................................................................................................282
" Figure 73. Write Outputs Followed by Read Inputs (cbit = IMMEDIATE; a1 = sbit) Timing Characteristics ....283
" Figure 74. Enable and Write Strobe Transition Timing ......................................................................................284
" Figure 75. Timing Diagram for EREQN and EACKN .........................................................................................285
" Figure 76. Asynchronous Read Timing Diagram (RHOLD = 0 and RSETUP = 0) ............................................286
" Figure 77. Asynchronous Write Timing Diagram (WHOLD = 0, WSETUP = 0) .................................................287
" Figure 78. Synchronous Read Timing Diagram (Read-Read-Write Sequence) ................................................288
" Figure 79. Synchronous Write Timing Diagram .................................................................................................289
" Figure 80. ERDY Pin Timing Diagram ...............................................................................................................290
" Figure 81. Host Data Write to PDI Timing Diagram ...........................................................................................291
" Figure 82. Host Data Read from PDO Timing Diagram .....................................................................................292
" Figure 83. Host Register Write (PAH, PAL, PCON, or HSCRATCH) Timing Diagram ......................................293
" Figure 84. Host Register Read (PAH, PAL, PCON, or DSCRATCH) Timing Diagram ......................................294
" Figure 85. SIU Passive Frame and Channel Mode Input Timing Diagram ........................................................295
" Figure 86. SIU Passive Frame Mode Output Timing Diagram...........................................................................296
" Figure 87. SIU Passive Channel Mode Output Timing Diagram........................................................................297
" Figure 88. SCK External Clock Source Input Timing Diagram ..........................................................................298
" Figure 89. SIU Active Frame and Channel Mode Input Timing Diagram ...........................................................299
" Figure 90. SIU Active Frame Mode Output Timing Diagram .............................................................................301
" Figure 91. SIU Active Channel Mode Output Timing Diagram ..........................................................................302
" Figure 92. ST-Bus 2x Input Timing Diagram......................................................................................................303
" Figure 93. ST-Bus 2x Output Timing Diagram ...................................................................................................304
8
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
List of Tables
Table
" Table 1.
" Table 2.
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" Table 47.
" Table 48.
" Table 49.
" Table 50.
" Table 51.
Page
DSP16410CG Block Diagram Legend ...............................................................................................16
DSP16000 Core Block Diagram Legend............................................................................................22
State of Device Output and Bidirectional Pins During and After Reset ..............................................24
Hardware Interrupts............................................................................................................................27
imux (Interrupt Multiplex Control) Register ........................................................................................28
Global Disabling and Enabling of Hardware Interrupts ......................................................................30
inc0 and inc1 (Interrupt Control) Registers 0 and 1 ..........................................................................31
ins (Interrupt Status) Register............................................................................................................32
Interrupt and Trap Vector Table .........................................................................................................33
psw1 (Processor Status Word 1) Register.........................................................................................35
DSP16410CG Memory Components .................................................................................................38
signal Register...................................................................................................................................47
Full-Duplex Data Transfer Code Through Core-to-Core Message Buffer ..........................................48
DMAU MMT Channel Interrupts .........................................................................................................49
DMA Intracore and Intercore Transfers Example...............................................................................49
sbit (BIO Status/Control) Register .....................................................................................................50
cbit (BIO Control) Register ................................................................................................................51
BIO Operations...................................................................................................................................52
BIO Flags ...........................................................................................................................................52
timer〈0,1〉c (TIMER〈0,1〉 Control) Register.......................................................................................55
timer〈0,1〉 (TIMER〈0,1〉 Running Count) Register ............................................................................56
ID (JTAG Identification) Registers......................................................................................................57
TCS 14-Pin Socket Pinout..................................................................................................................58
JCS 20-Pin Socket Pinout ..................................................................................................................59
HDS 9-Pin, Subminiature, D-Type Plug Pinout ..................................................................................60
JTAG0 Boundary-Scan Register ........................................................................................................62
JTAG1 Boundary-Scan Register ........................................................................................................63
DMAU Channel Assignment...............................................................................................................64
DMAU Memory-Mapped Registers ....................................................................................................67
DSTAT (DMAU Status) Register ........................................................................................................69
DMCON0 (DMAU Master Control 0) Register....................................................................................71
DMCON1 (DMAU Master Control 1) Register....................................................................................72
Collective Designations Used in Table 34..........................................................................................73
CTL〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Control) Registers .......................................................................................74
Collective Designations Used in Table 36..........................................................................................76
CTL〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Control) Registers .......................................................................................76
SADD〈0—5〉 and DADD〈0—5〉 (Channels 0—5 Source and Destination Address) Registers ..........77
SCNT〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Source Counter) Registers .......................................................................78
SCNT〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Source Counter) Registers.......................................................................78
DCNT〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Destination Counter) Registers ................................................................79
DCNT〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Destination Counter) Registers ................................................................79
LIM〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Limit) Registers ............................................................................................80
LIM〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Limit) Registers ............................................................................................80
SBAS〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Source Base Address) Registers .............................................................81
DBAS〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Destination Base Address) Registers ......................................................81
STR〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Stride) Registers .........................................................................................82
RI〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Reindex) Registers .........................................................................................82
SWT-Specific Memory-Mapped Registers .........................................................................................88
MMT-Specific Memory-Mapped Registers .........................................................................................91
DMAU Interrupts.................................................................................................................................92
Overview of SEMI Pins.....................................................................................................................101
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
List of Tables (continued)
Table
Page
" Table 52. Configuration Pins for the SEMI External Interface..........................................................................102
" Table 53. Asynchronous Memory Bus Arbitration Pins ....................................................................................103
" Table 54. Enable and Strobe Pins for the SEMI External Interface .................................................................104
" Table 55. Address and Data Bus Pins for the SEMI External Interface ...........................................................106
" Table 56. 16-Bit External Bus Configuration ....................................................................................................108
" Table 57. 32-Bit External Bus Configuration ....................................................................................................108
" Table 58. SEMI Memory-Mapped Registers ....................................................................................................109
" Table 59. ECON0 (External Control 0) Register ..............................................................................................110
" Table 60. ECON1 (External Control 1) Register ..............................................................................................111
" Table 61. EXSEG0 (CORE0 External X Segment Address Extension) Register.............................................112
" Table 62. EXSEG1 (CORE1 External X Segment Address Extension) Register.............................................112
" Table 63. EYSEG0 (CORE0 External Y Segment Address Extension) Register.............................................113
" Table 64. EYSEG1 (CORE1 External Y Segment Address Extension) Register.............................................113
" Table 65. System Bus Minimum Access Times ...............................................................................................126
" Table 66. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Asynchronous Interface, 32-Bit Data Bus..............................131
" Table 67. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Asynchronous Interface, 16-Bit Data Bus..............................131
" Table 68. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Synchronous Interface, 32-Bit Data Bus ...............................131
" Table 69. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Synchronous Interface, 16-Bit Data Bus ...............................131
" Table 70. Example Average Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, 32-Bit Data Bus ........................................132
" Table 71. Example Average Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, 16-Bit Data Bus ........................................132
" Table 72. PIU Registers ...................................................................................................................................133
" Table 73. PCON (PIU Control) Register...........................................................................................................134
" Table 74. PDI (PIU Data In) Register ...............................................................................................................135
" Table 75. PDO (PIU Data Out) Register ..........................................................................................................135
" Table 76. HSCRATCH (Host Scratch) Register ...............................................................................................135
" Table 77. DSCRATCH (DSP Scratch) Register ...............................................................................................135
" Table 78. PA (Parallel Address) Register.........................................................................................................136
" Table 79. PIU External Interface ......................................................................................................................137
" Table 80. Enable and Strobe Pins....................................................................................................................138
" Table 81. Address and Data Pins.....................................................................................................................139
" Table 82. Flags, Interrupt, and Ready Pins......................................................................................................140
" Table 83. Summary of Host Commands ..........................................................................................................145
" Table 84. Status/Control/Address Register Read Commands ......................................................................... 146
" Table 85. Status/Control/Address Register Write Commands .........................................................................146
" Table 86. Memory Read Commands ...............................................................................................................147
" Table 87. Memory Write Commands................................................................................................................149
" Table 88. SIU External Interface ......................................................................................................................154
" Table 89. Control Register Fields for Pin Conditioning, Bit Clock Selection, and Frame Sync Selection ........155
" Table 90. A Summary of Bit Clock and Frame Sync Control Register Fields ..................................................162
" Table 91. Examples of Bit Clock and Frame Sync Control Register Fields .....................................................163
" Table 92. Subframe Definition..........................................................................................................................170
" Table 93. Location of Control Fields Used in Channel Mode ...........................................................................172
" Table 94. Description of Control Fields Used in Channel Mode.......................................................................172
" Table 95. Subframe Selection ..........................................................................................................................173
" Table 96. Channel Activation Within a Selected Subframe..............................................................................173
" Table 97. Channel Masking Within a Selected Subframe ................................................................................173
" Table 98. Control Register and Field Configuration for ST-Bus Interface ........................................................179
" Table 99. Control Register and Fields That Are Configured as Required for ST-Bus Interface.......................180
" Table 100. SIU Registers ...................................................................................................................................182
" Table 101. SCON0 (SIU Input/Output General Control) Register ......................................................................183
" Table 102. SCON1 (SIU Input Frame Control) Register ....................................................................................184
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
List of Tables (continued)
Table
Page
" Table 103. SCON2 (SIU Output Frame Control) Register .................................................................................185
" Table 104. SCON3 (SIU Input/Output Subframe Control) Register ...................................................................186
" Table 105. SCON4 (SIU Input Even Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register .................................................187
" Table 106. SCON5 (SIU Input Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register...................................................187
" Table 107. SCON6 (SIU Output Even Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register...............................................188
" Table 108. SCON7 (SIU Output Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register ................................................188
" Table 109. SCON8 (SIU Output Even Subframe Mask Vector Control) Register ..............................................188
" Table 110. SCON9 (SIU Output Odd Subframe Mask Vector Control) Register ...............................................188
" Table 111. SCON10 (SIU Input/Output General Control) Register ....................................................................189
" Table 112. SCON11 (SIU Input/Output Active Clock Control) Register .............................................................192
" Table 113. SCON12 (SIU Input/Output Active Frame Sync Control) Register...................................................193
" Table 114. SIDR (SIU Input Data) Register .......................................................................................................194
" Table 115. SODR (SIU Output Data) Register...................................................................................................194
" Table 116. STAT (SIU Input/Output General Status) Register ...........................................................................195
" Table 117. FSTAT (SIU Input/Output Frame Status) Register ...........................................................................195
" Table 118. OCIX〈0—1〉 and ICIX〈0—1〉 (SIU Output and Input Channel Index) Registers ...............................196
" Table 119. OCIX〈0—1〉 (SIU Output Channel Index) Registers.........................................................................196
" Table 120. ICIX〈0—1〉 (SIU Input Channel Index) Registers .............................................................................197
" Table 121. Source Clock Selection ....................................................................................................................198
" Table 122. pllcon (Phase-Lock Loop Control) Register ....................................................................................200
" Table 123. pllfrq (Phase-Lock Loop Frequency Control) Register ....................................................................200
" Table 124. plldly (Phase-Lock Loop Delay Control) Register ...........................................................................200
" Table 125. Wake-Up Latency and Power Consumption for Low-Power Standby Mode ....................................205
" Table 126. Core Boot-Up After Reset ................................................................................................................206
" Table 127. Contents of IROM0 and IROM1 Boot ROMs....................................................................................206
" Table 128. DSP16410CG Instruction Groups ....................................................................................................208
" Table 129. Instruction Set Summary ..................................................................................................................210
" Table 130. Notation Conventions for Instruction Set Descriptions .....................................................................216
" Table 131. Overall Replacement Table..............................................................................................................217
" Table 132. F1 Instruction Syntax........................................................................................................................220
" Table 133. F1E Function Statement Syntax.......................................................................................................222
" Table 134. DSP16410CG Conditional Mnemonics ............................................................................................224
" Table 135. Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers by Type, Listed Alphabetically .........................227
" Table 136. DMAU Memory-Mapped Registers ..................................................................................................230
" Table 137. SEMI Memory-Mapped Registers ....................................................................................................231
" Table 138. PIU Registers ...................................................................................................................................232
" Table 139. SIU Memory-Mapped Registers .......................................................................................................232
" Table 140. alf (AWAIT Low-Power and Flag) Register ......................................................................................233
" Table 141. auc0 (Arithmetic Unit Control 0) Register ........................................................................................234
" Table 142. auc1 (Arithmetic Unit Control 1) Register ........................................................................................235
" Table 143. cbit (BIO Control) Register ..............................................................................................................236
" Table 144. cloop (Cache Loop) Register...........................................................................................................237
" Table 145. csave (Cache Save) Register ..........................................................................................................237
" Table 146. cstate (Cache State) Register .........................................................................................................237
" Table 147. imux (Interrupt Multiplex Control) Register ......................................................................................238
" Table 148. ID (JTAG Identification) Registers....................................................................................................239
" Table 149. inc0 and inc1 (Interrupt Control) Registers 0 and 1 ........................................................................239
" Table 150. ins (Interrupt Status) Register..........................................................................................................240
" Table 151. mgi (Core-to-Core Message Input) Register....................................................................................240
" Table 152. mgo (Core-to-Core Message Output) Register................................................................................240
" Table 153. pid (Processor Identification) Register.............................................................................................240
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
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List of Tables (continued)
Table
Page
" Table 154. pllcon (Phase-Lock Loop Control) Register ....................................................................................241
" Table 155. pllfrq (Phase-Lock Loop Frequency Control) Register ....................................................................241
" Table 156. plldly (Phase-Lock Loop Delay Control) Register ...........................................................................241
" Table 157. psw0 (Processor Status Word 0) Register.......................................................................................242
" Table 158. psw1 (Processor Status Word 1) Register.......................................................................................243
" Table 159. sbit (BIO Status/Control) Register ...................................................................................................244
" Table 160. signal (Core-to-Core Signal) Register .............................................................................................244
" Table 161. timer0c and timer1c (TIMER〈0,1〉 Control) Registers ....................................................................245
" Table 162. timer0 and timer1 (TIMER〈0,1〉 Running Count) Registers ............................................................246
" Table 163. vsw (Viterbi Support Word) Register ...............................................................................................246
" Table 164. Core Register States After Reset—40-Bit Registers........................................................................247
" Table 165. Core Register States After Reset—32-Bit Registers........................................................................247
" Table 166. Core Register States After Reset—20-Bit Registers........................................................................248
" Table 167. Core Register States After Reset—16-Bit Registers........................................................................248
" Table 168. Off-Core (Peripheral) Register Reset Values ...................................................................................248
" Table 169. Memory-Mapped Register Reset Values—32-Bit Registers ............................................................249
" Table 170. Memory-Mapped Register Reset Values—20-Bit Registers ............................................................249
" Table 171. Memory-Mapped Register Reset Values—16-Bit Registers ............................................................249
" Table 172. RB Field............................................................................................................................................250
" Table 173. 208-Ball PBGA Ball Assignments Sorted Alphabetically by Symbol ................................................252
" Table 174. Absolute Maximum Ratings for Supply Pins ....................................................................................263
" Table 175. Minimum ESD Voltage Thresholds ..................................................................................................263
" Table 176. Recommended Operating Conditions ..............................................................................................263
" Table 177. Package Thermal Considerations ....................................................................................................264
" Table 178. Electrical Characteristics and Requirements....................................................................................265
" Table 179. Typical Internal Power Dissipation at 1.575 V..................................................................................269
" Table 180. Typical I/O Power Dissipation at 3.3 V .............................................................................................271
" Table 181. Power Sequencing Recommendations ............................................................................................273
" Table 182. Reference Voltage Level for Timing Characteristics and Requirements for Inputs and Outputs .....275
" Table 183. PLL Requirements............................................................................................................................276
" Table 184. Wake-Up Latency.............................................................................................................................277
" Table 185. Timing Requirements for Input Clock ...............................................................................................278
" Table 186. Timing Characteristics for Output Clock...........................................................................................278
" Table 187. Timing Requirements for Powerup and Device Reset ..................................................................... 279
" Table 188. Timing Characteristics for Device Reset ..........................................................................................279
" Table 189. Timing Requirements for Reset Synchronization Timing .................................................................280
" Table 190. Timing Requirements for JTAG I/O ..................................................................................................281
" Table 191. Timing Characteristics for JTAG I/O.................................................................................................281
" Table 192. Timing Requirements for Interrupt and Trap ....................................................................................282
" Table 193. Timing Requirements for BIO Input Read ........................................................................................283
" Table 194. Timing Characteristics for BIO Output..............................................................................................283
" Table 195. Timing Characteristics for ERWN and Memory Enables..................................................................284
" Table 196. Timing Requirements for EREQN ....................................................................................................285
" Table 197. Timing Characteristics for EACKN and SEMI Bus Disable ..............................................................285
" Table 198. Timing Requirements for Asynchronous Memory Read Operations ................................................286
" Table 199. Timing Characteristics for Asynchronous Memory Read Operations...............................................286
" Table 200. Timing Characteristics for Asynchronous Memory Write Operations...............................................287
" Table 201. Timing Requirements for Synchronous Read Operations................................................................288
" Table 202. Timing Characteristics for Synchronous Read Operations ..............................................................288
" Table 203. Timing Characteristics for Synchronous Write Operations...............................................................289
" Table 204. Timing Requirements for ERDY Pin.................................................................................................290
12
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
List of Tables (continued)
Table
Page
" Table 205. Timing Requirements for PIU Data Write Operations ......................................................................291
" Table 206. Timing Characteristics for PIU Data Write Operations .....................................................................291
" Table 207. Timing Requirements for PIU Data Read Operations ......................................................................292
" Table 208. Timing Characteristics for PIU Data Read Operations.....................................................................292
" Table 209. Timing Requirements for PIU Register Write Operations.................................................................293
" Table 210. Timing Characteristics for PIU Register Write Operations ...............................................................294
" Table 211. Timing Requirements for PIU Register Read Operations ................................................................294
" Table 212. Timing Characteristics for PIU Register Read Operations ...............................................................294
" Table 213. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Frame Mode Input ...............................................................295
" Table 214. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Channel Mode Input ............................................................295
" Table 215. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Frame Mode Output ............................................................296
" Table 216. Timing Characteristics for SIU Passive Frame Mode Output...........................................................296
" Table 217. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Channel Mode Output .........................................................297
" Table 218. Timing Characteristics for SIU Passive Channel Mode Output........................................................297
" Table 219. Timing Requirements for SCK External Clock Source .....................................................................298
" Table 220. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Frame Mode Input..................................................................299
" Table 221. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Frame Mode Input ................................................................299
" Table 222. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Channel Mode Input...............................................................300
" Table 223. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Channel Mode Input .............................................................300
" Table 224. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Frame Mode Output ...............................................................301
" Table 225. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Frame Mode Output..............................................................301
" Table 226. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Channel Mode Output ............................................................302
" Table 227. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Channel Mode Output...........................................................302
" Table 228. ST-Bus 2x Input Timing Requirements ............................................................................................303
" Table 229. ST-Bus 2x Output Timing Requirements..........................................................................................304
" Table 230. ST-Bus 2x Output Timing Characteristics ........................................................................................304
" Table 231. Pin Name Inconsistencies ................................................................................................................305
" Table 232. Register Name Inconsistencies........................................................................................................305
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
3 Notation Conventions
4 Hardware Architecture
The following notation conventions apply to this data
sheet. Table 130 on page 216 specifies the notation
conventions for the DSP16000 instruction set.
4.1 DSP16410CG Architectural Overview
boldface
Register names and DSP16410CG
core instructions are printed in boldface
when used in text descriptions.
The DSP16410CG device is a 16-bit fixed-point programmable digital signal processor (DSP). The
DSP16410CG consists of two DSP16000 cores
together with on-chip memory and
peripherals. Advanced architectural features with an
expanded instruction set deliver a dramatic increase in
performance compared to traditional DSP architectures
for signal coding algorithms. This increase in performance, together with an efficient design implementation, results in an extremely cost-efficient and powerefficient solution for wireless and multimedia applications.
italics
Documentation variables that are
replaced are printed in italics.
Figure 1 on page 15 shows a block diagram of the
DSP16410CG.
courier
DSP16410CG program examples or
C-language representations are printed
in courier font.
[]
Square brackets enclose a range of
numbers that represents multiple bits in
a single register or bus. The range of
numbers is delimited by a colon. For
example, imux[11:10] are bits 11 and
10 of the program-accessible imux register.
〈〉
Angle brackets enclose a list of items
delimited by commas or a range of
items delimited by a dash (—), one of
which is selected if used in an
instruction. For example, SADD〈0—3〉
represents the four memory-mapped
registers SADD0, SADD1, SADD2,
and SADD3, and the general instruction aTE〈h,l〉 = RB can be replaced
with a0h = timer0
blue
In this document, blue text or the blue
graphic object " indicates a hypertext
link. Click on the text or " to display the
referenced item.
lower-case
Registers that are directly writable or
readable by DSP16410CG core
instructions are lower-case.
UPPER-CASE Device flags, I/O pins, control register
fields, and registers that are not directly
writable or readable by DSP16410CG
core instructions are upper-case.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.1 DSP16410CG Architectural Overview (continued)
DSP16410CGB Block Diagram
SICK0
SIFS0
SOD0
SCK0
PADD[3:0]
PODS
PRWN
POBE
PRDY
SID0
SOCK0 SOFS0
PD[15:0]
PIDS
PCSN
PRDYMD
PIBF
PINT
PIU
SAB
SDB
27
4
20
ZSEG
ED[31:0]
ZEAB
ZEDB
ESEG[3:0]
16
PAB DPI
ZSEG
32
SIU0
SDB SAB
PAB DPI
32
20
32
20
SDB SAB
DDO
32
ZIDB
16
SDB SAB
16
32
SICK1
20
SAB
SDB
DDO
16
DDO
SID1
SIFS1
SOFS1
SIU1
DSI0
DMAU
ZEAB
ZEDB
DSI DDO
SOD1
16
DSI
DSI1
ZIAB
SOCK1
20
EA[18:0]
SCK1
32
ERAMN
ZIDB
ZIDB
TPRAM0
(96K x 16)
YDB YAB
ERWN[1:0]
XAB0
XDB0
YAB0
YDB0
XAB1
XDB1
YAB1
YDB1
EREQN
EACKN
ERDY
32
ERTYPE
ESIZE
20
TO IMUX1
ID
HDS0
TO HDS1/MGU1
CLOCK/CONTROL
pllcon
pllfrq
KEY:
20
32
XDB XAB
plldly
20
YDB YAB
32
CORE1
IDB
IDB
MGU0
MGU1
signal
signal
32
IMUX1
imux
INT[3:0]
pid
16
16
mgo
mgi
JTAG1
jiob
TIMER0_0
TIMER0_1
timer0
timer0c
timer0
timer0c
TIMER1_0
TIMER1_1
timer1
timer1c
timer1
timer1c
BIO0
cbit
sbit
BIO1
cbit
sbit
IO0BIT[6:0]
IO1BIT[6:0]
OFF-CORE REGISTER-MAPPED REGISTERS
ACCESSIBLE BY CORE0
20
XDB XAB
CORE0
mgi
mgo
BOUNDARY SCAN
TRAP
32
pid
JTAG0
jiob
CLK
YDB YAB
XDB XAB
32
IMUX0
imux
INT[3:0]
RSTN
XDB XAB
IROM1
YDB YAB
CKI
TPRAM1
(96K x 16)
SLM
(2K x 16)
IROM0
EXM
TCK0
TMS0
TDO0
TDI0
TRST0N
ZIAB
SDB SAB
EION
ECKO
32
ZIAB
SEMI
EROMN
20
TCK1
TMS1
TDO1
TDI1
TRST1N
ID
BOUNDARY SCAN
HDS1
TRAP
OFF-CORE REGISTER-MAPPED REGISTERS
ACCESSIBLE BY CORE1
Figure 1. DSP16410CG Block Diagram
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.1 DSP16410CG Architectural Overview (continued)
Table 1. DSP16410CG Block Diagram Legend
Symbol
BIO〈0—1〉
cbit
CLK
CORE0
CORE1
DDO
DMAU
DPI
DSI0
DSI1
HDS〈0—1〉
ID
IDB
imux
IMUX〈0—1〉
IROM〈0—1〉
jiob
JTAG〈0—1〉
mgi
mgo
MGU〈0—1〉
PAB
pid
PIU
pllcon
pllfrq
plldly
SAB
sbit
SDB
SEMI
signal
SIU0
SIU1
SLM
timer0
TIMER0_0
TIMER0_1
timer0c
timer1
TIMER1_0
TIMER1_1
timer1c
16
Description
Bit I/O Units. One for each core.
16-Bit BIO Control Register.
Internal Clock Signal.
DSP16000 Core—System Master.
DSP16000 Core—System Slave.
DMA Data Out. (For transferring data from DMAU to PIU, SIU0, and SIU1.)
Direct Memory Access Unit.
DMA Parallel In. (For transferring 16-bit data from PIU to DMAU.)
DMA Serial Data In Zero. (For transferring data from SIU0 to DMAU.)
DMA Serial Data In One. (For transferring data from SIU1 to DMAU.)
Hardware Development Systems. One for each core.
JTAG Port Identification Register Accessible Via the JTAG Port. One for each of the two JTAG〈0—1〉
ports.
Internal Data Bus. One for each core.
16-Bit IMUX Control Register.
Interrupt Multiplexers. One for each core; selects ten interrupts from DMAU, SIU0, SIU1, PIU, INT[3:0],
TIMER〈0—1〉, and MGU.
Internal Read-Only Memories (one for each core) for Boot and HDS Code.
32-Bit JTAG Test Register.
JTAG Test Ports. One for each core.
16-Bit Core-to-Core Message Input Register.
16-Bit Core-to-Core Message Output Register.
Core-to-Core Messaging Unit. One for each core.
27-Bit Parallel Address Bus. (For DMAU/PIU communications.)
16-Bit Processor ID Register (CORE0: 0x0000; CORE1: 0x0001).
Parallel Interface Unit. (16-bit parallel host interface.)
16-Bit Phase-Lock Loop Control Register.
16-Bit Phase-Lock Loop Frequency Control Register.
16-Bit Phase-Lock Loop Delay Control Register.
20-Bit System Address Bus. Address for system bus (S-bus) accesses.
16-Bit BIO Status/Control Register.
32-Bit System Data Bus. Data for system bus (S-bus) accesses.
System and External Memory Interface.
16-Bit Signal Register for Core-to-Core Communication.
Serial Input/Output Unit Zero.
Serial Input/Output Unit One.
2 Kword Shared Local Memory.
16-Bit Timer Running Count Register for TIMER0.
Programmable Timer 0 for CORE0.
Programmable Timer 0 for CORE1.
16-Bit Timer Control Register for TIMER0.
16-Bit Timer Running Count Register for TIMER1.
Programmable Timer 1 for CORE0.
Programmable Timer 1 for CORE1.
16-Bit Timer Control Register for TIMER1.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.1 DSP16410CG Architectural Overview (continued)
Table 1. DSP16410CG Block Diagram Legend (continued)
Symbol
TPRAM〈0—1〉
XAB〈0—1〉
XDB〈0—1〉
YAB〈0—1〉
YDB〈0—1〉
ZEAB
ZEDB
ZIAB
ZIDB
ZSEG
Description
96 Kword Three-Port Random-Access Memories (one for each core). Private code (X), data (Y), and
DMA (Z).
20-Bit X-Memory Space Address Bus. One for each core.
32-Bit X-Memory Space Data Bus. One for each core.
20-Bit Y-Memory Space Address Bus. One for each core.
32-Bit Y-Memory Space Data Bus. One for each core.
20-Bit External Z-Memory Space Address Bus. Interfaces DMAU to SEMI.
32-Bit External Z-Memory Space Data Bus. Interfaces DMAU to SEMI.
20-Bit Internal Z-Memory Space Address Bus. Interfaces DMAU to TPRAM0 and TPRAM1.
32-Bit Internal Z-Memory Space Data Bus. Interfaces DMAU to TPRAM0 and TPRAM1.
External Segment Address Bits Associated with ZEAB. Interfaces DMAU to SEMI.
4.1.1 DSP16000 Cores
The two DSP16000 cores (CORE0 and CORE1) are
the signal-processing engines of the
DSP16410CG. The DSP16000 is a modified Harvard
architecture with separate sets of buses for the instruction/coefficient (X-memory) and data (Y-memory)
spaces. Each set of buses has 20 bits of address and
32 bits of data. The core contains data and address
arithmetic units and control for on-chip memory and
peripherals.
4.1.2 Clock Synthesizer (PLL)
The DSP16410CG powers up with an input clock (CKI)
as the source for the processor clock (CLK). An onchip clock synthesizer (PLL) that runs at a frequency
multiple of CKI can also be used to generate CLK. The
clock synthesizer is deselected and powered down on
reset. The selection of the clock source is under software control of CORE0. See Section 4.17, beginning
on page 198, for details.
4.1.3 Triport RAMs (TPRAM〈0—1〉)
Each core has a private block of TPRAM consisting of
96 banks (banks 0—95) of zero wait-state memory.
Each bank consists of 1K 16-bit words and has three
separate address and data ports: one port to the core’s
instruction/coefficient (X-memory) space, a second
port to the core’s data (Y-memory) space, and a third
port to the DMA (Z-memory) space. TPRAM0 is
accessible by CORE0, TPRAM1 is accessible by
CORE1, and both TPRAM0 and TPRAM1 are accessible by the DMAU. TPRAM is organized into even and
odd interleaved banks for which each even/odd
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address pair is a 32-bit wide module (see Section 4.6
on page 44 for details). The TPRAMs support singleword, aligned double-word, and misaligned doubleword accesses.
4.1.4 Shared Local Memory (SLM)
The SLM consists of two banks of memory. Each bank
consists of 1K 16-bit words. The SLM can be
accessed by both cores and by the DMAU and PIU
over the system bus (SAB, SDB). The SLM supports
single-word (16-bit) and aligned double-word (32-bit)
accesses. Misaligned double-word accesses are not
supported. An access to the SLM takes multiple clock
cycles to complete, and a core access to the SLM
causes the core to incur wait-states. See
Section 4.14.7.1 on page 126 for details on system bus
performance.
4.1.5 Internal Boot ROMs (IROM〈0—1〉)
Each core has its own boot ROM that contains a single
boot routine and software to support the Agere hardware development system (HDS). The code in IROM0
and IROM1 are identical. See Section 5 on page 206
for details.
4.1.6 Messaging Units (MGU〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides an MGU for each core:
MGU0 for CORE0 and MGU1 for CORE1. The MGUs
provide interprocessor (core-to-core) communication
and interrupt generation. See Section 4.8 on page 46
for details.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.1.11 Interrupt Multiplexers (IMUX〈0—1〉)
4.1 DSP16410CG Architectural
Overview (continued)
The DSP16410CG provides an interrupt multiplexer
unit for each core: IMUX0 for CORE0 and IMUX1 for
CORE1. Each IMUX multiplexes the 26 hardware
interrupts into the 20 available hardware interrupt
requests for each core. See Section 4.4.2 on page 28
for details.
4.1.7 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI)
The SEMI interfaces both cores and the DMAU to
external memory and I/O devices. It interfaces directly
to pipelined synchronous ZBT ™ SRAMs and asynchronous SRAMs. The SEMI also interfaces the cores
and the DMAU to the internal SLM and to memorymapped registers in the DMAU, PIU, SIU0, and SIU1
via the internal system bus or S-bus (SAB and
SDB). See Section 4.14, beginning on page 100, for
details.
4.1.8 Bit Input/Output Units (BIO〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides a BIO unit for each core:
BIO0 for CORE0 and BIO1 for CORE1. Each BIO unit
provides convenient and efficient monitoring and control of seven individually configurable pins. If configured as outputs, the pins can be individually set,
cleared, or toggled. If configured as inputs, individual
pins or combinations of pins can be tested for
patterns. Flags returned by the BIO can be tested by
conditional instructions. See Section 4.9 on page 50
for details.
4.1.9 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and
TIMER1_〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides two timer units for each
core: TIMER0_0 and TIMER1_0 for CORE0 and
TIMER0_1 and TIMER1_1 for CORE1. Each timer can
be used to provide an interrupt, either single or repetitive, at the expiration of a programmed interval. More
than nine orders of magnitude of interval selection are
provided. See Section 4.10 on page 53 for more information.
4.1.10 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU)
The direct memory access unit (DMAU) manages data
transfers in the DSP16410CG memory space. Data
can be moved between DSP16410CG memory and
peripherals and between different memory spaces in
the DSP16410CG. Once initiated, DMAU transfers
occur without core intervention. The DMAU supports
concurrent core execution and I/O processing. See
Section 4.13, beginning on page 64, for details.
18
4.1.12 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU)
The parallel interface unit (PIU) is a 16-bit parallel port
that provides a host processor direct access to the
entire DSP16410CG memory system (including memory-mapped peripheral registers). See Section 4.15,
beginning on page 133, for details.
4.1.13 Serial Interface Units (SIU〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides two identical SIUs. Each
SIU is a full-duplex, double-buffered serial port with
independent input and output frame and bit clock control. Clock and frame signals can be generated externally (passive) or by on-chip clock and frame
generation hardware (active). The SIU features multiple-channel TDM mode for ST-bus (1x and 2x compatible) and T1/E1 compatibility. Each SIU is provided a
DMAU interface for data transfer to memory (TPRAM0,
TPRAM1, SLM, memory-mapped registers, or external
memory) without core intervention. See Section 4.16,
beginning on page 152, for details.
4.1.14 Test Access Ports (JTAG〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides a JTAG unit for each core:
JTAG0 for CORE0 and JTAG1 for CORE1. See
Section 4.12 on page 57 for details.
4.1.15 Hardware Development Systems
(HDS〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides an HDS unit for each core:
HDS0 for CORE0 and HDS1 for CORE1. Each HDS is
an on-chip hardware module available for debugging
assembly-language programs that execute on the
DSP16000 core in real-time. The main capability of the
HDS is in allowing controlled visibility into the core’s
state during program execution. The HDS is enhanced
with powerful debugging capabilities such as complex
breakpointing conditions, multiple data/address watchpoint registers, and an intelligent trace mechanism for
recording discontinuities. See Section 4.11 on page 56
for details.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.2 DSP16000 Core Architectural Overview
The DSP16410CG contains two identical DSP16000
cores. As shown in Figure 2 on page 21, each core
consists of four major blocks: system control and cache
(SYS), data arithmetic unit (DAU), Y-memory space
address arithmetic unit (YAAU), and X-memory space
address arithmetic unit (XAAU). Bits within the auc0
and auc1 registers configure the DAU mode-controlled
operations. See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual for a complete description
of the DSP16000 core.
4.2.1 System Control and Cache (SYS)
This section consists of the control block and the
cache.
The control block provides overall system coordination
that is mostly invisible to the user. The control block
includes an instruction decoder and sequencer, a
pseudorandom sequence generator (PSG), an interrupt and trap handler, a wait-state generator, and lowpower standby mode control logic. An interrupt and trap
handler provides a user-locatable vector table and
three levels of user-assigned interrupt priority.
SYS contains the alf register, which is a 16-bit register
that contains AWAIT, a power-saving standby mode
bit, and peripheral flags. The inc0 and inc1 registers
are 20-bit interrupt control registers, and ins is a 20-bit
interrupt status register.
Programs use the instruction cache to store and execute repetitive operations such as those found in an
FIR or IIR filter section. The cache can contain up to
thirty-one 16-bit and 32-bit instructions. The code in the
cache can repeat up to 216 – 1 times without looping
overhead. Operations in the cache that require a coefficient access execute at twice the normal rate because
the XAAU and its associated bus are not needed for
fetching instructions. The cache greatly reduces the
need for writing in-line repetitive code and, therefore,
reduces instruction/coefficient memory size requirements. In addition, the use of cache reduces power
consumption because it eliminates memory accesses
for instruction fetches.
The cache provides a convenient, low-overhead looping structure that can be interrupted, saved, and
restored. The cache is addressable in both the X and Y
memory spaces. An interrupt or trap handling routine
can save and restore cloop, cstate, csave, and the
contents of the cache. The cloop register controls the
cache loop count. The cstate register contains the curAgere Systems Inc.
rent state of the cache. The 32-bit csave register holds
the opcode of the instruction following the loop instruction in program memory.
4.2.2 Data Arithmetic Unit (DAU)
The DAU is a power-efficient, dual-MAC (multiply/accumulate), parallel-pipelined structure that is tailored to
communications applications. It can perform two double-word (32-bit) fetches, two multiplications, and two
accumulations in a single instruction cycle. The dualMAC parallel pipeline begins with two 32-bit registers,
x and y. The pipeline treats the 32-bit registers as four
16-bit signed registers if used as input to two signed
16-bit x 16-bit multipliers. Each multiplier produces a
full 32-bit result stored into registers p0 and p1. The
DAU can direct the output of each multiplier to a 40-bit
ALU or a 40-bit 3-input ADDER. The ALU and ADDER
results are each stored in one of eight 40-bit accumulators, a0 through a7. Both the ALU and ADDER include
an ACS (add/compare/select) function for Viterbi
decoding. The DAU can direct the output of each accumulator to the ALU/ACS, the ADDER/ACS, or a 40-bit
BMU (bit manipulation unit).
The ALU implements 2-input addition, subtraction, and
various logical operations. The ADDER implements
2-input or 3-input addition and subtraction. To support
Viterbi decoding, the ALU and ADDER have a split
mode in which two simultaneous 16-bit additions or
subtractions are performed. This mode, available in
specialized dual-MAC instructions, is used to compute
the distance between a received symbol and its estimate.
The ACS provides the add/compare/select function
required for Viterbi decoding. This unit provides flags to
the traceback encoder for implementing mode-controlled side-effects for ACS operations. The source
operands for the ACS are any two accumulators, and
results are written back to one of the source accumulators.
The BMU implements barrel-shift, bit-field insertion, bitfield extraction, exponent extraction, normalization, and
accumulator shuffling operations. ar0 through ar3 are
auxiliary registers whose main function is to control
BMU operations.
The user can enable overflow saturation to affect the
multiplier output and the results of the three arithmetic
units. Overflow saturation can also affect an accumulator value as it is transferred to memory or other
register. These features accommodate various speech
coding standards such as GSM-FR, GSM-HR, and
GSM-EFR. Shifting in the arithmetic pipeline occurs at
several stages to accommodate various standards for
mixed-precision and double-precision multiplications.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.2 DSP16000 Core Architectural
Overview (continued)
4.2.2 Data Arithmetic Unit (DAU) (continued)
The DAU contains control and status registers auc0,
auc1, psw0, psw1, vsw, and c0—c2.
The arithmetic unit control registers auc0 and auc1
select or deselect various modes of DAU operation.
These modes include scaling of products, saturation on
overflow, feedback to the x and y registers from accumulators a6 and a7, simultaneous loading of x and y
registers with the same value (used for single-cycle
squaring), and clearing the low half of registers when
loading the high half to facilitate fixed-point operations.
The processor status word registers psw0 and psw1
contain flags set by ALU/ACS, ADDER, or BMU operations. They also include information on the current status of the interrupt controller.
The vsw register is the Viterbi support word associated
with the traceback encoder. The traceback encoder is a
specialized block for accelerating Viterbi decoding. The
vsw controls side-effects for three compare functions:
cmp0( ), cmp1( ), and cmp2( ). These instructions are
part of the MAC group that utilizes the traceback
encoder. The side-effects allow the DAU to store, with
no overhead, state information necessary for traceback
decoding. Side-effects use the c1 counter, the ar0 and
ar1 auxiliary registers, and bits 1 and 0 of vsw.
The c1 and c0 counters are 16-bit signed registers
used to count events such as the number of times the
program has executed a sequence of code. The c2
register is a holding register for counter c1. Conditional
instructions control these counters and provide a convenient method of program looping.
4.2.3 Y-Memory Space Address Arithmetic Unit
(YAAU)
The YAAU supports high-speed, register-indirect, data
memory addressing with postincrement of the address
register. Eight 20-bit pointer registers (r0—r7) store
read or write addresses for the data (Y-memory) space.
Two sets of 20-bit registers (rb0 and re0; rb1 and re1)
define the upper and lower boundaries of two zerooverhead circular buffers for efficient filter implementations. The j and k registers are two 20-bit signed registers that are used to hold user-defined postincrement
values for r0—r7. Fixed increments of +1, –1, 0, +2,
and –2 are also available. (Postincrement options 0
and –2 are not available for some specialized transfers.
20
See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual for details.)
The YAAU includes a 20-bit stack pointer (sp). The
data move group includes a set of stack instructions
that consists of push, pop, stack-relative, and pipelined
stack-relative operations. The addressing mode used
for the stack-relative instructions is register-plus-displacement indirect addressing (the displacement is
optional). The displacement is specified as either an
immediate value as part of the instruction or a value
stored in j or k. The YAAU computes the address by
adding the displacement to sp and leaves the contents
of sp unchanged. The data move group also includes
instructions with register-plus-displacement indirect
addressing for the pointer registers r0—r6 in addition
to sp.
The data move group of instructions includes instructions for loading and storing any YAAU register from or
to memory or another core register. It also includes
instructions for loading any YAAU register with an
immediate value stored with the instruction. The
pointer arithmetic group of instructions allows adding of
an immediate value or the contents of the j or k register
to any YAAU pointer register and storing the result to
any YAAU register.
4.2.4 X-Memory Space Address Arithmetic Unit
(XAAU)
The XAAU contains registers and an adder that control
the sequencing of instructions in the processor. The
program counter (PC) automatically increments
through the instruction space. The interrupt return register pi, the subroutine return register pr, and the trap
return register ptrap are automatically loaded with the
return address of an interrupt service routine, subroutine, and trap service routine, respectively. High-speed,
register-indirect, read-only memory addressing with
postincrementing is done with the pt0 and pt1 registers. The signed registers h and i are used to hold a
user-defined signed postincrement value. Fixed postincrement values of 0, +1, –1, +2, and –2 are also available. (Postincrement options 0 and –2 are available
only if the target of the data transfer is an accumulator.
See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual for details.)
The data move group includes instructions for loading
and storing any XAAU register from or to memory or
another core register. It also includes instructions for
loading any XAAU register with an immediate value
stored with the instruction.
vbase is the 20-bit vector base offset register. The user
programs this register with the base address of the
interrupt and trap vector table.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.2 DSP16000 Core Architectural Overview (continued)
4.2.5 Core Block Diagram
DSP16000 Core Block Diagram
SYS
OFFCORE
XAAU
IMMEDIATE SINGLE DOUBLE
VALUE†
–1, 0, 1 –2, 0, 2
h (20)
CACHE
CONTROL
31 INSTRUCTIONS
inc0 (20)
i (20)
ins (20)
XAB
(20)
TO
MEMORY
MUX
inc1 (20)
cloop (16)
XAB
(20)
+
alf (16)
XAB
(20)
cstate (16)
YAB
(20)
PC (20)
PSG
csave (32)
pt0 (20)
pi (20)
pr (20)
pt1 (20)
ptrap(20)
vbase (20)
FROM
MEMORY
XDB
(32)
XDB
(32)
IDB
(32)
IDB
(32)
DAU
y (32)
DOUBLE SINGLE
–2, 0, 2 –1, 0, 1
x (32)
auc0 (16)
SHIFT(0, –1)
auc1 (16)
YAAU
k (20)
MUX
vsw (16)
c0 (16)
TO
PERIPHERAL
SHIFT(0, –1)
SWAP MUX
psw1 (16)
IDB
(32)
16 × 16 MULTIPLY
16 × 16 MULTIPLY
ar0 (16)
p0 (32)
p1 (32)
ar1 (16)
SHIFT(2, 1, 0, –2)/SAT.
SHIFT(2, 1, 0, –2)/SAT.
YDB
(32)
TO/FROM
MEMORY
MUX
psw0 (16)
j (20)
IMMEDIATE
VALUE‡
XDB
(32)
+
c1 (16)
DEMUX
c2 (16)
SHIFT(0, –15, –16)
ar3 (16)
TRACEBACK
ENCODER
re0 (20)
rb0 (20)
re1 (20)
rb1 (20)
COMPARE
SHIFT
(0, –14)
MUX
SHIFT(0, –1)
ar2 (16)
TO
MEMORY
YAB
(20)
YAB
(20)
MUX
MUX
MUX
r0 (20)
r1 (20)
ALU/ACS
ADDER/ACS
BMU
r2 (20)
SAT.
SAT.
SAT.
r3 (20)
r4 (20)
r5 (20)
SPLIT/MUX
r6 (20)
r7 (20)
a0 (40)
sp (20)
a1 (40)
a2 (40)
a3 (40)
a4 (40)
KEY:
a5 (40)
PROGRAM-ACCESSIBLE REGISTERS
a6 (40)
a7 (40)
SAT.
SAT.
SAT.
MODE-CONTROLLED OPTIONS
SAT.
BUSES
MUX/EXTRACT
Associated with PC-relative branch addressing.
Associated with register-plus-displacement indirect addressing.
Figure 2. DSP16000 Core Block Diagram
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.2 DSP16000 Core Architectural Overview (continued)
4.2.5 Core Block Diagram (continued)
Table 2. DSP16000 Core Block Diagram Legend
Symbol
16 x 16 MULTIPLY
a0—a7
ADDER/ACS
alf
ALU/ACS
ar0—ar3
auc0, auc1
BMU
c0, c1
c2
cloop
COMPARE
csave
cstate
DAU
h
i
IDB
inc0, inc1
ins
j
k
MUX
p0, p1
PC
pi
pr
PSG
psw0, psw1
pt0, pt1
ptrap
r0—r7
rb0, rb1
re0, re1
SAT
SHIFT
sp
SPLIT/MUX
SWAP MUX
SYS
vbase
vsw
22
Name
16-Bit x 16-Bit Multiplier.
40-Bit Accumulators 0—7.
3-Input 40-Bit Adder/Subtractor and Add/Compare/Select Function. Used in Viterbi decoding.
16-Bit AWAIT Low-Power and Flags Register.
40-Bit Arithmetic Logic Unit and Add/Compare/Select Function. Used in Viterbi decoding.
16-Bit Auxiliary Registers 0—3.
16-Bit Arithmetic Unit Control Registers.
40-Bit Manipulation Unit.
16-Bit Counters 0 and 1.
16-Bit Counter Holding Register.
16-Bit Cache Loop Count Register.
Comparator. Used for circular buffer addressing.
32-Bit Cache Save Register.
16-Bit Cache State Register.
Data Arithmetic Unit.
20-Bit Pointer Postincrement Register for the X-Memory Space.
20-Bit Pointer Postincrement Register for the X-Memory Space.
32-Bit Internal Data Bus.
20-Bit Interrupt Control Registers 0 and 1.
20-Bit Interrupt Status Register.
20-Bit Pointer Postincrement/Offset Register for the Y-Memory Space.
20-Bit Pointer Postincrement/Offset Register for the Y-Memory Space.
Multiplexer.
32-Bit Product Registers 0 and 1.
20-Bit Program Counter.
20-Bit Program Interrupt Return Register.
20-Bit Program Return Register.
Pseudorandom Sequence Generator.
16-Bit Processor Status Word Registers 0 and 1.
20-Bit Pointers 0 and 1 to X-Memory Space.
20-Bit Program Trap Return Register.
20-Bit Pointers 0—7 to Y-Memory Space.
20-Bit Circular Buffer Pointers 0 and 1 (begin address).
20-Bit Circular Buffer Pointers 0 and 1 (end address).
Saturation.
Shifting Operation.
20-Bit Stack Pointer.
Split/Multiplexer. Routes the appropriate ALU/ACS, BMU, and ADDER/ACS outputs to the appropriate
accumulator.
Swap Multiplexer. Routes the appropriate data to the appropriate multiplier input.
System Control and Cache.
20-Bit Vector Base Offset Register.
16-Bit Viterbi Support Word. Associated with the traceback encoder.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.2 DSP16000 Core Architectural Overview (continued)
4.2.5 Core Block Diagram (continued)
Table 2. DSP16000 Core Block Diagram Legend (continued)
Symbol
x
XAAU
XAB
XDB
y
YAAU
YAB
YDB
Name
32-Bit Multiplier Input Register.
X-Memory Space Address Arithmetic Unit.
X-Memory Space Address Bus.
X-Memory Space Data Bus.
32-Bit Multiplier Input Register.
Y-Memory Space Address Arithmetic Unit.
Y-Memory Space Address Bus.
Y-Memory Space Data Bus.
4.3 Device Reset
4.3.2 RSTN Pin Reset
The DSP16410CG has three negative-assertion external reset input pins: RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N.
RSTN is used to reset both CORE0 and CORE1. The
primary function of TRST0N and TRST1N is to reset
the JTAG0 and JTAG1 test access port (TAP) controllers.
The device is properly reset by asserting RSTN (low)
for at least seven CKI cycles and then deasserting
RSTN. Reset initializes the state of user registers, synchronizes the internal clocks, and initiates code execution. See Section 6.2.4, beginning on page 247, for the
values of the user registers after reset.
4.3.1 Reset After Powerup or Power Interruption
At initial powerup or if power is interrupted, a reset is
required and RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N must all
be asserted (low) simultaneously for at least seven CKI
cycles (see Section 11.4 on page 279 for details). The
TRST0N and TRST1N pins must be asserted even if
the JTAG controllers are not used by the application.
Failure to properly reset the device on powerup or after
a power interruption can lead to a loss of communication with the DSP16410CG pins.
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After RSTN is deasserted, there is a delay of several
CKI cycles before the DSP16000 cores begin executing instructions (see Section 11.5 on page 280 for
details). The state of the EXM pin on the rising edge of
RSTN controls the boot program address for both
cores, as described in Section 5 on page 206.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.3 Device Reset (continued)
4.3.2 RSTN Pin Reset (continued)
Table 3 defines the states of the output and bidirectional pins both during and after reset. It does not include the
TDO0 and TDO1 output pins because their state is not affected by RSTN. The state of TDO0 and TDO1 are
affected only by the JTAG0 and JTAG1 TAP controllers.
Table 3. State of Device Output and Bidirectional Pins During and After Reset
Type
Pin
Condition
Output
PIBF, PINT
PRDY
—
PRDYMD = 0
PRDYMD = 1
INT0 = 0
(deasserted)
INT0 = 1
(asserted)
—
—
INT0 = 0
(deasserted)
INT0 = 1
(asserted)
INT0 = 0
(deasserted)
INT0 = 1
(asserted)
INT0 = 0
(deasserted)
INT0 = 1
(asserted)
—
EACKN, EION, ERAMN,
EROMN, ERWN0, ERWN1
POBE
SOD0, SOD1
ECKO
EA[18:0]
ESEG[3:0]
Bidirectional
(Input/Output)
IO0BIT[6:0], IO1BIT[6:0],
PD[15:0], SICK0, SICK1,
SIFS0, SIFS1, SOCK0,
SOCK1, SOFS0, SOFS1,
TRAP
ED[31:0]
EYMODE = 0
EYMODE = 1
State of Pin
During Reset (RSTN = 0)
logic low
logic low
logic high
logic high
Initial State of Pin
After Reset (RSTN = 1)
logic low
logic low
logic high
initial inactive state
3-state
logic high
3-state
logic low
logic high
3-state
CKI/2
3-state
logic low
initial inactive state
3-state
logic low
logic low
3-state
3-state
configured as input
3-state
output
3-state
output
4.3.3 JTAG Controller Reset
The recommended method of resetting the JTAG TAP controllers is to assert RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N low
simultaneously. An alternate method is to clock TCK〈0,1〉 through at least five cycles with TMS〈0,1〉 held high.
Both methods ensure that the user has control of the device pins. JTAG controller reset places it in the test logic
reset (TLR) state and does not initialize user registers, synchronize internal clocks, or initiate code execution
unless RSTN is also asserted (see Section 6.2.4 on page 247).
24
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps
Each core in the DSP16410CG supports the following
interrupts and traps:
!
26 hardware interrupts with three levels of userassigned priority:
— 1 core-to-core interrupt.
— 10 general DMAU interrupts.
— 1 DMAU interrupt under control of the other core.
— 4 SIU interrupts.
— 3 PIU interrupts.
— 1 MGU interrupt.
— 2 timer interrupts.
— 4 external interrupt pins.
!
64 software interrupts for each core, generated by
the execution of an icall IM6 instruction.
!
The TRAP pin.
!
The core-to-core trap.
If a hardware interrupt is disabled, the core does not
service it. If a hardware interrupt is enabled, the core
services it according to its priority. Device reset globally disables hardware interrupts. An application can
globally1 enable or disable hardware interrupts and can
individually enable or disable each hardware interrupt.
An application globally enables hardware interrupts by
executing the ei (enable interrupts) instruction and globally disables them by executing the di (disable interrupts) instruction. Within an interrupt service routine
(ISR), the execution of an ireturn instruction also globally enables hardware interrupts. An application can
individually enable a hardware interrupt at an assigned
priority or individually disable a hardware interrupt by
configuring the inc0 or inc1 register (see Table 7 on
page 31).
Software interrupts emulate hardware interrupts for the
purpose of software testing. The core services software interrupts even if hardware interrupts are globally
disabled.
Because the DSP16000 core supports a maximum of
20 hardware interrupts and the DSP16410CG provides
26 hardware interrupts, each core has an associated
programmable interrupt multiplexer (IMUX〈0,1〉).
A trap is similar to an interrupt but has the highest possible priority. An application cannot disable traps by
executing a di instruction or by any other means. Traps
do not nest, i.e., a trap service routine (TSR) cannot be
interrupted or trapped. A trap does not affect the state
of the psw1 register.
The interrupt and trap vectors are in consecutive locations in memory, and the base (starting) address of the
vectors is configurable via the core’s vbase register.
Each interrupt and trap source is preassigned to a
unique vector offset that differentiates its service routine.
The DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual provides an extensive discussion of interrupts and traps. The remainder of Section 4.4
describes the interrupts and traps for the
DSP16410CG.
The core must reach an interruptible or trappable state
(completion of an interruptible or trappable instruction)
before it services an interrupt or trap. If the core services an interrupt or trap, it saves the contents of its
program counter (PC) and begins executing instructions at the corresponding location in its vector table.
For interrupts, the core saves its PC in its program
interrupt (pi) register. For traps, the core saves its PC
in its program trap (ptrap) register. After servicing the
interrupt or trap, the servicing routine must return to the
interrupted or trapped program by executing an ireturn
or treturn instruction.
The core’s ins register (see Table 8 on page 32) contains a 1-bit status field for each of its hardware interrupts. If a hardware interrupt occurs, the core sets the
corresponding ins field to indicate that the interrupt is
pending. If the core services that interrupt, it clears the
corresponding ins field. The psw1 register (see
Table 10 on page 35) includes control and status bits
for the core’s hardware interrupt logic.
4.4.1 Hardware Interrupt Logic
Figure 3 on page 26 illustrates the path of each interrupt from its source peripheral or pin to the interrupt
logic of CORE0 and CORE1. Some of the interrupts
connect directly to the cores, and others connect via
the IMUX〈0,1〉 block. Some of the interrupts are specific to a core, and some are common to both cores.
The programmer can configure IMUX〈0,1〉 using the
corresponding imux register. The programmer can
divide processing of the multiplexed interrupts PIBF,
POBE, S〈O, I〉INT〈0,1〉, DSINT[3:0], DDINT[3:0],
DMINT[5:4], and INT[3:2] between CORE0 and
CORE1, or cause some of these interrupts to be common to both cores by defining the fields in each core’s
imux register. See Section 4.4.2 on page 28 for
details on interrupt multiplexing.
1. A program that runs on one core disables and enables its interrupts independent of the other core.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.1 Hardware Interrupt Logic (continued)
Interrupt Block Diagram
INT[1:0]
2
INT[1:0]
inc0
inc1
ins
DMINT[5:4] PHINT
TIMER0_0
TIMER1_0
TIMER0_1
TIMER1_1
TIME0†
TIME1†
TIME0†
TIME1†
CORE0
INT[1:0]
CORE1
MGIBF† SIGINT† MXI[9:0]‡
XIO†
XIO†
MXI[9:0]‡ SIGINT† MGIBF†
10
IMUX0
PHINT
inc0
inc1
ins
DMINT[5:4]
10
PIBF (PIU)
IMUX1
POBE (PIU)
imux
imux
4
S〈O,I〉INT〈0,1〉
(SIU〈0,1〉)
2
MGU0
MGU1
2
DMAU
DSINT[3:0], DDINT[3:0], DMINT[5:4]
10
PIU
INT[3:2]
KEY:
PROGRAM-ACCESSIBLE REGISTERS
† These interrupts are specific to a core, not common to both cores.
‡ Each of the MXI[9:0] interrupts can be either specific to a core or common to both cores, determined by how each interrupt is configured in
imux (see Table 5 on page 28).
Figure 3. CORE0 and CORE1 Interrupt Logic Block Diagram
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.1 Hardware Interrupt Logic (continued)
Table 4 summarizes each hardware interrupt in the DSP16410CG, including whether it is internal or external to the
device, which module generates it, and a brief description. For details on the operation of each internal interrupt,
see the section that describes the corresponding block.
Table 4. Hardware Interrupts
Interrupt
Type
DSINT0 Internal
DDINT0 Internal
DSINT1 Internal
DDINT1 Internal
DSINT2 Internal
DDINT2 Internal
DSINT3 Internal
DDINT3 Internal
DMINT4 Internal
DMINT5 Internal
INT[3:0] External
Name
DMAU Source Interrupt for SWT0 (for SIU0)
DMAU Destination Interrupt for SWT0 (for SIU0)
DMAU Source Interrupt for SWT1 (for SIU0)
DMAU Destination Interrupt for SWT1 (for SIU0)
DMAU Source Interrupt for SWT2 (for SIU1)
DMAU Destination Interrupt for SWT2 (for SIU1)
DMAU Source Interrupt for SWT3 (for SIU1)
DMAU Destination Interrupt for SWT3 (for SIU1)
DMAU Interrupt for MMT4
DMAU Interrupt for MMT5
External Interrupt Requests
MGIBF
PHINT
PIBF
POBE
SIGINT
SIINT0
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
Internal
MGU Input Buffer Full
PIU Host Interrupt
PIU Input Buffer Full
PIU Output Buffer Empty
Signal Interrupt (Core-to-Core)
SIU0 Input Interrupt
SIINT1
Internal
SIU1 Input Interrupt
Description
Channel SWT0† source (output) interrupt request.
Channel SWT0† destination (input) interrupt request.
Channel SWT1† source (output) interrupt request.
Channel SWT1† destination (input) interrupt request.
Channel SWT2† source (output) interrupt request.
Channel SWT2† destination (input) interrupt request.
Channel SWT3† source (output) interrupt request.
Channel SWT3† destination (input) interrupt request.
Channel MMT4‡ interrupt request.
Channel MMT5‡ interrupt request.
An external device has requested service by asserting
the corresponding INT[3:0] pin (0-to-1 transition).
The MGU input buffer (mgi) is full.
The host sets the HINT field (PCON[4]).
PDI contains data from a previous host write operation.
The data in PDO has been read by the host.
The other core sets its signal[0] field.
Based on the IINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11]),
asserted if:
!
Input frame sync detected.
!
Input subframe transfer complete.
!
Input channel transfer complete.
Input error occurs.
Based on the OINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[14:13]):
!
SOINT0
Internal
SIU0 Output Interrupt
SOINT1
Internal
SIU1 Output Interrupt
TIME0
TIME1
XIO
Internal
Internal
Internal
TIMER0 Delay/Interval Reached
TIMER1 Delay/Interval Reached
Core-to-Core DMAU Interrupt
!
Output frame sync detected.
!
Output subframe transfer complete.
!
Output channel transfer complete.
! Output error occurs.
TIMER0 has reached zero count.
TIMER1 has reached zero count.
Based on the other core’s XIOC[1:0] field:
!
Zero (logic low).
!
DMINT4 (MMT4 transfer complete).
!
DMINT5 (MMT5 transfer complete).
† An SWT channel is a single-word transfer channel used for both input and output by an SIU. It transfers single words (16 bits).
‡ An MMT channel is a memory-to-memory channel used by the cores to copy a block from any area of memory to any other area of memory. It
transfers single words (16 bits) or double words (32 bits).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.2 Hardware Interrupt Multiplexing
The total number of DSP16410CG hardware interrupt sources (26) exceeds the number of interrupt requests supported by the DSP16000 core (20). Therefore, each core includes an interrupt multiplexer block (IMUX) and associated control register (imux) to permit the 26 interrupts to be multiplexed into the 20 available hardware interrupt
requests. Each core supports ten dedicated interrupt requests. Each core’s IMUX block multiplexes the remaining
16 hardware requests into the ten remaining hardware interrupt request lines.
Table 5 describes the imux register and Figure 4 on page 29 illustrates the IMUX block.
Table 5. imux (Interrupt Multiplex Control) Register
15—14
13—12
11—10
9—8
XIOC[1:0]†
Reserved
IMUX9[1:0]
IMUX8[1:0]
Bit
Field
15—14
XIOC[1:0]†
Controls
Multiplexed
Interrupt
XIO
13—12
11—10
Reserved
IMUX9[1:0]
—
MXI9
9—8
IMUX8[1:0]
MXI8
7
IMUX7
MXI7
6
IMUX6
MXI6
5
IMUX5
MXI5
4
IMUX4
MXI4
3
IMUX3
MXI3
2
IMUX2
MXI2
1
IMUX1
MXI1
0
IMUX0
MXI0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
IMUX7 IMUX6 IMUX5 IMUX4 IMUX3 IMUX2 IMUX1 IMUX0
Value
Interrupt
Selected
Description
R/W Reset
Value
00
01
10
11
0
00
01
10
11
00
01
10
11
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0 (logic low)
DMINT4
DMINT5
Reserved
—
INT3
POBE
PIBF
Reserved
INT2
POBE
PIBF
Reserved
SIINT1
DDINT2
SOINT1
DSINT2
SIINT0
DDINT0
SOINT0
DSINT0
DDINT2
DDINT3
DSINT2
DSINT3
DDINT0
DDINT1
DSINT0
DSINT1
—
DMAU interrupt for MMT4.
DMAU interrupt for MMT5.
Reserved.
Reserved—write with zero.
Pin.
PIU output buffer empty.
PIU input buffer full.
Reserved.
Pin.
PIU output buffer empty.
PIU input buffer full.
Reserved.
SIU1 input interrupt.
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
SIU1 output interrupt.
DMAU source interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
SIU0 input interrupt.
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
SIU0 output interrupt.
DMAU source interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT3 (SIU1).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT3 (SIU1).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT1 (SIU0).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT1 (SIU0).
R/W
00
R/W
R/W
0
00
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
† The XIOC[1:0] field controls the XIO interrupt for the other core.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.2 Hardware Interrupt Multiplexing (continued)
IMUX Block Diagram
IMUX0 (imux[0])
DSINT0
MUX
MXI0
MUX
MXI1
MUX
MXI2
MUX
MXI3
DSINT0
MUX
MXI4
DDINT0
MUX
MXI5
DSINT2
MUX
MXI6
DDINT2
MUX
MXI7
MUX
MXI8
MUX
MXI9
MUX
XIO (TO OTHER CORE)
DSINT1
IMUX1 (imux[1])
DDINT0
DDINT1
IMUX2 (imux[2])
DSINT2
DSINT3
IMUX3 (imux[3])
DDINT2
DDINT3
IMUX4 (imux[4])
SOINT0
IMUX5 (imux[5])
SIINT0
IMUX6 (imux[6])
SOINT1
IMUX7 (imux[7])
SIINT1
IMUX8[1:0] (imux[9:8])
2
INT2
POBE
PIBF
IMUX9[1:0] (imux[11:10])
INT3
PIBF
POBE
XIOC[1:0] (imux[15:14])
0
DMINT4
DMINT5
2
2
IMUX〈0,1〉
Figure 4. IMUX Block Diagram
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.3 Clearing Core Interrupt Requests
Internal hardware interrupt signals are pulses that the
core latches into its ins register (see Section 4.4.7 on
page 32). Therefore, the user software need not clear
the interrupt request. However, in the case of the PIU
host interrupt, PHINT, the user software must clear the
HINT field (PCON[4]) to allow the host to request a
subsequent interrupt. See Section 4.15.7 on page 151
for details.
4.4.4 Host Interrupt Output
The DSP16410CG provides an interrupt output pin,
PINT, that can interrupt a host processor connected to
the PIU. A core can assert this pin by setting the PINT
field (PCON[3]). The host must clear the PINT field to
allow a core to request a subsequent interrupt. See
Section 4.15.7 on page 151 for details.
4.4.5 Globally Enabling and Disabling Hardware
Interrupts
application must execute an ei instruction to globally
enable interrupts, i.e., to cause the core to service
interrupts that are individually enabled. Section 4.4.6
on page 31 describes individually enabling and disabling interrupts. Executing the di instruction globally
disables interrupts.
The core automatically globally disables interrupts if it
begins servicing an interrupt, i.e., interrupt nesting is
disabled by default. When the ireturn instruction that
the programmer must place at the end of the ISR is
executed, the core automatically globally re-enables
interrupts. Therefore, the programmer does not need to
explicitly re-enable interrupts by executing an ei
instruction before exiting the ISR. An interrupt service
routine (ISR) can allow nesting, i.e., can be interrupted
by a higher-priority interrupt, if it globally enables interrupts in the correct sequence as described in
Section 4.4.11 on page 35, Nesting Interrupts.
The one-bit IEN field (psw1[14]—see Table 10 on
page 35) is cleared if hardware interrupts are globally
disabled. The IEN field is set if interrupts are globally
enabled.
Table 6 summarizes global disabling and enabling of
hardware interrupts.
A device reset globally disables interrupts, i.e., the core
does not service interrupts by default after reset. The
Table 6. Global Disabling and Enabling of Hardware Interrupts
Condition
Hardware interrupts
globally† disabled
Hardware interrupts
globally† enabled
Caused By
!
Device reset
!
Execution of a di instruction
!
!
The core begins to service an interrupt
Execution of an ei instruction
!
Execution of an ireturn instruction
Indicated By
IEN (psw1[14]) = 0
Effect
Core does not service
interrupts.
IEN (psw1[14]) = 1
Core services individually
enabled interrupts.
† With the exception of device reset, CORE0 and CORE1 are independent with respect to global disabling and enabling of hardware interrupts.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.6 Individually Enabling, Disabling, and Prioritizing Hardware Interrupts
An application can individually disable a hardware interrupt by clearing both bits of its corresponding 2-bit field in
the inc0 or inc1 register (see Table 7). Reset clears the inc0 and inc1 registers, individually disabling all hardware interrupts by default. An application can individually enable a hardware interrupt at one of three priority levels
by setting one or both bits of its corresponding 2-bit field in the inc0 or inc1 register.
The following are the advantages of interrupt prioritization:
!
An ISR can service concurrent interrupts according to their priority.
!
Interrupt nesting is supported, i.e., an interrupt can interrupt a lower-priority ISR. See Section 4.4.11 on page 35
for details on interrupt nesting.
If multiple concurrent interrupts with the same assigned priority occur, the core first services the interrupt that has
its status field in the relative least significant bit location of the ins register (see Table 8 on page 32), i.e., the core
first services the interrupt with the lowest vector address (see Table 9 on page 33).
Note: If interrupts are globally enabled (see Section 4.4.5 on page 30), an application must not change inc〈0—1〉.
Doing so can cause a potential race condition between the detection of the interrupts and the determination
of their relative priorities. Prior to changing inc〈0—1〉, the application must globally disable interrupts by
executing a di instruction. After changing inc〈0—1〉, the application can globally re-enable interrupts by executing an ei instruction.
The following code segment is an example of properly changing inc〈0—1〉:
di
inc1=0x00001
ei
// Globally disable interrupts (default after reset).
// Enable MGIBF at level 1 priority.
// OK to globally re-enable interrupts.
di
inc1=0x00006
ei
// Before changing inc1, first globally disable interrupts.
// Disable MGIBF.
// OK to globally re-enable interrupts.
Table 7. inc0 and inc1 (Interrupt Control) Registers 0 and 1
19—18
17—16
15—14
13—12
11—10
9—8
7—6
5—4
3—2
1—0
inc0 INT1[1:0] INT0[1:0] DMINT5[1:0] DMINT4[1:0] MXI3[1:0] MXI2[1:0] MXI1[1:0] MXI0[1:0] TIME1[1:0] TIME0[1:0]
inc1 MXI9[1:0] MXI8[1:0] MXI7[1:0]
MXI6[1:0] MXI5[1:0] MXI4[1:0] PHINT[1:0] XIO[1:0] SIGINT[1:0] MGIBF[1:0]
Field
INT〈0—1〉[1:0]
DMINT〈4—5〉[1:0]
MXI〈0—9〉[1:0]†
TIME〈0—1〉[1:0]
PHINT[1:0]
XIO[1:0]
SIGINT[1:0]
MGIBF[1:0]
Value
Description
00
Disable the selected interrupt (no priority).
01
Enable the selected interrupt at priority 1 (lowest).
10
Enable the selected interrupt at priority 2.
11
Enable the selected interrupt at priority 3 (highest).
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
00
† See Table 5 on page 28 for definition of MXI〈0—9〉 (IMUX〈0—9〉).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
tor table. If the ISR does not globally enable
interrupts by following the procedure specified in
Section 4.4.11 on page 35, Nesting Interrupts,
and the same interrupt reoccurs while the core is
executing the ISR, the interrupt is not latched
into ins and is therefore not recognized by the
core.
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.7 Hardware Interrupt Status
If a hardware interrupt occurs, the core sets the corresponding bit in the ins register (Table 8) to indicate that
the interrupt is pending. If the core services the interrupt, it clears the ins bit. Alternatively, if the application
uses interrupt polling (Section 4.4.13 on page 37), the
application program must explicitly clear the ins bit by
writing a 1 to that bit and a 0 to every other ins bit.
Writing a 0 to an ins bit leaves that bit unchanged. A
reset clears the ins register, indicating that no interrupts are pending.
If a hardware interrupt occurs, the core sets its ins bit
(i.e., latches the interrupt as pending) regardless of
whether the interrupt is enabled or disabled. If a hardware interrupt occurs while it is disabled and the interrupt is later enabled, the core services the interrupt
after servicing any other pending interrupts of equal or
higher priority.
Note: The DSP16000 core globally disables interrupts
when it begins executing instructions in the vec-
4.4.8 Interrupt and Trap Vector Table
The interrupt and trap vectors for a core are in contiguous locations in memory. The base (starting) address
of the vectors is configurable in the core’s vbase
register. Each interrupt and trap source is preassigned to a unique vector offset within a 352-word
vector table (see Table 9 on page 33). The programmer can place at the vector location an instruction that
branches to an interrupt service routine (ISR) or trap
service routine (TSR). After servicing the interrupt or
trap, the ISR or TSR must return to the interrupted or
trapped program by executing an ireturn or treturn
instruction. Alternatively, the programmer can place at
the vector location up to four words of instructions that
service the interrupt or trap, the last of which must be
an ireturn or treturn.
Table 8. ins (Interrupt Status) Register
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
MXI9
MXI8
MXI7
MXI6
MXI5
MXI4
PHINT
XIO
SIGINT
MGIBF
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
INT1
INT0
DMINT5
DMINT4
MXI3
MXI2
MXI1
MXI0
TIME1
TIME0
R/W
Reset
Value
0
Field
MXI〈0—9〉†
PHINT
XIO
SIGINT
MGIBF
INT〈0—1〉
DMINT〈4—5〉
TIME〈0—1〉
Value
Description
0
Read—corresponding interrupt not pending.
Write—no effect.
1
Read—corresponding interrupt is pending.
Write—clears bit and changes corresponding interrupt status to not
pending.
R/Clear
† See Table 5 on page 28 for definition of MXI〈0—9〉 (IMUX〈0—9〉).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.8 Interrupt and Trap Vector Table (continued)
Table 9. Interrupt and Trap Vector Table
icall 62
icall 63
vbase + 0x158
vbase + 0x15C
…
…
Reserved
PTRAP‡
UTRAP§
Reserved
TIME0
TIME1
MXI0 (DSINT0 or DSINT1‡‡)
MXI1 (DDINT0 or DDINT1‡‡)
MXI2 (DSINT2 or DSINT3‡‡)
MXI3 (DDINT2 or DDINT3‡‡)
DMINT4
DMINT5
INT0
INT1
MGIBF
SIGINT
XIO
PHINT
MXI4 (SOINT0 or DSINT0‡‡)
MXI5 (SIINT0 or DDINT0‡‡)
MXI6 (SOINT1 or DSINT2‡‡)
MXI7 (SIINT1 or DDINT2‡‡)
MXI8 (INT2, POBE, or PIBF‡‡)
MXI9 (INT3, POBE, or PIBF‡‡)
icall 0§§
icall 1
Vector Address†
Hexadecimal
Decimal
vbase + 0x0
vbase + 0
vbase + 0x4
vbase + 4
vbase + 0x8
vbase + 8
vbase + 0xC
vbase + 12
vbase + 0x10
vbase + 16
vbase + 0x14
vbase + 20
vbase + 0x18
vbase + 24
vbase + 0x1C
vbase + 28
vbase + 0x20
vbase + 32
vbase + 0x24
vbase + 36
vbase + 0x28
vbase + 40
vbase + 0x2C
vbase + 44
vbase + 0x30
vbase + 48
vbase + 0x34
vbase + 52
vbase + 0x38
vbase + 56
vbase + 0x3C
vbase + 60
vbase + 0x40
vbase + 64
vbase + 0x44
vbase + 68
vbase + 0x48
vbase + 72
vbase + 0x4C
vbase + 76
vbase + 0x50
vbase + 80
vbase + 0x54
vbase + 84
vbase + 0x58
vbase + 88
vbase + 0x5C
vbase + 92
vbase + 0x60
vbase + 96
vbase + 0x64
vbase + 100
…
Vector Description
vbase + 344
vbase + 348
Priority
—
6 (Highest)
5
—
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
0—3††
—
—
—
—
—
†
‡
§
††
vbase contains the base address of the 352-word vector table.
Driven by TRAP pin (see Section 4.4.10 on page 34) or core-to-core trap (see Section 4.8.1 on page 47).
Reserved for HDS.
The programmer specifies the relative priority levels 0—3 for hardware interrupts via inc0 and inc1 (see Table 7 on page 31). Level 0 indicates a disabled interrupt. If multiple concurrent interrupts with the same assigned priority occur, the core first services the interrupt that has its status field in the
relative least significant bit location of the ins register (see Table 8 on page 32); i.e., the core first services the interrupt with the lowest vector
address.
‡‡ The choice of interrupt is selected by the imux register (see Table 5 on page 28).
§§ Reserved for system services.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4.10 INT[3:0] and TRAP Pins
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
The DSP16410CG provides four positive-assertion
edge-detected interrupt pins (INT[3:0]) and a bidirectional positive-assertion edge-detected trap pin
(TRAP).
4.4.9 Software Interrupts
Software interrupts emulate hardware interrupts for the
purpose of software testing. A software interrupt is
always enabled and has no assigned priority and no
corresponding field in the ins register. A program
causes a software interrupt by executing an icall IM6
instruction, where IM6 is replaced with 0—63. When a
software interrupt is serviced, the core saves the contents of PC in the pi register and transfers control to
the interrupt vector defined in Table 9 on page 33.
The TRAP pin is used by an application to gain control
of both processors for asynchronous event handling,
typically for catastrophic error recovery. It is a 3-state
bidirectional pin that connects to both cores and both
HDS blocks. TRAP is connected directly to both cores
via the PTRAP signal. After reset, TRAP is configured
as an input; it can be configured as an output under
JTAG control to support HDS multiple-device debugging.
CAUTION: If a software interrupt is inserted into an
ISR, it is explicitly nested in the ISR and
therefore the ISR must be structured for
nesting. See Section 4.4.11 on page 35
for more information about interrupt
nesting.
Figure 5 is a functional timing diagram for the INT[3:0]
and TRAP pins. A low-to-high transition of one of
these pins asserts the corresponding interrupt or trap.
INT[3:0] or TRAP must be held high for a minimum of
two CLK cycles and must be held low for at least two
CLK cycles before being reasserted. If INT[3:0] or
TRAP is asserted and stays high, the core services the
interrupt or trap only once.
A minimum of four cycles1 after INT[3:0] or PTRAP is
asserted, the core services the interrupt or trap by executing instructions starting at the vector location as
defined in Table 9 on page 33. In the case of PTRAP, a
maximum of three instructions are allowed to execute
before the core services the trap.
Functional Timing for INT[3:0] and TRAP
ECKO†
INT[3:0]/TRAP‡
A
B
† ECKO is programmed to be the internal clock CLK (the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—see Table 60 on page 111) is programmed to 1).
‡ The INT[3:0] or TRAP pin must be held high for a minimum of two CLK cycles and must be held low for a minimum of two CLK cycles before
being reasserted.
Notes:
A. The DSP16410CG synchronizes INT[3:0] or TRAP on the falling edge of the internal clock CLK.
B. A minimum four-cycle delay before the core services the interrupt or trap (executes instructions starting at the vector location). For a trap, the
core executes a maximum of three instructions before it services the trap.
Figure 5. Functional Timing for INT[3:0] and TRAP
1. The number of cycles depends on the number of wait-states incurred by the interrupted or trapped instruction.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.11 Nesting Interrupts
The psw1 register (see Table 10) contains the IPLC[1:0] and IPLP[1:0] fields that are used for interrupt
nesting. See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual for details on these fields.
Table 10. psw1 (Processor Status Word 1) Register
15
14
13—12
11—10
9—7
6
5—0
Reserved
IEN
IPLC[1:0]
IPLP[1:0]
Reserved
EPAR
a[7:2]V
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
Reset
Value†
15
14
Reserved
IEN‡
0
0
IPLC[1:0]
Reserved—write with zero.
Hardware interrupts are globally disabled.
Hardware interrupts are globally enabled.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 0; core handles pending interrupts of
priority 1, 2, or 3.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 1; core handles pending interrupts of
priority 2 or 3.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 2; core handles pending interrupts of
priority 3 only.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 3; core does not handle any pending
interrupts.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 0.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 1.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 2.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 3.
Reserved—write with zero.
Most recent BMU or special function shift result has odd parity.
Most recent BMU or special function shift result has even parity.
The current contents of a7 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a7 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a6 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a6 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a5 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a5 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a4 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a4 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a3 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a3 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a2 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a2 are mathematically overflowed.††
R/W
R
13—12
0
0
1
00
R/W
00
R/W
XX
R/W
R/W
X
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
01
10
11
11—10
IPLP[1:0]
9—7
6
Reserved
EPAR
5
a7V
4
a6V
3
a5V
2
a4V
1
a3V
0
a2V
00
01
10
11
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
†
‡
In this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
The user clears this bit by executing a di instruction and sets it by executing an ei or ireturn instruction. The core clears this bit whenever it begins to
service an interrupt.
§ Previous interrupt priority level is the priority level of the interrupt most recently serviced prior to the current interrupt. This field is used for interrupt
nesting.
†† The most recent DAU result that was written to that accumulator resulted in mathematical overflow (LMV) with FSAT = 0.
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Data Sheet
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.11 Nesting Interrupts (continued)
Caution: The procedure for nesting interrupts described below is different than that described in
Section 5.4.9 of the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual. The
DSP16410CG contains version 2 of the DSP16000 core, and the manual describes version 1 of the
core. See the DSP16K V2 Core Nested Interrupt Design Exception Advisory (AY01-033WINF) for
details.
The DSP16000 core automatically globally disables interrupts when it begins servicing an interrupt, disabling interrupt nesting by default. To allow interrupt nesting, the interrupt service routine (ISR) must perform the steps specified in the following ISR code example. The code segment highlighted in bold globally enables interrupts in the
proper sequence. This code segment replaces the ei instruction in the ISR code example described in
Section 5.4.11 of the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual. (The code example in
Section 5.4.11 of the information manual contains additional instructions needed if the main body of the ISR uses
cache loops. These instructions have been omitted from the following example for simplicity.)
// Save Context:
ISR: push pi
// Save pi to stack
- needed for nesting.
push psw1
// Save psw1 to stack
- needed for nesting.
push cstate // Save cstate to stack - needed for nesting.
cstate=0
// Clear cstate
- needed for nesting.
// (The cstate register must be saved and cleared so that, if this ISR has interrupted
// a cache loop and this ISR is interrupted by a higher-priority interrupt, the ireturn
// in the higher-priority ISR returns to this ISR and not to the cache loop.)
// Save (push) any other registers to stack that will be used in BODY below.
// If required, execute noninterruptible user code here.
// Globally enable interrupts -- replaces ei instruction and is needed for nesting.
push psw1
// Save current state of IPLC and IPLP.
pi=JMP
// Set jump location for ireturn.
psw1=0x3C00 // Set IPLC=IPLP=3 (set core to highest priority level) so that
// no interrupts will be accepted until psw1 is restored.
ireturn
// Globally enable interrupts and goto pi (JMP).
JMP: pop psw1
// Restore psw1 -- restore core to correct priority level.
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
//
BODY -- Main body of ISR that services the interrupt. Can be interrupted
//
//
by an interrupt of higher priority.
//
////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
di
// Globally disable interrupts for restoring state.
// If required, execute noninterruptible user code here.
// Restore (pop) any other registers from stack that have been saved (pushed).
pop cstate
// Restore cstate from stack.
pop psw1
// Restore psw1 from stack.
pop pi
// Restore pi from stack.
ireturn
// Return from interrupt and globally enable interrupts.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.4 Interrupts and Traps (continued)
4.4.12 Interrupts and Cache Usage
If an ISR or TSR uses cache (do or redo) loops, then it must first save the state of the cache and then restore it
before returning to normal program execution. This is necessary because the interrupt or trap can occur during the
execution of a cache loop. See Section 3.5.2.7 and Section 5.4.11 of the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core
Information Manual for details on saving and restoring the state of the cache.
4.4.13 Interrupt Polling
Software can poll an interrupt source by checking its pending status in ins. The program can clear an interrupt and
change its status from pending to not pending by writing a 1 to its corresponding ins field. This clears the field and
leaves the remaining fields of ins unchanged. The example code segment below polls the MGU input buffer full
(MGIBF):
poll:
a0=ins
a0=a0&0x00000400
if eq goto poll
...
ins=0x00400
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//
//
//
//
//
Copy ins register contents to a0.
Mask out all but bit 10.
If bit 10 is zero, then MGIBF not pending.
Interrupt is now pending -- service it.
Clear MGIBF; don’t change other interrupts.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.5 Memory Maps
The DSP16000 core is a modified Harvard architecture with separate program and data memory spaces
(X-memory space and Y-memory space). The core differentiates between the X- and Y-memory spaces by the
addressing unit used for the access (XAAU vs. YAAU) and not by the physical memory accessed. The core
accesses its X-memory space via its 20-bit X address bus (XAB) and 32-bit X data bus (XDB). The core accesses
its Y-memory space via its 20-bit Y address bus (YAB) and 32-bit Y data bus (YDB).
The DMAU accesses private internal memory (TPRAM〈0—1〉) via its 20-bit internal Z address bus (ZIAB) and
32-bit internal Z data bus (ZIDB) and shared external memory1 (EIO and ERAM) via its 20-bit external Z address
bus (ZEAB) and 32-bit external Z data bus (ZEDB).
Although DSP16410CG memory is 16-bit word-addressable, data or instruction widths can be either 16 bits or
32 bits and applications can access the memories 32 bits at a time.
Table 11 summarizes the components of the DSP16410CG memory. The table specifies the name and size of
each component, whether it is internal or external, whether it is private to a core or shared by both cores, and in
which memory space(s) it resides. The five memory spaces are CORE0’s X-memory space, CORE0’s Y-memory
space, CORE1’s X-memory space, CORE1’s Y-memory space, and the DMAU’s Z-memory space.
Table 11. DSP16410CG Memory Components
Type
Memory
Component
Size
Private Internal
TPRAM0
96 Kwords
CACHE0
62 words
IROM0
4 Kwords
TPRAM1
96 Kwords
CACHE1
62 words
IROM1
4 Kwords
I/O‡
Shared Internal
Internal
Shared External
EIO
128 Kwords
ERAM
512 Kwords
EROM
512 Kwords
CORE0
X-Memory
Y-Memory
Space
Space†
#
#
#
CORE1
X-Memory
Y-Memory
Space
Space†
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
128 Kwords
#
DMAU
Z-Memory
Space†
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
† Assumes that WEROM is 0 for normal operation. If WEROM is 1, ERAM is replaced by EROM in the memory space, allowing the normally
read-only EROM section to be written. WEROM is discussed in detail in Section 4.5.3 on page 39.
‡ The internal I/O section consists of 2 Kwords of SLM and memory-mapped registers in the SEMI, DMAU, PIU, SIU0, and SIU1 blocks. Only a
small portion of the 128 Kwords reserved for internal I/O is actually populated with memory or registers.
The remainder of this section consists of the following:
!
Section 4.5.1, Private Internal Memory, on page 39.
!
Section 4.5.2, Shared Internal I/O, on page 39.
!
Section 4.5.3, Shared External I/O and Memory, on page 39.
!
Section 4.5.4, X-Memory Map, on page 40.
!
Section 4.5.5, Y-Memory Maps, on page 41.
!
Section 4.5.6, Z-Memory Maps, on page 42.
!
Section 4.5.7, Internal I/O Detailed Memory Map, on page 43.
1. ZEAB and ZEDB connect to EIO and ERAM through the SEMI.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.5.3 Shared External I/O and Memory
4.5 Memory Maps (continued)
External I/O and memory consists of three shared components: EIO, ERAM, and EROM. EIO and ERAM are
accessible in the Y-memory spaces of both cores and
also in the DMAU’s Z-memory space. EROM is normally read-only and accessible only in the X-memory
spaces of both cores. If the programmer sets the
WEROM field in the memory-mapped ECON1 register
(see Table 60 on page 111), EROM takes the place of
ERAM in the Y-memory spaces of both cores and in
the DMAU’s Z-memory space (see Section 4.5.5 on
page 41 and Section 4.5.6 on page 42 for details).
This allows the EROM component to be written for program downloads to external X memory.
4.5.1 Private Internal Memory
Each core has its own private internal memories for
program and data storage. CORE0 has IROM0,
CACHE0, and TPRAM0. CORE1 has IROM1,
CACHE1, and TPRAM1. A core cannot directly access
the other core’s private memory. However, the DMAU
can access both TPRAM0 and TPRAM1 and can move
data between these two memories to facilitate core-tocore communication (see Section 4.8 on page 46).
TPRAM is described in more detail in Section 4.6 on
page 44. Cache memory is described in detail in the
DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information
Manual. IROM contains boot and HDS code and is
described in Section 5 on page 206.
4.5.2 Shared Internal I/O
The 128 Kword internal I/O memory component is
accessible by both cores in their Y-memory spaces and
by the DMAU in its Z-memory space. Any access to
this memory component is made over the system bus
and is arbitrated by the SEMI. The internal shared I/O
memory component consists of:
!
2 Kwords of shared local memory (SLM). SLM can
be used for core-to-core communication (see
Section 4.8 on page 46). SLM is described in
Section 4.1.4 on page 17.
!
Memory-mapped control and data registers within
the following peripherals:
— DMAU
— SEMI
— PIU
— SIU0
— SIU1
The physical size of the EIO, ERAM, and EROM components can be expanded from the sizes defined in
Table 11 on page 38 by employing the ESEG[3:0]
pins. The external memory system can use ESEG[3:0]
in either of the following ways:
1. ESEG[3:0] can be interpreted by the external memory system as four separate decoded address
enable signals. Each ESEG[3:0] pin individually
selects one of four segments for each memory
component. This results in four glueless 512 Kword
(1 Mbyte) ERAM segments, four glueless 512 Kword
(1 Mbyte) EROM segments, and four glueless
128 Kword (256 KB) EIO segments.
2. ESEG[3:0] can be interpreted by the external memory system as an extension of the address bus, i.e.,
the ESEG[3:0] pins can be concatenated with the
EAB[18:0] pins to form a 23-bit address. This results
in one glueless 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) ERAM segment, one glueless 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) EROM
segment, and one glueless 2 Mword (4 Mbytes) EIO
segment.
See Section 4.14.1.4 on page 106 for details on configuring the ESEG[3:0] pins.
Only a small portion of the 128 Kwords reserved for
internal I/O is actually populated with memory or registers. Any access to the internal I/O memory component takes multiple cycles to complete. DSP core or
DMAU writes take a minimum of two CLK cycles to
complete. DSP core or DMAU reads take a minimum
of five CLK cycles to complete.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.5 Memory Maps (continued)
4.5.4 X-Memory Map
XMAP
0x00000
......
TPRAMn (PRIVATE†)
96 Kwords
0x17FFF
RESERVED
...
0x1FFC0
0x1FFFD
CACHEn (PRIVATE†)
62 words
RESERVED
0x20000
...
0x20FFF
0x18000
0x1FFBF
0x1FFFE
0x1FFFF
IROMn (PRIVATE†)
4 Kwords
0x21000
..................................
RESERVED
INTERNAL
0x7FFFF
0x80000
.........................................................................
EXTERNAL
EROM (SHARED)‡
0xFFFFF
16 bits
† n is 0 for CORE0 or 1 for CORE1. Private memory can be accessed by the core with which it is associated. TPRAM0, CACHE0, and IROM0
cannot be accessed directly by CORE1. TPRAM1, CACHE1, and IROM1 cannot be accessed directly by CORE0. Both TPRAM0 and
TPRAM1 can be accessed by the DMAU and PIU.
‡ EROM can be configured as four glueless 512 Kword (1 Mbyte) segments or one 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) segment. See Section 4.14.4.3 beginning on page 112 for details. EROM is shared, i.e., is accessible by both CORE0 and CORE1, and is also accessible by the DMAU and the
PIU.
Figure 6. X-Memory Map
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.5 Memory Maps (continued)
4.5.5 Y-Memory Maps
YMAP
(WEROM = 0)
0x00000
YMAP
(WEROM = 1)
0x00000
0x17FFF
RESERVED
0x1FFBF
0x1FFC0
CACHEn (PRIVATE†)
62 words
0x1FFFD
RESERVED
0x3FFFF
0x3FFFF
0x40000
INTERNAL
INTERNAL I/O‡ (SHARED§)
128 Kwords
0x5FFFF
...........
0x40000
...........
.............
0x1FFFE
.............
0x1FFFE
RESERVED
0x18000
0x1FFBF
CACHEn (PRIVATE †)
62 words
...
...
0x1FFFD
0x17FFF
0x18000
RESERVED
0x1FFC0
TPRAMn (PRIVATE†)
96 Kwords
......
......
TPRAMn (PRIVATE†)
96 Kwords
INTERNAL I/O‡ (SHARED§)
128 Kwords
0x5FFFF
0x60000
0x7FFFF
0x80000
0x7FFFF
0x80000
...........................................................
............................................................
ERAM†† (SHARED§)
EIO†† (SHARED§)
128 Kwords
EXTERNAL
...........
...........
EIO†† (SHARED§)
128 Kwords
0x60000
EROM†† (SHARED§)
0xFFFFF
0xFFFFF
16 bits
16 bits
† n is 0 for CORE0 or 1 for CORE1. Private memory can be accessed by the core with which it is associated. TPRAM0, CACHE0, and IROM0
cannot be accessed directly by CORE1. TPRAM1, CACHE1, and IROM1 cannot be accessed directly by CORE0. Both TPRAM0 and
TPRAM1 can be accessed by the DMAU and PIU.
‡ Internal I/O consists of shared local memory (SLM) and internal memory-mapped registers.
§ A shared memory space is accessible by both CORE0 and CORE1, and is also accessible by the DMAU and the PIU.
†† EROM and ERAM can each be configured as four glueless 512 Kword (1 Mbyte) segments or one 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) segment. EIO can
be configured as four glueless 128 Kword (256 Mbytes) segments or one glueless 2 Mword (4 Mbytes) segment. (See Section 4.14.4.3.)
Figure 7. Y-Memory Maps
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.5 Memory Maps (continued)
4.5.6 Z-Memory Maps
ZMAP
(WEROM = 0)
0x00000
0x00000
TPRAM0† (96 Kwords)
or
TPRAM1† (96 Kwords)
TPRAM0† (96 Kwords)
or
TPRAM1† (96 Kwords)
......
......
0x17FFF
ZMAP
(WEROM = 1)
0x17FFF
0x18000
0x18000
...........................
...........................
RESERVED
RESERVED
0x3FFFF
0x3FFFF
0x40000
INTERNAL I/O‡ (SHARED§)
128 Kwords
INTERNAL
0x5FFFF
............
............
0x40000
INTERNAL I/O‡ (SHARED§)
128 Kwords
0x5FFFF
0x60000
............
............
EIO†† (SHARED§)
0x60000
EIO†† (SHARED§)
EXTERNAL
0x7FFFF
0x80000
0x7FFFF
0x80000
0xFFFFF
.........................................................................
.........................................................................
ERAM†† (SHARED§)
EROM†† (SHARED§)
0xFFFFF
16 bits
16 bits
† The CMP[2:0] field in the DMAU address register (SADD〈0—5〉 or DADD〈0—5〉—Table 37 on page 77) or in the parallel address register
(PA—Table 78 on page 136) selects either TPRAM0 or TPRAM1.
‡ Internal I/O consists of shared local memory (SLM) and internal memory-mapped registers.
§ A shared memory space is accessible by both CORE0 and CORE1, and is also accessible by the DMAU and the PIU.
†† EROM and ERAM can each be configured as four glueless 512 Kword (1 Mbyte) segments or one 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) segment. EIO can
be configured as four glueless 128 Kword (256 Mbytes) segments or one glueless 2 Mword (4 Mbytes) segment. (See Section 4.14.4.3.)
Figure 8. Z-Memory Maps
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.5 Memory Maps (continued)
4.5.7 Internal I/O Detailed Memory Map
Figure 9 is a detailed view of the 128 Kword internal I/O memory component shown in Figures 7 and 8. It consists
of a 4 Kword block for the memory-mapped registers of each peripheral and a 2 Kword block for the SLM. The
internal I/O memory component is directly accessible by both cores and by the DMAU and PIU. The SEMI controls
access to the internal I/O memory component, which is subject to wait-state and contention penalties. The SEMI
permits only 16-bit and aligned 32-bit accesses to the internal I/O memory component. The SEMI does not permit
misaligned 32-bit accesses (double-word accesses with an odd address) for the internal I/O memory component
because they produce undefined results. An access to the internal I/O memory component takes multiple clock
cycles to complete and a core access to the internal I/O memory component causes that core to incur waitstates. See Section 4.14.7.1 on page 126 for details on system bus performance.
PIU REGISTERS
(4 Kwords†)
......
0x42000
0x42FFF
......
0x44FFF
0x41FFF
DMAU REGISTERS
(4 Kwords†)
SIU0 REGISTERS
(4 Kwords†)
0x44000
0x41000
......
0x40FFF
SEMI REGISTERS
(4 Kwords†)
0x43000
......
......
0x40000
0x43FFF
SIU1 REGISTERS
(4 Kwords†)
SLM (2 Kwords)
...........................
0x45800
0x45000
0x457FF
RESERVED
(106 Kwords)
0x5FFFF
16 bits
† Although 4 Kwords are reserved for the memory-mapped registers of each peripheral, not all of the 4 Kwords are actually used.
Figure 9. Internal I/O Memory Map
The memory-mapped registers located in their associated peripherals are each mapped to an even address. The
sizes of these registers are 16 bits, 20 bits, or 32 bits. A register that is 20 bits or 32 bits must be accessed as an
aligned double word. A register that is 16 bits can be accessed as a single word with an even address or as an
aligned double word. If a register that is 16 bits or 20 bits is accessed as a double word, the contents of the register
are right-justified. Section 6.2.2 on page 229 details the memory-mapped registers.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.6 Triport Random-Access Memory (TPRAM)
Each core has a private block TPRAM (TPRAM0 and TPRAM1) consisting of 96 banks (banks 0—95) of zero waitstate memory. Each bank consists of 1K 16-bit words and has three separate address and data ports: one port to
the core’s instruction/coefficient (X-memory) space, a second port to the core’s data (Y-memory) space, and a third
port to the DMAU’s (Z-memory) space. TPRAM is organized into even and odd interleaved banks for which each
even/odd address pair is a 32-bit wide module as illustrated in Figure 10. The core’s data buses (XDB and YDB)
and the DMAU’s data bus (ZIDB) are each 32 bits wide, and therefore 32-bit data in the TPRAM with an aligned
(even) address can be accessed in a single cycle. Typically, a misaligned double word is accessed in two cycles.
EVEN BANK
11 LSBs
OF
ADDRESS
ODD BANK
11 LSBs
OF
ADDRESS
0x000
0x001
0x002
0x003
0x7FE
0x7FF
16 bits
TPRAM MODULE
1K x 32 bits
(2 Kwords)
16 bits
32 bits
Figure 10. Interleaved Internal TPRAM
Figure 11 illustrates an example arrangement of single words (16 bits) and double words (32 bits) in memory. It
also illustrates an aligned double word and a misaligned double word. See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor
Core Information Manual for details on word alignment and misalignment wait-states.
Example Memory Arrangement
ADDRESS
EVEN BANK
ODD BANK
ADDRESS
0
SINGLE WORD
SINGLE WORD
1
2
MORE
MOST SIGNIFICANT WORD
LEAST
LESS SIGNIFICANT
SIGNIFICANTWORD
WORD
3
4
SINGLE WORD
MOST SIGNIFICANT WORD
5
6
LEAST
LESS SIGNIFICANT
SIGNIFICANTWORD
WORD
SINGLE WORD
7
16 bits
32 bits
KEY:
ALIGNED DOUBLE WORD AND DOUBLE-WORD ADDRESS
MISALIGNED DOUBLE WORD AND DOUBLE-WORD ADDRESS
Figure 11. Example Memory Arrangement
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.7 Shared Local Memory (SLM)
4.6 Triport Random-Access Memory
(TPRAM) (continued)
Each core, the DMAU, and the PIU can access SLM
(shared local memory) through the SEMI and the system buses (SAB and SDB). SLM is a 2 Kword block
located in the internal I/O memory component. SLM
supports both 16-bit and aligned 32-bit accesses, but
not 32-bit misaligned accesses.
The core’s X and Y ports and the DMAU’s Z port can
access separate modules within a TPRAM simultaneously with no wait-states incurred by the core. If the
same module of TPRAM is accessed from multiple
ports simultaneously, the TPRAM automatically
sequences the accesses in the following priority order:
X port (instruction/coefficient), Y port (data), then Z port
(DMAU). This sequencing can cause the core to incur
a conflict wait-state. Because the core must complete
any consecutive accesses to a module of TPRAM
before the DMAU can access that module, the DMAU
can be blocked from accessing that module for a significant number of cycles.
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The SEMI controls access to the SLM, which is subject
to wait-state and contention penalties; see
Section 4.14.7.1 on page 126 for details. Because
access to the SLM is subject to wait-state and contention penalties, it is not an efficient method for transferring large blocks of data between the cores. (An
efficient method is to use the DMAU memory-to-memory (MMT) channel.)
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
The following mechanisms support data access:
!
The MGU can control the occurrence of a synchronizing event (interrupt/trap) for information/status
transfer.
Effective interprocessor (core-to-core) communication
requires synchronization and access to required data.
!
The MGU provides data transfer through its fullduplex message buffers (mgi and mgo).
The following hardware mechanisms support access
synchronization:
!
The DMAU can copy data from one core’s TPRAM to
the other core’s TPRAM.
4.8 Interprocessor Communication
!
The MGU provides core-to-core interrupts and traps.
!
!
The MGU provides message buffer interrupts and
flags.
Cores can directly share data in external memory
(ERAM, EROM, or EIO spaces).
!
Cores can directly share data in the SLM.
!
DMAU interrupts.
Figure 12 illustrates the interprocessor communication
logic provided by MGU0 and MGU1.
Inter-Processor Communication Logic in MGU0 and MGU1
CORE0
CORE1
INTERRUPTS
INTERRUPTS
FLAGS
XIO
MGOBF MGIBE MGIBF
PTRAP SIGINT
SIGINT PTRAP
imux
2
BIT 1
BIT 0
signal
BIT 0 BIT 1
signal
MUX
0
0
IMUX0
MGIBF MGIBE MGOBF
imux
2
MUX
2
XIO
FLAGS
2
IMUX1
mgi
mgi
mgo
pid
MGU0
TRAP
16
DMINT[5:4]
(INTERRUPTS
FROM DMAU)
mgo
16
pid
KEY:
MGU1
PROGRAM-ACCESSIBLE REGISTERS
Figure 12. Interprocessor Communication Logic in MGU0 and MGU1
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.8 Interprocessor Communication (continued)
Note: Sharing data directly through external memory
(ERAM, EROM, or EIO spaces) or the SLM is
the least efficient means of interprocessor communication involving large blocks of data. It is
more efficient to perform block memory-to-memory moves using a DMAU MMT channel. See
Section 4.7 on page 45 for details on SLM and
Section 4.5.3 on page 39 for details on ERAM,
EROM, or EIO.
The code segment below illustrates the code running
on one core to assert the SIGINT interrupt of the other
core:
signal=1
Software executing on one core can trap the other core
by writing a 1 to its own signal register bit 1. This
causes the assertion of the other core’s PTRAP. As
shown in Figure 12 on page 46, the signal register bit 1
is logically ORed with the TRAP pin and the result is
input to the other core’s PTRAP signal. (See
Section 4.4.10 on page 34 for more information on
PTRAP). See the code segment below:
signal=2
4.8.1 Core-to-Core Interrupts and Traps
Software executing on one core can interrupt the other
core by writing a 1 to its own MGU signal register bit 0
(Table 12). This causes the assertion of the other
core’s SIGINT interrupt signal.
// interrupt other core
// trap other core
To ensure correct operation, the execution of the signal register write instruction must be followed by the
execution of any instruction other than another signal
register write instruction.
Table 12. signal Register
Bit
Field
Value
15—11
1
Reserved
SIGTRAP
0
SIGINT
0
0
1
0
1
15—11
1
0
Reserved
SIGTRAP
SIGINT
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
No effect.
Trap the other core by asserting its PTRAP signal.
No effect.
Interrupt the other core by asserting its SIGINT interrupt.
R/W
W
W
Reset
Value
0
0
W
0
Note: If the program sets the SIGTRAP or SIGINT field, the MGU automatically clears the field after asserting the trap or interrupt. Therefore, the program must not explicitly clear the field.
4.8.2 Message Buffer Data Exchange
Each core can use its MGU message buffers to transmit and receive status information to and from the other core.
A core can send a message to another core by writing to its own 16-bit output message register mgo. A core can
receive a message from another core by reading its own 16-bit input message register mgi.
If the transmitting core writes mgo, the following steps occur:
1. After two instruction cycles of latency, the transmitting core’s message output buffer full (MGOBF) condition flag
is set.
2. After an additional two instruction cycles of latency:
!
The DSP16410CG copies the contents of the transmitting core’s mgo to the receiving core’s input message
register mgi.
!
The DSP16410CG clears the receiving core’s message input buffer empty (MGIBE) condition flag.
!
The DSP16410CG asserts the receiving core’s message input buffer full (MGIBF) interrupt.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.8.2.2 Message Buffer Read Protocol
4.8 Interprocessor Communication (continued)
The receiving core can detect an incoming message by
enabling the MGIBF interrupt in the inc1 register
(Table 149 on page 239). The following is an example
of a simple interrupt service routine for the receiving
core:
4.8.2 Message Buffer Data Exchange (continued)
The receiving core can use interrupts or polling to
detect the presence of an incoming message. When
the receiving core reads mgi, the following steps occur:
1. After one instruction cycle of latency, the
DSP16410CG sets the receiving core’s MGIBE flag.
2. After an additional instruction cycle of latency, the
DSP16410CG clears the transmitting core’s MGOBF
flag.
4.8.2.1 Message Buffer Write Protocol
To ensure an older message has been processed by
the receiving core, the transmitting core must not write
a new message to mgo until its MGOBF flag is cleared.
The example code segment below is executed by the
transmitting core:
if mgobf goto .
mgo=*r0++
// Wait for old message
// to be read.
// Write new message.
ISR:
a0h=mgi
*r0++=a0h
// Read new message and
// clear MGIBF.
ireturn
As an alternative to the interrupt-directed message
buffer read protocol described above, the receiving
core can poll its MGIBE flag for the arrival of a new
message. The example code segment below is executed by the receiving core:
if mgibe goto .
a0h=mgi
*r0++=a0h
// Wait for new
// message.
// Read new message.
The DSP16410CG can operate a full-duplex communication channel between CORE0 and CORE1, with
each core using its own mgi and mgo registers and its
own MGOBF and MGIBE flags. Table 13 illustrates
two code segments for a full-duplex data exchange of
N words between CORE0 and CORE1. This segment
exchanges two words (one input, one output) between
the two cores every 18 CLK cycles.
Table 13. Full-Duplex Data Transfer Code Through Core-to-Core Message Buffer
CORE0 Message Buffer Transfer Code
c0=1-N
xfer: if mgobf goto .
mgo=*r0++
//Write message to
//CORE1 and set MGOBF.
//4 cycles latency
//until CORE1’s MGIBE
//is cleared.
if mgibe goto . //Wait for CORE1
//message to arrive.
a0h=mgi
*r1++=a0h
//Read CORE1 message
//and clear CORE1’s
//MGOBF.
if c0lt goto xfer
48
CORE1 Message Buffer Transfer Code
c0=1-N
xfer: if mgobf goto .
mgo=*r1++
//Write message to
//CORE0 and set MGOBF.
//4 cycles latency
//until CORE0’s MGIBE
//is cleared.
if mgibe goto . //Wait for CORE0
//message to arrive.
a0h=mgi
*r0++=a0h
//Read CORE0 message
//and clear CORE0’s
//MGOBF.
if c0lt goto xfer
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.8 Interprocessor Communication (continued)
4.8.3 DMAU Data Transfer
The most efficient mechanism for synchronously transferring large data blocks between the two cores is
through the two DMAU memory-to-memory (MMT)
channels, MMT4 and MMT5, described in detail in
Section 4.13.6, beginning on page 90. For example,
one core uses one MMT channel to transfer data and
the other core uses the other channel. In this way, a
transmitting core writes a message block via its MMT
channel and an interrupt notifies the receiving core
after the DMA transfer is complete. Table 14 summarizes the MMT interrupts, DMINT4 and DMINT5, used
to synchronize DMAU transfers. Both cores can monitor both DMINT4 and DMINT5.
Table 14. DMAU MMT Channel Interrupts
DMAU
Channel
MMT4
MMT5
Name
DMINT4
DMINT5
Interrupt
Description
MMT4 transfer complete.
MMT5 transfer complete.
If an MMT channel is dedicated to intercore transfers
and not used for intracore transfers, the transmitting
and receiving cores can use the DMINT4 and DMINT5
interrupts directly to synchronize transfers. For example, MMT4 can be dedicated to CORE0-to-CORE1
transfers and MMT5 can be dedicated to CORE1-toCORE0 transfers. In this case, DMINT4 interrupts
CORE1 if a message block from CORE0 is in memory,
and likewise, DMINT5 interrupts CORE0 if a message
block from CORE1 is in memory.
If an MMT channel is used for both intracore and intercore transfers, DMINT4 or DMINT5 is used for synchronizing intracore transfers and the XIO interrupt is
used for synchronizing intercore transfers. Each core
programs the XIO interrupt for the other core via its
imux register (Table 5 on page 28). The XIOC[1:0]
field (imux[15:14]) selects XIO for the other core as
either zero (XIOC[1:0] = 0), DMINT4 (XIOC[1:0] = 1),
or DMINT5 (XIOC[1:0] = 2).
Table 15 illustrates an example configuration for intracore and intercore transfers via DMA. This example
assigns CORE0 to MMT4 and CORE1 to MMT5.
Table 15. DMA Intracore and Intercore Transfers Example
DMAU
Channel
Intracore
MMT4
Core
CORE0
Interrupt
DMINT4
MMT5
CORE1
DMINT5
imux[XIOC[1:0]]
0
(CORE1’s XIO = 0)
0
(CORE0’s XIO = 0)
Core
CORE0
CORE1
Intercore (Core-to-Core)
Transmitting
Receiving
imux[XIOC[1:0]]
Core
Interrupt
1
CORE1 XIO (DMINT4)
(CORE1’s XIO = DMINT4)
2
CORE0 XIO (DMINT5)
(CORE0’s XIO = DMINT5)
If a core uses an MMT channel for intracore transfers, i.e., not for transfers with the other core, it must first program
its XIOC[1:0] field (imux[15:14]) to zero. This prevents the MMT interrupt from disturbing the other core via its XIO
interrupt. The core must enable the corresponding MMT interrupt (DMINT4 or DMINT5) in its inc0 register
(Table 149 on page 239).
If a core uses its MMT channel for intercore transfers, i.e., for transmitting to the other core, it must first program its
XIOC[1:0] field (imux[15:14]) to either 1 or 2 (DMINT4 or DMINT5). The receiving core must enable its XIO interrupt in its inc1 register (Table 149 on page 239). The transmitting core must disable the corresponding MMT interrupt (DMINT4 or DMINT5) in its own inc0 register.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.9 Bit Input/Output Units (BIO〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG has two bit I/O units, BIO0 for
CORE0 and BIO1 for CORE1. Each BIO unit connects
to seven bidirectional pins, IO0BIT[6:0] for BIO0 and
IO1BIT[6:0] for BIO1. User software running in CORE0
controls and monitors BIO0 via its sbit and cbit registers. User software running in CORE1 controls and
monitors BIO1 via its sbit and cbit registers. The software can do the following:
■
Individually configure each pin as an input or output.
■
Read the current state of the pins.
■
Test the combined state of input pins.
■
Individually set, clear, or toggle output pins.
The DIREC[6:0] field (sbit[14:8]—see Table 16) controls the direction of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0]
pin; a logic 0 configures the pin as an input or a logic 1
configures it as an output. Reset clears the
DIREC[6:0] field, configuring all BIO pins as inputs by
default. The read-only VALUE[6:0] field (sbit[6:0])
contains the current state of the corresponding pin,
regardless of whether the pin is configured as an input
or output.
The cbit register (Table 17 on page 51) contains two
7-bit fields, MODE[6:0]/MASK[6:0] and
DATA[6:0]/PAT[6:0]. The meaning of the individual
bits in these fields, MODE[n]/MASK[n] and
DATA[n]/PAT[n], is based on whether the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin is configured as an input or an
output. If IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] is configured as an input, the
fields are MASK[n] and PAT[n]. If IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] is
configured as an output, the fields are MODE[n] and
DATA[n]. Table 18 on page 52 summarizes the function of the MODE[6:0]/MASK[6:0] and
DATA[6:0]/PAT[6:0] fields.
If the software configures an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin as an
output and:
■
If the software clears MODE[n] and clears DATA[n],
the BIO〈0,1〉 drives the pin low.
■
If the software clears MODE[n] and sets DATA[n],
the BIO〈0,1〉 drives the pin high.
■
If the software sets MODE[n] and clears DATA[n],
the BIO does not change the state of the pin.
■
If the software sets MODE[n] and sets DATA[n], the
BIO〈0,1〉 toggles (inverts) the state of the pin.
If an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin is configured as an input and
the software sets MASK[n], the BIO〈0,1〉 tests the state
of the pin by comparing it to the PAT[n] (pattern) field.
BIO〈0,1〉 sets or clears its flags based on the result of
the comparison of all its tested inputs:
■
ALLT (all true) is set if all of the tested inputs match
the test pattern.
■
ALLF (all false) is set if all of the tested inputs do not
match the test pattern.
■
SOMET (some true) is set if some or all of the tested
inputs match the test pattern.
■
SOMEF (some false) is set if some or all of the
tested inputs do not match the test pattern.
Table 16. sbit (BIO Status/Control) Register
15
14—8
7
6—0
Reserved
DIREC[6:0]
Reserved
VALUE[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
14—8
Reserved
DIREC[6:0]
(Controls direction of pins)
Reserved
VALUE[6:0]‡
(Current value of
pins)
X
0
Configure the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin as an input.
1
Configure the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin as an output.
X
0
The current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is logic 0.
1
The current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is logic 1.
7
6—0
Description
Reserved—writing to this field has no functional effect.
Reserved—value is read-only and is undefined.
R/W
Reset
Value†
R/W
0
R/W
0
R
R
0
P§
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ This field is read-only; writing the VALUE[6:0] field of sbit has no effect. If the user software toggles a bit in the DIREC[6:0] field, there is a
latency of one cycle until the VALUE[6:0] field reflects the current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin. If an IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is
configured as an output (DIREC[6:0] = 1) and the user software writes cbit to change the state of the pin, there is a latency of two cycles until
the VALUE[6:0] field reflects the current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
§ The IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pins are configured as inputs after reset. If external circuitry does not drive an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin, the VALUE[n] field is
undefined after reset.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.9 Bit Input/Output Units (BIO〈0—1〉) (continued)
Table 17. cbit (BIO Control) Register
15
14—8
7
6—0
Reserved
MODE[6:0]/MASK[6:0]
Reserved
DATA[6:0]/PAT[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
14—8
Reserved
MODE[6:0]
(outputs†)
0
0
1
Description
R/W
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
The BIO drives the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin to the correR/W
sponding value in DATA[6:0].
■ If the corresponding DATA[6:0] field is 0, the BIO does not change the state
of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
If the corresponding DATA[6:0] field is 1, the BIO toggles (inverts) the state
of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
The BIO does not test the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin
to determine the state of the BIO flags‡.
The BIO compares the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin to
the corresponding value in the PAT[6:0] field to determine the state of the BIO
flags‡; true if pin matches or false if pin doesn’t match.
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
■ If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 0, the BIO drives the corresponding R/W
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin to logic 0.
Reset
Value
0
0
■
MASK[6:0]
(inputs†)
0
1
7
6—0
Reserved
DATA[6:0]
(outputs†)
0
0
■
1
■
0
0
If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 1, the BIO does not change the
state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 0, the BIO drives the corresponding
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin to logic 1.
If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 1, the BIO toggles (inverts) the
state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
If the corresponding MASK[6:0] field is 1, the BIO tests the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin to determine the state of the BIO flags‡;
true if pin is logic 0 or false if pin is logic 1.
If the corresponding MASK[6:0] field is 1, the BIO tests the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin to determine the state of the BIO flags‡;
true if pin is logic 1 or false if pin is logic 0.
■
PAT[6:0]
(inputs†)
0
1
† An IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is configured as an output if the corresponding DIREC[6:0] field (sbit[14:8]) has been set by the user software. An
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is configured as an input if the corresponding DIREC[6:0] field has been cleared by the user software or by device reset.
‡ The BIO flags are ALLT, ALLF, SOMET, and SOMEF. See Table 19 on page 52 for details on BIO flags.
If all the IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pins are configured as outputs
or if the MASK[n] field is cleared for all pins that are
configured as inputs, the BIO〈0,1〉 sets the ALLT and
ALLF flags and clears the SOMET and SOMEF flags.
PAT[n] field, there is a latency of two cycles until the
DSP16410CG updates the BIO flags to reflect the
change. The following code segment illustrates this
latency by the use of the two nop instructions:
Table 19 on page 52 summarizes the BIO flags, which
software can test with conditional instructions (see
Table 134 on page 224). Software can test, save, or
restore the state of the flags by reading or writing the
alf register (see Table 140 on page 233). As illustrated
in Table 19 on page 52, ALLT is the logical inverse of
SOMEF and ALLF is the logical inverse of SOMET.
sbit=0
cbit=0
...
cbit=0x0302
2*nop
if allt goto OK
If an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin is configured as an input and
the software writes cbit to change the MASK[n] or
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// All pins are inputs.
// Test no inputs.
//
//
//
//
Test IOBIT[1:0].
Any 2 instructions.
Branch if IOBIT1...
is 1 and IOBIT0 is 0.
51
Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.9 Bit Input/Output Units
(BIO〈0—1〉) (continued)
sbit=0x0F00
cbit=0x000A
If an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin is configured as an output and
the software writes cbit to change the state of the pin,
there is a latency of one cycle until the DSP16410CG
changes the state of the pin and a latency of an additional cycle until the VALUE[n] field (sbit[6:0]) reflects
the change. The use of two nop instructions in the following code segment illustrates this latency:
sbit=0x1000
cbit=0x0010
nop
nop
a0h=sbit
//
//
//
//
//
The following code segment illustrates the latency
described in the previous paragraph:
IOBIT4 is an output.
Drive IOBIT4 high.
IOBIT4 goes high.
VALUE4 is updated.
Bit 4 of a0h is 1.
If the software writes sbit to change an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n]
pin from an input to an output or from an output to an
input, there is a latency of one cycle before the
VALUE[n] field of sbit is updated to reflect the state of
the pin. If the software writes sbit to change an
IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin from an output to an input and back
to an output, the BIO drives the pin with its original output value.
//
//
//
//
//
//
//
//
//
//
//
//
cbit=0x0101
sbit=0
sbit=0x0F00
nop
a0h=sbit
IOBIT[3:0] - output.
IOBIT[3:0] = 1010
...after 1 cycle.
Toggle IOBIT0...
IOBIT[3:0] = 1011
...after 1 cycle.
IOBIT[3:0] - input.
IOBIT[3:0] - output.
IOBIT[3:0] = 1011
...after 0 cycles.
Any instruction.
a0h[3:0] = 1011.
Table 18. BIO Operations
..
DIREC[n]†
1
(Output)
MODE[n]/ DATA[n]/
BIO Action
MASK[n]† PAT[n]†
0
0
Clear IO〈0,1〉BIT[n].
1
Set IO〈0,1〉BIT[n].
1
0
(Input)
0
Do not change
IO〈0,1〉BIT[n].
1
Toggle IO〈0,1〉BIT[n].
0
X
Do not test‡
IO〈0,1〉BIT[n].
1
0
Test‡ IO〈0,1〉BIT[n]
for logic zero.
1
Test‡ IO〈0,1〉BIT[n]
for logic one.
† 0 ≤ n ≤ 6.
‡ The BIO tests the state of input pins to determine the states of the
BIO flags. See Table 19 for details on the BIO flags.
Table 19. BIO Flags
Condition
All or some of the
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pins are
configured as inputs.†
All tested inputs match the pattern.‡
All tested inputs do not match the pattern.§
Some (but not all) of the tested inputs match the pattern.††
All of the inputs are not tested.‡‡
All IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pins are configured as outputs.§§
ALLT
(alf[0])
1
0
0
1
1
ALLF
(alf[1])
0
1
0
1
1
SOMET SOMEF
(alf[2]) (alf[3])
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
For at least one pin IO〈0,1〉BIT[n], DIREC[n] = 0.
For every pin IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] with DIREC[n] = 0 and MASK[n] = 1, IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] = PAT[n].
For every pin IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] with DIREC[n] = 0 and MASK[n] = 1, IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] ≠ PAT[n].
For at least one pin IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] with DIREC[n] = 0 and MASK[n] = 1, IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] = PAT[n], and for at least one pin IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] with
DIREC[n] = 0 and MASK[n] = 1, IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] ≠ PAT[n].
‡‡ For all pins IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] with DIREC[n] = 0, MASK[n] = 0.
§§ DIREC[6:0] are all ones.
†
‡
§
††
52
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
■
4.10 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and
TIMER1_〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides two timer units for each
core: TIMER0_0 and TIMER1_0 for CORE0 and
TIMER0_1 and TIMER1_1 for CORE1. Each TIMER
provides a programmable single interval interrupt or a
programmable periodic interrupt. Figure 13 on
page 54 is a block diagram of a TIMER that contains
the following:
■
■
■
A 16-bit control register timer〈0,1〉c (see Table 20
on page 55).
A running count register timer〈0,1〉 (see Table 21 on
page 56) consisting of a 16-bit down counter and a
16-bit period register.
A prescaler that divides the internal clock (CLK) by
one of 16 programmed values in the range 2 to
65536. The prescaler output clock decrements the
timer〈0,1〉 down counter. The programmed prescale value and the value written to timer〈0,1〉 determine the interrupt interval or period.
By default after device reset1, the DSP16410CG clears
timer〈0,1〉c and powers up the TIMER. To save power
if the TIMER is not in use, the software can set the
PWR_DWN field (timer〈0,1〉c[6]). Until the user software writes to timer〈0,1〉c and timer〈0,1〉, the TIMER
does not operate or generate interrupts.
Note: The software can read or write timer〈0,1〉 only if
the TIMER is powered up (PWR_DWN = 0).
If the software reads timer〈0,1〉, the value read is the
output of the down counter. If the software writes
timer〈0,1〉, the TIMER loads the write value into the
down counter and into the period register simultaneously.
The prescaler consists of a 16-bit up counter and a
multiplexer controlled by the PRESCALE[3:0] field
(timer〈0,1〉c[3:0]). PRESCALE[3:0] contains a
value N that selects the period of the prescaler output
clock as:
N+1
2
------------f CLK
where fCLK is the frequency of the internal clock (see
Section 4.17).
To operate the TIMER (i.e., for the prescaler to decrement the timer〈0,1〉 down counter), the user software
must perform the following steps:
■
Write timer〈0,1〉c to program its fields as follows:
— Write 0 to the PWR_DWN field.
— Write 0 to the RELOAD field (timer〈0,1〉c[5]) for a
single interval interrupt or write 1 to the RELOAD
field for periodic interrupts.
— Write 1 to the COUNT field (timer〈0,1〉c[4]) to
enable the prescaler output clock.
— Program the PRESCALE[3:0] field to configure
the frequency of the prescaler output clock.
Write a nonzero value to timer〈0,1〉 to enable the
down counter input clock.
The software can perform the above steps in either
order, and the TIMER starts after the second step.
If the TIMER is operating and the timer〈0,1〉 down
counter reaches zero, the TIMER asserts its interrupt
request pulse TIME〈0,1〉 (see Section 4.4 for details on
interrupts). The interval from starting the TIMER to the
occurrence of the first interrupt is the following:
timer 〈 0,1 〉 × 2
------------------------------------------------f CLK
N+1
If the down counter reaches zero and RELOAD is 0,
the TIMER disables the input clock to the down
counter, causing the down counter to hold its current
value of zero. The user software can restart the
TIMER by writing a nonzero value to timer〈0,1〉.
If the down counter reaches zero and RELOAD is 1, a
prescale period elapses and the TIMER reloads the
down counter from the timer〈0,1〉 period register.
Another prescale period elapses and the prescaler
decrements the down counter. Therefore, the subsequent interval between periodic interrupts is the following:
( timer 〈 0,1 〉 + 1 ) × 2
--------------------------------------------------------------f CLK
N+1
Software can read or write timer〈0,1〉 while the timer is
running. If the software writes timer〈0,1〉, the TIMER
loads the write value into the down counter and period
register and initializes the prescaler by clearing the
16-bit up counter. Because the TIMER initializes the
prescaler if the software writes timer〈0,1〉, the interval
from writing timer〈0,1〉 to decrementing the down
counter is one complete prescale period.
Clearing COUNT disables the clock to the prescaler,
causing the down counter to hold its current value and
the prescaler to retain its current state. If the TIMER
remains powered up (PWR_DWN = 0), software can
stop and restart the TIMER at any time by clearing and
setting COUNT.
1. After device reset, the DSP16410CG clears the down counter of timer〈0,1〉 and leaves the period register of timer〈0,1〉 unchanged.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.10 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and TIMER1_〈0—1〉) (continued)
16
timer〈0,1〉c
15—7
6
5
4
3—0
RESERVED
PWR_DWN
RELOAD
COUNT
PRESCALE[3:0]
16
timer〈0,1〉
LD
CLK
16-bit RELOAD VALUE
(PERIOD) REGISTER
16
N
4
16
1
PRESCALER
CLK
-------------
0
2
MUX
15
14
16
N+1
15
14
16-bit
UP
COUNTER
MUX
LD 16-bit DOWN COUNTER
0
16
0
CLR
COUNTER = 0 (LEVEL)
IDB[15:0]
LOAD
timer〈0,1〉
REGISTER
TIME 〈0,1〉
INTERRUPT
PULSE
KEY:
PROGRAM-ACCESSIBLE
REGISTER
TO CORE
Figure 13. Timer Block Diagram
54
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.10 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and TIMER1_〈0—1〉) (continued)
Table 20. timer〈0,1〉c (TIMER〈0,1〉 Control) Register
15—7
6
5
4
3—0
Reserved
PWR_DWN
RELOAD
COUNT
PRESCALE[3:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15—7
6
Reserved
PWR_DWN
5
RELOAD
0
0
1
0
1
4
COUNT
3—0
PRESCALE[3:0]
0
1
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Power up the timer.
Power down the timer†.
Stop decrementing the down counter after it reaches zero.
Automatically reload the down counter from the period register after
the counter reaches zero and continue decrementing the counter
indefinitely.
Hold the down counter at its current value, i.e., stop the timer.
Decrement the down counter, i.e., run the timer.
fCLK/2
Controls the counter prescaler to determine the frequency of the timer, i.e., the frequency of the clock
fCLK/4
applied to the timer down counter. This frequency is a
fCLK/8
ratio of the internal clock frequency fCLK.
fCLK/16
fCLK/32
fCLK/64
fCLK/128
fCLK/256
fCLK/512
fCLK/1024
fCLK/2048
fCLK/4096
fCLK/8192
fCLK/16384
fCLK/32768
fCLK/65536
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0000
† If TIMER〈0,1〉 is powered down, timer〈0,1〉 cannot be read or written. While the timer is powered down, the state of the down counter and
period register remain unchanged.
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.10 Timer Units (TIMER0_〈0—1〉 and TIMER1_〈0—1〉) (continued)
Table 21. timer〈0,1〉 (TIMER〈0,1〉 Running Count) Register
15—0
TIMER〈0,1〉 Down Counter
TIMER〈0,1〉 Period Register
Bit
Field†
Description
R/W‡ Reset
Value§
15—0
Down Counter
If the COUNT field (timer〈0,1〉c[4]) is set, TIMER〈0,1〉 decrements this portion
of the timer〈0,1〉 register every prescale period. When the down counter
reaches zero, TIMER〈0,1〉 generates an interrupt.
15—0
Period Register If the COUNT field (timer〈0,1〉c[4]) and the RELOAD field (timer〈0,1〉c[5]) are
R/W
0
W
X
both set and the down counter contains zero, TIMER〈0,1〉 reloads the down
counter with the contents of this portion of the timer〈0,1〉 register.
† If the user program writes to the timer〈0,1〉 register, TIMER〈0,1〉 loads the 16-bit write value into the down counter and into the period register
simultaneously. If the user program reads the timer〈0,1〉 register, TIMER〈0,1〉 returns the current 16-bit value from the down counter.
‡ To read or write the timer〈0,1〉 register, TIMER〈0,1〉 must be powered up, i.e., the PWR_DWN field (timer〈0,1〉c[6]) must be cleared.
§ For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
4.11 Hardware Development System
(HDS〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides an on-chip hardware
development module for each of the two cores
(HDS〈0—1〉).
Each HDS is available for debugging assemblylanguage programs that execute on the DSP16000
core at the core’s rated speed. The main capability of
the HDS is allowing controlled visibility into the core’s
state during program execution.
The fundamental steps in debugging an application
using the HDS include the following:
1. Setup: Download program code and data into the
correct memory regions and set breakpointing conditions.
2. Run: Start execution or single step from a desired
starting point (i.e., allow device to run under simulated or real-time conditions).
3. Break: Break program execution on satisfying breakpointing conditions; upload and allow user accessibility to internal state of the device and its pins.
4. Resume: Resume execution (normally or single
step) after hitting a breakpoint and finally upload
internal state at the end of execution.
A powerful debugging capability of the HDS is the ability to break program execution on complex breakpointing conditions. A complex breakpoint condition, for
example, can be an instruction that executes from a
56
particular instruction-address location (or from a particular instruction-address range such as a subroutine)
and accesses a coefficient/data element from a specific
memory location (or from a memory region such as
inside an array or outside an array). Complex conditions can also be chained to form more complex breakpoint conditions. For example, a complex breakpoint
condition can be defined as the back-to-back execution
of two different subroutines.
The HDS also provides a debugging feature that allows
a number of complex breakpoints to be ignored. The
number of breakpoints ignored is programmable by the
user.
An intelligent trace mechanism for recording discontinuity points during program execution is also available
in the HDS. This mechanism allows unambiguous
reconstruction of program flow involving discontinuity
points such as gotos, calls, returns, and interrupts. The
trace mechanism compresses single-level (nonnested) loops and records them as a single discontinuity. This feature prevents single-level loops from filling
up the trace buffers. Also, cache loops do not get registered as discontinuities in the trace buffers. Therefore, two-level loops with inner cache loops are
registered as a single discontinuity.
The HDS provides a 32-bit cycle counter for accurate
code profiling during program development. The cycle
counter records processor CLK cycles between a userdefined start point and end point. The cycle counter
can optionally be used to break program execution
after a user-specified number of clock cycles.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉)
The DSP16410CG provides an on-chip IEEE 1149.1
compliant JTAG port for each of the two cores
(JTAG〈0—1〉). JTAG is an on-chip hardware module
that controls the HDS. All communication between the
HDS software, running on the host computer, and the
on-chip HDS is in a bit-serial manner through the JTAG
port. The JTAG port pins consist of test data input,
TDI〈0—1〉, test data output, TDO〈0—1〉, test mode
select, TMS〈0—1〉, test clock, TCK〈0—1〉, and test
reset, TRST〈0—1〉N.
The set of test registers includes the JTAG identification register (ID), the boundary-scan register, and the
scannable peripheral registers.
4.12.1 Port Identification
Each JTAG port has a read-only identification register,
ID, as defined in Table 22. As specified in the table, the
contents of the ID register for JTAG0 is 0x4C81403B
and the contents of the ID register for JTAG1 is
0x5C81403B.
Table 22. ID (JTAG Identification) Registers
31—28
27—19
18—12
11—0
DEVICE OPTIONS
ROMCODE
PART ID
AGERE ID
Bit
31—28
Field
DEVICE OPTIONS
27—19
18—12
11—0
ROMCODE
PART ID
AGERE ID
Agere Systems Inc.
Value
0x4
0x5
0x190
0x14
0x03B
Description
JTAG0—device options.
JTAG1—device options.
ROMCODE of device.
Part ID—DSP16410CG.
Agere identification.
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R/W
R
Reset Value
0x4
0x5
0x190
0x14
0x03B
57
Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.12.2.1 TCS 14-Pin Header
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉) (continued)
4.12.2 Emulation Interface Signals to the
DSP16410CG
For in-circuit emulation and application software
debugging, the Agere TargetView ® Communication
System (TCS) provides communication between a host
PC and one or more DSP16410CG devices. Users of
the TCS hardware have the option of using one of
three connectors to interface this tool with
DSP16410CG devices on the target application. The
pinouts for these connectors are described in the following three sections.
The TCS interface pod provides a 14-pin, dual-row
(0.10 in. x 0.10 in.) socket (female) for connection to
the user’s target hardware. Figure 14 illustrates the
pinout of this connector. Table 23 describes the signal
names and their relationship to the DSP16410CG signals.
PIN 1
PIN 13
PIN 2
PIN 14
5-7333 (F)
Figure 14. TCS 14-Pin Connector
Table 23. TCS 14-Pin Socket Pinout
TCS Pin TCS Signal
Number
Name
1
TCK
2
NC
3
Ground
4
Ground
5
TMS
6
VTARG
7
NC
8
NC
9
TDO
10
TDI
11
Ground
12
Ground
13
NC
14
NC
58
Description
Test clock
No connect
System ground
System ground
Test mode select
Target I/O voltage
No connect
No connect
Test data output
Test data input
System ground
System ground
No connect
No connect
TCS
I/O
O
NA
G
G
O
I
NA
NA
I
O
G
G
NA
NA
DSP16410CG
Pin Number
F4 and L13
NA
See Section 7 on page 251
See Section 7 on page 251
G2 and K15
See Section 7 on page 251
NA
NA
F1 or L16 (not both)
G1 or K16 (not both)
See Section 7 on page 251
See Section 7 on page 251
NA
NA
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DSP16410CG
Signal Name
I/O
TCK0 and TCK1
I
NA
NA
VSS
G
VSS
G
TMS0 and TMS1
I
VDD2
P
NA
NA
NA
NA
TDO0 or TDO1 (not both)
O
TDI0 or TDI1 (not both)
I
VSS
G
VSS
G
NA
NA
NA
NA
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉) (continued)
4.12.2 Emulation Interface Signals to the
DSP16410CG (continued)
connector. Table 24 describes the signal names and
their relationship to the DSP16410CG signals. This
connector is also compatible with the Agere JTAG communications system (JCS) tools.
PIN 1
PIN 19
PIN 2
PIN 20
4.12.2.2 JCS 20-Pin Header
The TCS tools provide an interface adapter to convert
the 14-pin interface pod to a 20-pin dual-row
(0.05 in. x 0.10 in.) socket (female, 3M ® part number
82020-6006) for connection to the user’s target hardware. Figure 15 illustrates the pinout of this
5-7334 (F)
Figure 15. JCS 20-Pin Connector
Table 24. JCS 20-Pin Socket Pinout
JCS Pin JCS Signal
Description
JCS I/O
Number
Name
1
NC
No connect
NA
2
Ground
System ground
G
3
NC
No connect
NA
4
NC
No connect
NA
5
NC
No connect
NA
6
TMS
Test mode select
O
7
Ground
System ground
G
8
VTARG
Target I/O voltage
I
9
NC
No connect
NA
10
Ground
System ground
G
11
NC
No connect
NA
12
TDI
Test data input
O
13
Ground
System ground
G
14
TCK
Test clock
O
15
Ground
System ground
G
16
TDO
Test data output
I
17
NC
No connect
NA
18
Ground
System ground
G
19
NC
No connect
NA
20
NC
No connect
NA
Agere Systems Inc.
DSP16410CG
DSP16410CG
DSP16410CG
Pin Number
Signal Name
I/O
NA
NA
NA
See Section 7 on page 251
VSS
G
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
G2 and K15
TMS0 and TMS1
I
See Section 7 on page 251
VSS
G
See Section 7 on page 251
VDD2
P
NA
NA
NA
See Section 7 on page 251
VSS
G
NA
NA
NA
G1 or K16 (not both)
TDI0 or TDI1 (not both)
I
See Section 7 on page 251
VSS
G
F4 and L13
TCK0 and TCK1
I
See Section 7 on page 251
VSS
G
F1 or L16 (not both)
TDO0 or TDO1 (not both)
O
NA
NA
NA
See Section 7 on page 251
VSS
G
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
their relationship to the DSP16410CG signals. This
connector is also compatible with the Agere JTAG communications system (JCS) and hardware development
system (HDS) tools.
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉) (continued)
4.12.2 Emulation Interface Signals to the
DSP16410CG (continued)
PIN 1
PIN 5
4.12.2.3 HDS 9-Pin, D-Type Connector
PIN 6
The TCS tools also provide an interface adapter to
convert the 14-pin interface pod to a 9-pin, subminiature, D-type plug (male) for connection to the user’s
target hardware. Figure 16 illustrates the pinout of this
connector. Table 25 describes the signal names and
PIN 9
5-7335 (F)
Figure 16. HDS 9-Pin Connector
Table 25. HDS 9-Pin, Subminiature, D-Type Plug Pinout
HDS Pin
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
HDS Signal
Name
Ground
TCK
NC
TMS
Ground
TDO
Description
HDS I/O
System ground
Test clock
No connect
Test mode select
System ground
Test data output
G
O
NA
O
G
I
DSP16410CG
Pin Number
See Section 7 on page 251
F4 and L13
NA
G2 and K15
See Section 7 on page 251
F1 or L16 (not both)
7
TDI
Test data input
O
G1 or K16 (not both)
8
9
VTARG
NC
Target I/O voltage
No connect
I
NA
See Section 7 on page 251
NA
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DSP16410CG
Signal Name
VSS
TCK0 and TCK1
NA
TMS0 and TMS1
VSS
TDO0 or TDO1
(not both)
TDI0 or TDI1
(not both)
VDD2
NA
DSP16410CG
I/O
G
I
NA
I
G
O
I
P
NA
Agere Systems Inc.
Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉) (continued)
4.12.3 Multiprocessor JTAG Connections
The DSP16410CG has two JTAG ports, one for each
DSP16000 core. The user can daisy chain these ports
onto the same scan chain, potentially with other
DSP16410CG devices, or interface to each JTAG port
individually for debugging. If multiple JTAG ports are
interfaced together on the same scan chain, TMS and
TCK are broadcast to all DSPs in the scan chain. TDI
of the first JTAG port in the chain is then connected to
RESET
TDI of the TCS connector on the user’s board, TDO of
the first JTAG port is connected to TDI of the next
JTAG port in the chain, and so on. TDO of the last
JTAG port in the chain is then tied to TDO of the TCS
connector. If more than six JTAG ports are in the same
scan chain, TMS and TCK must be buffered to ensure
compatibility with t155 and t156 (See Table 190 on
page 281). In the typical application, the user’s board
ties the DSP16410CG JTAG reset signals, TRST0N
and TRST1N, to the device reset, RSTN. Figure 17
illustrates a typical daisy-chain connection between the
TCS hardware and the two cores of a single
DSP16410CG.
RSTN
DSP16410CG
TRST1N
CORE0
TRST0N
TCK0
TCK
TMS0
TMS
CORE1
TDI0
TDO0
TCK1
TDI
TMS1
TDI1
TDO1
TDO
JCS/TCS
Note: CORE0 is DSP1 on the scan chain and CORE1 is DSP2 on the scan chain. For multiple DSP16410CG devices on a single scan chain,
maintain the CORE0-to-CORE1 daisy-chain.
Figure 17. Typical Multiprocessor JTAG Connection with Single Scan Chain
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉) (continued)
4.12.4 Boundary Scan
JTAG0 contains a full boundary-scan register as described in Table 26 and JTAG1 contains a single-bit boundaryscan register as described in Table 27 on page 63. As described in Section 4.12.3, JTAG0 and JTAG1 of multiple
DSP16410CG devices can be chained together with full boundary-scan capabilities.
Table 26. JTAG0 Boundary-Scan Register
Cell
Type†
Control
Cell
—
—
—
—
—
21
—
38
—
65
45
45
45
45
—
Cell
Type†
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
104—101
65
—
70
—
—
O
OE
O
I
I
Signal Name/
Function
ERTYPE
EXM
ESIZE
EREQN
ERDY
ED[15:0]
ED[15:0] direction control
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16] direction control
EACKN
ERWN[1:0]
EROMN
ERAMN
EION
EION, ERAMN, EROMN,
ERWN[1:0] 3-state control
EA[18:0]
EA[18:0] 3-state control
ESEG[3:0]
ESEG[3:0] 3-state control
ECKO and EACKN
3-state control
ECKO
SOD1 3-state control
SOD1
SID1
SCK1
0
1
2
3
4
20—5
21
37—22
38
39
41—40
42
43
44
45
I
I
I
I
I
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
O
O
O
O
O
OE
64—46
65
69—66
70
71
O
OE
O
OE
OE
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
SOFS1 direction control
SOFS1
SOCK1 direction control
SOCK1
SIFS1 direction control
SIFS1
SICK1 direction control
SICK1
IO1BIT[0] direction control
IO1BIT[0]
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
I
Signal Name/
Function
IO1BIT[1] direction control
IO1BIT[1]
IO1BIT[2] direction control
IO1BIT[2]
IO1BIT[3] direction control
IO1BIT[3]
IO1BIT[4] direction control
IO1BIT[4]
IO1BIT[5] direction control
IO1BIT[5]
IO1BIT[6] direction control
IO1BIT[6]
IO1BIT[7] direction control ‡
IO1BIT[7]‡
PADD[3:0]
Control
Cell
—
87
—
89
—
91
—
93
—
95
—
97
—
99
—
105
106
107
108
109
I
I
I
I
I
PCSN
PRWN
PIDS
PODS
PRDYMD
—
—
—
—
—
71
—
73
—
—
110
111
112
113
114
O
O
O
O
OE
114
114
114
114
—
—
77
—
79
—
81
—
83
—
85
130—115
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
I/O
DC
I
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
PINT
PRDY
PIBF
POBE
PINT, PRDY, PIBF,
POBE 3-state control
PD[15:0]
PD[15:0] direction control
EYMODE
IO0BIT[0] direction control
IO0BIT[0]
IO0BIT[1] direction control
IO0BIT[1]
IO0BIT[2] direction control
IO0BIT[2]
IO0BIT[3] direction control
131
—
—
—
132
—
134
—
136
—
† Key to this column: I = input; OE = 3-state control cell; O = output; DC = bidirectional control cell; I/O = input/output.
‡ There is no pin associated with this signal. This is a pad only and is not connected in the package.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.12 JTAG Test Port (JTAG〈0—1〉) (continued)
4.12.4 Boundary Scan (continued)
Table 26. JTAG0 Boundary-Scan Register (continued)
Cell
Type†
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
OE
O
I
I
Signal Name/
Function
IO0BIT[3]
IO0BIT[4] direction control
IO0BIT[4]
IO0BIT[5] direction control
IO0BIT[5]
IO0BIT[6] direction control
IO0BIT[6]
IO0BIT[7] direction control‡
IO0BIT[7]‡
SOD0 3-state control
SOD0
SID0
SCK0
Control
Cell
138
—
140
—
142
—
144
—
146
—
148
—
—
Cell
Type†
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
164—161
165
166
167
168
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
DC
I/O
I
DC
I/O
I
I
Signal Name/
Function
SOFS0 direction control
SOFS0
SOCK0 direction control
SOCK0
SIFS0 direction control
SIFS0
SICK0 direction control
SICK0
INT[3:0]
TRAP direction control
TRAP
RSTN
CKI
Control
Cell
—
152
—
154
—
156
—
158
—
—
164
—
—
† Key to this column: I = input; OE = 3-state control cell; O = output; DC = bidirectional control cell; I/O = input/output.
‡ There is no pin associated with this signal. This is a pad only and is not connected in the package.
Table 27. JTAG1 Boundary-Scan Register
Cell
0
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Function
Internal Cell
Control Cell
—
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU)
The DMAU (direct memory access unit) manages
movement of data to or from the DSP16410CG internal
or external memory with minimal core intervention:
!
!
The DMAU can move data between memory and the
I/O units:
— The DMAU provides four single-word transfer
(SWT) channels for moving data between memory
and SIU〈0—1〉. A core initially defines the data
structure and the DMAU provides address generation, compare, and update functions. Twodimensional array capability facilitates applications such as TDM channel multiplexing/demultiplexing. Each SWT channel allows an SIU to
access memory one word (16 bits) at a time.
— The DMAU provides a single addressing bypass
channel for moving data between memory and the
PIU. Unlike the SWT channels, the bypass channel does not provide address generation, compare, and update functions. The bypass channel
allows a host to address and access memory one
word (16 bits) at a time.
The DMAU can move data between two blocks of
memory. It provides two memory-to-memory (MMT)
channels for which a core initially defines the data
structure. The DMAU provides address generation,
compare, and update functions for each channel.
The DMAU can perform a block transfer either a single word (16 bits) at a time or a double word (32 bits)
at a time.
4.13.1 Overview
The DMAU has six independent channels and an
addressing bypass channel as detailed in Table 28.
These channels can access any DSP16410CG memory component, including TPRAM0, TPRAM1, and
external memory.
Figure 18 on page 65 is a functional overview of the
DMAU channels and their interconnections to the
peripherals and memory buses. The DMAU arbitrates
among the seven channels for access to the memory.
For an SWT channel, a core can define a data structure (array) in DSP16410CG memory by programming
DMAU memory-mapped registers. The DMAU can
then perform source or destination transfers. A
source transfer is defined as a series of read operations from the memory array to an SIU. A destination
transfer is defined as a series of write operations to
the memory array from an SIU. A transfer consists of a
series of transactions in response to SIU requests. A
source transaction is defined as reading a word
(16 bits) from the array, writing the word to the SIU output data register (SODR), and updating the appropriate
DMAU registers. A destination transaction is defined
as reading a word from the SIU input data register
(SIDR), writing the word to the array, and updating the
appropriate DMAU registers. See Section 4.13.5 for
details on SWT transactions.
The DMAU also provides two channels for memory-tomemory transfers (MMT). These channels allow a
user-defined block of data to be transferred between
any two DSP16410CG memory blocks, including external memory. Each MMT channel transfers data
between a source block and a destination
block. The DMAU can perform a block transfer either
a single word (16 bits) at a time or a double word
(32 bits) at a time. See Section 4.13.6 for details on
memory-to-memory block transfers.
Finally, the DMAU provides an addressing bypass
channel that is dedicated to the PIU. This channel
bypasses the DMAU address generation, compare,
and update processes. The DMAU relies on the PIU to
provide the memory address for each PIU transaction
(data transfer between a host and the DSP16410CG).
The addressing bypass channel provides a host with
fast access to any DSP16410CG memory space. See
Section 4.13.4 for more details.
Table 28. DMAU Channel Assignment
DMAU Channel
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
Bypass
64
Description
Single-word (16-bit) transfers
Single-word (16-bit) transfers
Single-word (16-bit) transfers
Single-word (16-bit) transfers
Single-word (16-bit) or double-word (32-bit) transfers
Single-word (16-bit) or double-word (32-bit) transfers
Single-word (16-bit) transfers
Associated With
SIU0
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Memory
PIU
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.1 Overview (continued)
DMAU Channels
DMAU
DESTINATION
DATA
16
SIU0
SOURCE
DATA
SWT0
CHANNEL
SWT1
CHANNEL
TPRAM0
16
ZIDB
DESTINATION
DATA
16
SIU1
SOURCE
DATA
32
SWT2
CHANNEL
TPRAM1
SWT3
CHANNEL
16
DATA
PIU
16
BYPASS
CHANNEL
Z-BUS
ARBITER
DESTINATION
DATA
16/32
MMT4
CHANNEL
SOURCE
DATA
16/32
DESTINATION
DATA
ZEDB
SEMI
32
16/32
MMT5
CHANNEL
SOURCE
DATA
16/32
Figure 18. DMAU Interconnections and Channels
Figure 19 is a block diagram of the DMAU. The DMAU includes 55 memory-mapped registers that it uses in processing source transfers, destination transfers, and memory-to-memory block transfers. These registers are configured by programs running in the cores that access the registers. The registers control the DMAU and contain its
current status. See Section 4.13.2 for details on these registers. Although the DMAU registers are memorymapped, they are physically located in the DMAU and are accessible by either core via the SEMI and the SDB
(system data bus).
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.1 Overview (continued)
DMAU Block Diagram
SEMI
SEMI
TPRAM〈0,1〉
SAB SDB
ZSEG ZEAB ZEDB
ZIAB ZIDB
DMAU
8 CONTROL REGISTERS
CTL〈0—5〉
DMCON〈0—1〉
16 bits
20
4
32
20 20
32
32
1 STATUS REGISTER
DSTAT
32 bits
4 STRIDE REGISTERS
STR〈0—3〉
MMT
SOURCE
LOOK-AHEAD
BUFFER
(6 x 32 FIFO)
14
16 bits
16
16
DSI0
DDO
SICIX0
4 REINDEX REGISTERS
RI〈0—3〉
SOCIX0
20
16
20 bits
16
8 BASE REGISTERS
SBAS〈0—3〉
DBAS〈0—3〉
DDO
SICIX1
ADDRESS
COMPARE
&
UPDATE
6 LIMIT REGISTERS
LIM〈0—5〉
DSI1
SIU1
20
20 bits
SIU0
Z-BUS
ARBITER
SOCIX1
20
20 bits
12 COUNTER REGISTERS
SCNT〈0—5〉
20
DCNT〈0—5〉
20
REQUEST
20 bits
32
12 ADDRESS REGISTERS
SADD〈0—5〉
20
DADD〈0—5〉
27
32 bits
16
PIU ADDRESSING
BYPASS CHANNEL
DDO
DPI
PIU
27
PAB
10
DSINT[3:0], DDINT[3:0], DMINT[5:4]
(TO CORES)
Figure 19. DMAU Block Diagram
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers
Table 29 lists the DMAU memory-mapped registers in functional order, not in address order. Section 6.2.2 on
page 229 describes addressing of memory-mapped registers. The DMAU contains a status register and two master control registers for all SWT and MMT channels: DMCON0, DMCON1, and DSTAT. Every DMAU channel has
a corresponding control register CTL〈0—5〉, source and destination address register (SADD〈0—5〉 and
DADD〈0—5〉), source and destination counter register (SCNT〈0—5〉 and DCNT〈0—5〉), and limit register
(LIM〈0—5〉). In addition, each SWT channel has a corresponding source and destination base address register
(SBAS〈0—3〉 and DBAS〈0—3〉), reindex register (RI〈0—3〉), and stride register (STR〈0—3〉).
Table 29. DMAU Memory-Mapped Registers
Type
DMAU Status
DMAU Master Control 0
DMAU Master Control 1
Channel Control
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Register
Name
DSTAT
DMCON0
DMCON1
CTL0
CTL1
CTL2
CTL3
CTL4
CTL5
SADD0
DADD0
SADD1
DADD1
SADD2
DADD2
SADD3
DADD3
SADD4
DADD4
SADD5
DADD5
SCNT0
DCNT0
SCNT1
DCNT1
SCNT2
DCNT2
SCNT3
DCNT3
SCNT4
DCNT4
SCNT5
DCNT5
Channel
Address
All
All
All
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
SWT0
0x4206C
0x4205C
0x4205E
0x42060
0x42062
0x42064
0x42066
0x42068
0x4206A
0x42000
0x42002
0x42004
0x42006
0x42008
0x4200A
0x4200C
0x4200E
0x42010
0x42012
0x42014
0x42016
0x42020
0x42022
0x42024
0x42026
0x42028
0x4202A
0x4202C
0x4202E
0x42030
0x42032
0x42034
0x42036
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
Size
(Bits)
32
16
R/W
Type
status
control
Signed/
Unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
Reset
Value†
X
0
R
R/W
16
R/W
control
unsigned
X
32
R/W
address
unsigned
X
20
R/W
data
unsigned
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. Any reserved fields within the register are reset to zero.
‡ The reindex registers are in sign-magnitude format.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 29. DMAU Memory-Mapped Registers (continued)
Type
Limit
Source Base
Destination Base
Source Base
Destination Base
Source Base
Destination Base
Source Base
Destination Base
Stride
Reindex
Register
Name
LIM0
LIM1
LIM2
LIM3
LIM4
LIM5
SBAS0
DBAS0
SBAS1
DBAS1
SBAS2
DBAS2
SBAS3
DBAS3
STR0
STR1
STR2
STR3
RI0
RI1
RI2
RI3
Channel
Address
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
SWT0
0x42050
0x42052
0x42054
0x42056
0x42058
0x4205A
0x42040
0x42042
0x42044
0x42046
0x42048
0x4204A
0x4204C
0x4204E
0x42018
0x4201A
0x4201C
0x4201E
0x42038
0x4203A
0x4203C
0x4203E
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
Size
(Bits)
20
R/W
Type
data
Signed/
Unsigned
unsigned
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
20
R/W
address
unsigned
X
16
R/W
data
unsigned
X
20
R/W
data
signed‡
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. Any reserved fields within the register are reset to zero.
‡ The reindex registers are in sign-magnitude format.
Note: The remainder of Section 4.13.2 describes the detailed encoding for each register.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
The DMAU status register (DSTAT) reports current DMAU channel activity for both source and destination operations and reports channel errors. This register can be read by the user software executing in either core to determine if a specific DMAU channel is already in use, or if an error has occurred that may result in data corruption.
The ERR[5:0] fields of the DSTAT register reflect DMAU protocol errors. See Section 4.13.8 on page 94 for information on error reporting and recovery.
Table 30. DSTAT (DMAU Status) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4206C.
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
RBSY5 RBSY4 SBSY5 DBSY5 SRDY5 DRDY5 ERR5 SBSY4 DBSY4 SRDY4 DRDY4 ERR4 SBSY3 DBSY3 SRDY3 DRDY3
15
14
13
12
11
ERR3 SBSY2 DBSY2 SRDY2 DRDY2
Bits
Field
Value
31
RBSY5
30
RBSY4
29
SBSY5
28
DBSY5
27
SRDY5
26
DRDY5
25
ERR5
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
24
SBSY4
23
DBSY4
22
SRDY4
21
DRDY4
20
ERR4
19
SBSY3
18
DBSY3
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
10
ERR2
9
8
7
6
SBSY1 DBSY1 SRDY1 DRDY1
5
4
3
2
1
ERR1 SBSY0 DBSY0 SRDY0 DRDY0
Description
R/W
MMT5 is busy completing a reset operation‡.
R
MMT5 is not completing a reset operation.
MMT4 is busy completing a reset operation‡.
R
MMT4 is not completing a reset operation.
MMT5 is reading memory.
R
MMT5 is not reading memory.
MMT5 is writing memory.
R
MMT5 is not writing memory.
MMT5 has a source transaction pending.
R
MMT5 does not have a source transaction pending.
MMT5 has a destination transaction pending.
R
MMT5 does not have a destination transaction pending.
MMT5 has detected a protocol error (source or destination). Error report is cleared by R/Clear
writing a 1 to this bit.
MMT5—no errors.
MMT4 is reading memory.
R
MMT4 is not reading memory.
MMT4 is writing memory.
R
MMT4 is not writing memory.
MMT4 has a source transaction pending.
R
MMT4 does not have a source transaction pending.
MMT4 has a destination transaction pending.
R
MMT4 does not have a destination transaction pending.
MMT4 has detected a protocol error (source or destination). Error report is cleared by R/Clear
writing a 1 to this bit.
MMT4—no errors.
SWT3 is reading memory.
R
SWT3 is not reading memory.
SWT3 is writing memory.
R
SWT3 is not writing memory.
0
ERR0
Reset
Value†
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ A core resets MMT5 by setting the RESET5 field (DMCON1[5]—Table 32 on page 72) and resets MMT4 by setting the RESET4 field (DMCON1[4]).
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 30. DSTAT (DMAU Status) Register (continued)
Bits
Field
Value
Description
R/W
17
SRDY3
DRDY3
R
X
15
ERR3
R/Clear
X
14
SBSY2
R
X
13
DBSY2
R
X
12
SRDY2
R
X
11
DRDY2
R
X
10
ERR2
R/Clear
X
9
SBSY1
R
X
8
DBSY1
R
X
7
SRDY1
R
X
6
DRDY1
R
X
5
ERR1
R/Clear
X
4
SBSY0
R
X
3
DBSY0
R
X
2
SRDY0
R
X
1
DRDY0
R
X
0
ERR0
SWT3 has a source transaction pending.
SWT3 does not have a source transaction pending.
SWT3 has a destination transaction pending.
SWT3 does not have a destination transaction pending.
SWT3 has detected a protocol error (source or destination). Error report is cleared by
writing a 1 to this bit.
SWT3—no errors.
SWT2 is reading memory.
SWT2 is not reading memory.
SWT2 is writing memory.
SWT2 is not writing memory.
SWT2 has a source transaction pending.
SWT2 does not have a source transaction pending.
SWT2 has a destination transaction pending.
SWT2 does not have a destination transaction pending.
SWT2 has detected a protocol error (source or destination). Error report is cleared by
writing a 1 to this bit.
SWT2—no errors.
SWT1 is reading memory.
SWT1 is not reading memory.
SWT1 is writing memory.
SWT1 is not writing memory.
SWT1 has a source transaction pending.
SWT1 does not have a source transaction pending.
SWT1 has a destination transaction pending.
SWT1 does not have a destination transaction pending.
SWT1 has detected a protocol error (source or destination). Error report is cleared by
writing a 1 to this bit.
SWT1—no errors.
SWT0 is reading memory.
SWT0 is not reading memory.
SWT0 is writing memory.
SWT0 is not writing memory.
SWT0 has a source transaction pending.
SWT0 does not have a source transaction pending.
SWT0 has a destination transaction pending.
SWT0 does not have a destination transaction pending.
SWT0 has detected a protocol error (source or destination). Error report is cleared by
writing a 1 to this bit.
SWT0—no errors.
R
16
1
0
1
0
1
Reset
Value†
X
R/Clear
X
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ A core resets MMT5 by setting the RESET5 field (DMCON1[5]—Table 32 on page 72) and resets MMT4 by setting the RESET4 field (DMCON1[4]).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
The DMAU master control registers, DMCON0 and DMCON1, control the reset, enable, or disable of individual
DMAU channels. DMCON0 also controls the enabling of the source look-ahead buffer for pipelined MMT reads of
a source block.
Table 31. DMCON0 (DMAU Master Control 0) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4205C.
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7—4
3—0
HPRIM
MINT
XSIZE5
XSIZE4
TRIGGER5
TRIGGER4
SLKA5
SLKA4
DRUN[3:0]
SRUN[3:0]
Bits
Field
Value
Definition
15
HPRIM
0
If MMT channel interruption is enabled (if MINT is set), this bit indicates MMT4 is
the higher-priority channel.
If MMT channel interruption is enabled (if MINT is set), this bit indicates MMT5 is
the higher-priority channel.
If the DMAU has begun processing an MMT channel, it transfers all the data for that
MMT channel without interruption by the other MMT channel. Any SWT or PIU
bypass channel requests interrupt the active MMT channel.
The higher-priority MMT channel indicated by HPRIM can preempt the lower-priority MMT channel. If the DMAU has begun processing the higher-priority MMT
channel, it transfers all the data for that MMT channel without interruption by the
lower-priority MMT channel. Any SWT or PIU bypass channel requests interrupt
the active MMT channel.
MMT5 transfers single words (16-bit values).
MMT5 transfers aligned double words (32-bit values)†.
MMT4 transfers single words (16-bit values).
MMT4 transfers aligned double words (32-bit values)†.
If the DMAU begins a block transfer using MMT5, it automatically clears this bit. If a
core writes a 0 to this bit position, it has no effect and does not change the DMAU
activity. The cores can cause the DMAU to terminate channel activity by setting the
RESET5 field (DMCON1[5]—Table 32 on page 72).
Set by core software to request the DMAU to begin a block transfer using MMT5.
If the DMAU begins a block transfer using MMT4, it automatically clears this bit. If a
core writes a 0 to this bit position, it has no effect and does not change the DMAU
activity. The cores can cause the DMAU to terminate channel activity by setting the
RESET4 field (DMCON1[4]—Table 32 on page 72).
Set by core software to request the DMAU to begin a block transfer using MMT4.
Force source and destination accesses for MMT5 to occur in order (source lookahead disabled).
Permit source reads for MMT5 to be launched before older destination writes
(source look-ahead enabled). This maximizes block transfer throughput.
Force source and destination accesses for MMT4 to occur in order (source lookahead disabled).
Permit source reads for MMT4 to be launched before older destination writes
(source look-ahead enabled). This maximizes block transfer throughput.
1
14
MINT
0
1
13
XSIZE5
12
XSIZE4
11
TRIGGER5
0
1
0
1
0
10
TRIGGER4
1
0
9
SLKA5
1
0
1
8
SLKA4
0
1
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
† The corresponding source and destination addresses must be even.
‡ Each bit of DRUN[3:0] corresponds to one of the SWT〈0—3〉 channels. For example, DRUN3 corresponds to SWT3.
§ Each bit of SRUN[3:0] corresponds to one of the SWT〈0—3〉 channels. For example, SRUN2 corresponds to SWT2.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 31. DMCON0 (DMAU Master Control 0) Register (continued)
Bits
Field
Value
7—4
DRUN[3:0]
0
1
3—0
SRUN[3:0]
0
1
Definition
R/W Reset
Value
The DMAU clears this field if it has completed a destination transfer and the corre- R/
0
sponding AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]—Table 34 on page 74) is cleared. If a
Set
core writes a 0 to this bit position, it has no effect and does not change the DMAU
activity. The cores can cause the DMAU to terminate channel activity by setting the
corresponding RESET[3:0] field (DMCON1[3:0]—Table 32 on page 72).
The software running in a core sets this field to cause the DMAU to initiate a new
destination transfer for the corresponding SWT channel‡.
The DMAU clears this field if it has completed a source transfer and the correR/
0
sponding AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]—Table 34 on page 74) is cleared. If a
Set
core writes a 0 to this bit position, it has no effect and does not change the DMAU
activity. The cores can cause the DMAU to terminate channel activity by setting the
corresponding RESET[3:0] field (DMCON1[3:0]—Table 32 on page 72).
The software running in a core sets this field to cause the DMAU to initiate a new
source transfer for the corresponding SWT channel§.
† The corresponding source and destination addresses must be even.
‡ Each bit of DRUN[3:0] corresponds to one of the SWT〈0—3〉 channels. For example, DRUN3 corresponds to SWT3.
§ Each bit of SRUN[3:0] corresponds to one of the SWT〈0—3〉 channels. For example, SRUN2 corresponds to SWT2.
Table 32. DMCON1 (DMAU Master Control 1) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4205E.
15—7
6
5—4
3—0
Reserved
PIUDIS
RESET[5:4]
RESET[3:0]
Bits
Field
Value
15—7
6
Reserved
PIUDIS
5—4
RESET[5:4]
0
0
1
0
1
3—0
RESET[3:0]
0
1
Definition
R/W
Reserved—write with zero.
The DMAU processes PIU requests.
The DMAU ignores PIU requests.
The corresponding MMT channel† is unaffected.
The software running in a core sets this field to cause the DMAU to unconditionally terminate all channel activity for the corresponding MMT channel†.
The corresponding SWT channel‡ is unaffected.
The software running in a core sets this field to cause the DMAU to unconditionally terminate all channel activity for the corresponding SWT channel‡.
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
† RESET5 corresponds to MMT5 and RESET4 corresponds to MMT4. Setting RESET[5:4] does not affect the state of any DMAU registers. RESET[5:4]
is typically used for error recoverySection 4.13.8 on page 94.
‡ Each bit of RESET[3:0] corresponds to one of the SWT〈0—3〉 channels. For example, RESET3 corresponds to SWT3. Setting a RESET[3:0] field
does not affect the state of any DMAU registers, including the state of the SRUN[3:0]/DRUN[3:0] fields (DMCON0[7:0]—Table 31). RESET[3:0] is typically used for error recoverySection 4.13.8 on page 94.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 34 on page 74 describes the SWT〈0—3〉 control
registers, CTL〈0—3〉. Each of the CTL〈0—3〉 registers
controls the behavior of the corresponding SWT channel and determines the following:
1. Whether the access takes place in row-major (twodimensional array) or column-major (one-dimensional array) order.
2. Whether the autoload feature is enabled or disabled.
If enabled, this feature causes the DMAU to automatically reload the address registers with the con-
tents of the base register after an entire array has
been processed.
3. The point in the operation when a DMAU interrupt
request is generated.
The control register for a specific SWT channel determines these attributes for both the source and destination transfers for that channel. Therefore, if the SWT
channel is used for bidirectional transfers, the source
and destination data must have the same array size
and structure. As a result, each SWT channel has only
one stride (STR〈0—3〉) and one reindex (RI〈0—3〉)
register. Therefore, references to fields in Table 34 are
common to both SWT source and destination transfers
and are given as common references. Table 33 maps
the common references used in Table 34 to their specific attribute.
Table 33. Collective Designations Used in Table 34
Collective
Designation
RUN
ADD
Description
Source Channel Enable for SWT〈3—0〉
Destination Channel Enable for SWT〈3—0〉
Source Address
ROW
COL
Register or Register Field
See
SRUN[3:0] (DMCON0[3:0])
Table 31 on page 71
DRUN[3:0] (DMCON0[7:4])
SADD〈0—3〉
Table 37 on page 77
Destination Address
DADD〈0—3〉
Source Row Counter
SROW[12:0] (SCNT〈0—3〉[19:7])
Table 38 on page 78
Destination Row Counter
DROW[12:0] (DCNT〈0—3〉[19:7])
Table 40 on page 79
Source Column Counter
SCOL[6:0] (SCNT〈0—3〉[6:0])
Table 38 on page 78
Destination Column Counter
DCOL[6:0] (DCNT〈0—3〉[6:0])
Table 40 on page 79
LASTROW
Row Limit
LASTROW[12:0] (LIM〈0—3〉[19:7])
Table 42 on page 80
LASTCOL
Column Limit
LASTCOL[6:0] (LIM〈0—3〉[6:0])
BAS
Source Base Register
SBAS〈0—3〉
Table 44 on page 81
Destination Base Register
DBAS〈0—3〉
Table 45 on page 81
STR
Stride Register
STR〈0—3〉
Table 46 on page 82
RI
Reindex Register
RI〈0—3〉
Table 47 on page 82
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 34. CTL〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Control) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
15—6
5—4
3—1
0
Reserved
POSTMOD[1:0]
SIGCON[2:0]
AUTOLOAD
Bit
Field
Value
15—6
5—4
Reserved
POSTMOD[1:0]
0
00
01
Definition
R/W
Reserved—write with zero.
The DMAU performs no pointer or counter update operations.
Select two-dimensional array accesses. After every transaction:
R/W
R/W
!
If the column counter has not expired, the DMAU increments it by one
and increments the address by the contents of the stride register.
(If COL≠ LASTCOL, then COL=COL+1 and ADD=ADD+STR.)
!
If the row counter has not expired and the column counter has expired,
the DMAU increments the row counter by one, clears the column
counter, and increments the address by the contents of the sign-magnitude reindex register. (if ROW ≠ LASTROW and COL = LASTCOL, then
ROW = ROW + 1, COL = 0, and ADD+RI.)
!
If both the row counter and the column counter have expired and the
AUTOLOAD field is set, the DMAU clears the row and column counters
and reloads the address with the base value. (If ROW= LASTROW
and COL= LASTCOL and AUTOLOAD=1, then ROW=0, COL=0, and
ADD=BAS.)
Reset
Value†
0
XX
If both the row counter and the column counter have expired and the
AUTOLOAD field is cleared, the DMAU deactivates the channel.
(If ROW= LASTROW and COL= LASTCOL and AUTOLOAD=0, then
RUN=0.)
Select one-dimensional array accesses. After every transaction:
!
10
!
If the row counter has not expired, the DMAU increments the counter
and the address. (If ROW≠ LASTROW, then ROW=ROW+1 and
ADD=ADD+1.)
!
If the row counter has expired and the column counter has not expired,
the DMAU clears the row counter and increments the column counter
and the address. (If ROW= LASTROW and COL≠ LASTCOL, then
ROW=0, COL=COL+1, and ADD=ADD+1.)
!
If both the row counter and the column counter have expired and the
AUTOLOAD field is set, the DMAU clears the row and column counters
and reloads the address with the base value. (If ROW= LASTROW and
COL= LASTCOL and AUTOLOAD=1, then ROW=0, COL=0, and
ADD=BAS.)
If both the row counter and the column counter have expired and the
AUTOLOAD field is cleared, the DMAU clears the row and column
counters, reloads the address with the base value, and deactivates the
channel. (If ROW= LASTROW and COL= LASTCOL and
AUTOLOAD=0, then ROW=0, COL=0, ADD=BAS, and RUN=0.)
Reserved.
!
11
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ The DMAU hardware performs the division as a one-bit right shift. Therefore, the least significant bit is truncated for odd values of LASTROW or LASTCOL.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 34. CTL〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Control) Registers (continued)
Bit
Field
Value
Definition
R/W
3—1
SIGCON[2:0]
000
The DMAU generates an interrupt request after each single word has
been transferred.
The DMAU generates an interrupt request following completion of a transfer with ROW equal to LASTROW/2‡.
The DMAU generates an interrupt request following completion of a transfer with COL equal to LASTCOL.
The DMAU generates an interrupt request following completion of a transfer with COL equal to LASTCOL and ROW equal to LASTROW/2‡.
The DMAU generates an interrupt request following completion of a transfer with ROW equal to LASTROW.
The DMAU generates an interrupt request following completion of a transfer with COL equal to LASTCOL and ROW equal to LASTROW.
The DMAU generates an interrupt request following completion of a transfer with COL equal to LASTCOL/2‡ and ROW equal to LASTROW.
Reserved.
After the DMAU transfers an entire array, it deactivates the channel.
(If ROW= LASTROW and COL= LASTCOL, then RUN=0.) The software
can reactivate the channel by setting the RUN field.
After the DMAU transfers an entire array, it reloads the channel’s counter
and address registers with their base values and initiates another array
transfer without core intervention. (If ROW= LASTROW and
COL= LASTCOL, then ROW=0, COL=0, and ADD=BAS.)
R/W
Reset
Value†
XXX
R/W
X
001
010
011
100
101
110
0
AUTOLOAD
111
0
1
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ The DMAU hardware performs the division as a one-bit right shift. Therefore, the least significant bit is truncated for odd values of LASTROW or LASTCOL.
MMT block transfers are unidirectional only, but are listed as common references for consistency with the SWT
channels. Each of the CTL〈4—5〉 registers described in Table 36 on page 76 controls the behavior of the corresponding MMT channel. The control register of a specific MMT channel determines the point in the block transfer
when a DMAU interrupt request is generated. Table 35 on page 76 maps the common references used in Table 36
on page 76 to their specific attribute.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 35. Collective Designations Used in Table 36
Collective
Designation
XSIZE
Description
Register or Register Field
See
Transfer Size for MMT4
XSIZE4 (DMCON0[12])
(0 for 16 bits or 1 for 32 bits)
XSIZE5 (DMCON0[13])
(0 for 16 bits or 1 for 32 bits)
SADD〈4—5〉
DADD〈4—5〉
SROW[12:0] (SCNT〈4—5〉[19:7])
DROW[12:0] (DCNT〈4—5〉[19:7])
LASTROW[12:0] (LIM〈4—5〉[19:7])
Table 31 on page 71
Transfer Size for MMT5
ADD
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Row Counter
Destination Row Counter
Row Limit
ROW
LASTROW
Table 37 on page 77
Table 39 on page 78
Table 41 on page 79
Table 43 on page 80
Table 36. CTL〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Control) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
15—6
5—4
3—1
0
Reserved
POSTMOD[1:0]
SIGCON[2:0]
Reserved
Bit
Field
Value
15—6
5—4
Reserved
POSTMOD[1:0]
0
00
01
10
Definition
R/W
Reserved—write with zero.
The DMAU performs no pointer or counter update operations.
Reserved.
After every transaction:
!
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value†
0
XX
R/W
XXX
R/W
0
If the row counter has not expired, the DMAU increments it and increments the address by the element size‡. (If ROW≠LASTROW, then
ROW=ROW+1 and ADD=ADD+ 1+ XSIZE.)
If the row counter has expired, the DMAU clears the row counter, increments the address by the element size‡, and deactivates the channel.
(If ROW=LASTROW, then ROW=0 and ADD=ADD+ 1+ XSIZE.)
11 Reserved.
000 The DMAU generates an interrupt request after each element‡ has been
transferred.
001 The channel generates an interrupt request following completion of a
transfer with ROW equal to LASTROW/2.
01X Reserved.
100 The channel generates an interrupt request following completion of a
transfer with ROW equal to LASTROW.
101 Reserved.
11X Reserved.
0
Reserved—write with zero.
!
3—1
SIGCON[2:0]
0
Reserved
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ The element size is 1 for single-word transactions (XSIZE = 0) or 2 for double-word transactions (XSIZE = 1).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 37. SADD〈0—5〉 and DADD〈0—5〉 (Channels 0—5 Source and Destination Address) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
31—27
26—23
22—20
19—0
Reserved
ESEG[3:0]
CMP[2:0]
ADD[19:0]
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
31—27
26—23
Reserved
ESEG[3:0]
CMP[2:0]
19—0
ADD[19:0]
Reserved—write with zero.
External memory address extension. If the DMAU accesses external
memory (CMP[2:0] = 100), it causes the SEMI to place the value in this
field onto the ESEG[3:0] pins.
The selected memory component is TPRAM0.
The selected memory component is TPRAM1.
Reserved.
The selected memory component is ERAM‡, EIO, or internal I/O.
Reserved.
Reserved.
The address within the selected memory component. For an MMT〈4—5〉
channel, if the corresponding XSIZE[5:4] field (DMCON0[13:12]—see
Table 31 on page 71) is set, this value must be even.
R/W
R/W
22—20
0
0x0
to
0xF
000
001
01X
100
101
11X
0x00000
to
0xFFFFF
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value†
0
X
XXX
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ If the WEROM field (ECON1[11]—Table 60 on page 111) is set, EROM is selected in place of ERAM.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 38. SCNT〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Source Counter) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19—7
6—0
SROW[12:0]
SCOL[6:0]
Bit
Field
Description
R/W
19—7
SROW[12:0]
R/W
6—0
SCOL[6:0]
The row counter of the one-dimensional or two-dimensional source array for
the corresponding SWT channel (read data). The DMAU updates this field
as the transfer proceeds and automatically clears it upon the completion of
the transfer.
The column counter of the one-dimensional or two-dimensional source array
for the corresponding SWT channel (read data). The DMAU updates this
field as the transfer proceeds and automatically clears it upon the completion
of the transfer.
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. SCNT〈0—3〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU
channel via the DMCON1 register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an SWT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding
SCNT〈0—3〉 register after a DSP16410CG device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
Table 39. SCNT〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Source Counter) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19—7
6—0
SROW[12:0]
SCOL[6:0]
Bit
Field
Description
R/W
19—7
SROW[12:0]
R/W
6—0
SCOL[6:0]
The row counter of the source block for the corresponding MMT channel
(read data). The DMAU increments this field as the transfer proceeds and
automatically clears it upon the completion of the transfer.
The column counter of the source block for the corresponding MMT channel
(read data). Typically, the user has programmed the LASTCOL[6:0] field
(LIM〈4—5〉[6:0]—Table 43 on page 80) with zero, and therefore, the DMAU
does not update this field.
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. SCNT〈4—5〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU
channel via the DMCON1 register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an MMT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding
SCNT〈4—5〉 register after a DSP16410CG device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 40. DCNT〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Destination Counter) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19—7
6—0
DROW[12:0]
DCOL[6:0]
Bit
Field
Description
R/W
19—7
DROW[12:0]
R/W
6—0
DCOL[6:0]
The row counter of the one-dimensional or two-dimensional destination array
for the corresponding SWT channel (write data). The DMAU updates this
field as the transfer proceeds and automatically clears it upon the completion
of the transfer.
The column counter of the one-dimensional or two-dimensional destination
array for the corresponding SWT channel (write data). The DMAU updates
this field as the transfer proceeds and automatically clears it upon the completion of the transfer.
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. DCNT〈0—3〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU
channel via the DMCON1 register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an SWT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding
DCNT〈0—3〉 register after a DSP16410CG device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
Table 41. DCNT〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Destination Counter) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19—7
6:0
DROW[12:0]
DCOL[6:0]
Bit
Field
Description
R/W
19—7
DROW[12:0]
R/W
6—0
DCOL[6:0]
The row counter of the destination block for the corresponding MMT channel
(write data). The DMAU increments this field as the transfer proceeds and
automatically clears it upon the completion of the transfer.
The column counter of the destination block for the corresponding MMT
channel (write data). Typically, the user has programmed the LASTCOL[6:0] field (LIM〈4—5〉[6:0]—Table 43 on page 80) with zero, and therefore, the DMAU does not update this field.
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. DCNT〈4—5〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU
channel via the DMCON1 register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an MMT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding
DCNT〈4—5〉 register after a DSP16410CG device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 42. LIM〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Limit) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
Bit
19—7
6—0
19—7
6—0
LASTROW[12:0]
LASTCOL[6:0]
Field
Description
R/W
LASTROW[12:0] The last row count for both the source and destination arrays for the corresponding SWT channel. The source and destination arrays are either onedimensional or two-dimensional. For a single-buffered array, this field is programmed with the number of rows in each single buffer minus one (r – 1). For
a double-buffered two-dimensional array, this field is programmed with two
times the number of rows in each single buffer minus one ((2 × r) – 1).
LASTCOL[6:0] The last column count for both the source and destination arrays for the corresponding SWT channel. The source and destination arrays are either onedimensional or two-dimensional. This field is programmed with the number
of columns minus one (n – 1).
R/W
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
X
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
Table 43. LIM〈4—5〉 (MMT〈4—5〉 Limit) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
Bit
19—7
6—0
Field
19—7
6—0
LASTROW[12:0]
LASTCOL[6:0]
Description
LASTROW[12:0] The last row count for both the source and destination blocks for the corresponding MMT channel. This field is typically programmed with the number
of rows‡ in the block minus one (r – 1).
LASTCOL[6:0] The last column count for both the source and destination blocks for the corresponding MMT channel. The user typically programs this field with zero§.
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ Each row contains one element. The element size is either 16 bits or 32 bits, based on the programming of the XSIZE4 or XSIZE5 field
(DMCON0[13:12]—Table 31 on page 71).
§ This document assumes that the LASTCOL[6:0] field is programmed with zero.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 44. SBAS〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Source Base Address) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19—0
Source Base Address
Bit
19—0
Field
Description
R/W
Source Base The program must initialize the SBAS〈0—3〉 register with the starting address of the R/W
Address
one-dimensional or two-dimensional source array for the corresponding channel
(read data). If the corresponding AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]) is set, the DMAU
copies the contents of SBAS〈0—3〉 to the corresponding SADD〈0—3〉 register after
the transfer of an entire array is complete. The DMAU does not modify SBAS〈0—3〉.
Reset
Value†
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
Table 45. DBAS〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Destination Base Address) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19—0
Destination Base Address
Bit
19—0
Field
Description
R/W
Destination The program must initialize the DBAS〈0—3〉 register with the starting address of the R/W
Base Address one-dimensional or two-dimensional destination array for the corresponding channel
(write data). If the corresponding AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]) is set, the DMAU
copies the contents of DBAS〈0—3〉 to the corresponding DADD〈0—3〉 register after
the transfer of an entire array is complete. The DMAU does not modify DBAS〈0—3〉.
Reset
Value†
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.2 Registers (continued)
Table 46. STR〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Stride) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
15—14
13—0
Reserved
Stride
Bit
Field
Value
Description
15—14 Reserved
0
Reserved—write with zero.
13—0
Stride
≤16,383 If the corresponding SWT channel is programmed for one-dimensional array
accesses (if the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[5:4]) is 0x2), this field is ignored.
R/W Reset
Value†
R/W
0
R/W
X
If the corresponding SWT channel is programmed for two-dimensional array
accesses (if the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[5:4]) is 0x1), the DMAU adds
the contents of this register to the corresponding source and destination address
registers (SADD〈0—3〉 and DADD〈0—3〉) until it processes the last column in the
array. The program must initialize this register with the number of memory locations between corresponding rows (elements) of consecutive columns (buffers).
Typically, the columns (buffers) are back-to-back (contiguous) in memory, and this
register is programmed with the number of rows per column.
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
Table 47. RI〈0—3〉 (SWT〈0—3〉 Reindex) Registers
See Table 29, starting on page 67, for the memory addresses of these registers.
19
18—0
Sign Bit
Magnitude
Bit
Field
Value
Description
19
Sign Bit
1
If the corresponding SWT channel is programmed for one-dimensional
array accesses (if the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[5:4]) is 0x2), this
field is ignored.
18—0
Magnitude
R/W
If the corresponding SWT channel is programmed for two-dimensional
array accesses (if the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[5:4]) is 0x1), this
bit must be set. This causes the reindex value to be negative and the
DMAU to subtract the reindex magnitude from SADD〈0—3〉 and
DADD〈0—3〉.
≤262,143 If the corresponding SWT channel is programmed for one-dimensional
array accesses (if the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[5:4]) is 0x2), this
field is ignored.
Reset
Value†
R/W
X
R/W
X
If the corresponding SWT channel is programmed for two-dimensional
array accesses (if the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[5:4]) is 0x1), the
DMAU subtracts this value from the corresponding address register
(SADD〈0—3〉 or DADD〈0—3〉) after accessing the last column in the
array. For a single-buffered array of r rows and n columns (n > 1), the
magnitude of the reindex value is (r × (n – 1)) – 1. For a double-buffered
array of r rows and n columns (n > 1), the magnitude of the reindex value
is (2r × (n – 1)) – 1.
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.3 Data Structures
The DMAU moves data in one-dimensional array, two-dimensional array, and block transfer patterns. The following sections outline these three types of data structures and the methods for programming the DMAU registers to
establish them.
4.13.3.1 One-Dimensional Data Structure (SWT Channels)
Figure 20 illustrates the structure of a one-dimensional array for an SWT channel. The array consists of n columns
(buffers), each containing r rows (elements). The columns must be contiguous (back-to-back) in memory. See
Section 4.13.5 for more information about SWT channels. See Section 4.13.9.2 for an example of a transfer using
a one-dimensional array.
A One-Dimensional Data Structure for Buffering n Input Channels
SOURCE
BUFFER
COMPLETE
ROW =0
ROW =1
ROW=r–1
DESTINATION
BUFFER
COMPLETE
ROW=r–1
ROW =0
ROW =1
COL=0
COL=0
DESTINATION
BUFFER
COMPLETE
ROW =0
ROW =1
COL=n–1
ROW=r–1
COL=n–1
SOURCE
BUFFER
COMPLETE
DBAS〈0—3〉
ROW =0
ROW =1
AUTOLOAD
SBAS〈0—3〉
INPUT DESTINATION ARRAY
AUTOLOAD
OUTPUT SOURCE ARRAY
ROW=r–1
Figure 20. One-Dimensional Data Structure for Buffering n Channels
One-dimensional data structures for data transfers use
the address, base, limit, counter, and control registers
associated with the SWT channel carrying the data
between an SIU and memory.
CTL〈0—3〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding control register with the POSTMOD[1:0]
field programmed to 0x2 to enable one-dimensional
array accesses, the SIGCON[2:0] field programmed to
a value that defines when interrupts are generated, and
the AUTOLOAD field set to one so that no further core
interaction is needed.
DADD〈0—3〉 and SADD〈0—3〉: The user software
must initialize the corresponding destination and
source address registers to the top of the input (destination) and output (source) arrays located in memory.
The DMAU automatically increments these registers as
the transfer proceeds.
DBAS〈0—3〉 and SBAS〈0—3〉: The user software
must also initialize the corresponding destination and
source base registers to the top of the input (destination) and output (source) arrays located in
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memory. These registers are used with the autoload
feature of the associated SWT channel.
LIM〈0—3〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding limit register with the dimensions of the
array. The number of rows (or elements) is r; therefore,
the LASTROW[12:0] field is programmed to r – 1. The
number of columns, n, is the same as the number of
buffers; therefore, LASTCOL[6:0] field is programmed
to n – 1.
DCNT〈0—3〉 and SCNT〈0—3〉: The corresponding
destination and source count registers contain the row
and column counters for one-dimensional array
accesses. The user software must initially clear these
registers. The DMAU automatically clears these registers upon the completion of an SWT transfer, and
increments the row and column counter fields of these
registers as the transfer proceeds.
DMCON0: The user software must set the corresponding SRUN[3:0] and DRUN[3:0] fields in DMCON0
to enable source and destination transfers.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.3 Data Structures (continued)
4.13.3.2 Two-Dimensional Data Structure (SWT Channels)
Figure 21 illustrates the structure of a two-dimensional double-buffered array for an SWT channel. This structure
is useful for TDM channel multiplexing and demultiplexing. The array consists of n columns (double buffers), each
containing 2r rows (elements). The columns are typically contiguous (back-to-back) in memory, but this is not
required. See Section 4.13.5 for more information about SWT channels. See Section 4.13.9.1 for an example of a
transfer using a two-dimensional array.
A Two-Dimensional Data Structure for Double-Buffering n Channels
SOURCE
ARRAY
COMPLETE
ROW =0
ROW =1
ROW=r–1
COL=1
ROW=2r–1
ROW =2r–1
DESTINATION
BUFFER COMPLETE
(SIGCON=0x3)
DESTINATION
ARRAY COMPLETE
(SIGCON=0x5)
ROW=0
ROW=1
COL=0
COL=1
ROW=2r–1
ROW=r–1
DESTINATION
FRAME COMPLETE
(SIGCON=0x2)
SINGLE
BUFFER
DOUBLE
BUFFER
ROW=r–1
COL=n–1
ROW =2r–1
ROW=0
ROW=1
ROW=0
ROW=1
COL=n–1
ROW=r–1
SOURCE
BUFFER
COMPLETE
STR〈0—3〉
ROW =2r–1
ROW =0
ROW =1
SOURCE
FRAME
COMPLETE
COL=0
ROW=r–1
DBAS〈0—3〉
SINGLE
BUFFER
DOUBLE
BUFFER
ROW =0
ROW =1
RI〈0—3〉
AUTOLOAD
STR〈0—3〉
SBAS〈0—3〉
INPUT DESTINATION ARRAY
RI〈0—3〉
AUTOLOAD
OUTPUT SOURCE ARRAY
ROW=r–1
ROW=2r–1
Figure 21. Two-Dimensional Data Structure for Double-Buffering n Channels
Two-dimensional data structures for data transfers use
address, base, limit, counter, stride, reindex, and control registers associated with the SWT channel carrying
the data between an SIU and memory.
CTL〈0—3〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding control register with the POSTMOD[1:0]
field programmed to 0x1 to enable two-dimensional
array accesses, the SIGCON[2:0] field programmed to
a value that defines when interrupts are generated, and
the AUTOLOAD field set to one so that no further core
interaction is needed.
memory. The DMAU automatically updates these registers in a row-major order as the transfer proceeds.
DBAS〈0—3〉 and SBAS〈0—3〉: The user software
must also initialize the corresponding destination and
source base registers to the top of the input (destination) and output (source) arrays located in
memory. These registers are used with the autoload
feature of the associated SWT channel.
DADD〈0—3〉 and SADD〈0—3〉: The user software
must initialize the corresponding destination and
source address registers to the top of the input (destination) and output (source) arrays located in
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
4.13.3 Data Structures (continued)
4.13.3.2 Two-Dimensional Data Structure (SWT
Channels) (continued)
LIM〈0—3〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding limit register with the dimensions of the
array. The number of rows (or elements) is r. For a single-buffered array, the LASTROW[12:0] field is programmed to r – 1. For a double-buffered array
(Figure 21 on page 84), the LASTROW[12:0] field is
programmed to (2 × r ) – 1. The number of columns (n)
is the same as the number of buffers. Therefore, the
LASTCOL[6:0] field is programmed to n – 1.
DCNT〈0—3〉 and SCNT〈0—3〉: The corresponding
destination and source count registers contain the row
and column counters for two-dimensional array access.
The user software must initially clear these registers.
The DMAU automatically clears these registers upon
the completion of an SWT transfer and increments the
row and column counter fields of these registers as the
transfer proceeds.
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STR〈0—3〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding stride register with the number of memory
locations between common rows (elements) of different
columns (buffers). Typical data structures have buffers
that are contiguous in memory. In this case, the stride
is the same as the buffer length (number of rows per
column). If the current column is not the last column,
the DMAU increments the contents of DADD〈0—3〉
and SADD〈0—3〉 by the stride value after each transaction, i.e., increments the address registers in rowmajor order. This causes DADD〈0—3〉 and
SADD〈0—3〉 to address the common row in the next
column.
RI〈0—3〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding reindex register to the sign-magnitude pointer
postmodification value to be applied to SADD〈0—3〉
and DADD〈0—3〉 after the DMAU has accessed the
last column. For a single-buffered array of r rows and
n columns (n > 1), the magnitude of the reindex value
is (r × (n – 1)) – 1. For a double-buffered array of
r rows and n columns (n > 1), the magnitude is
(2r × (n – 1)) – 1. Because the reindex value is always
negative for a two-dimensional array, the user software
must set the sign bit of RI〈0—3〉.
DMCON0: The user software must set the corresponding SRUN[3:0] and DRUN[3:0] fields in DMCON0
to enable source and destination transfers.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
memory. The DMAU automatically updates these registers as the transfer proceeds.
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
LIM〈4—5〉: The user software must initialize the corresponding limit register with the dimensions of the
array. The number of rows (or elements) is r. Therefore, the user software writes r – 1 to
LASTROW[12:0]. The array is structured as one column (one buffer). Therefore, the user software writes
zero to LASTCOL[6:0].
4.13.3 Data Structures (continued)
4.13.3.3 Memory-to-Memory Block Transfers (MMT
Channels)
Figure 22 illustrates a memory-to-memory block transfer using an MMT channel. See Section 4.13.6 for
more information about MMT channels. See
Section 4.13.9.3 for an example of a memory-to-memory block data transfer using an MMT channel.
Memory-to-memory block data structures for data
transfers use address, limit, counter, and control registers associated with the MMT channel transferring the
data between two memories.
DADD〈4—5〉 and SADD〈4—5〉: The user software
must initialize the corresponding destination and
source address registers to the top of the input (destination) and output (source) blocks located in
DCNT〈4—5〉 and SCNT〈4—5〉: The corresponding
destination and source count registers contain the row
and column counters for memory-to-memory block
transfers. The user software must initially clear these
registers. The DMAU automatically clears these registers upon the completion of an MMT source transfer,
and updates these registers as the source transfer proceeds.
CTL〈4—5〉: The user software must write the control
register with SIGCON[2:0] set to a value that defines
when interrupts are generated.
DMCON0: The user software must set the corresponding TRIGGER[5:4] field in DMCON0 to enable
MMT transfers.
Memory-to-Memory Block Transfer
SOURCE ARRAY
DESTINATION ARRAY
TRANSFER
ROW=(r –1)>>1
INITIAL VALUE
OF DADD〈4—5〉
ROW=0
ROW=1
ROW=r –1
ROW=(r –1)>>1
COL=0
ROW=0
ROW=1
COL=0
INITIAL VALUE
OF SADD〈4—5〉
TRANSFER
1/2 COMPLETE
ROW=r –1
Figure 22. Memory-to-Memory Block Transfer
4.13.4 The PIU Addressing Bypass Channel
If the PIUDIS field (DMCON1[6]—Table 32 on page 72) is cleared, a host microprocessor connected to the
DSP16410CG PIU port can gain access to the entire memory space of the DSP16410CG. The access is arbitrated by the DMAU. If PIUDIS is set to one, PIU requests are ignored by the DMAU.
All PIU transactions are handled through the addressing bypass channel. Host requests are independent of both
cores and add no overhead to core processing. The host can issue commands, read status information, read and
write DSP16410CG memory, and send messages via the host parallel port. Specific transactions are accomplished by host commands issued to the PIU. See Section 4.15.5 for more details.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
4.13.5 Single-Word Transfer Channels (SWT)
The DMAU provides a total of four SWT channels.
SWT0 and SWT1 are dedicated to SIU0, and SWT2
and SWT3 are dedicated to SIU1. Each SWT channel
is bidirectional and can transfer data to/from either
TPRAM0, TPRAM1, or external memory as defined by
the associated channel’s source and destination
address registers (SADD〈0—3〉 and DADD〈0—3〉).
Two SWT channels are dedicated to each SIU so that
data from a single SIU can be routed to separate memory spaces at any time. Each SIU’s ICIX〈0—1〉 and
OCIX〈0—1〉 control registers define the mapping of
serial port data to one of the two SWT channels dedicated to that SIU. For example, this provides a method
for routing logical channel data on a TDM bit stream
to/from either TPRAM on a time-slot basis.
If a specific SIU issues a request for service (input
buffer full or output buffer empty), an SWT channel performs a transaction. SWT channels provide both
source and destination transfers. A source transaction is defined as a read from DSP16410CG memory
and write to an SIU output register with the update of
the appropriate DMAU registers. A destination transaction is defined as the read of an SIU input register
and write to DSP16410CG memory with the update of
the appropriate DMAU registers. For a specific SWT
channel, the size and structure of the data to be transferred to/from the SIU must be the same. As an alternative, the source or destination transfer for a specific
channel can be disabled, allowing separate DMAU
channels to be used for the source and destination
transfers. For example, SWT0 can be used to service
SIU0 input and SWT1 for SIU0 output.
The DMAU supports address and counter hardware for
one- and two-dimensional memory accesses for each
SWT channel. The basic data structure is called an
array, which consists of columns (or buffers) and
rows (or elements). An array can be traversed in
either row-major (two-dimensional array) or columnmajor (one-dimensional array) order, as defined by the
DMAU control registers for that channel
(CTL〈0—3〉—Table 34 on page 74). Each SWT channel has two dedicated interrupt signals; one to represent the status of a source transfer and another to
represent the status of a destination transfer. These
signals can be used to create interrupt sources to
either core. (See Section 4.13.7 for details.)
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The SIGCON[2:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[3:1]) registers
define the exact meaning associated with both the
source and destination transfer interrupts. See
Table 50 on page 92 for a list of DMAU interrupts and
Table 34 on page 74 for the CTL〈0—3〉 bit field definitions.
The following steps are taken during a source
transaction:
1. One of the cores sets the appropriate SRUN[3:0]
field (DMCON0[3:0]—Table 31 on page 71) to initiate transfers.
2. If the SIU 16-bit output data register (SODR) is
empty, the SIU requests data from the DMAU. The
DMAU reads one data word over the Z-bus from the
appropriate DSP16410CG memory location using
the SWT channel’s source address register,
SADD〈0—3〉.
3. The DMAU transfers the data word to the corresponding SODR register over the peripheral data
bus, DDO.
4. The DMAU updates the SWT channel’s source
address register, SADD〈0—3〉, and the source
counter register, SCNT〈0—3〉.
5. The DMAU can generate a core interrupt, based on
the value of the SIGCON[2:0] field (CTL〈0—3〉[3:1]).
6. If this is not the last location of the source array
(SCNT〈0—3〉 ≠ LIM〈0—3〉), the DMAU returns to
step 2. If this is the last location of the source array:
!
!
If the AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]—Table 34
on page 74) is cleared, the DMAU clears
SCNT〈0—3〉, clears the corresponding
SRUN[3:0] field (DMCON0[3:0]—Table 31 on
page 71), and terminates the source transfer.
If the AUTOLOAD field is set:
— The DMAU reloads SADD〈0—3〉 with the value
in the source base address register,
SBAS〈0—3〉.
— The DMAU clears the value in the source
counter register (SCNT〈0—3〉 is written with 0).
— The DMAU initiates a new source transfer without core intervention.
The steps taken for a destination transaction are:
1. One of the cores sets the appropriate DRUN[3:0]
field (DMCON0[7:4]) to initiate transfers.
2. If the SIU 16-bit input data register (SIDR) is full, the
SIU requests that the DMAU read the data. After the
DMAU acknowledges the request, the SIU places
the contents of SIDR onto the data bus (DSI).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
step 2. If this is the last location of the destination
array:
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
!
4.13.5 Single-Word Transfer Channels
(SWT) (continued)
!
3. The DMAU transfers this data word over the Z-bus
to the appropriate DSP16410CG memory location
as defined by the channel’s destination address register, DADD〈0—3〉.
4. The DMAU updates the channel’s destination
address register, DADD〈0—3〉, and the destination
counter, DCNT〈0—3〉.
5. The DMAU can generate a core interrupt, based on
the value of the SIGCON[2:0] field
(CTL〈0—3〉[3:1]—Table 34 on page 74).
6. If this is not the last location of the destination array
(DCNT〈0—3〉 ≠ LIM〈0—3〉), the DMAU returns to
If the AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]—Table 34
on page 74) is cleared, the DMAU clears
DCNT〈0—3〉, clears the corresponding
DRUN[3:0] field (DMCON0[7:4]—Table 31 on
page 71), and terminates the destination transfer.
If the AUTOLOAD field is set:
— The DMAU reloads DADD〈0—3〉 with the value
in the destination base address register,
DBAS〈0—3〉.
— The DMAU clears the value in the destination
counter register (DCNT〈0—3〉 is written with 0).
— The DMAU initiates a new destination transfer
without core intervention.
The DMAU’s control and address registers determine
the data structure and access pattern supported by a
particular channel and reflect the status of the transfer.
These SWT channel registers are described in
Table 48, with additional detail provided in
Section 4.13.2.
Table 48. SWT-Specific Memory-Mapped Registers
Register
SADD〈0—3〉
SBAS〈0—3〉
SCNT〈0—3〉
DADD〈0—3〉
DBAS〈0—3〉
Type
Source
Address
Source
Base
Address
Source
Counter
Destination
Address
Destination
Base
Address
Size
Description
32-bit The program must initialize the SADD〈0—3〉 register with the starting address of the
source array† for the corresponding channel (read data). The DMAU updates the register with the address of the next memory location to be read by the corresponding SWT
channel as the transfer proceeds. Table 37 on page 77 describes the bit fields of the
SADD〈0—3〉 registers.
20-bit The program must initialize the SBAS〈0—3〉 register with the starting address of the
source array† for the corresponding channel (read data). If the corresponding AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]) is set, the DMAU copies the contents of SBAS〈0—3〉 to the
corresponding SADD〈0—3〉 register after the transfer of an entire array is complete.
The DMAU does not modify SBAS〈0—3〉.
20-bit This register contains the row and column counter of the source array† for the corresponding channel (read data). The DMAU updates the register as the transfer proceeds
and automatically clears the register upon the completion of the transfer. The source
row (SROW) is encoded in SCNT〈0—3〉[19:7], and the source column (SCOL) is
encoded in SCNT〈0—3〉[6:0].
Note: SCNT〈0—3〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU channel via the DMCON1
register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an SWT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding SCNT〈0—3〉 register after a DSP16410CG
device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
32-bit The program must initialize the DADD〈0—3〉 register with the starting address of the
destination array† for the corresponding channel (write data). The DMAU updates the
register with the address of the next memory location to be written by the corresponding
SWT channel as the transfer proceeds. Table 37 on page 77 describes the bit fields of
the DADD〈0—3〉 registers.
20-bit The program must initialize the DBAS〈0—3〉 register with the starting address of the
destination array† for the corresponding channel (write data). If the corresponding
AUTOLOAD field (CTL〈0—3〉[0]) is set, the DMAU copies the contents of DBAS〈0—3〉
to the corresponding DADD〈0—3〉 register after the transfer of an entire array is complete. The DMAU does not modify DBAS〈0—3〉.
† The array can be either one-dimensional or two-dimensional.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.5 Single-Word Transfer Channels (SWT) (continued)
Table 48. SWT-Specific Memory-Mapped Registers (continued)
Register
DCNT〈0—3〉
LIM〈0—3〉
STR〈0—3〉
RI〈0—3〉
CTL〈0—3〉
Type
Destination
Counter
Limit
Stride
Register
Reindex
Control
Size
Description
20-bit This register contains the row and column counter of the destination array† for the corresponding channel (write data). The DMAU updates the register as the transfer proceeds and automatically clears the register upon the completion of the transfer. The
destination row (DROW) is encoded in DCNT〈0—3〉[19:7], and the destination column
(DCOL) is encoded in DCNT〈0—3〉[6:0].
Note: DCNT〈0—3〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU channel via the DMCON1
register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an SWT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding DCNT〈0—3〉 register after a DSP16410CG
device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
20-bit The user programs LIM〈0—3〉 with the last row count and the last column count for both
the source and destination arrays† for the corresponding channel. For a single-buffered
array, LIM〈0—3〉[19:7] is programmed with the number of rows in each single buffer
minus one (r – 1). For a double-buffered two-dimensional array, LIM〈0—3〉[19:7] is programmed with two times the number of rows in each single buffer minus one
((2 × r) – 1). The number of columns minus one (n – 1) is encoded in LIM〈0—3〉[6:0].
Refer to Section 4.13.9 on page 95 for examples.
16-bit For an SWT channel with one-dimensional array accesses, the program must clear the
corresponding STR〈0—3〉 register.
For an SWT channel with two-dimensional array accesses, the user software assigns
the number of memory locations between common rows (elements) of different columns
(buffers). Typically, this value equals the number of rows per column, which places the
buffers back-to-back (contiguous) in memory. Refer to Section 4.13.9.1 on page 95 for
details.
20-bit For an SWT channel with one-dimensional array accesses, the program must clear the
corresponding RI〈0—3〉 register.
For an SWT channel with two-dimensional array accesses, the DMAU adds the signmagnitude value in the corresponding RI〈0—3〉 register to the corresponding address
register (SADD〈0—3〉 for source transactions and DADD〈0—3〉 for destination transactions) after the last column has been accessed. The magnitude of the reindex value for
an array of r rows and n columns (n > 1) is (r × (n – 1)) – 1. The magnitude of the
reindex value for a two-dimensional array that employs double buffers like that shown in
Figure 21 on page 84 is (2r × (n – 1)) – 1. Because the reindex value is always negative, set the sign bit (bit 19) of RI〈0—3〉.
16-bit CTL〈0—3〉 controls the following items for the corresponding SWT channel:
!
!
!
Enabling or disabling of AUTOLOAD for the starting address.
Determining the point in the transaction when a DMAU interrupt request is generated.
Determining whether the access takes place in row-major (two-dimensional array) or
column-major (one-dimensional array) order.
CTL〈0—3〉 determines these attributes for both the source and destination arrays for
the corresponding SWT channel. See Table 34 on page 74 for the field descriptions of
CTL〈0—3〉.
† The array can be either one-dimensional or two-dimensional.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
an MMT channel by setting the corresponding SLKA5
or SLKA4 field (DMCON0[9,8]).
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
Assuming that source look-ahead is disabled, the
DMAU performs the following steps during an MMT
block transfer:
4.13.5 Single-Word Transfer Channels
(SWT) (continued)
The two 16-bit DMAU master control registers,
DMCON0 and DMCON1, also influence the operation
of the SWT channels. The 32-bit DMAU status register, DSTAT, reflects the status of any SWT
transfer. The bit field definition of the DMAU control
and status registers is given in Section 4.13.2.
4.13.6 Memory-to-Memory Transfer Channels
(MMT)
The DSP16410CG DMAU provides two MMT channels
for block transfers called MMT4 and MMT5. Each
MMT channel moves data between a source block
and a destination block. Both the source and destination blocks must be one-dimensional arrays with the
same size and structure, as defined by the MMT channel’s control register, CTL〈4—5〉 (see Table 36 on
page 76). The user software initiates an MMT block
transfer request by writing a one to the corresponding
TRIGGER5 or TRIGGER4 field (DMCON0[11,10]—see
Table 31 on page 71). Each transfer can be 16 bits or
32 bits, as determined by the corresponding XSIZE5 or
XSIZE4 field (DMCON0[13,12]). If the transfers are
32 bits, the source and destination addresses as specified by SADD〈4—5〉 and DADD〈4—5〉 must both be
even.
Once initiated, MMT channel block transfers proceed
to completion and then stop. The DMAU pauses an
MMT block transfer to allow an SWT or bypass channel
transaction to complete, and then automatically
resumes the MMT block transfer. This prevents I/O
latencies and possible data overwrites due to long
MMT blocks. Each MMT channel has a dedicated
interrupt request that can be enabled in either core.
The SIGCON[2:0] field (CTL〈4—5〉[3:1]) determines
the exact meaning associated with the interrupt. See
Table 50 on page 92 and Table 34 on page 74 for more
information.
To optimize throughput, MMT channel read operations
can be pipelined. This allows the DMAU to initiate multiple fetches from the source block before an associated write to the destination block is performed. The
DMAU stores the data from the multiple fetches into an
internal source look-ahead buffer. The user enables
multiple fetches into the source look-ahead buffer for
90
1. The user software executing in one of the cores
writes a one to the corresponding TRIGGER5 or
TRIGGER4 field (DMCON0[11,10]) to initiate the
block transfer. The DMAU automatically clears the
TRIGGER5 or TRIGGER4 field.
2. The DMAU initiates a read operation from the
source block using the address in the channel’s
source address register, SADD〈4—5〉 (see Table 37
on page 77). If the corresponding XSIZE5 or
XSIZE4 field (DMCON0[13,12]) is cleared, the read
operation is 16 bits. If the corresponding XSIZE5 or
XSIZE4 field is set, the read operation is 32 bits.
3. If the read operation is 16 bits, the DMAU increments SADD〈4—5〉 by one. If the read operation is
32 bits, the DMAU increments SADD〈4—5〉 by two.
The DMAU updates the source counter register
(SCNT〈4—5〉—Table 39 on page 78) by incrementing its SROW[12:0] field by one.
4. When the read data from step 2 becomes available,
the DMAU places it into the source look-ahead
buffer.
5. The DMAU writes the data in the source look-ahead
buffer to the destination block using the address in
the channel’s destination address register,
DADD〈4—5〉. If the corresponding XSIZE5 or
XSIZE4 field (DMCON0[13,12]) is cleared, the write
operation is 16 bits. If the corresponding XSIZE5 or
XSIZE4 field is set, the write operation is 32 bits.
6. If the write operation is 16 bits, the DMAU increments DADD〈4—5〉 by one. If the write operation is
32 bits, the DMAU increments DADD〈4—5〉 by
two. The DMAU updates the destination counter
register (DCNT〈4—5〉) by incrementing its
DROW[12:0] field by one.
7. Depending on the SIGCON[2:0] field
(CTL〈4—5〉[3:1]), the DMAU can generate an interrupt.
8. If this is the last location of the block
(DCNT〈4—5〉 = LIM〈4—5〉), the DMAU stops processing for the channel. If this is not the last location
of the block, the DMAU returns to step 2.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.6 Memory-to-Memory Transfer Channels (MMT) (continued)
If source look-ahead is enabled, the DMAU performs the same steps as above except that it initially repeats steps
2—4 multiple times in a pipelined manner. It then performs reads and writes to the source and destination blocks
as access cycles become available. It is strongly recommended that the user enable source look-ahead. See
Section 4.14.7.4 on page 131 for a performance comparison.
The DMAU’s control and address registers determine the data size and location supported by a particular channel
and reflect the status of the request. These MMT channel registers are described in Table 49 on page 91 with
additional detail provided in Section 4.13.2.
Table 49. MMT-Specific Memory-Mapped Registers
Register
SADD〈4—5〉
SCNT〈4—5〉
DADD〈4—5〉
DCNT〈4—5〉
Type
Source
Address
Source
Counter
Destination
Address
Destination
Counter
LIM〈4—5〉
Limit
CTL〈4—5〉
Control
Size
Description
32-bit Prior to each MMT block move, the program must initialize the corresponding
SADD〈4—5〉 register with the starting address in memory for the source block (read
data). The DMAU updates the register with the address of the next memory location to
be read by the specified MMT channel as the block move proceeds. Table 37 on
page 77 describes the bit fields of SADD〈4—5〉.
20-bit This register contains the source row and column counter for the corresponding
channel. The DMAU updates the register as the block move proceeds and automatically
clears the register upon the completion of the block move. The source row (SROW) is
encoded in SCNT〈4—5〉[19:7], and the source column (SCOL) is encoded in
SCNT〈4—5〉[6:0].
Note: SCNT〈4—5〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU channel via the DMCON1
register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an MMT channel can be used, the program must clear the corresponding SCNT〈4—5〉 register after a DSP16410CG
device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
32-bit Prior to each MMT block move, the program must initialize the corresponding
DADD〈4—5〉 register with the starting address in memory for the destination block (write
data). The DMAU updates the register with the address of the next memory location to
be written by the specified MMT channel as the block move proceeds. Table 37 on
page 77 describes the bit fields of DADD〈4—5〉.
20-bit This register contains the destination row and column counter for the corresponding
channel. The DMAU updates the register as the block move proceeds and automatically
clears the register upon the completion of the block move. The destination row (DROW)
is encoded in DCNT〈4—5〉[19:7] and the destination column (DCOL) is encoded in
DCNT〈4—5〉[6:0].
Note: DCNT〈4—5〉 are not cleared by a reset of the DMAU channel via the DMCON1
register (Table 32 on page 72). Before an MMT channel can be used, the user
program must clear the corresponding DCNT〈4—5〉 register after a
DSP16410CG device reset. Otherwise, the value of this register is undefined.
20-bit The user programs LIM〈4—5〉 with the last row count and the last column count for both
the source and destination blocks for the corresponding channel. The last row count is
the number of rows minus one and is encoded in the LASTROW field (LIM〈4—5〉[19:7]).
The last column count is the number of columns minus one and is encoded in the LASTCOL field (LIM〈4—5〉[6:0]). Typically, LASTCOL is zero for a block move.
16-bit CTL〈4—5〉 controls interrupt generation for both the source and destination block
moves.
The two 16-bit DMAU master control registers, DMCON0 and DMCON1, influence the operation of the MMT channels. The 32-bit DMAU status register, DSTAT, reflects the status of any MMT transfer. The bit field definition of
the DMAU control and status registers is given in Section 4.13.2.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.7 Interrupts and Priority Resolution
The DMAU provides information to both cores of the DSP16410CG in the form of status and interrupts. A core can
determine status by reading the DMAU’s memory-mapped DSTAT register, which reflects the current state of any
DMAU channel. The field definitions for DSTAT are defined in Table 30 on page 69.
A core can configure the DMAU interrupts by programming the corresponding SIGCON[2:0] field
(CTL〈0—3〉[3:1]—Table 34 on page 74 and CTL〈4—5〉[3:1]—Table 36 on page 76). Several DMAU interrupt signals are multiplexed to each core, so not all DMAU interrupt requests can be monitored by a core simultaneously.
Refer to Section 4.4.2 regarding the interrupt multiplexer, IMUX. Table 50 provides a list of the DMAU interrupt signals and their descriptions.
Table 50. DMAU Interrupts
DMAU Channel
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
Description†
SIU0 source (output) transaction complete
SIU0 destination (input) transaction complete
SIU0 source (output) transaction complete
SIU0 destination (input) transaction complete
SIU1 source (output) transaction complete
SIU1 destination (input) transaction complete
SIU1 source (output) transaction complete
SIU1 destination (input) transaction complete
Memory-to-memory transfer complete
Memory-to-memory transfer complete
DSP Core Interrupt Name
DSINT0
DDINT0
DSINT1
DDINT1
DSINT2
DDINT2
DSINT3
DDINT3
DMINT4
DMINT5
† The SIGCON[2:0] field of the channel’s CTL〈0—5〉 register determines the condition under which the DMAU asserts the interrupt. See Table 34 on
page 74 for a description of CTL〈0—3〉, or Table 36 on page 76 for a description of CTL〈4—5〉).
92
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
4.13.7 Interrupts and Priority Resolution (continued)
The DMAU provides arbitration for requests from many
sources. If multiple requests are pending simultaneously, the DMAU completes its current transaction1
and then provides access to the source that has the
highest priority. The order of priority, from highest to
lowest, is as follows:
1. SWT0 source transaction (SIU0 output) (highest)
2. SWT0 destination transaction (SIU0 input)
3. SWT1 source transaction (SIU0 output)
4. SWT1 destination transaction (SIU0 input)
5. SWT2 source transaction (SIU1 output)
6. SWT2 destination transaction (SIU1 input)
7. SWT3 source transaction (SIU1 output)
8. SWT3 destination transaction (SIU1 input)
9. PIU
10. MMT4 destination write
11. MMT5 destination write
12. MMT4 source fetch
13. MMT5 source fetch (lowest)
MMT channel block transfers that are in progress are
paused if any SWT or PIU bypass channel request
occurs. The single SWT or bypass channel transaction
completes, and then the paused MMT channel block
transfer resumes.
MMT channel priority can be changed by the user
software. The default priority of the MMT channels is
listed above. If both MMT4 and MMT5 require service
at the same time, an MMT4 request has higher priority
than the corresponding MMT5 request. The default
operation does not allow a new MMT request to interrupt an MMT block transfer already in progress, i.e.,
the DMAU’s default condition is to start and complete
an MMT block transfer before a new MMT block transfer can begin. Any MMT block transfer can be interrupted by any SWT or PIU bypass channel transaction.
The default operation of the MMT channels can be
changed. The HPRIM field (DMCON0[15]—Table 31
on page 71) is used to select the relative priority of
MMT4 and MMT5. If HPRIM is cleared (the default),
MMT4 has higher priority than MMT5. If HPRIM is set,
MMT5 has the higher priority.
A higher-priority MMT channel can be made to interrupt
a lower-priority MMT channel block transfer already in
progress. The MINT field (DMCON0[14]) controls this
feature. If MINT is cleared, MMT channels do not interrupt each other, as stated above, and an MMT block
transfer already in progress completes before another
MMT channel request is taken. If MINT is set, the
higher-priority MMT channel can interrupt the lower-priority channel as determined by the HPRIM field
setting. In a typical application, the higher-priority
channel is assigned to moving small, time-critical data
blocks, and the lower-priority channel is assigned to
large, less time-critical blocks. This feature alleviates
latency that can be incurred due to the transfer of large
data blocks.
1. A request to the DMAU can result in more than one transaction, a transaction being the transfer of one single (16-bit) or double (32-bit) word.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
For the MMT〈4—5〉 channels, the DMAU sets the corresponding ERR[5:4] field if:
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
!
The user software attempts to set the TRIGGER[5:4]
field by writing 1 to DMCON0[11:10] and the TRIGGER[5:4] field is already set.
!
The user software attempts to set the TRIGGER[5:4]
field by writing 1 to DMCON0[11:10] and the
RESET[5:4] field (DMCON1[5:4]) is set.
4.13.8 Error Reporting and Recovery
Each of the ERR[5:0] fields of the DSTAT register
(Table 30 on page 69) reflects a DMAU protocol failure
that indicates a loss of data for the corresponding
channel. For the SWT〈0—3〉 channels, the DMAU sets
the corresponding ERR[3:0] field if:
!
!
!
!
An SIU〈0—1〉 requests DMAU service for a channel
before the DMAU has accepted the previous request
from that SIU〈0—1〉 for that channel.
An SIU〈0—1〉 requests DMAU service for a channel,
and that channel’s RESET[3:0] field
(DMCON1[3:0]—Table 32 on page 72) is set.
An SIU〈0—1〉 requests DMAU destination/source
service for a channel, and that channel’s
DRUN[3:0]/SRUN[3:0] field
(DMCON0[7:0]—Table 31 on page 71) is cleared.
An SIU〈0—1〉 requests DMAU service for a channel,
and that channel’s source/destination transfer is
complete (SCNT〈0—3〉/DCNT〈0—3〉 = LIM〈0—3〉),
and that channel’s AUTOLOAD field
(CTL〈0—3〉[0]—Table 34 on page 74) is cleared.
94
If servicing a DMAU channel interrupt, the user software should poll DSTAT to determine whether an error
has occurred. If so, the user software must perform the
following steps:
1. Set the corresponding RESET[5:0] field
(DMCON1[5:0]) to terminate all channel activity.
2. Write a 1 to the corresponding ERR[5:0] field to clear
the field and the error condition.
3. Reinitialize the corresponding channel address and
count registers.
4. Clear the corresponding RESET[5:0] field to reallow
channel activity.
5. For an MMT channel, re-enable a channel transfer
by setting the appropriate TRIGGER[5:4] field
(DMCON0[11:10]).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.9 Programming Examples
This section illustrates three typical DMAU applications.
4.13.9.1 SWT Example 1: A Two-Dimensional Array
This example describes the input and output of four channels of full-duplex TDM speech data from SIU0 with the
following assumptions:
!
The data is double-buffered to avoid latencies and the potential of missing samples.
!
Input and output data have the same array size and structure and are processed by the SWT0 channel.
!
There are four logical channels (time slots) grouped in four contiguous double buffers, corresponding to the number of columns (n) in a two-dimensional array.
!
Each single buffer has 160 elements, or rows (r), and each double buffer has a length of 320 (0x140).
!
CORE0 begins processing data after 160 samples have been input for all four logical channels.
!
SIU0 input (destination) data begins at address 0x01000 in TPRAM0.
!
SIU0 output (source) data begins at address 0x02000 in TPRAM0.
!
The autoload feature is used to minimize core intervention.
Figure 23 illustrates this data structure. This example does not discuss the setup and control of SIU0.
A Two-Dimensional Data Structure for Double-Buffering n Channels
ROW=159
0x023C0
SOURCE
BUFFER
COMPLETE
ROW=159
ROW=319
ROW=319
ROW=0
ROW=1
ROW=159
0x013C0
DESTINATION
BUFFER COMPLETE
(SIGCON=0x3)
COL=0
COL=1
SINGLE
BUFFER
DOUBLE
BUFFER
STR0
(0x140)
COL=0
ROW=159
0x01280
ROW=319
ROW=0
ROW=1
ROW=319
ROW=0
ROW=1
COL=2
ROW=319
ROW=0
ROW=1
ROW=159
ROW=319
ROW=0
ROW=1
ROW=159
COL=3
0x02280
ROW=0
ROW=1
RI0 = –959 (0x803BF)
AUTOLOAD
ROW=159
0x01140
COL=1
ROW=319
ROW=0
ROW=1
COL=3
0x02140
ROW=159
0x01000
(DBAS0)
COL=2
STR0
(0x140)
ROW=0
ROW=1
RI0 = –959 (0x803BF)
AUTOLOAD
0x02000
(SBAS0)
INPUT DESTINATION ARRAY
SINGLE
BUFFER
DOUBLE
BUFFER
OUTPUT SOURCE ARRAY
ROW=319
DESTINATION
ARRAY COMPLETE
(SIGCON=0x5)
SOURCE
ARRAY
COMPLETE
Figure 23. Example of a Two-Dimensional Double-Buffered Data Structure
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit
(DMAU) (continued)
4.13.9 Programming Examples (continued)
4.13.9.1 SWT Example 1: A Two-Dimensional
Array (continued)
The user software running in CORE0 must perform the
following steps to properly initialize SWT0:
1. The user software sets the source address
(SADD0—Table 37 on page 77) and the source
base address (SBAS0—Table 44 on page 81) to the
top of the output (source) array located in
TPRAM0. The user software writes 0x00002000 to
SADD0 and 0x02000 to SBAS0.
two-dimensional array accesses, writes 0x3 to the
SIGCON[2:0] field (CTL0[3:1]), and writes 1 to the
AUTOLOAD field (CTL0[0]) so that no further core
interaction is needed. The user software writes
0x0017 to CTL0.
8. Finally, the user software sets both the SRUN0 and
DRUN0 fields (DMCON0[0] and DMCON0[4]—
Table 31 on page 71) to enable SWT0 source and
destination transfers. The user software writes
0x0011 to DMCON0.
The DMAU begins processing the SWT0 input and output channels. For the output channel, the DMAU performs the following steps:
1. It reads the single word at the TPRAM0 location
pointed to by SADD0 (0x00002000) and transfers
the data to SIU0. This data is the first output sample
for the first logical channel (ROW = 0 and COL = 0).
2. The user software sets the destination address
(DADD0—Table 37 on page 77) and the destination
base address (DBAS0—Table 45 on page 81) to the
top of the input (destination) array located in
TPRAM0. The user software writes 0x00001000 to
DADD0 and 0x01000 to DBAS0.
2. It increments SADD0 by the contents of STR0, so
SADD0 contains 0x00002140 and points to the first
output sample for the second logical channel
(ROW = 0 and COL = 1). It updates SCNT0 by
incrementing the column counter, so SCNT0 contains 0x00001.
3. The user software clears the source and destination
counter registers SCNT0 and DCNT0 (Table 38 on
page 78 and Table 40 on page 79).
3. It reads the data at 0x02140 and transfers it to SIU0.
4. The user software initializes the limit register
(LIM0—Table 42 on page 80) with the dimensions of
the array. The number of rows (or elements) is 2r
(320), so the user software writes 319 (2r – 1) into
the LASTROW[12:0] field (LIM0[19:7]). The number
of columns is 4, so the user software writes 3 (n – 1)
into the LASTCOL[6:0] field (LIM0[6:0]). The user
software writes 0x09F83 into LIM0.
5. The user software initializes the stride register
(STR0—Table 46 on page 82) with the distance
between corresponding rows of consecutive columns. Because the buffers are contiguous in this
example, the stride is the same as the buffer length
and the user software writes 0x0140 into STR0.
6. The user software initializes the reindex register
(RI0—Table 47 on page 82) with the sign-magnitude
postmodification value to be applied to SADD0 and
DADD0 after each time that the last column has
been accessed. The magnitude of the reindex value
is ((2r × (n – 1)) – 1) or (320 × 3) – 1 = 959 = 0x3BF.
The sign must be negative, so the user software
writes 0x803BF into RI0.
7. The user software writes the control registers to
enable SWT0 and begin I/O processing. First, the
user software writes one into the POSTMOD[1:0]
field (CTL0[5:4]—Table 34 on page 74) to enable
96
4. It increments SADD0 by the contents of STR0, so
SADD0 contains 0x00002280 and points to the first
output sample for the third logical channel (ROW = 0
and COL = 2). It updates SCNT0 by incrementing
the column counter, so SCNT0 contains 0x00002.
5. As in steps 3 and 4, the DMAU continues to read
data, transfer the data to SIU0, and update SADD0
and SCNT0 until the column counter equals the last
column (SCNT0[6:0] = LIM0[6:0] = 3). SADD0 contains 0x000023C0 and points to the first row of the
last column.
6. The DMAU subtracts the magnitude of the contents
of RI0 from SADD0 (0x000023C0 – 0x3BF) and
places the result into SADD0 (0x00002001).
SADD0 points to the second output sample for the
first logical channel (ROW = 1 and COL = 0).
The DMAU continues processing in this manner until it
processes row 159 of column 3. At this point,
ROW = LASTROW/2 and COL = LASTCOL. Because
this condition is met and SIGCON[2:0] = 0x3, the
DMAU asserts the DSINT0 interrupt to CORE0.
CORE0’s ISR changes SIGCON[2:0] to 0x5 so that the
DMAU asserts DSINT0 again after it has processed the
remaining samples in the buffers. CORE0 can overwrite the already-processed samples while the DMAU
continues to process the remaining samples.
The steps performed by the DMAU for the input channel are similar to those for the output channel.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.9 Programming Examples (continued)
4.13.9.2 SWT Example 2: A One-Dimensional Array
This example describes the input of four blocks of speech data from SIU1 with the following assumptions:
!
The data is single-buffered.
!
Data is processed by the SWT3 channel.
!
There are four blocks of data grouped in four contiguous buffers, corresponding to the number of columns (n) in
a one-dimensional array.
!
Each single buffer has 160 elements, or rows (r = 0xA0).
!
The DMAU fills four buffers in sequential order, i.e., it receives all 160 samples of one buffer and then all
160 samples of the next buffer, etc.
!
The DMAU places the data in ascending linear order in memory, beginning at TPRAM1 address 0x01000.
!
CORE1 begins processing data after 160 samples have been input.
!
The autoload feature is used to minimize core intervention.
Figure 24 illustrates the data structure for this example.
A One-Dimensional Data Structure for Buffering n Input Channels
INPUT DESTINATION ARRAY
ROW =159
ROW=0
ROW=1
0x01140
ROW =159
ROW=0
ROW=1
0x011E0
ROW =159
ROW=0
ROW=1
DESTINATION
BUFFER COMPLETE
DESTINATION
BUFFER COMPLETE
DESTINATION
BUFFER COMPLETE
COL=2
0x010A0
AUTOLOAD
DESTINATION
BUFFER COMPLETE
COL=1
COL=0
ROW=0
ROW=1
COL=3
0x01000
(DBAS3)
ROW =159
Figure 24. Example of One-Dimensional Data Structure
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.9 Programming Examples (continued)
4.13.9.2 SWT Example 2: A One-Dimensional
Array (continued)
The user software running in CORE1 must perform the
following steps to properly initialize SWT3:
1. The user software sets the destination address
(DADD3—Table 37 on page 77) and the destination
base address (DBAS3—Table 45 on page 81) to the
top of the input (destination) array located in
TPRAM1. The user software writes 0x00101000 to
DADD3 and 0x01000 to DBAS3.
2. The user software clears the destination counter
(DCNT3—Table 40 on page 79).
3. The user software initializes the limit register
(LIM3—Table 42 on page 80) with the dimensions of
the array. The number of rows (or elements) is 160,
so the user software writes 159 (r – 1) into the LASTROW[12:0] field (LIM3[19:7]). The number of columns is 4, so the user software writes 3 (n – 1) into
the LASTCOL[6:0] field (LIM3[6:0]). The user software writes 0x04F83 to LIM3.
The DMAU begins processing the SWT3 input channel
and performs the following steps:
1. It receives data from SIU1 and writes it to the singleword TPRAM1 location pointed to by DADD3
(0x00101000). This data is the first input sample for
the first buffer (ROW = 0 and COL = 0).
2. It increments DADD3 by one, so DADD3 contains
0x00101001 and points to the second input sample
for the first buffer (ROW = 1 and COL = 0). It
updates SCNT3 by incrementing the row counter, so
SCNT3 contains 0x00080.
3. It receives data from SIU1 and writes it to the singleword TPRAM1 location pointed to by DADD3
(0x00101001).
The DMAU continues processing in this manner until it
fills row 159 of column 0. At this point, ROW = LASTROW and COL = 0. Because this condition is met
and SIGCON[2:0] = 0x4, the DMAU asserts the
DDINT3 interrupt to CORE1. CORE1 can begin processing the first buffer while the DMAU continues to fill
the second buffer.
4. The user software writes the control registers to
enable SWT3 and begin I/O processing. First, the
user software writes two into the POSTMOD[1:0]
field (CTL3[5:4]—Table 34 on page 74) to enable
one-dimensional array accesses, writes 0x4 to the
SIGCON[2:0] field (CTL3[3:1]), and writes 1 to the
AUTOLOAD field (CTL3[0]) so that no further core
interaction is needed. The user software writes
0x0029 to CTL3.
5. Finally, the user software sets the DRUN3 field
(DMCON0[7]—Table 31 on page 71) to enable
SWT3 destination transfers. The user software
writes 0x0080 to DMCON0.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.13 Direct Memory Access Unit (DMAU) (continued)
4.13.9 Programming Examples (continued)
4.13.9.3 MMT Example
This example illustrates the use of MMT4 to move a source block of 100 rows or elements (r = 100) in TPRAM0 to
a destination block in TPRAM1, as Figure 25 illustrates. For this example, the source address in TPRAM0 is
0x01000 and the destination address in TPRAM1 is 0x02000.
Memory-to-Memory Block Transfer
SOURCE ARRAY
DESTINATION ARRAY
TRANSFER
ROW=0
0x0102000 (DADD4)
ROW =1
ROW=1
0x0102002
ROW=49
ROW=99
ROW=49
COL=0
ROW =0
0x0001002
COL=0
(SADD4) 0x0001000
TRANSFER
1/2 COMPLETE
ROW =99
Figure 25. Memory-to-Memory Block Transfer
The user software running in one of the cores must perform the following steps to properly initialize MMT4:
1. The user software writes the source address (SADD4—Table 37 on page 77) with the top of the output (source)
block located in TPRAM0. The user software writes 0x00001000 to SADD4.
2. The user software writes the destination address (DADD4—Table 37 on page 77) with the top of the input (destination) block located in TPRAM1. The user software writes 0x00102000 to DADD4.
3. The user software clears the source and destination counter registers SCNT4 and DCNT4 (Table 39 on page 78
and Table 41 on page 79).
4. The user software initializes the limit register (LIM4—Table 43 on page 80) with the dimensions of the
array. The number of rows (or elements) is 100, so the user software writes 99 (r – 1) into the LASTROW[12:0]
field (LIM4[19:7] = 0x63). The number of columns is one, so the user software writes zero into the LASTCOL[6:0] field (LIM4[6:0]). The user software writes 0x03180 to LIM4.
5. The user software writes the control registers to enable MMT4 and begin block processing. First, the user software writes two into the POSTMOD[1:0] field (CTL4[5:4]—Table 36 on page 76) to enable pointer and counter
update operations, and writes 0x1 to the SIGCON[2:0] field (CTL4[3:1]). The user software writes 0x0022 to
CTL4.
6. Finally, the user software sets the SLKA4 field (DMCON0[8]—Table 31 on page 71) to enable source lookahead, sets the XSIZE4 field (DMCON0[12]) to transfer 32-bit words, and sets the TRIGGER4 field
(DMCON0[10]) to initiate MMT4 block transfers. The user software writes 0x1500 to DMCON0.
The DMAU begins processing the MMT4 channel. For each read operation from TPRAM0 starting at address
0x01000, the DMAU increments SADD4 by two and increments the SROW[12:0] field of SCNT4 by one. The
DMAU performs multiple fetches from TPRAM0 and places the data into the source look-ahead buffer. For each
write operation to TPRAM1 starting at address 0x02000, the DMAU increments DADD4 by two and increments the
SROW[12:0] field of DCNT4 by one. Because SIGCON[2:0] = 0x1, the DMAU interrupts the cores when the transfer is half complete (DROW[12:0] = LASTROW/2 = LASTROW[12:0]>>1 = 0x31 or DCNT4 = 0x1880). The ISR
then changes SIGCON[2:0] to 0x4 to cause the DMAU to interrupt the cores again when the transfer is complete
(DROW[12:0] = LASTROW[12:0] or DCNT4 = LIM4 = 0x3180).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
These features are controlled via a combination of
SEMI pins and control registers. Some additional features of the SEMI are the following:
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI)
The system and external memory interface (SEMI) is
the DSP16410CG interface to external memory and
memory-mapped off-chip peripherals:
!
The SEMI supports a maximum total external memory size of 18 Mwords (16-bit words) through a combination of an address bus, an address bus
extension, and decoded enables.
!
The SEMI can configure the external data bus as
either 16 bits or 32 bits.
!
The SEMI can support a mix of asynchronous memory and synchronous, pipelined ZBT (zero bus turnaround) SRAMs.
!
The SEMI provides support for bus arbitration logic
for shared-memory systems.
!
The SEMI provides programmable enable assertion,
setup, and hold times for external asynchronous
memory.
!
The SEMI arbitrates and prioritizes accesses from
both cores and from the DMAU.
!
The SEMI allows the cores to boot from internal or
external memory controlled by the state of an input
pin.
!
The SEMI controls the internal system bus, which
allows the cores, the DMAU, and the PIU to access
the shared internal I/O memory component. This
component includes the SLM and the internal memory-mapped registers within the DMAU, SIU0, SIU1,
PIU, and SEMI.
Figure 26 depicts the internal and external interfaces to
the SEMI. The SEMI interfaces directly to the X-memory space buses and Y-memory space buses for both
cores and to the DMAU’s external Z-memory space
buses. This allows:
!
Either core to perform external program or data
accesses.
!
Either core or the DMAU to access the SLM or internal memory-mapped registers.
SEMI Interface Block Diagram
EXTERNAL SIGNALS
DSP16410CG
YDB
CORE1
YAB
XDB
XAB
32
20
32
20
EYMODE
YDB1
YAB1
ED[31:0]
XDB1
EA[18:0]
XAB1
ESEG[3:0]
ADDRESS
AND
DATA
ERAMN
YDB
YAB
CORE0
XDB
XAB
ZEDB
DMAU
ZEAB
ZSEG
32
20
32
20
32
20
4
YDB0
EROMN
YAB0
EION
XDB0
SEMI
XAB0
ERWN[1:0]
ESIZE
ZEDB
ERTYPE
ZEAB
EXM
ZSEG
ERDY
EREQN
SYSTEM BUS
(TO SLM, PIU,
SIU0, AND SIU1)
SAB
SAB
SDB
SDB
ENABLES
AND
STROBES
CONFIGURATION
BUS
ARBITRATION
EACKN
ECKO
CLOCK
Figure 26. SEMI Interface Block Diagram
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface
Table 51 provides an overview of the SEMI pins. These pins are described in detail in the remainder of this section.
Table 51. Overview of SEMI Pins
Function
Clock
Configuration
Pin
ECKO
ESIZE
Type
O External clock.
I
Size of external SEMI data bus:
Description
ESIZE = 0 selects 16-bit data bus.
ERTYPE
I
ESIZE = 1 selects 32-bit data bus.
EROM type:
ERTYPE = 0 selects asynchronous memory for the EROM component.
EXM
I
ERTYPE = 1 selects synchronous pipelined ZBT SRAM for the EROM component.
Boot source:
EXM = 0 selects IROM.
Bus Arbitration
for Asynchronous
Memory
Enables
and Strobes
EREQN
EACKN
ERDY
ERAMN
EROMN
EION
ERWN[1:0]
I
O
I
O/Z
O/Z
O/Z
O/Z
EXM = 1 selects EROM.
External request for SEMI bus (negative assertion).
SEMI acknowledge for external request (negative assertion).
External device ready for asynchronous access.
ERAM component enable (negative assertion).
EROM component enable (negative assertion).
EIO component enable (negative assertion).
External read/write not:
If ESIZE = 0 (16-bit external bus):
ERWN1: Inactive (logic high).
ERWN0: Write enable (negative assertion).
Address
and Data
ED[31:0]
EA[18:1]
EA0
If ESIZE = 1 (32-bit external bus):
ERWN1: Odd word (least significant 16 bits) write enable (negative assertion).
ERWN0: Even word (most significant 16 bits) write enable (negative assertion).
I/O/Z Bidirectional 32-bit external data bus.
O/Z External address bus bits 18—1.
O/Z If ESIZE = 0:
External address bus bit 0.
If ESIZE = 1 and the external component is synchronous†:
ESEG[3:0]
EYMODE
O/Z
I
Write strobe (negative assertion).
External segment address.
This pin determines the mode of the external data bus. It must be static and tied to
VSS (if the SEMI is used) or VDD2 (if the SEMI is not used). If EYMODE = 0, the external data bus ED[31:0] operates normally as described above. If EYMODE = 1,
ED[31:0] are statically configured as outputs (regardless of the state of RSTN) and
must not be connected externally. If EYMODE = 1, external pull-up resistors are not
needed on ED[31:0]. See Section 10.1 on page 267 for details.
† The EROM component is synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM component is synchronous if YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is set and the
EIO component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface (continued)
4.14.1.1 Configuration
The SEMI configuration pins are inputs that are individually tied high or low based on system requirements. The
ESIZE and ERTYPE pins reflect the configuration of the external memory system. The EXM pin specifies the
memory boot area for the DSP16000 cores. Table 52 details the SEMI configuration pins.
Table 52. Configuration Pins for the SEMI External Interface
F
Pin
Value
ESIZE
0 Configures external data bus as 16 bits:
(input)
! ED[31:16] is active and ED[15:0] is 3-state.
Description
!
EA[18:0] provides the address.
!
For a single-word (16-bit) access, the SEMI places the address onto EA[18:0]:
— For a read, the SEMI transfers the word from ED[31:16].
— For a write, the SEMI drives the word onto ED[31:16] and asserts ERWN0.
For a double-word (32-bit) access, the SEMI performs two single-word (16-bit) accesses:
— First, the SEMI accesses the most significant half of the double word at the original address (see singleword (16-bit) access described above).
— Second, the SEMI increments the address and accesses the least significant half of the double word
(see single-word (16-bit) access described above).
Configures external data bus as 32 bits:
!
1
!
EA[18:1] provides the even address.
!
For a single-word (16-bit) access to an even location:
— For a read, the SEMI transfers the word from ED[31:16] and ignores ED[15:0].
— For a write, the SEMI drives the word onto ED[31:16] and asserts ERWN0†.
!
For a single-word (16-bit) access to an odd location:
— For a read, the SEMI transfers the word from ED[15:0] and ignores ED[31:16].
— For a write, the SEMI drives the word onto ED[15:0] asserts ERWN1†.
!
For a double-word (32-bit) aligned access, i.e., an access to an even address:
— For a read, the SEMI transfers the double word from ED[31:0].
— For a write, the SEMI drives the double word onto ED[31:0] and asserts ERWN0 and ERWN1†.
For a double-word (32-bit) misaligned access, the SEMI performs two single-word (16-bit) accesses:
— First, the SEMI accesses the most significant half of the double word at the original address (see singleword (16-bit) access to an odd location described above).
— Second, the SEMI increments the address and accesses the least significant half of the double word
(see single-word (16-bit) access to an even location described above).
The EROM component is populated with ROM or asynchronous SRAM, and the SEMI performs asynchronous accesses to the EROM component.
The EROM component is populated with synchronous ZBT SRAM, and the SEMI performs synchronous
accesses to the EROM component.
If EXM is logic low when the RSTN pin makes a low-to-high transition, both cores begin program execution
from their internal ROM (IROM) memory at location 0x20000.
If EXM is logic high when the RSTN pin makes a low-to-high transition, both cores begin program execution
from external ROM (EROM) memory at location 0x80000. The SEMI arbitrates the accesses from the two
cores.
!
ERTYPE
(input)
0
1
EXM
(input)
0
1
† For a synchronous write, the SEMI also asserts EA0 as a write strobe. The EROM component is synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic high. The
ERAM component is synchronous if the YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is set. The EIO component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is
set. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface (continued)
4.14.1.2 Asynchronous Memory Bus Arbitration
The SEMI allows an external device to request direct access to an asynchronous external memory by asserting the
EREQN pin. The SEMI acknowledges the external request by asserting its EACKN pin. The SEMI allows an
external device to extend the duration of an external asynchronous access by deasserting the ERDY pin.
Table 53. Asynchronous Memory Bus Arbitration Pins
Pin
EREQN
(negativeassertion input)
Description
An external device asserts EREQN (low) to request direct access to an asynchronous external memory. If
the NOSHARE field (ECON1[8]—see Table 60 on page 111) is set, the DSP16410CG ignores the
request. If NOSHARE is cleared, a minimum of four cycles later the SEMI grants the request by performing
the following:
!
First, the SEMI completes any external access that is already in progress.
!
The SEMI 3-states the address bus and segment address (EA[18:0] and ESEG[3:0]), the data bus
(ED[31:0]), and all the external enables and strobes (ERAMN, EROMN, EION, and ERWN[1:0]) until the
external device deasserts EREQN. The SEMI continues to drive ECKO.
!
The SEMI acknowledges the request by asserting EACKN.
The cores and the DMAU continue processing. If a core or the DMAU attempts to perform an external
memory access, it stalls until the external device relinquishes the bus. If the external device deasserts
EREQN (changes EREQN from 0 to 1), four cycles later the SEMI deasserts EACKN (changes EACKN
from 0 to 1). To avoid external bus contention, the external device must wait for at least ATIMEMAX cycles†
after it deasserts EREQN (changes EREQN from 0 to 1) before reasserting EREQN (changing EREQN
from 1 to 0). The software can read the state of the EREQN pin in the EREQN field (ECON1[4]—see
Table 60 on page 111).
EACKN
(negativeassertion output)
ERDY
(positiveassertion input)
Note: If EREQN is not in use by the application, it must be tied high.
The SEMI acknowledges the request of an external device for direct access to an asynchronous external
memory by asserting EACKN. See the description of the EREQN pin above for details. The software can
read the state of the EACKN pin in the EACKN field (ECON1[5]—see Table 60 on page 111).
An external device instructs the SEMI to extend the duration of the current asynchronous external memory
access by driving ERDY low. See Section 4.14.5.2 for details. The software can read the state of the ERDY
pin in the EREADY field (ECON1[6]—see Table 60 on page 111).
Note: If this pin is not in use by the application or if all external memory is synchronous, ERDY must be tied
high.
† ATIMEMAX is the greatest of IATIME (ECON0[11:8]), YATIME (ECON0[7:4]), and XATIME (ECON0[3:0]).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface (continued)
4.14.1.3 Enables and Strobes
The SEMI provides a negative-assertion external memory enable output pin for each of the three external memory
components: ERAM, EIO, and EROM. These pins are the active-low enables for the external memory components
ERAM (external RAM), EROM (external ROM), and EIO (external I/O). Refer to the memory maps described in
Section 4.5 on page 38 and shown in Figures 6, 7, 8, and 9 for details about these memory components. The
SEMI provides two negative-assertion write strobe output pins, ERWN[1:0]. Table 54 details the SEMI enables and
strobe pins. The SEMI 3-states the enables and strobes if it grants a request by an external device to access the
external memory (see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
Table 54. Enable and Strobe Pins for the SEMI External Interface
Pin
Value
Description
ERAMN
0
The SEMI is selecting the ERAM memory component for an access. The SEMI asserts this enable
(negativefor a duration based on whether the ERAM memory component is configured as asynchronous or
assertion output)
synchronous:
!
If the ERAM memory component is configured as asynchronous (the YTYPE field
(ECON1[9]—see Table 60 on page 111) is cleared), the SEMI asserts ERAMN for the number of
instruction cycles specified by the YATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[7:4]—see Table 59 on page 110).
If the ERAM memory component is configured as synchronous (the YTYPE field is set), the SEMI
asserts ERAMN for two instruction cycles (one ECKO cycle†) for a read or write operation.
The SEMI is not selecting the ERAM memory component for an access.
The SEMI 3-states ERAMN if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory (see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
The SEMI is selecting the EIO memory component for an access. The SEMI asserts this enable for
a duration based on whether the EIO memory component is configured as asynchronous or synchronous:
!
1
Z
EION
(negativeassertion output)
0
!
If the EIO memory component is configured as asynchronous (the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]—see
Table 60 on page 111) is cleared), the SEMI asserts EION for the number of instruction cycles
specified by the IATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[11:8]—see Table 59 on page 110).
If the EIO memory component is configured as synchronous (the ITYPE field is set), the SEMI
asserts EION for two instruction cycles (one ECKO cycle†) for a read or write operation.
The SEMI is not selecting the EIO memory component for an access.
The SEMI 3-states EION if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory
(see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
The SEMI is selecting the EROM memory component for an access†. The SEMI asserts this enable
for a duration based on whether the EROM memory component is configured as asynchronous or
synchronous:
!
1
Z
EROMN
(negativeassertion output)
0
!
If the EROM memory component is configured as asynchronous (the ERTYPE pin is low), the
SEMI asserts EROMN for the number of instruction cycles specified by the XATIME[3:0] field
(ECON0[3:0]—see Table 59 on page 110).
If the EROM memory component is configured as synchronous (the ERTYPE pin is high), the
SEMI asserts EROMN for two instruction cycles (one ECKO cycle†) for a read or write operation‡.
The SEMI is not selecting the EROM memory component for a read access.
The SEMI 3-states EROMN if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory (see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
!
1
Z
† If any memory component is configured as synchronous, ECKO must be programmed as CLK/2, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on
page 111) must be programmed to 0x0.
‡ The SEMI can write the EROM component only if the WEROM field (ECON1[11]—see Table 60 on page 111) is set.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface (continued)
4.14.1.3 Enables and Strobes (continued)
Table 54. Enable and Strobe Pins for the SEMI External Interface (continued)
Pin
Value
Description
ERWN1
0
The external memory is configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE pin is high), and the SEMI is perform(negativeing an external write access over the least significant half of the external data bus (ED[15:0]).
assertion output)
1
The external memory is configured for 16-bit data (the ESIZE pin is low) or the external memory is
configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE pin is high), and the SEMI is not performing an external write
access over the least significant half of the external data bus (ED[15:0]).
Z
The SEMI 3-states ERWN1 if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory (see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
ERWN0
0
The SEMI is performing an external write access over the most significant half of the external data
(negativebus (ED[31:16]).
assertion output)
1
The SEMI is not performing an external write access over the most significant half of the external
data bus (ED[31:16]).
Z
The SEMI 3-states ERWN0 if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory (see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
† If any memory component is configured as synchronous, ECKO must be programmed as CLK/2, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on
page 111) must be programmed to 0x0.
‡ The SEMI can write the EROM component only if the WEROM field (ECON1[11]—see Table 60 on page 111) is set.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface (continued)
4.14.1.4 Address and Data
The SEMI provides a 32-bit external data bus,
ED[31:0]. If the external memory is configured for
16-bit data (the ESIZE input pin is low), the SEMI uses
only the upper half of the data bus (ED[31:16]). The
SEMI provides a 19-bit external address bus, EA[18:0],
to select a location within the selected external memory
component (ERAM, EIO, or EROM). If the external
memory is configured for 16-bit data, the SEMI uses
EA[18:0] to address single (16-bit) words within the
selected memory component. If the external memory
is configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE input pin is
high), the SEMI uses EA[18:1] to address double
(32-bit) words within the selected memory component
and does not use EA0 as an address bit. For more
detail, see Table 55 or Section 4.14.2.
The SEMI provides the ESEG[3:0] pins to expand the
size of each of the external memory components, using
one of the following methods:
1. ESEG[3:0] can be interpreted by the external memory system as four separate decoded address
enable signals. Each ESEG[3:0] pin individually
selects one of four segments for each memory
component. This results in four glueless 512 Kword
(1 Mbyte) ERAM segments, four glueless 512 Kword
(1 Mbyte) EROM segments, and four glueless
128 Kword (256 Kbytes) EIO segments.
2. ESEG[3:0] can be interpreted by the external memory system as an extension of the address bus, i.e.,
the ESEG[3:0] pins can be concatenated with the
EAB[18:0] pins to form a 23-bit address. This results
in one glueless 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) ERAM segment, one glueless 8 Mword (16 Mbytes) EROM
segment, and one glueless 2 Mword (4 Mbytes) EIO
segment.
For external accesses by either core, the SEMI places
the contents of a field in one of four segment address
extension registers onto the ESEG[3:0] pins. The four
segment address extension registers are described in
Section 4.14.4. For external accesses by the DMAU or
PIU, the contents of address registers within those
units determine the state of the ESEG[3:0] pins. See
Table 55 for more detail.
Table 55. Address and Data Bus Pins for the SEMI External Interface
Pins
ED[31:16]
(input/output)
ED[15:0]
(input/output)
!
Description
If the external memory is configured for 16-bit data (the ESIZE pin is low), the SEMI uses ED[31:16] for all
external accesses.
!
If the external memory is configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE pin is high), the SEMI uses ED[31:16] if:
— The SEMI is accessing a single word (16 bits) at an even address.
— The SEMI is accessing a double word at an even (aligned) address.
— The SEMI is accessing the least significant half of a double word at an odd (misaligned) double-word
address.
!
If the SEMI is not currently performing one of the above types of accesses, it 3-states ED[31:16]. The
SEMI 3-states ED[31:16] if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory (see
description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
If the external memory is configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE pin is high), the SEMI uses ED[15:0] if:
— The SEMI is accessing a single word (16 bits) at an odd address.
— The SEMI is accessing a double word at an even (aligned) address.
— The SEMI is accessing the most significant half of a double word at an odd (misaligned) double-word
address.
!
If the SEMI is not currently performing one of the above types of accesses, it 3-states ED[15:0].
This pin determines the mode of the external data bus. It must be static and tied to VSS (if the SEMI is used)
or VDD2 (if the SEMI is not used). If EYMODE = 0, the external data bus ED[31:0] operates normally as
described above. If EYMODE = 1, ED[31:0] are statically configured as outputs (regardless of the state of
RSTN) and must not be connected externally. See Section 10.1 on page 267 for details.
!
EYMODE
(input)
† The EROM component is synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM component is synchronous if YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is set. The EIO
component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.1 External Interface (continued)
4.14.1.4 Address and Data (continued)
Table 55. Address and Data Bus Pins for the SEMI External Interface (continued)
Pins
EA[18:1]
(output)
EA0
(output)
ESEG[3:0]
(output)
!
Description
If the external memory is configured for 16-bit data (the ESIZE pin is low), the SEMI places the 18 most
significant bits of the 19-bit external address onto EA[18:1].
!
If the external memory is configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE pin is high), the SEMI places the 18-bit
external address onto EA[18:1].
!
After an access is complete and before the start of a new access, the SEMI continues to drive EA[18:1]
with its current state.
!
The SEMI 3-states EA[18:1] if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory
(see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
If the external memory is configured for 16-bit data (the ESIZE pin is low), the SEMI places the least significant bit of the 19-bit external address onto EA0.
!
!
If the external memory is configured for 32-bit data (the ESIZE pin is high), the SEMI does not use EA0 as
an address bit:
— If the selected memory component is configured as asynchronous†, the SEMI drives EA0 with its previous value.
— If the selected memory component is configured as synchronous†, the SEMI drives a negative-assertion write strobe onto EA0 (the SEMI drives EA0 with the logical AND of ERWN1 and ERWN0).
!
The SEMI 3-states EA0 if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory (see
description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
If CORE0 accesses EROM, the SEMI drives ESEG[3:0] with the contents of the XSEG0[3:0] field
(EXSEG0[3:0]—see Table 61 on page 112).
!
!
If CORE1 accesses EROM, the SEMI drives ESEG[3:0] with the contents of the XSEG1[3:0] field
(EXSEG1[3:0]—see Table 62 on page 112).
!
If CORE0 accesses ERAM, the SEMI drives ESEG[3:0] with the contents of the YSEG0[3:0] field
(EYSEG0[3:0]—see Table 63 on page 113).
!
If CORE1 accesses ERAM, the SEMI drives ESEG[3:0] with the contents of the YSEG1[3:0] field
(EYSEG1[3:0]—see Table 64 on page 113).
!
If CORE0 accesses EIO, the SEMI drives ESEG[3:0] with the contents of the ISEG0[3:0] field
(EYSEG0[7:4]—see Table 63 on page 113).
!
If CORE1 accesses EIO, the SEMI drives ESEG[3:0] with the contents of the ISEG1[3:0] field
(EYSEG1[7:4]—see Table 64 on page 113).
!
If one of the DMAU SWT〈0—3〉 or MMT〈4—5〉 channels accesses EROM, ERAM, or EIO, the SEMI
places the contents of the ESEG[3:0] field (SADD〈0—5〉[26:23] for read operations and
DADD〈0—5〉[26:23] for write operations—see Table 37 on page 77) onto its ESEG[3:0] pins.
!
If the PIU accesses EROM, ERAM, or EIO via the DMAU bypass channel, the SEMI places the contents
of the ESEG[3:0] field (PA[26:23]—see Table 78 on page 136) onto its ESEG[3:0] pins.
!
After an access is complete and before the start of a new access, the SEMI continues to drive ESEG[3:0]
with its current state.
!
The SEMI 3-states ESEG[3:0] if it grants a request by an external device to access the external memory
(see description of the EREQN pin in Table 53 on page 103).
† The EROM component is synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM component is synchronous if YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is set. The EIO
component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.2 16-Bit External Bus Accesses
Regardless of the configuration of the external data bus via the ESIZE pin, each access by a core or the DMAU can
be a 16-bit (single-word) or 32-bit (double-word) access. Table 56 summarizes each type of access for a 16-bit
external bus configuration (ESIZE = 0).
Table 56. 16-Bit External Bus Configuration
Internal Address
Even or Odd
Even (aligned†)
Type of Access
Single-Word Read
Single-Word Write
Double-Word Read
Double-Word Write
Odd (misaligned‡)
Double-Word Read
Double-Word Write
External Address
Even or Odd
EA[18:0]
EA[18:0]
Even
EA[18:0]
Odd
EA[18:0]
Even
EA[18:0]
Odd
EA[18:0]
Odd
EA[18:0]
Even
EA[18:0]
Odd
EA[18:0]
Even
EA[18:0]
External Data
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ERWN1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
ERWN0
1
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
† The SEMI performs two separate back-to-back 16-bit accesses, even address (most significant data) first and odd address (least significant data) second.
‡ The SEMI performs two separate 16-bit accesses, odd address (most significant data) first and even address (least significant data) second. The two
accesses are not necessarily back-to-back, i.e., they can be separated by other accesses.
4.14.3 32-Bit External Bus Accesses
Regardless of the configuration of the external data bus via the ESIZE pin, each access by a core or the DMAU can
be a 16-bit (single-word) or 32-bit (double-word) access. Table 57 summarizes each type of access for a 32-bit
external bus configuration (ESIZE = 1).
Table 57. 32-Bit External Bus Configuration
Internal Address
Even
Odd
Even (aligned)
Odd (misaligned‡)
Type of Access
Single-Word Read
Single-Word Write
Single-Word Read
Single-Word Write
Double-Word Read
Double-Word Write
Double-Word Read
Double-Word Write
External Address
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
EA[18:1]
External Data
ED[31:16]
ED[31:16]
ED[15:0]
ED[15:0]
ED[31:0]
ED[31:0]
ED[15:0]
ED[31:16]
ED[15:0]
ED[31:16]
ERWN1
1
1
1
0†
1
0†
1
1
0†
1
ERWN0
1
0†
1
1
1
0†
1
1
1
0†
† For a write operation to a synchronous memory component, the SEMI also drives the EA0 pin low for use as a write enable. The EROM component is
synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM component is synchronous if the YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is set. The EIO component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
‡ The SEMI performs two separate 16-bit accesses. It accesses the most significant data in the odd address first, and then the least significant data in
the even address second. The two accesses are not necessarily back-to-back, i.e., they can be separated by other accesses.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.4 Registers
There are six 16-bit memory-mapped control registers that configure the operation of the SEMI, as shown in
Table 58.
Table 58. SEMI Memory-Mapped Registers
Register Name
Address
ECON0
ECON1
EXSEG0
EYSEG0
EXSEG1
EYSEG1
0x40000
0x40002
0x40004
0x40006
0x40008
0x4000A
Description
SEMI Control
SEMI Status and Control
External X Segment Register for CORE0
External Y Segment Register for CORE0
External X Segment Register for CORE1
External Y Segment Register for CORE1
Size
(Bits)
16
16
16
R/W
Type
Reset Value
R/W
R/W†
R/W
Control
Control
Address
0x0FFF
0‡
0
† Some bits in this register are read-only or write-only.
‡ With the following exceptions: ECON1[6,4] are a reflection of the state of external pins and are unaffected by reset, and ECON1[5] is set.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.4 Registers (continued)
4.14.4.1 ECON0 Register
ECON0 determines the setup, hold, and assertion times for the three external memory component enables. The
programmer needs to use the ECON0 register only if one or more of the external memory components (ERAM,
EROM, or EIO) is configured as asynchronous (see Section 4.14.4.2 on page 111 and Section 4.14.1.1 on
page 102).
Table 59. ECON0 (External Control 0) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x40000.
15
14
13
12
11—8
7—4
3—0
WHOLD
RHOLD
WSETUP
RSETUP
IATIME[3:0]
YATIME[3:0]
XATIME[3:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
WHOLD
0
1
14
13
12
11—8
7—4
3—0
110
Description
The SEMI does not extend the write cycle.
The SEMI extends the write cycle for one CLK cycle, applies the target address,
deasserts all enables, deasserts all write strobes, and 3-states ED[31:0].
RHOLD
0
The SEMI does not extend the read cycle.
1
The SEMI extends the read cycle for one CLK cycle, applies the target address,
and deasserts all enables.
WSETUP
0
The SEMI does not delay the assertion of the write strobe, the memory enable,
and the assertion of ED[31:0] for write operations.
1
The SEMI delays the assertion of the write strobe, the memory enable, and
ED[31:0] during a write cycle for one CLK cycle. During the setup time, the SEMI
applies the target address to EA[18:0], deasserts all enables and ERWN signals,
and 3-states ED[31:0].
RSETUP
0
The SEMI does not delay the assertion of the memory enable for read operations.
1
The SEMI delays the assertion of the memory enable during a read cycle for one
CLK cycle. During the setup time, the SEMI applies the target address to
EA[18:0], deasserts all enables and ERWN signals, and 3-states ED[31:0].
IATIME[3:0] 0—15 The duration in CLK cycles (1—15) that the SEMI asserts EION for an asynchronous access to the EIO component. A value of 0 or 1 corresponds to a 1 CLK
cycle assertion time.
YATIME[3:0] 0—15 The duration in CLK cycles (1—15) that the SEMI asserts ERAMN for an asynchronous access to the ERAM component. A value of 0 or 1 corresponds to a 1
CLK cycle assertion time.
XATIME[3:0] 0—15 The duration in CLK cycles (1—15) that the SEMI asserts EROMN for an asynchronous access to the EROM component. A value of 0 or 1 corresponds to a 1
CLK cycle assertion time.
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R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0xF
R/W
0xF
R/W
0xF
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.4 Registers (continued)
4.14.4.2 ECON1 Register
The ECON1 register (Table 60) reports status information and controls additional features of the SEMI. If any of
the external memory components (ERAM, EROM, or EIO) are configured as synchronous1, the ECKO[1:0] field of
this register must be set to zero to select CLK/2 for the ECKO pin.
Table 60. ECON1 (External Control 1) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x40002.
15—12
11
Reserved
WEROM
10
9
ITYPE YTYPE
8
7
6
5
4
3—2
1—0
NOSHARE
Reserved
EREADY
EACKN
EREQN
Reserved
ECKO[1:0]
Bit
Field
Value
Description
15—12
11
Reserved
WEROM
0
0
Reserved—write with zero.
The external portion of Y-memory and Z-memory space is ERAM (see
Section 4.5.3 on page 39).
The external portion of Y-memory and Z-memory space is EROM (see
Section 4.5.3 on page 39).
EION is asynchronous SRAM.
EION is pipelined, synchronous SRAM.
ERAMN is asynchronous SRAM.
ERAMN is pipelined, synchronous SRAM.
SEMI works as a bus-shared interface and asserts EACKN in response to
EREQN.
SEMI ignores requests for the external bus and does not assert EACKN.
Reserved—write with zero.
The ERDY pin indicates an external device is requesting the SEMI to extend the
current asynchronous external memory access (see Table 53 on page 103).
The ERDY pin indicates an external device is not requesting the SEMI to extend
the current asynchronous external memory access (see Table 53 on page 103).
The EACKN pin indicates the SEMI acknowledges a request by an external
device for access to external memory (see Table 53 on page 103).
The EACKN pin indicates the SEMI does not acknowledge a request by an external device for access to external memory (see Table 53 on page 103).
The EREQN pin indicates an external device is requesting access to external
memory (see Table 53 on page 103).
The EREQN pin indicates an external device is not requesting access to external
memory (see Table 53 on page 103).
Reserved—write with zero.
The SEMI external clock (ECKO pin) is CLK/2 for synchronous operation of the
SEMI.
The SEMI external clock (ECKO pin) is the internal clock CLK.
The SEMI external clock (ECKO pin) is the buffered input clock pin CKI.
The SEMI external clock (ECKO pin) is held low.
1
10
ITYPE
9
YTYPE
8
NOSHARE
0
1
0
1
0
7
6
Reserved
EREADY
1
0
0
1
5
EACKN
0
1
4
EREQN
0
1
3—2
1—0
Reserved
ECKO[1:0]
0
00
01
10
11
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
R
0
P†
R
1
R
P†
R/W
R/W
0
00
† The state is a reflection of the state of the external pins and is unaffected by reset.
1. The EROM component is synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM component is synchronous if the YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is
set. The EIO component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is described in Table 60.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
address extension (EA[22:19], for example) or as
decoded enables.
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
The SEMI drives bits 3:0 of the 16-bit EXSEG0 register
onto the ESEG[3:0] pins at the same time as it drives
the address onto EA[18:0] for an external ROM
(EROM) access from CORE0.
4.14.4 Registers (continued)
4.14.4.3 Segment Registers
The external program and data memory components
(EROM, ERAM, and EIO) can each be expanded for
each core through a combination of registers and pins.
The ESEG[3:0] pins (see Section 4.14.1) reflect the
value of the EXSEG0, EXSEG1, EYSEG0, or EYSEG1
external segment registers for a given external access.
A user’s program executing in either core can write to
these registers to expand the external ERAM and
EROM data components. The value written to any one
of these registers is driven onto the ESEG[3:0] pins for
a corresponding memory component as described
below, and can be interpreted by the system as an
The SEMI drives bits 3:0 (for ERAM) or bits 7:4 (for
EIO) of the 16-bit EYSEG0 register onto the ESEG[3:0]
pins at the same time as it drives the address onto
EA[18:0] for an external RAM (ERAM or EIO) access
from CORE0.
The SEMI drives bits 3:0 of the 16-bit EXSEG1 register
onto the ESEG[3:0] pins at the same time as it drives
the address onto EA[18:0] for an external ROM
(EROM) access from CORE1.
The SEMI drives bits 3:0 (for ERAM) or bits 7:4 (for
EIO) of the 16-bit EYSEG1 register onto the ESEG[3:0]
pins at the same time as it drives the address onto
EA[18:0] for an external RAM (ERAM or EIO) access
from CORE1.
Table 61. EXSEG0 (CORE0 External X Segment Address Extension) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x40004.
Bit
15—4
3—0
15—4
3—0
Reserved
XSEG0[3:0]
Field
Description
Reserved Reserved—write with zero.
XSEG0[3:0] External segment address extension for X-memory accesses to EROM by
CORE0.
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0
0
Table 62. EXSEG1 (CORE1 External X Segment Address Extension) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x40008.
Bit
15—4
3—0
112
15—4
3—0
Reserved
XSEG1[3:0]
Field
Description
Reserved Reserved—write with zero.
XSEG1[3:0] External segment address extension for X-memory accesses to EROM by
CORE1.
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R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0
0
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.4 Registers (continued)
4.14.4.3 Segment Registers (continued)
Table 63. EYSEG0 (CORE0 External Y Segment Address Extension) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x40006.
Bit
15—8
7—4
3—0
15—8
7—4
3—0
Reserved
ISEG0[3:0]
YSEG0[3:0]
Field
Description
Reserved Reserved—write with zero.
ISEG0[3:0] External segment address extension for Y-memory accesses to EIO by
CORE0.
YSEG0[3:0] External segment address extension for Y-memory accesses to ERAM by
CORE0.
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0
0
R/W
0
Table 64. EYSEG1 (CORE1 External Y Segment Address Extension) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4000A.
Bit
15—8
7—4
3—0
15—8
7—4
3—0
Reserved
ISEG1[3:0]
YSEG1[3:0]
Field
Description
Reserved Reserved—write with zero.
ISEG1[3:0] External segment address extension for Y-memory accesses to EIO by
CORE1.
YSEG1[3:0] External segment address extension for Y-memory accesses to ERAM by
CORE1.
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R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0
0
R/W
0
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14.5.1 Functional Timing
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
The following describes the functional timing for an
asynchronous read operation:
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory
This section describes the functional timing and interfacing for external memory components that are configured as asynchronous. The EROM component is
asynchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 0. The ERAM
component is asynchronous if the YTYPE field
(ECON1[9]) is cleared, and the EIO component is
asynchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is
cleared. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
In this section:
!
The designation ENABLE refers to the EROMN,
ERAMN, or EION pin.
!
The designation ERWN refers to:
— The ERWN0 pin if the external data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic low.
— The ERWN1 and ERWN0 pins if the external data
bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin
is logic high.
!
The designation EA refers to:
— The external address pins EA[18:0] and the external segment address pins ESEG[3:0] if the external data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the
ESIZE pin is logic low.
— The external address pins EA[18:1] and the external segment address pins ESEG[3:0] if the external data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the
ESIZE pin is logic high.
!
The designation ED refers to:
— The external data pins ED[31:16] if the external
data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE
pin is logic low.
— The external data pins ED[31:0] if the external
data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE
pin is logic high.
!
The designation ATIME refers to IATIME
(ECON0[11:8]) for accesses to the EIO space,
YATIME (ECON0[7:4]) for accesses to the ERAM
space, or XATIME (ECON0[3:0]) for accesses to the
EROM space.
!
RSETUP refers to the RSETUP field
(ECON0[12]—see Table 59 on page 110).
!
RHOLD refers to the RHOLD field (ECON0[14]).
!
WSETUP refers to the WSETUP field (ECON0[13]).
!
WHOLD refers to the WHOLD field (ECON0[15]).
114
1. On a rising edge of the internal clock (CLK), the
SEMI asserts ENABLE and drives the read address
onto EA. If RSETUP is set, the SEMI asserts
ENABLE one CLK cycle later.
2. The SEMI asserts ENABLE for ATIME CLK cycles.
3. The SEMI deasserts ENABLE on a rising edge of
CLK and latches the data from ED.
4. The SEMI continues to drive the read address onto
EA for a minimum of one CLK cycle to guarantee an
address hold time of at least one cycle. If RHOLD is
set, the SEMI continues to drive the read address for
an additional CLK cycle.
The SEMI continues to drive the address until another
external memory access is initiated. Another read or a
write to the same memory component can immediately
follow the read cycle described above.
The following describes the functional timing for an
asynchronous write operation:
1. On a rising edge of the internal clock (CLK), the
SEMI asserts ERWN and drives the write address
onto EA. If WSETUP is set, the SEMI asserts
ERWN one CLK cycle later.
2. One CLK cycle after the SEMI asserts ERWN, the
SEMI asserts ENABLE and drives valid data onto
ED to guarantee one CLK cycle of setup time.
3. The SEMI asserts ENABLE for ATIME CLK cycles.
4. The SEMI deasserts ENABLE on a rising edge of
CLK.
5. The SEMI continues to drive ED with the write data,
drive EA with the write address, and assert ERWN
for one additional CLK cycle to guarantee one cycle
of hold time. If WHOLD is set, the SEMI continues
to drive the write address for an additional CLK
cycle.
The SEMI continues to drive the address until another
external memory access is initiated. Another write to
the same memory component can immediately follow
the write cycle described above. If a read to the same
memory component follows the write cycle described
above, the SEMI inserts an idle bus cycle (one CLK
cycle).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.1 Functional Timing (continued)
Figures 27 through 30 provide examples of asynchronous memory accesses for various SEMI configurations.
These examples assume that the DMAU is performing the external memory accesses. The access rate shown is
not achievable if the accesses are performed by one or both cores. For details on SEMI performance for an asynchronous interface, see Section 4.14.7.2 on page 127. For a summary of SEMI performance, see Section 4.14.7.4
on page 131.
Asynchronous Timing
ECKO
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
ERAMN
IATIME
IATIME
EION
ERWN
EA
A0
ED
Q0
ERAM
READ
A1
A2
A3
A4
D1
D2
Q3
Q4
ERAM
WRITE
ERAM
WRITE
A5
Q5
A6
D6
ERAM
ERAM
EIO
EIO
READ
READ
READ
WRITE
IDLE CYCLE: WRITE FOLLOWED IMMEDIATELY BY READ
DON’T CARE
HIGH-IMPEDANCE OUTPUT
Notes:
It is assumed that ECKO is programmed as CLK, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111) is programmed to 0x1.
It is assumed that the YATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[7:4]—Table 59 on page 110) is programmed to 0x2 and the IATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[11:8]) is
programmed to 0x3.
It is assumed that the DMAU is performing the external memory accesses. The access rate shown is not achievable if the accesses are performed by one or both cores.
Figure 27. Asynchronous Memory Cycles
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.1 Functional Timing (continued)
Asynchronous Memory Cycles (RSETUP = 1, WSETUP = 1)
ECKO
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
ERAM
RSETUP
RSETUP
IATIME
IATIME
EIO
RSETUP
ERWN
EA
ED
A0
Q0
ERAM
READ
WSETUP
WSETUP
A1
A2
D1
D1
ERAM
WRITE
WSETUP
A3
D2
D2
ERAM
WRITE
Q3
A4
Q4
A5
D5
ERAM
EIO
EIO
READ
READ
WRITE
IDLE CYCLE: WRITE FOLLOWED IMMEDIATELY BY READ
HIGH-IMPEDANCE OUTPUT
Notes:
It is assumed that ECKO is programmed as CLK, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111) is programmed to 0x1.
It is assumed that the YATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[7:4]—Table 59 on page 110) is programmed to 0x2 and the IATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[11:8]) is
programmed to 0x3.
It is assumed that the DMAU is performing the external memory accesses. The access rate shown is not achievable if the accesses are performed by one or both cores.
Figure 28. Asynchronous Memory Cycles (RSETUP = 1, WSETUP = 1)
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.1 Functional Timing (continued)
Asynchronous Memory Cycles (RHOLD = 1, WHOLD = 1)
ECKO
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
YATIME
ERAM
IATIME
IATIME
EIO
ERWN
EA
A0
A1
RHOLD
ED
Q0
ERAM
READ
A2
WHOLD
A3
WHOLD
D1
D2
ERAM
WRITE
ERAM
WRITE
A4
RHOLD
Q3
A5
RHOLD
Q4
WHOLD
D5
ERAM
EIO
EIO
READ
READ
WRITE
IDLE CYCLE: WRITE FOLLOWED IMMEDIATELY BY READ
HIGH-IMPEDANCE OUTPUT
Notes:
It is assumed that ECKO is programmed as CLK, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111) is programmed to 0x1.
It is assumed that the YATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[7:4]—Table 59 on page 110) is programmed to 0x2 and the IATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[11:8]) is
programmed to 0x3.
It is assumed that the DMAU is performing the external memory accesses. The access rate shown is not achievable if the accesses are performed by one or both cores.
Figure 29. Asynchronous Memory Cycles (RHOLD = 1, WHOLD = 1)
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.2 Extending Access Time Via the ERDY Pin
An external device can delay the completion of an external memory access to an asynchronous memory component by control of the ERDY pin (see Figure 30). If driven low by the external device, the SEMI extends the current
external memory access that is already in progress. To guarantee proper operation, ERDY must be driven low at
least 4 CLK cycles before the end of the access and the enable must be programmed for at least 5 CLK cycles of
assertion (via the YATIME, XATIME, or IATIME field of ECON0—see Table 59 on page 110). The SEMI ignores the
state of ERDY prior to 4 CLK cycles before the end of the access. The access is extended by 4 CLK cycles after
ERDY is driven high. The state of ERDY is readable in the EREADY field (ECON1[6]—see Table 60 on page 111).
This feature of the SEMI provides a convenient interface to peripherals that have a variable access time or require
an access time greater than 15 CLK cycles in duration.
Use of ERDY Pin to Extend Asynchronous Accesses
N × T‡
ATIME †
END OF
ACCESS
(UNSTALLED)
SEMI
SAMPLES
ERDY PIN
END OF
ACCESS
(STALLED)
ECKO§
4T‡
ENABLE ††
ERDY
N × T‡
4T‡
† ATIME must be programmed as greater than or equal to five CLK cycles. Otherwise, the SEMI ignores the state of ERDY.
‡ T = internal clock period (CLK). N must be greater than or equal to one, i.e., ERDY must be held low for at least one CLK cycle after the
SEMI samples ERDY.
§ ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
†† The designation ENABLE refers to one of the following pins: EROMN, ERAMN, or EION.
Figure 30. Use of ERDY Pin to Extend Asynchronous Accesses
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.2 Extending Access Time Via the ERDY Pin (continued)
Figure 31 illustrates an example read and write operation using the ERDY pin to extend the accesses.
Use of ERDY Pin to Extend Asynchronous Accesses
ECKO
ERAMN
STALL
YATIME
STALL
YATIME
SAMPLE
POINT
SAMPLE
POINT
ERDY
4T
4T
ERWN
EA
A0
A1
D1
Q1
ED
ERAM
READ
ERAM
WRITE
HIGH-IMPEDANCE OUTPUT
DON’T CARE
Notes:
It is assumed that ECKO is programmed as CLK, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111) is programmed to 0x1.
It is assumed that the YATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[7:4]—Table 59 on page 110) is programmed to 0x7.
Figure 31. Example of Using the ERDY Pin
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Data Sheet
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.3 Interfacing Examples
Figures 32 and 33 illustrate two examples of interfacing 16-bit asynchronous SRAMs to the SEMI. The user can
individually configure the EROMN, ERAMN, and EION enables to support asynchronous devices. The ERTYPE
pin must be at logic low for the EROM component to be configured for asynchronous accesses. Clearing the
YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) and ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) configures the ERAM and EIO components for asynchronous accesses.
The programmer can individually configure the access time (defined as the number of CLK cycles that the enable
is asserted) for each enable. The YATIME field (ECON0[7:4]) specifies the number of CLK cycles that the ERAMN
enable is asserted. The XATIME field (ECON0[3:0]) specifies the number of CLK cycles that the EROMN enable is
asserted. The IATIME field (ECON0[11:8]) specifies the number of CLK cycles that the EION enable is asserted.
The range of values for these fields is from 0 to 15 (corresponding to a range of 1 to 15 CLK cycles). A value of 0
or 1 programs a 1 CLK assertion time for the corresponding enable.
120
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.5 Asynchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.5.3 Interfacing Examples (continued)
32-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Asynchronous SRAMs
DSP16410CG SEMI
ESIZE
VDD
ERTYPE
VSS
SRAM
EA[16:1]
A[15:0]
ERWN0
WE
ERAMN
CE
DB[15:0]
ED[31:16]
EVEN ADDRESS
SRAM
A[15:0]
WE
ERWN1
CE
DB[15:0]
ED[15:0]
ODD ADDRESS
Figure 32. 32-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Asynchronous SRAMs
16-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Asynchronous SRAMs
DSP16410CG SEMI
ESIZE
VSS
ERTYPE
VSS
SRAM
EA[16:0]
A[16:0]
ERWN0
WE
ERAMN
CE
ED[31:16]
DB[15:0]
Figure 33. 16-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Asynchronous SRAMs
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14.6.1 Functional Timing
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
The following describes the functional timing for a synchronous read operation (see Figure 34 on page 123):
4.14.6 Synchronous Memory
1. On a rising edge of the external output clock
(ECKO), the SEMI drives the read address onto EA
and asserts ENABLE for one ECKO cycle.
This section describes the functional timing and interfacing for external memory components that are configured as synchronous. The EROM component is
synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM
component is synchronous if the YTYPE field
(ECON1[9]) is set, and the EIO component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is
described in Table 60 on page 111.
2. On the rising edge of the second ECKO cycle, the
SEMI deasserts ENABLE.
If any of the external memory components (EROM,
ERAM, or EIO) are configured as synchronous, the
SEMI external output clock (ECKO) must be programmed for a frequency of fCLK/2 by clearing the
ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]). The DSP16410CG
clears the ECKO[1:0] field by default after reset.
The following describes the functional timing for a synchronous write operation (see Figure 34 on page 123):
In this section:
2. On the rising edge of the second ECKO cycle, the
SEMI deasserts ENABLE and ERWN.
!
The designation ENABLE refers to the EROMN,
ERAMN, or EION pin.
!
The designation ERWN refers to:
— The ERWN0 pin if the external data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic low.
— The ERWN1, ERWN0, and EA01 pins if the external data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the
ESIZE pin is logic high.
!
The designation EA refers to:
— The external address pins EA[18:0] and the external segment address pins ESEG[3:0] if the external data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the
ESIZE pin is logic low.
— The external address pins EA[18:1] and the external segment address pins ESEG[3:0] if the external data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the
ESIZE pin is logic high.
!
The designation ED refers to:
— The external data pins ED[31:16] if the external
data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE
pin is logic low.
— The external data pins ED[31:0] if the external
data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE
pin is logic high.
3. On the rising edge of the third ECKO cycle, a new
access can begin because synchronous accesses
are pipelined.
4. On the rising edge of the fourth ECKO cycle, the
SEMI latches the data from ED.
1. On a rising edge of the external output clock
(ECKO), the SEMI drives the write address onto EA
and asserts ERWN and ENABLE for one ECKO
cycle.
3. On the rising edge of the third ECKO cycle, a new
access can begin because synchronous accesses
are pipelined. On this edge, the SEMI drives ED
with the write data for one ECKO cycle.
4. On the rising edge of the fourth cycle, the external
memory latches the data from ED.
1. The EA0 pin is a strobe only if the bus is configured for 32 bits and the memory is configured as synchronous.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.6 Synchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.6.1 Functional Timing (continued)
Figure 34 illustrates an example of synchronous memory accesses. This example assumes that the DMAU is performing the external memory accesses. The access rate shown is not achievable if the accesses are performed by
one or both cores. For details on SEMI performance for a synchronous interface, see Section 4.14.7.3 on
page 129. For a summary of SEMI performance, see Section 4.14.7.4 on page 131.
Synchronous Timing
CLK
ECKO
ERAMN
EION
ERWN
EA
A0
A1
Q0
ED
A2
D1
A3
D2
ERAM READ
A4
Q3
A5
Q4
Q5
D6
EIO
WRITE
ERAM READ
ERAM
WRITE
A6
ERAM READ
ERAM
WRITE
EIO READ
HIGH-IMPEDANCE OUTPUT
Figure 34. Synchronous Memory Cycles
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
Figure 35 illustrates interfacing the SEMI to a 16-bit
synchronous, pipelined ZBT SRAM. In this example:
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
1. The SEMI address bus (EA[17:0]) is connected to
the SRAM’s address bus (A[17:0]). One of the SEMI
ESEG[3:0] pins can be optionally connected to the
SRAM’s active-high chip select input (CE2).
4.14.6 Synchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.6.2 Interfacing Examples
For synchronous operation, the programmer must configure the SEMI external output clock (ECKO) to CLK/2
by clearing the ECKO field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on
page 111). The DSP16410CG clears the ECKO[1:0]
field by default after reset.
Figures 35 and 36 illustrate examples of interfacing
16-bit and 32-bit pipelined synchronous ZBT SRAMs to
the SEMI. The programmer can individually configure
EROMN, ERAMN, and EION enables to support this
type of synchronous device. The ERTYPE pin must be
at logic high for the EROM component to be configured
for synchronous accesses. Setting the YTYPE field
(ECON1[9]) and ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) configures
the ERAM and EIO components for synchronous
accesses.
2. The upper 16 bits of the SEMI data bus (ED[31:16])
are connected to the SRAM’s bidirectional data bus
(DQ[15:0]).
3. The SEMI external clock (ECKO) is programmed for
operation at fCLK/2, and is connected to the SRAM’s
CLK input.
4. The SEMI external data component enable
(ERAMN) and external read/write strobe (ERWN0)
are connected to the SRAM’s active-low chip enable
and write enable inputs, respectively.
5. The SRAM’s active-low ADV/LD must be tied low.
6. The SEMI’s ESIZE pin is tied low to configure the
data bus for 16-bit accesses.
16-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit ZBT Pipelined Synchronous SRAMs
16-bit SYNCHRONOUS
SRAM
DSP16410CG
EA[17:0]
A[17:0]
ECKO
CLK
ERAMN
CE1
ERWN0
WE
VSS
ED[31:16]
DQ[15:0]
ESIZE
VSS
ERTYPE
VDD
BWa
BWb
VSS
ESEG[3:0]
ADV/LD
OE
CE2
Figure 35. 16-Bit External Interface with 16-Bit Pipelined, Synchronous ZBT SRAMs
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.6 Synchronous Memory (continued)
4.14.6.2 Interfacing Examples (continued)
32-Bit External Interface with 32-Bit ZBT Pipelined Synchronous SRAMs
32-bit SYNCHRONOUS
SRAM
DSP16410CG
ERTYPE
VDD
ESIZE
VDD
EA[17:1]
ECKO
VSS
OE
A[16:0]
CLK
ERAMN
CE
ERWN0
BWa
BWb
BWc
BWd
ERWN1
ED[31:24]
DQa[7:0]
ED[23:16]
DQb[7:0]
ED[15:8]
DQc[7:0]
ED[7:0]
DQd[7:0]
EA0†
RW
† SEMI is configured for a 32-bit data bus. In this configuration, EA0 is RWN for 32-bit accesses (logical AND of ERWN0 and ERWN1).
Figure 36. 32-Bit External Interface with 32-Bit Pipelined, Synchronous ZBT SRAMs
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance
The following terms are used in this section:
!
A requester, a core or the DMAU, requests the SEMI
to access external memory or the system bus.
!
Contention refers to multiple requests for the same
resource at the same time.
!
The designation ATIME refers to IATIME
(ECON0[11:8]—see Table 59 on page 110) for
accesses to the EIO space, YATIME (ECON0[7:4])
for accesses to the ERAM space, or XATIME
(ECON0[3:0]) for accesses to the EROM space.
!
RSETUP refers to the RSETUP field (ECON0[12]).
!
RHOLD refers to the RHOLD field (ECON0[14]).
!
WSETUP refers to the WSETUP field (ECON0[13]).
!
WHOLD refers to the WHOLD field (ECON0[15]).
!
Misaligned refers to 32-bit accesses to odd
addresses.
!
SLKA refers to the SLKA〈5—4〉 fields
(DMCON0[9:8]—see Table 31 on page 71).
!
TCLK refers to one period of the internal clock CLK.
The source of the request (core vs. DMAU), the configuration of the SEMI data bus size (16-bit vs. 32-bit),
and the type of access (read vs. write) determine the
throughput of any external memory access.
Section 4.14.7.2 and Section 4.14.7.3 describe the
performance for all combinations.
The DMAU source look-ahead feature takes advantage
of the DMAU pipeline and allows the DMAU to read
source data before completing the previous write to the
destination. Section 4.14.7.4 on page 131 shows performance figures with this feature both enabled and
disabled.
For an MMT channel, each DMAU access consists of a
read of the source location and write to the destination
location. Therefore, the DMAU performance values
stated in this section assume two operations per transfer.
4.14.7.1 System Bus
The SEMI controls and arbitrates accesses to internal
I/O segment accessed via the system bus. Only 16-bit
and aligned 32-bit transfers are permitted via the system bus. The system bus is used to access all the
memory-mapped registers in the DMAU, SIU0, SIU1,
PIU, and SEMI. See Section 6.2.2 on page 229 for
details on the memory-mapped registers. Misaligned
32-bit accesses to internal I/O space cause undefined
results.
The SEMI controls and arbitrates two types of memory
accesses. The first is to external memory. The second
is to the internal I/O segment accessed via the system
bus. Section 4.14.7.1 describes the SEMI performance for system bus accesses. Section 4.14.7.2 on
page 127 describes the SEMI performance for asynchronous external memory accesses and
Section 4.14.7.3 on page 129 describes the SEMI performance for synchronous external memory accesses.
The performance for all of these types of accesses are
summarized in Section 4.14.7.4 on page 131.
Table 65 specifies the minimum system bus access
time for either a single-word (16-bit) or double-word
(32-bit) access by a single requester. The SEMI processes system bus accesses by multiple requesters at
a maximum rate of one access per CLK cycle.
For the remainder of this section, unless otherwise otherwise stated, the following assumptions apply:
For example, if a program executing in CORE0 performs a read of the 16-bit DMCON0 register, the read
requires a minimum of five CLK cycles. The access
could take longer if the SEMI is busy processing a prior
request, i.e., if there is contention. As a second example of an S-bus transfer, assume the DMAU is moving
data between TPRAM0 and the SLM. The SLM is a
memory block accessed via the S-bus. Assuming no
contention, the DMAU can read a word from TPRAM0
and write a word to the SLM at an effective rate of two
16-bit words per two CLK cycles.
!
There is only a single requester, i.e., no contention.
!
SEMI requests by the DMAU are from a memory-tomemory (MMT) channel and the user program has
enabled the source look-ahead feature by setting the
appropriate SLKA field (Section 4.13.6).
126
Table 65. System Bus Minimum Access Times
Access
Minimum Access Time
Read
5 × TCLK
Write
2 × TCLK
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance (continued)
4.14.7.2 External Memory, Asynchronous Interface
External Accesses by Either Core, 32-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by either core to asynchronous
memory with the external data bus configured as 32-bit
(the ESIZE pin is logic high):
READS—For the cores, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned
external asynchronous memory reads occur with a
minimum period of the enable assertion time (as programmed in ATIME ), plus a one CLK cycle enforced
hold time, plus three CLK cycles for the SEMI pipeline
to complete the core access. This assumes that
RSETUP and RHOLD are cleared. The core treats
misaligned 32-bit reads as two separate 16-bit reads
requiring two complete SEMI accesses.
The core read access time for a 32-bit data bus is the
following:
[ATIME + 4 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × misaligned × TCLK
where:
! misaligned = 1 for 16-bit and aligned 32-bit
accesses.
!
External Accesses by the DMAU, 32-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by a DMAU MMT channel to
asynchronous memory with the external data bus configured as 32-bit (the ESIZE pin is logic high):
READS—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned external asynchronous memory reads (with corresponding writes to internal TPRAM) occur with a minimum period of the enable
assertion time (as programmed in ATIME ), plus a one
CLK cycle enforced hold time. This assumes that
RSETUP and RHOLD are cleared. Misaligned 32-bit
reads are not permitted.
The DMAU read access time for a 32-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is the following:
[ATIME + 1 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × TCLK
WRITES—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned asynchronous
memory writes (with corresponding reads from internal
TPRAM) can occur with a minimum period of the
enable assertion time (as programmed in ATIME ), plus
a one CLK cycle enforced setup time, plus a one CLK
cycle enforced hold time. This assumes that WSETUP
and WHOLD are cleared. Misaligned 32-bit writes are
not permitted.
The DMAU write access time for a 32-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is the following:
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × TCLK
misaligned = 2 for misaligned 32-bit accesses.
WRITES—For the cores, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned
asynchronous memory writes can occur with a minimum period of the enable assertion time (as programmed in ATIME ), plus a one CLK cycle enforced
setup time, plus a one CLK cycle enforced hold time.
This assumes that WSETUP and WHOLD are cleared.
Unlike read cycles, the core does not wait for the SEMI
pipeline to complete the access, so the three CLK
cycle pipeline delay is not incurred on core writes. The
core treats misaligned 32-bit writes as two separate
16-bit writes requiring two complete SEMI accesses.
The core write access time for a 32-bit data bus is the
following:
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × misaligned × TCLK
where misaligned has the same definition as for reads.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance (continued)
The core write access time for a 16-bit data bus is the
following:
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × longword × TCLK
where:
! longword = 1 for 16-bit accesses.
!
4.14.7.2 External Memory, Asynchronous
Interface (continued)
External Accesses by Either Core, 16-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by either core to asynchronous
memory with the external data bus configured as 16-bit
(the ESIZE pin is logic low):
READS—For the cores, 16-bit external asynchronous
memory reads occur with a minimum period of the
enable assertion time (as programmed in ATIME ), plus
a one CLK cycle enforced hold time, plus three CLK
cycles for the SEMI pipeline to complete the core
access. This assumes that RSETUP and RHOLD are
cleared. The SEMI coordinates two separate accesses
for aligned 32-bit reads, adding two CLK cycles to the
above description. The core treats misaligned 32-bit
reads as two separate 16-bit reads requiring two complete SEMI accesses.
longword = 2 for 32-bit accesses.
External Accesses by the DMAU, 16-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by a DMAU MMT channel to
asynchronous memory with the external data bus configured as 16-bit (the ESIZE pin is logic low):
READS—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit external asynchronous memory reads
(with corresponding writes to internal TPRAM) occur
with a minimum period of the enable assertion time (as
programmed into ATIME ), plus a one CLK cycle
enforced hold time. This assumes that RSETUP and
RHOLD are cleared. The SEMI coordinates and treats
aligned 32-bit reads as two separate accesses. Misaligned 32-bit reads are not permitted.
The DMAU read access time for a 16-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is the following:
[ATIME + 1 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × longword × TCLK
The core read access time for a 16-bit data bus is the
following:
where:
! longword = 1 for 16-bit accesses.
[ATIME + aligned + RSETUP + RHOLD] × misaligned × TCLK
!
where:
! aligned = 4 and misaligned = 1 for 16-bit accesses.
!
aligned = 6 and misaligned = 1 for 32-bit aligned
accesses.
!
aligned = 4 and misaligned = 2 for 32-bit misaligned
accesses.
WRITES—For the cores, 16-bit asynchronous memory
writes can occur with a minimum period of the enable
assertion time (as programmed in ATIME ), plus a one
CLK cycle enforced setup time, plus a one CLK cycle
enforced hold time. This assumes that WSETUP and
WHOLD are cleared. Unlike read cycles, the core
does not wait for the SEMI pipeline to complete the
access, so the three CLK cycle pipeline delay is not
incurred on core writes. The SEMI coordinates and
treats aligned 32-bit writes as two separate
accesses. The core treats misaligned 32-bit writes as
two separate 16-bit writes requiring two complete SEMI
accesses.
128
longword = 2 for 32-bit aligned accesses.
WRITES—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit asynchronous memory writes (with
corresponding reads from internal TPRAM) can occur
with a minimum period of the enable assertion time (as
programmed in ATIME ), plus a one CLK cycle
enforced setup time, plus a one CLK cycle enforced
hold time. This assumes that WSETUP and WHOLD
are cleared. The SEMI coordinates and treats aligned
32-bit writes as two separate accesses. Misaligned
32-bit writes are not permitted.
The DMAU write access time for a 16-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is the following:
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × longword × TCLK
where longword has the same meaning as for DMAU
reads.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance (continued)
4.14.7.3 External Memory, Synchronous Interface
The primary advantage of synchronous memory is
bandwidth, not latency. For synchronous operation,
the SEMI external output clock (ECKO) must be programmed for a frequency of fCLK/2 by writing zero to the
ECKO field (ECON1 [1:0]).
External Accesses by the DMAU, 32-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by a DMAU MMT channel to synchronous memory with the external data bus configured as 32-bit (the ESIZE pin is logic high):
READS—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned external synchronous memory reads (with corresponding writes to internal TPRAM) occur with a minimum period of four CLK
cycles (two ECKO cycles). Misaligned 32-bit reads are
not permitted.
The DMAU read access time for a 32-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is four CLK cycles.
External Accesses by Either Core, 32-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
4 × TCLK
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by either core to synchronous
memory with the external data bus configured as 32-bit
(the ESIZE pin is logic high):
WRITES—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned synchronous memory writes (with corresponding reads from internal
TPRAM) can occur with a minimum period of four CLK
cycles (two ECKO cycles). Misaligned 32-bit writes are
not permitted.
READS—For the cores, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned
external synchronous memory reads occur with a minimum period of eight CLK cycles (four ECKO cycles),
plus three CLK cycles for SEMI to arbitrate the core
access, plus one CLK cycle to synchronize ECKO with
a rising edge of CLK. The core treats misaligned 32-bit
reads as two separate 16-bit reads requiring two complete SEMI accesses.
The DMAU write access time for a 32-bit data bus and
SLKA = 1 is four CLK cycles.
4 × TCLK
The core read access time for a 32-bit data bus is the
following:
12 × misaligned × TCLK
where:
! misaligned = 1 for 16-bit and aligned 32-bit
accesses.
!
misaligned = 2 for misaligned 32-bit accesses.
WRITES—For the cores, 16-bit and 32-bit aligned synchronous memory writes can occur with a minimum
period of four CLK cycles (two ECKO cycles) per
transfer. The core treats misaligned 32-bit writes as
two separate 16-bit writes requiring two complete SEMI
accesses.
The core write access time for a 32-bit data bus is the
following:
4 × misaligned × TCLK
where misaligned has the same definition as for reads.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface
(SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance (continued)
4.14.7.3 External Memory, Synchronous
Interface (continued)
External Accesses by Either Core, 16-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by either core to synchronous
memory with the external data bus configured as 16-bit
(the ESIZE pin is logic low):
READS—For the cores, 16-bit external synchronous
memory reads occur with a minimum period of eight
CLK cycles (four ECKO cycles), plus three CLK cycles
for SEMI to arbitrate the core access, plus one CLK
cycle to synchronize ECKO with a rising edge of CLK.
The SEMI coordinates and treats aligned 32-bit reads
as two separate accesses. The core treats misaligned
32-bit reads as two separate 16-bit reads requiring two
complete SEMI accesses.
The core read access time for a 16-bit data bus is the
following:
(12 + aligned ) × misaligned × TCLK
where:
! aligned = 0 and misaligned = 1 for 16-bit accesses.
!
aligned = 4 and misaligned = 1 for 32-bit aligned
accesses.
!
aligned = 0 and misaligned = 2 for 32-bit misaligned
accesses.
External Accesses by the DMAU, 16-Bit SEMI Data
Bus
The following describes the SEMI performance for read
and write operations by a DMAU MMT channel to synchronous memory with the external data bus configured as 16-bit (the ESIZE pin is logic low):
READS—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit external synchronous memory reads
(with corresponding writes to internal TPRAM) occur
with a minimum period of four CLK cycles (two ECKO
cycles). The SEMI coordinates and treats aligned
32-bit reads as two separate accesses. Misaligned
32-bit reads are not permitted.
The DMAU read access time for a 16-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is the following:
4 × longword × TCLK
where:
! longword = 1 for 16-bit accesses.
!
longword = 2 for any 32-bit aligned accesses.
WRITES—For the DMAU MMT channels with
SLKA = 1, 16-bit synchronous memory writes (with corresponding reads from internal TPRAM) can occur with
a minimum period of four CLK cycles (two ECKO
cycles). The SEMI coordinates and treats aligned
32-bit writes as two separate accesses. Misaligned
32-bit writes are not permitted.
The DMAU write access time for a 16-bit data bus with
SLKA = 1 is the following:
4 × longword × TCLK
where longword has the same meaning as for DMAU
reads.
WRITES—For the cores, 16-bit synchronous memory
writes can occur with a minimum period of four CLK
cycles (two ECKO cycles) per transfer. The SEMI
coordinates and treats aligned 32-bit writes as two separate accesses. The core treats misaligned 32-bit
writes as two separate 16-bit writes requiring two complete SEMI accesses.
The core write access time for a 16-bit data bus is the
following:
4 × longword × TCLK
where:
! longword = 1 for 16-bit accesses.
!
longword = 2 for any 32-bit accesses.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance (continued)
4.14.7.4 Summary of Access Times
Tables 66 through 69 summarize the information in Section 4.14.7.2 and Section 4.14.7.3.
Table 66. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Asynchronous Interface, 32-Bit Data Bus
F
Requester
Core
DMAU,
SLKA = 1
Access Type
Reads
Writes
16-bit
[ATIME + 4 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × TCLK
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × TCLK
32-bit aligned
32-bit misaligned [ATIME + 4 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × 2 × TCLK [ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × 2 × TCLK
16-bit
[ATIME + 1 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × TCLK
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × TCLK
32-bit aligned
Table 67. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Asynchronous Interface, 16-Bit Data Bus
F
Requester
Core
DMAU,
SLKA = 1
Access Type
Reads
Writes
16-bit
[ATIME + 4 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × TCLK
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × TCLK
32-bit aligned
[ATIME + 6 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × TCLK
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × 2 × TCLK
32-bit misaligned [ATIME + 4 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × 2 × TCLK [ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × 2 × TCLK
16-bit
[ATIME + 1 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × TCLK
[ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × TCLK
32-bit aligned
[ATIME + 1 + RSETUP + RHOLD] × 2 × TCLK [ATIME + 2 + WSETUP + WHOLD] × 2 × TCLK
Table 68. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Synchronous Interface, 32-Bit Data Bus
F
Requester
Core
DMAU,
SLKA = 1
Access Type
16-bit
32-bit aligned
32-bit misaligned
16-bit
32-bit aligned
Reads
12 × TCLK
Writes
4 × TCLK
24 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
Table 69. Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, Synchronous Interface, 16-Bit Data Bus
F
Requester
Core
DMAU,
SLKA = 1
Access Type
16-bit
32-bit aligned
32-bit misaligned
16-bit
32-bit aligned
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Reads
12 × TCLK
16 × TCLK
24 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
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Writes
4 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.14 System and External Memory Interface (SEMI) (continued)
4.14.7 Performance (continued)
4.14.7.4 Summary of Access Times (continued)
Tables 70 and 71 show example access times under various conditions, including DMAU accesses with SLKA = 0.
These access times are derived from actual measurements. For the asynchronous access times, it is assumed
that the programmed enable assertion time is one (ATIME = 1) and that RSETUP = RHOLD = WSETUP =
WHOLD = 0. The actual value of these fields is application-dependent.
Table 70. Example Average Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, 32-Bit Data Bus
F
Requester
Access Type
Core
16-bit
32-bit aligned
32-bit misaligned
16-bit
32-bit aligned
16-bit
32-bit aligned
DMAU, SLKA = 1
DMAU, SLKA = 0
Asynchronous
Reads
Writes
5 × TCLK
3 × TCLK
Synchronous
Reads
Writes
12 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
10 × TCLK
2 × TCLK
6 × TCLK
3 × TCLK
24 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
9 × TCLK
5 × TCLK
14 × TCLK
5 × TCLK
Table 71. Example Average Access Time Per SEMI Transaction, 16-Bit Data Bus
Requester
Access Type
Core
16-bit
32-bit aligned
32-bit misaligned
16-bit
32-bit aligned
16-bit
32-bit aligned
DMAU, SLKA = 1
DMAU, SLKA = 0
Asynchronous
Reads
Writes
5 × TCLK
3 × TCLK
7 × TCLK
6 × TCLK
10 × TCLK
6 × TCLK
2 × TCLK
3 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
6 × TCLK
9 × TCLK
5 × TCLK
11 × TCLK
6 × TCLK
Synchronous
Reads
Writes
12 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
16 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
24 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
4 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
14 × TCLK
5 × TCLK
18 × TCLK
8 × TCLK
4.14.8 Priority
SEMI prioritizes the requests from both cores and the DMAU in the following order:
1. CORE0 program (X) and data (Y) requests have the highest priority. If CORE0 requires a simultaneous X and Y
access, X is performed first, then Y.
2. CORE1 program (X) and data (Y) requests have the second-highest priority. If CORE1 requires a simultaneous
X and Y access, X is performed first, then Y.
3. DMAU data requests have the lowest priority.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
The PIU provides the following features:
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU)
The parallel interface unit (PIU) is the DSP16410CG
interface to a host microprocessor or microcontroller.
This interface is a 16-bit parallel port that is passive
only, i.e., the DSP16410CG is the slave to the host for
all transactions. The PIU is both Intel ® and Motorola ®
memory bus compatible and provides select logic for a
shared-bus interface. As an additional feature, the
host can access the entire DSP16410CG memory
(internal and external) through the PIU.
The PIU control and data registers are memorymapped into the DSP16410CG shared internal I/O
memory component (Section 4.5.7 on page 43). The
host can access all of the PIU data and control registers via external pins. Both cores and the DMAU can
access these registers directly via the system bus. The
DMAU can directly access the PIU data registers PDI
and PDO.
The DMAU supports the PIU via a dedicated bypass
channel. Unlike the DMAU SWT and MMT channels,
the PIU bypass channel must be configured by the host
via commands over the PIU address pins, PADD[3:0].
The PIU provides three interrupt signals to the cores.
These interrupts indicate a host-generated request or
the completion of an input or output transaction.
!
A high-speed, 16-bit parallel host interface
!
Compatibility with industry-standard microprocessor
buses
!
Chip select logic for shared bus system architectures
!
Interrupt output pin for DSP16410CG-to-host interrupt generation
!
Dedicated host and core scratch registers for convenient messaging
!
Supported by DMAU to access all memory
4.15.1 Registers
As summarized in Table 72, the PIU contains seven
memory-mapped registers that are accessible by the
host and the cores. The host accesses these registers
by issuing commands through the PIU. Please refer to
Section 4.15.5 on page 145. All PIU registers are
accessed by the host as 16-bit quantities. The cores
access the PIU registers as 32-bit memory-mapped
locations residing in the shared internal I/O memory
component (Section 4.5.7 on page 43). The PIU registers are aligned to even addresses and occupy
addresses 0x41000 to 0x4100A, as noted in Table 72.
Section 6.2.2 on page 229 provides an overview of
memory-mapped registers.
Table 72. PIU Registers
Register
Name
PCON
Address
Size
Size
R/W
R/W
(Host) (Cores) (Host) (Cores)
R/W‡
0x41000
16
32
R/W‡
PDI§
PDO
0x41008
0x4100A
16
PAH
PAL
0x41004
(PA)
DSCRATCH
HSCRATCH
16
Type†
Description
c&s
PIU control and status. The application must choose
one of the cores to write PCON.
PIU data in from host.
PIU data out to host. For a typical application, the
DMAU writes PDO, but either core can also write
PDO. The application must choose one of these entities to write PDO.
PIU address for host access to DSP16410CG memory. The application must choose either the host or
one of the cores to write this register.
DSP scratch. The application must choose one of
the cores to write DSCRATCH.
Host scratch.
32
32
W
R
R
R/W
data
data
16
16
32
R/W
R/W
R/W
data
0x41002
16
32
R
R/W
data
0x41006
16
32
W
R
data
† c & s means control and status.
‡ All bits of PCON are readable by both the host and the cores. Not all bits are writable—see Table 73 on page 134 for details.
§ PDI is double-buffered (unlike the DSP16XX PHIF PDX register). Therefore, a host write to PDI can be issued (but not completed) before a
previous host write to PDI is completed.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.1 Registers (continued)
The PCON register is the PIU status and control register. This register reflects the state of the PIU flags (PIBF and
POBE) and provides a mechanism for the host and a core to interrupt each other or reset the PIU. The bit fields of
PCON are detailed in Table 73. For each bit field, the table defines what actions can be performed by the host or a
core: read, write, clear to zero, or set to one. All the bit fields of PCON can be read by the host and by the cores. If
the PCON register is read, only the lower 7 bits contain valid information. The upper bits are undefined. If the host
or a core writes PCON, it must write the upper 25 bits with zero.
Table 73. PCON (PIU Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x41000. The application must ensure that both cores do not write PCON
at the same time.
Bit
31—7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
DRESET
HRESET
HINT§
PINT§
PREADY
PIBF
POBE
Field
31—7 Reserved
6
DRESET
Name
Value
—
DSP
Reset
—
0
1
5
HRESET
Host
Reset
0
1
4
HINT§
Interrupt
from Host
0
1
3
PINT§
2
PREADY
1
PIBF
0
POBE
PIU
Interrupt
to Host
0
PIU
Ready
PIU Input
Buffer
Full
—
PIU Output
Buffer
Empty
0
1
0
1
1
Description
R/W
R/W Reset
(Cores) (Host) Value†
Reserved—write with zero; undefined on read.
—
—
—
Always read as zero. Write with zero—no effect.
Set/
—
0
‡
Read
The program running in a core resets the PIU by writing a 1
to this field. The PIU reset clears this field automatically.
Always read as zero. Write with zero—no effect.
—
Set/
0
Read
The host resets‡ the PIU by writing a one to this field. The
PIU reset clears this field automatically.
Read as zero—no outstanding interrupt from host.
Clear/ Set/
0
Write with zero—no effect.
Read Read
If this field is initially cleared and the host sets it, the PIU
asserts the PHINT interrupt. The interrupted core’s service
routine must clear this field after servicing the PHINT request
to allow the host to request a subsequent interrupt. The service routine clears the field by writing one to it.
Read as zero—no outstanding interrupt to host.
Set/ Clear/
0
Write with zero—no effect.
Read Read
If this field is initially cleared and a program running in either
core sets it, the PIU asserts the PINT pin to interrupt the
host. The host must clear this field after servicing the PINT
request to allow a core to request a subsequent interrupt. It
clears the field by writing 1 to it.
This bit is the logical OR of the PIBF and POBE flags. (It is
Read Read
1
not the same as the PRDY pin.) If set, the PIU is not ready.
PDI contains data that has already been read by one of the
Read Read
0
cores. The host may write PDI with new data.
PDI contains data from a prior host write request. To avoid
loss of data, the host must not write PDI.
PDO contains new data. To avoid loss of data, the cores
Read Read
1
must not write PDO.
PDO contains data that has already been read by the host.
The cores may write PDO with new data.
† Device reset or PIU reset.
‡ The purpose of the PIU reset is to reinitialize all PIU sequencers and flags to their reset state.
§ If the host and a core attempt to set/clear this bit simultaneously, the PIU clears the bit.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.1 Registers (continued)
The PDI and PDO registers (Table 74 and Table 75) are the 16-bit PIU input and output data registers. PDI contains data written by the host at the conclusion of a valid host write cycle. PDO contains data written by a core or
the DMAU that is driven onto the PIU data bus during a valid host read cycle.
Table 74. PDI (PIU Data In) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x41008.
Bit
31—16
15—0
31—16
15—0
Reserved
PIU Input Data
Field
Reserved
PIU Input Data
Description
Reserved—read as zero.
PIU data in from host.
R/W (Cores) R/W (Host)
R
W
R
W
Reset Value
0
0
Table 75. PDO (PIU Data Out) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4100A. For a typical application, the DMAU writes PDO, but the cores
can also write PDO. The application must ensure that these entities do not write PDO at the same time.
Bit
31—16
15—0
31—16
15—0
Reserved
PIU Output Data
Field
Description
Reserved
Reserved—write with zero.
PIU Output Data PIU data out to host.
R/W (Cores) R/W (Host)
R/W
R
R/W
R
Reset Value
0
0
The DSCRATCH and HSCRATCH registers (Table 77 and Table 76) are the DSP and host scratch registers that
can be used to pass messaging data between a core and the host. After a core writes 16-bit data to DSCRATCH,
the host can read this data by issuing a read_dscratch command. Conversely, the host can write 16-bit data to
HSCRATCH by issuing a write_hscratch command. See Section 4.15.5 on page 145 for details on host commands.
Table 76. HSCRATCH (Host Scratch) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x41006.
Bit
31—16
15—0
Field
Reserved
Host Scratch
31—16
15—0
Reserved
Host Scratch
Description
Reserved—read as zero.
Host scratch data to DSP16410CG.
R/W (Cores) R/W (Host)
R
W
R
W
Reset Value
0
0
Table 77. DSCRATCH (DSP Scratch) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x41002. The application must choose one of the cores to write
DSCRATCH.
Bit
31—16
15—0
Field
Reserved
DSP Scratch
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31—16
15—0
Reserved
DSP Scratch
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
DSP scratch data to host.
R/W (Cores) R/W (Host)
R/W
R
R/W
R
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Reset Value
0
0
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.1 Registers (continued)
The PA register (Table 78) provides the DSP16410CG memory address for any host accesses to DSP16410CG
memory. The host must access this register as two 16-bit quantities: the high half (PAH) and the low half (PAL). A
core accesses PA as a double-word (32-bit) location at address 0x41004. See Figure 37 for details. As shown in
Table 78, the ADD[19:0] field (PA[19:0]) contains the memory address to be accessed within the selected memory
component determined by the CMP[2:0] field (PA[22:20]). The ESEG[3:0] field (PA[26:23]) determines the external segment extension for external memory accesses through the SEMI. The SEMI drives the value in the
ESEG[3:0] field onto the ESEG[3:0] pins at the same time that it asserts the appropriate enable pin (ERAMN,
EION, or EROMN) and drives the external memory address onto EA[18:0].
Table 78. PA (Parallel Address) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x41004. The application must choose either the host or one of the cores
to write this register.
31—27
26—23
22—20
19—0
Reserved
ESEG[3:0]
CMP[2:0]
ADD[19:0]
Bit
DSP
Access
Host
Access
Field
Value
31—27
26—23
PA†
PAH[15:0]‡
Reserved
ESEG[3:0]
0
0x0
to
0xF
000
001
01X
100
22—20
CMP[2:0]
19—16
15—0
†
‡
§
††
‡‡
ADD[19:0]
PAL[15:0]‡‡
Definition
Reserved—write with zero.
External memory address extension. The value
of this field is placed directly on the ESEG[3:0]
pins for PIU accesses to external memory§.
The selected memory component is TPRAM0.
The selected memory component is TPRAM1.
Reserved.
The selected memory component is ERAM††,
EIO, or internal I/O.
101
Reserved.
11X
Reserved.
0x00000 The address within the selected memory space.
to
0xFFFFF
R/W
Reset
Value
R/W
R/W
0
0x0
R/W
000
R/W
0x00000
Memory-mapped to double word at address 0x41004.
Write with write_pah command; read with read_pah command.
This field is valid only for external memory accesses (CMP[2:0] = 100) and is ignored for internal memory accesses.
If the WEROM field (ECON1[11]—Table 60 on page 111) is set, EROM is selected in place of ERAM.
Write with write_pal command; read with read_pal command.
32-Bit PA Register Host and DSP Access
CORES ACCESS PA[31:0] AS DOUBLE-WORD MEMORY-MAPPED REGISTER AT LOCATION 0x41004
31—27
26—23
22—20
Reserved
ESEG[3:0]
CMP[2:0]
19—0
ADD[19:16]
15
ADD[15:0]
0 15
HOST ACCESSES PA[31:16] AS PAH[15:0] VIA
THE read_pah AND write_pah COMMANDS
0
HOST ACCESSES PA[15:0] AS PAL[15:0] VIA
THE read_pal AND write_pal COMMANDS
Figure 37. 32-Bit PA Register Host and Core Access
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.1 Registers (continued)
The host accesses PAH and PAL by executing the read_pah, read_pal, write_pah, and write_pal commands.
After certain host commands, the PIU autoincrements the value in PA. See Section 4.15.5 on page 145 for details
on host commands. Unlike the DSP1620 and DSP16210 MIOU, the PIU increments the value in the PA register
linearly and does not wrap it.
4.15.2 Hardware Interface
The host interface to the PIU consists of 29 pins, as summarized in Table 79. The remainder of this section
describes these pins in detail.
Table 79. PIU External Interface
.
Function
Address and
Data
Enables and
Strobes
Flags, Interrupt,
and Ready
Pin
Type
Description
PD[15:0] I/O/Z 16-bit bidirectional, parallel data bus. 3-stated if PCSN = 1.
PADD[3:0]† I PIU 4-bit address and control input.
PODS‡
I PIU output data strobe.
Intel host: Connect to the host active-low read data strobe.
Motorola host: Connect to the host data strobe.
PIDS‡
I PIU input data strobe.
Intel host: Connect to the host active-low write data strobe.
Motorola host: Connect to logic 0 to program an active-high data strobe. Connect to
logic 1 to program an active-low data strobe.
I PIU read/write not.
PRWN‡
Intel host: Connect to the host active-low host write strobe.
Motorola host: Connect to host RWN strobe.
‡
PCSN
I PIU chip select—active-low.
POBE
O PIU output buffer empty flag.
PIBF
O PIU input buffer full flag.
PINT
O PIU interrupt (interrupt signal to host).
PRDY
O PIU ready.
Indicates the status of the current host read operation or previous host write operation.
The PRDYMD pin determines the logic level of this pin.
PRDYMD†
I PIU ready pin mode.
0: PRDY pin is active-low (PRDY = 0 indicates the PIU is ready).
1: PRDY pin is active-high (PRDY = 1 indicates the PIU is ready).
† If the system application does not use these pins, they must be tied low.
‡ If the system application does not use these pins, they must be tied high.
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Data Sheet
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.2 Hardware Interface (continued)
4.15.2.1 Enables and Strobes
The PIU provides a chip select input pin (PCSN) that allows the host to connect to multiple DSP16410CG or other
devices. The function of the enable and strobe pins (PODS, PIDS, and PRWN) is based on whether the host type
is Intel or Motorola. In order to support both types of hosts, the PIU generates a negative-assertion internal strobe
PSTRN that is a logical combination of PCSN, PODS, and PIDS as follows:
PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS)
The PIU initiates all transactions on the falling edge of PSTRN and completes all transactions on the rising edge of
PSTRN.
Table 80. Enable and Strobe Pins
Pin
PCSN
(input)
Name
PIU Chip
Select
PODS
(input)
PIU Output
Data Strobe
Value
Description
0 The host is selecting this device for PIU transfers.
1 The host is not selecting this device for PIU transfers and the PIU 3-states PD[15:0] and
ignores any activity on PIDS, PODS, and PRWN.
— ! For an Intel host, PODS functions as an output data strobe and must be connected to the
host active-low read data strobe. The host initiates a read transaction by asserting (low)
both PCSN and PODS. The host concludes a read transaction by deasserting (high)
either PCSN or PODS.
!
PIDS
(input)
PIU Input Data
Strobe
—
!
For a Motorola host, PODS functions as a data strobe and must be connected to the host
data strobe. The state of the PIDS pin determines the active level of PODS. If PIDS = 0,
PODS is an active-high data strobe. If PIDS = 1, PODS is an active-low data strobe. The
host initiates a read transaction by asserting both PCSN and PODS. The host concludes
a read transaction by deasserting either PCSN or PODS.
For an Intel host, PIDS functions as an input data strobe and must be connected to the
host active-low write data strobe. The host initiates a write transaction by asserting (low)
both PCSN and PIDS. The host concludes a write transaction by deasserting (high)
either PCSN or PIDS.
For a Motorola host, the state of PIDS determines the active level of the host data strobe,
PODS.
The host drives PRWN high during host reads and low during host writes. PRWN must be
stable for the entire access (while PCSN and the appropriate data strobes are asserted).
!
PRWN
(input)
138
PIU
Read/Write
Not Strobe
—
!
For an Intel host, PRWN and PIDS are connected to the host active-low write data strobe.
!
For a Motorola host, PRWN functions as an active read/write strobe and must be connected to the host RWN output.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.2 Hardware Interface (continued)
4.15.2.2 Address and Data Pins
The PIU provides a 16-bit external data bus (PD[15:0]). It provides a 4-bit input address bus (PADD[3:0]) that the
host uses to select between PIU registers and to issue PIU commands.
Table 81. Address and Data Pins
Pin
PD[15:0]
(input/
output)
Name
Data Bus
!
!
Description
If the host issues a read command, the PIU drives the data contained in PDO onto PD[15:0].
If the host issues a write command, it drives the data onto PD[15:0] and the PIU latches the data
into PDI.
If the PIU is not selected by the host (PCSN is high), the PIU 3-states PD[15:0].
PADD[3:0] Address Bus A 4-bit address input driven by the host to select between various PIU registers and to issue PIU
(input)
commands. See Section 4.15.5 on page 145 for details.
!
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Data Sheet
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.2 Hardware Interface (continued)
4.15.2.3 Flags, Interrupt, and Ready Pins
The PIU provides buffer status flag pins, an interrupt to the host, and a host ready and mode pin pair.
Table 82. Flags, Interrupt, and Ready Pins
Pin
POBE†
(output)
Name
PIU Output
Buffer Empty
PIBF‡
(output)
PIU Input
Buffer Full
Value
0
1
0
1
PINT
(output)
PIU Interrupt
Host
0
1
PRDYMD
(input)
PIU Ready
Mode
0
1
PRDY§
(output)
PIU Ready
If
PRDYMD = 0
0
Description
PDO contains data ready for the host to read.
PDO is empty, i.e., there is no data for the host to read.
PDI is empty, so the host can safely write another word into PDI.
PDI is full with the previous word that was written by the host. If the host
writes PDI, the previous data is overwritten.
A core has not requested an interrupt to the host.
A core has requested an interrupt to the host by setting the PINT field
(PCON[3]—Table 73 on page 134). The host acknowledges the interrupt
by writing a 1 to the PINT field, clearing it.
PRDY is active-low.
PRDY is active-high.
! For a host data read operation, the read data in PDO and on PD[15:0] is
valid and the host can latch the data and conclude the read cycle††.
!
1
!
!
If
PRDYMD = 1
0
!
!
1
!
!
For a host write operation, the previous write operation has been processed by the DSP16410CG (PDI is empty) and the host can conclude
the current write cycle††, i.e., can write PDI with new data.
For a host data read operation, the DSP16410CG is processing the current read operation (PDO is still empty) and the host must extend the
current access until the PIU drives PRDY low before concluding the
read cycle††.
For a host write operation, the DSP16410CG is processing the previous
write operation (PDI is still full) and the host must extend the current
access until the PIU drives PRDY low before concluding the write
cycle††.
For a host data read operation, the DSP16410CG is processing the current read operation (PDO is still empty) and the host must extend the
current access until the PIU drives PRDY high before concluding the
read cycle††.
For a host write operation, the DSP16410CG is processing the previous
write operation (PDI is still full) and the host must extend the current
access until the PIU drives PRDY high before concluding the write
cycle††.
For a host data read operation, the read data in PDO and on PD[15:0] is
valid and the host can latch the data and conclude the read cycle††.
For a host write operation, the previous write operation has been processed by the DSP16410CG (PDI is empty) and the host can conclude
the current write cycle††, i.e., can write PDI with new data.
†
‡
§
The state of this pin is also readable by the cores in the POBE field (PCON[0]—see Table 73 on page 134).
The state of this pin is also readable by the cores in the PIBF field (PCON[1]—see Table 73 on page 134).
For the descriptions in this table to be valid, the PIU must be activated, i.e., PSTRN must be asserted. See Section 4.15.2.1 on page 138 for a definition of PSTRN.
†† See description of PIDS and PODS in Table 80 on page 138.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.3 Host Data Read and Write Cycles
This section describes typical host read and write
cycles of data for both Intel and Motorola hosts.
Figure 38 on page 142 is a functional timing diagram of
a data read and a data write cycle for both an Intel and
a Motorola host. The address that the host applies to
PADD[3:0] during the cycle determines the transaction
type, i.e., determines the host command. See Section
4.15.5 on page 145 for details on host commands.
The following sequence corresponds to the Intel data
read cycle shown in Figure 38:
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0].
The host must hold PIDS high for the entire duration
of the access.
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting (low) PCSN
and PODS.
3. When data becomes available in PDO, the PIU
drives the data onto PD[15:0].
4. To notify the host that the data in PDO and on
PD[15:0] is valid, the PIU asserts PRDY and deasserts POBE. If the data in PDO is not yet valid, the
PIU continues deasserting PRDY and the host must
wait until the PIU asserts PRDY.
The following sequence corresponds to the Motorola
data read cycle shown in Figure 38. In the figure and in
the timing sequences described below, it is assumed
that PIDS is tied high, selecting an active-low data
strobe (PODS).
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0].
The host must hold PRWN high for the duration of
the access.
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting PCSN and
PODS (low).
3. When data becomes available in PDO, the PIU
drives the data onto PD[15:0].
4. To notify the host that the data in PDO and on
PD[15:0] is valid, the PIU asserts PRDY and deasserts POBE. If the data in PDO is not yet valid, the
PIU continues deasserting PRDY and the host must
wait until the PIU asserts PRDY.
5. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PODS and latching the data from PD[15:0].
6. The PIU 3-states PD[15:0].
The following sequence corresponds to the Motorola
data write cycle shown in Figure 38. In the figure and
in the timing sequences described below, it is assumed
that PIDS is tied high, selecting an active-low data
strobe (PODS).
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0] and
drives PRWN low.
5. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PODS and latching the data from PD[15:0].
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting PCSN and
PODS (low).
6. The PIU 3-states PD[15:0].
3. The host drives data onto PD[15:0].
The following sequence corresponds to the Intel data
write cycle shown in Figure 38:
4. If PDI is empty, the PIU notifies the host by asserting
PRDY and deasserting PIBF. If PDI is still full from a
previous host write, the host must wait until the PIU
asserts PRDY.
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0].
The host must hold PODS high for the entire duration of the access.
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting (low) PCSN,
PIDS, and PRWN.
5. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PODS, causing the PIU to latch the data from
PD[15:0] into PDI.
6. The host 3-states PD[15:0].
3. The host drives data onto PD[15:0].
4. If PDI is empty, the PIU notifies the host by asserting
PRDY and deasserting PIBF. If PDI is still full from a
previous host write, the host must wait until the PIU
asserts PRDY.
5. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PIDS, causing the PIU to latch the data from
PD[15:0] into PDI.
6. The host 3-states PD[15:0].
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transaction, it must complete it properly as
described above. If the host concludes the
transaction before the PIU asserts PRDY, the
results are undefined and the PIU must be
reset. In this case, the host can reset the PIU by
setting the HRESET field (PCON[5]—Table 73
on page 134), or a core can reset the PIU by setting the DRESET field (PCON[6]).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.3 Host Data Read and Write Cycles (continued)
PIU Functional Timing for a Data Read and Write Operation
PCSN
PIDS/
PRWN
INTEL
INTERFACE
PODS
PRWN
MOTOROLA
INTERFACE
PODS†
PSTRN ‡
PADD[3:0]
ADDRESS
ADDRESS
DSP
DATA
PD[15:0]
HOST
DATA
POBE
PIBF
PRDY§
1
2
3
4
5
6
1
2
DATA READ
3
4
5
6
DATA WRITE
† For the Motorola interface, it is assumed that PIDS is tied high, selecting an active-low data strobe (PODS).
‡ PSTRN is an internal signal that is a logical combination of PCSN, PIDS, and PODS as follows: PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS).
§ It is assumed that the PRDYMD input pin is logic low, causing PRDY to be active-low.
Figure 38. PIU Functional Timing for a Data Read and Write Operation
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.4 Host Register Read and Write Cycles
This section describes typical host read and write
cycles of PIU registers for both Intel and Motorola
hosts. Figure 39 on page 144 is a functional timing diagram of a register read and a register write cycle for
both an Intel and a Motorola host. The address that
the host applies to PADD[3:0] during the cycle determines how the host accesses the register, i.e., determines the host command. See Section 4.15.5 on page
145 for details on host commands.
The following sequence corresponds to the Intel host
read of the PAH, PAL, PCON, or DSCRATCH register
shown in Figure 39:
The following sequence corresponds to the Motorola
read of the PAH, PAL, PCON, or DSCRATCH register
shown in Figure 39. In the figure and in the timing
sequences described below, it is assumed that PIDS is
tied high, selecting an active-low data strobe (PODS).
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0].
The host must hold PRWN high for the duration of
the access.
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting (low) PCSN
and PODS.
3. The PIU drives the data in the register onto
PD[15:0].
4. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PODS and latching the data from PD[15:0].
5. The PIU 3-states PD[15:0].
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0].
The host must hold PIDS high for the entire duration
of the access.
The following sequence corresponds to the Motorola
write of the PAH, PAL, PCON, or DSCRATCH register
shown in Figure 39. In the figure and in the timing
sequences described below, it is assumed that PIDS is
tied high, selecting an active-low data strobe (PODS).
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting (low) PCSN
and PODS.
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0] and
drives PRWN low.
3. The PIU drives the contents of the register onto
PD[15:0].
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting (low) PCSN
and PODS.
4. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PODS and latching the data from PD[15:0].
3. The host drives data onto PD[15:0].
5. The PIU 3-states PD[15:0].
The following sequence corresponds to the Intel host
write of the PAH, PAL, PCON, or HSCRATCH register
shown in Figure 39. The PIU uses the PDI register to
temporarily hold the write data.
1. The host drives a valid address onto PADD[3:0].
The host must hold PODS high for the entire duration of the access.
2. The host initiates the cycle by asserting (low) PCSN,
PIDS, and PRWN.
3. The host drives data onto PD[15:0].
4. If PDI is empty, the PIU notifies the host by asserting
PRDY and deasserting PIBF. If PDI is still full from a
previous host write, the host must wait until the PIU
asserts PRDY.
5. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PIDS, causing the PIU to latch the data from
PD[15:0] into PDI. The PIU transfers the data in PDI
into PAH, PAL, PCON, or HSCRATCH.
4. If PDI is empty, the PIU notifies the host by asserting
PRDY and deasserting PIBF. If PDI is still full from a
previous host write, the host must wait until the PIU
asserts PRDY.
5. The host concludes the cycle by deasserting PCSN
or PODS, causing the PIU to latch the data from
PD[15:0] into PDI. The PIU transfers the data in PDI
into PAH, PAL, PCON, or HSCRATCH.
6. The host 3-states PD[15:0].
Note: Once the host initiates a register write transaction, it must complete it properly as described
above. If the host concludes the transaction
before the PIU asserts PRDY, the results are
undefined and the PIU must be reset. In this
case, the host can reset the PIU by setting the
HRESET field (PCON[5]—Table 73 on
page 134) or a core can reset the PIU by setting
the DRESET field (PCON[6]).
6. The host 3-states PD[15:0].
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.4 Host Register Read and Write Cycles (continued)
PIU Functional Timing for a Register Read and Write Operation
PCSN
PIDS/
PRWN
INTEL
INTERFACE
PODS
PRWN
MOTOROLA
INTERFACE
PODS†
PSTRN ‡
PADD[3:0]
ADDRESS
ADDRESS
DSP
DATA
PD[15:0]
HOST
DATA
PIBF
PRDY§
1
2
3
REGISTER READ
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
6
REGISTER WRITE
For the Motorola interface, it is assumed that PIDS is tied high, selecting an active-low data strobe (PODS).
PSTRN is an internal signal that is a logical combination of PCSN, PIDS, and PODS as follows: PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS).
It is assumed that the PRDYMD input pin is logic low, causing PRDY to be active-low. PRDY is guaranteed by design to always
reflect the ready state during register read operations.
Figure 39. PIU Functional Timing for a Register Read and Write Operation
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.5 Host Commands
The host commands are summarized in Table 83. A host command is a host read or write cycle with the
PADD[3:0] pins configured to select one of several commands. Each command has a corresponding mnemonic as
defined in the table. These mnemonics are defined to simplify the explanations that follow and are also used by
the DSP16410CG model in the LUxWORKS ® debugger. These commands are detailed in the remainder of this
section.
Table 83. Summary of Host Commands
Command
Type
Memory Write
Pins
PRWN PADD[3:0]
0
0000
PIU Register Write
Memory Read
Command
Mnemonic
write_pdi
0
0001
write_pdi++
0
0
0
0
1
100X
101X
110X
111X
0000
write_pah
write_pal
write_pcon
write_hscratch
read_pdo
1
0001
read_pdo++
1
1
0010
0011
—
rdpf_pdo++
1
0100
load_pdo
1
0101
load_pdo++
Description
(PIU/DMAU Response)
Write DSP16410CG memory location pointed to by PA
with data on PD[15:0].
1. Write DSP16410CG memory location pointed to by
PA with data on PD[15:0].
2. Increment PA by one.
Write high half of PA via PDI with data from PD[15:0].
Write low half of PA via PDI with data from PD[15:0].
Write PCON via PDI with data from PD[15:0].
Write HSCRATCH via PDI with data from PD[15:0].
Read DSP16410CG memory location pointed to by PA,
and place the contents onto PD[15:0].
1. Read DSP16410CG memory location pointed to by
PA, and place the contents onto PD[15:0].
2. Increment PA by one.
Reserved.
Perform a memory read operation with prefetch. This is
the highest-performance command for host reads of
contiguous blocks of memory.
See Section 4.15.5.3 on page 147 for details.
1. Read DSP16410CG memory location pointed to by
PA, and place the contents in PDO.
Flow
Control
Yes
Yes
Yes
—
Yes
No
2. Follow with unld_pdo.
1. Read DSP16410CG memory location pointed to by
PA, and place the contents in PDO.
2. Increment PA by one.
PIU Register Read
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1
1
1
1
1
0110
100X
101X
110X
111X
3. Follow with unld_pdo.
unld_pdo
Place the contents of PDO onto PD[15:0].
read_pah
Place the contents of the high half of PA onto PD[15:0].
read_pal
Place the contents of the low half of PA onto PD[15:0].
read_pcon
Place the contents of PCON onto PD[15:0].
read_dscratch Place the contents of DSCRATCH onto PD[15:0].
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No
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.5 Host Commands (continued)
The host issues commands to the PIU through the PIU’s external interface. Host commands allow the host to
access all DSP16410CG internal and external memory locations. Host commands can also read or write PIU
scratch and control/status registers. All commands are executed by a combination of actions performed by the PIU
and by the DMAU bypass channel.
A host command consists of four parts:
1. Read vs. write operation is determined by the state of the PRWN pin.
2. The selection of a PIU internal register (PDI, PDO, PA, PCON, HSCRATCH, or DSCRATCH) is made by
PADD[3:1].
3. The command can be qualified by the state of the PADD[0] pin. This pin determines if a read or write command
requires a postincrement of the PA register.
4. Data is read or driven onto PD[15:0] by the host.
4.15.5.1 Status/Control/Address Register Read Commands
The host can read the PA, PCON, and DSCRATCH registers by issuing the appropriate command as part of a host
read cycle. These commands do not affect the state of the PA, PCON, or PDO registers or the state of the PIBF,
POBE, or PRDY pins. No flow control is required for these commands.
Table 84. Status/Control/Address Register Read Commands
Command
Mnemonic
read_pah
read_pal
read_pcon
read_dscratch
Description
This command causes the PIU to place the upper 16-bit contents of the PA register (PAH) onto PD[15:0].
This command causes the PIU to place the lower 16-bit contents of the PA register (PAL) onto PD[15:0].
This command causes the PIU to place the 16-bit contents of the PCON register onto PD[15:0].
This command causes the PIU to place the 16-bit contents of the DSCRATCH register onto PD[15:0].
4.15.5.2 Status/Control/Address Register Write Commands
The host can write the PA, PCON, and HSCRATCH registers by executing the appropriate command as part of a
host write cycle. Flow control is required for these commands, i.e., the host must check the status of the PRDY pin
to ensure that any previous data write has completed before writing to PA, PCON, or HSCRATCH. For a description of flow control, see the flow control description in Section 4.15.5.5 on page 149.
Table 85. Status/Control/Address Register Write Commands
Command
Mnemonic
write_pah
Description
This command causes the PIU to move the contents of the PDI register into the upper 16 bits of the PA register (PAH). The data move begins at the termination of a PIU host write cycle.
write_pal
This command causes the PIU to move the contents of the PDI register into the lower 16 bits of the PA register (PAL). The data move begins at the termination of a PIU host write cycle.
write_pcon
This command causes the PIU to move the contents of the PDI register into the PCON register. The data
move begins at the termination of a PIU host write cycle.
write_hscratch This command causes the PIU to move the contents of the PDI register into the HSCRATCH register. The
data move begins at the termination of a PIU host write cycle.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.5 Host Commands (continued)
4.15.5.3 Memory Read Commands
The DMAU1 coordinates and executes host data read commands via its PIU bypass channel (Section 4.13.4 on
page 86). Prior to issuing a data read command, the host must initialize the PA register with the starting address in
memory by executing the write_pah and write_pal commands. Table 86 describes each host read command in
detail.
Table 86. Memory Read Commands
Command
Mnemonic
load_pdo
load_pdo++
unld_pdo
read_pdo
read_pdo++
Description
This command causes the PIU to:
!
Request the DMAU to fetch the single word (16 bits) pointed to by the contents of PA.
!
Place the word into PDO.
The host does not wait for the data after issuing this command (flow control can be ignored), but must issue
a subsequent unld_pdo command.
This command causes the PIU to:
!
Request the DMAU to fetch the single word (16 bits) pointed to by the contents of PA.
!
Place the word into PDO.
!
Postincrement the address in PA by one to point to the next single-word location.
The host does not wait for the data after issuing this command (flow control can be ignored), but must issue
a subsequent unld_pdo command.
This command causes the PIU to drive the current contents of PDO onto PD[15:0]. The host must use
proper flow control with this command (see Section 4.15.5.4 on page 148).
This command causes the PIU to:
!
Request the DMAU to fetch the single word (16 bits) pointed to by the contents of PA.
!
Place the word into PDO.
!
Drive the contents of PDO onto PD[15:0].
The host must use proper flow control with this command (see Section 4.15.5.4 on page 148).
This command causes the PIU to:
!
Request the DMAU to fetch the single word (16 bits) from the address in PA.
!
Place the word into PDO.
!
Drive the contents of PDO onto PD[15:0].
!
Postincrement the address in PA by one to point to the next single-word location.
The host must use proper flow control with this command (see Section 4.15.5.4 on page 148).
1. A core can coordinate host data read commands by program control, but this is very inefficient compared to using the DMAU for this purpose.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.5 Host Commands (continued)
4.15.5.3 Memory Read Commands (continued)
Table 86. Memory Read Commands (continued)
Command
Mnemonic
rdpf_pdo++
Description
This command is a host read with prefetch. It is the highest-performance command for host reads of contiguous blocks of memory because it causes the DMAU to fetch the block of data as double words (32 bits).
Because the host reads the data as single words (16 bits), the PIU stores the other half of the double word in
a prefetch buffer. As a result, the host must adhere to the following rules to use this command:
!
Before the host issues its first rdpf_pdo++ command with a new memory address, it must first issue a
read_pdo++ command. This flushes the prefetch buffer from any previously issued rdpf_pdo++ command.
!
The host must not issue a command that reads or writes PA, PCON, HSCRATCH, or DSCRATCH within
a series of rdpf_pdo++ commands.
!
The host must use proper flow control with this command (see Section 4.15.5.4).
For every two rdpf_pdo++ commands issued by the host, the DMAU and PIU perform the following:
!
The PIU requests the DMAU to fetch the double word† pointed to by the contents of PA.
!
The PIU postincrements PA by two to point to the next double-word location.
!
The PIU places the first word (the single word at the address in PA) into PDO, places the second word
(the single word at the address in PA + 1) into the prefetch buffer, and drives the word in PDO onto
PD[15:0].
!
In response to the second rdpf_pdo++ command issued by the host, the PIU places the second word (the
contents of the prefetch buffer) into PDO and drives the word in PDO onto PD[15:0].
This command achieves an average throughput of one word per seven CLK cycles.
† If PA contains an odd address, the PIU requests a single-word access for the first rdpf_pdo++ command in the sequence because the DMAU
requires all double-word accesses to have even addresses. All subsequent rdpf_pdo++ commands in the sequence have even addresses
and the PIU requests double-word accesses.
4.15.5.4 Flow Control for Memory Read Commands
The host performs flow control for memory read commands by one of two methods:
1. The host can monitor the PRDY pin to extend an access that has been initiated and wait for PRDY to be
asserted. This method must be used for the read_pdo, read_pdo++, and rdpf_pdo++ commands and can be
used for the unld_pdo command.
2. If the host is unable to use the PRDY pin for flow control, it cannot use the read_pdo, read_pdo++, or
rdpf_pdo++ command to read memory and must instead use the combination of the load_pdo and unld_pdo
commands. The host monitors the POBE field (PCON[0]—see Table 73 on page 134) to determine if PDO is full
and can be read with the unld_pdo command, as shown in the following pseudocode:
Issue the load_pdo command to the core
Do:
Issue a read_pcon command to the core
Repeat until POBE is 0
Issue the unld_pdo command
148
// Fetch a word from DSP16410CG
memory
// and place into PDO register.
// Host read of PCON.
// Wait for POBE = 0.
// Data in PDO now on PD[15:0].
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.5 Host Commands (continued)
4.15.5.5 Memory Write Commands
The DMAU1 coordinates and executes host data write commands via its PIU bypass channel (Section 4.13.4 on
page 86). Prior to issuing a data write command, the host must initialize the PA register with the starting address in
memory by executing the write_pah and write_pal commands. Table 87 describes each host write command in
detail.
Table 87. Memory Write Commands
Command
Mnemonic
write_pdi
write_pdi++
Description
This command causes the PIU to:
!
Latch the data from PD[15:0] into PDI.
!
Request the DMAU to write the contents of PDI to the single word pointed to by the contents of PA.
The host must use proper flow control with this command (see Section 4.15.5.6).
This command causes the PIU to:
!
Latch the data from PD[15:0] into PDI.
!
Request the DMAU to write the contents of PDI to the single word pointed to by the contents of PA.
!
Postincrement the address in PA to point to the next single-word location.
The host must use proper flow control with this command (see Section 4.15.5.6).
4.15.5.6 Flow Control for Control/Status/Address Register and Memory Write Commands
The host must use proper flow control for write commands (write_pdi, write_pdi++, write_pah, write_pal,
write_pcon, or write_hscratch) using one of two methods:
1. After the host initiates a write cycle, it can monitor the PRDY pin to determine if PDI is already full. If so, the host
can extend the access and wait for the PIU to assert PRDY.
2. If the host is unable to use the PRDY pin for flow control, it can monitor the PIBF field (PCON[1]—see Table 73
on page 134) before initiating the transaction. For example, the host can execute the following pseudocode:
Do:
Issue a read_pcon command to the core
Repeat until PIBF = = 0
Issue the write_pdi command
// Host read of PCON.
// Wait for PIBF = 0.
// Write word into PDI.
1. A core can coordinate host data read commands by program control, but this is very inefficient compared to using the DMAU for this purpose.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.6 Host Command Examples
4.15.6.1 Download of Program or Data
This example illustrates a host download to DSP16410CG TPRAM1 (CORE1) memory. Download will begin at
address 0x0 in TPRAM1 and proceed for 1000 16-bit words. For all the following steps, the host must observe
proper flow control.
1. First, the host must write the starting address into the PA register. The starting address is location 0x0 in
TPRAM1, so the host issues the following two host write commands:
write_pah 0x0010
write_pal 0x0
// Host sets PADD[3:0] to 0x8 and writes 0x0010 to PD[15:0]
// Host sets PADD[3:0] to 0xA and writes 0x0 to PD[15:0]
2. Next, the host begins to write the data to TPRAM1. This is done by repeatedly issuing the following command
999 times. Each iteration writes the appropriate data to be loaded to each sequential 16-bit location in TPRAM1.
write_pdi++ data
// Host sets PADD[3:0] to 0x1 and writes data to PD[15:0]
3. For the write of the last data word (in this example, the 1000th word), the host issues the following command:
write_pdi data_
// Host sets PADD[3:0] to 0x0 and writes data_ to PD[15:0]
4.15.6.2 Upload of Data
This example illustrates a host upload from DSP16410CG TPRAM0 (CORE0) memory. The upload begins at
address 0x0200 in TPRAM0 and proceeds for 160 16-bit words. For all the following steps, the host must observe
proper flow control.
1. First, the host must write the starting address into the PA register. The starting address is location 0x0200 in
TPRAM0, so the host issues the following two host write commands:
write_pah 0x0
write_pal 0x0200
// Host sets PADD[3:0] to 0x8 and writes 0x0 to PD[15:0].
// Host sets PADD[3:0] to 0xA and writes 0x0200 to PD[15:0].
2. Next, the host begins to read the data from TPRAM0, as transferred to the PIU’s PDO register via the DMAU.
This is done by first issuing the following command, which drives PD[15:0] with the data from TPRAM0 address
0x00200:
read_pdo++ // Host sets PADD[3:0]=0x1 and reads data (address 0x00200) on PD[15:0].
// (PIU requests DMAU to fetch single word from address 0x00200.)
3. The host then issues the following commands. Because the address is initially misaligned, the first command
causes the PIU to request the DMAU to fetch a single word. For the remaining commands, the PIU requests the
DMAU to fetch a double word for every other command.
rdpf_pdo++ //
//
rdpf_pdo++ //
//
rdpf_pdo++ //
Host
(PIU
Host
(PIU
Host
sets PADD[3:0]=0x3 and reads data (address 0x00201) on PD[15:0].
requests DMAU to fetch single word from address 0x00201.)
sets PADD[3:0]=0x3 and reads data (address 0x00202) on PD[15:0].
requests DMAU to fetch double word from address 0x00202.)
sets PADD[3:0]=0x3 and reads data(address 0x00203)on PD[15:0].
// Repeat rdpf_pdo++ command 156 more times for a total of 159 times.
Note: The host must not issue a command that reads or writes PA, PCON, HSCRATCH, or DSCRATCH within a
series of rdpf_pdo++ commands.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.15 Parallel Interface Unit (PIU) (continued)
4.15.7 PIU Interrupts
A core can issue an interrupt to the host by setting the
PINT field (PCON[3]—see Table 73 on page 134). If
this field is initially cleared and the core sets it, the PIU
asserts (high) the PINT pin. The host must clear this
field after servicing the PINT request to allow a core to
request a subsequent interrupt. It clears the field by
writing 1 to it.
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The host can issue an interrupt to the cores by setting
the HINT field (PCON[4]—see Table 73 on
page 134). If this field is initially cleared and the host
sets it, the PIU asserts the PHINT interrupt to the
cores. The interrupted core’s service routine must
clear this field after servicing the PHINT request to
allow the host to request a subsequent interrupt. It
clears the field by writing 1 to it. See Section 4.4 for
more information on interrupts.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU)
The DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor SIU provides the following features:
!
Two modes of operation: channel mode and frame
mode:
— Both modes support a maximum frame size of
128 logical channels.
— Frame mode selects all channels within a given
frame.
— Channel mode with a maximum of 32 channels in
two subframes allows minimum core intervention
(a core configures the input and output sections
independently only once or on frame boundaries).
— Channel mode with a maximum of 128 channels
in eight subframes is achievable if a core configures the input and output sections independently
on subframe boundaries.
!
Independent input and output sections:
— Programmable data length (4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits,
or 16 bits).
— LSB or MSB first.
— Programmable frame sync active level, frequency, and position relative to the first data bit in
the frame.
— Programmable bit clock active level and frequency.
— Programmable active or passive frame syncs and
bit clocks.
!
Compatible with T1/E1 and ST-bus framer devices.
!
Hardware for µ-law and A-law companding.
The DSP16410CG provides two identical serial interface units (SIU) to interface to codecs and various time
division multiplex (TDM) bit streams. Each SIU is a
full-duplex, double-buffered serial port with independent input and output frame and bit clock control. The
SIU can generate clocks and frame syncs internally
(active), or can use clocks and frame syncs generated
externally (passive). The programmable modes of the
SIU provide for T1/E1 and ST-bus compatibility.
The SIU control registers SCON〈0—12〉, the SIU status
registers (STAT and FSTAT), and the SIU input and
output channel index registers (ICIX〈0—1〉 and
OCIX〈0—1〉) are memory-mapped into the
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor shared I/O
memory component (see Section 4.5.7 on page 43).
Section 4.16.15 on page 182 provides a detailed
description of the encoding of these registers.
The DMAU supports each SIU with two bidirectional
SWT (single-word transfer) channels. SIU0 is directly
connected to DMAU channels SWT0 and SWT1. SIU1
is directly connected to DMAU channels SWT2 and
SWT3. The SWT channels provide transfers between
the SIU input and output data registers and any
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor memory space
with minimal core overhead. Each of the SWT channels can perform two-dimensional memory accesses to
support the buffering of TDM data to or from the SIU.
Refer to Section 4.13 on page 64 for more information
on the DMAU.
Each SIU provides two interrupt signals directly to each
DSP core, indicating the completion of an input or output transaction. Each core can individually enable or
mask these interrupts by programming the core’s inc0
register.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
Figure 40 is a block diagram of an SIU.
SIU Block Diagram
SICK
SOCK
ICK
CLOCK
AND
FRAME SYNC
SELECTION
PIN
CONDITIONING
SIFS
IFS
OCK
SOFS
OFS
AGFS
AGCKI
INTERNAL
BIT CLOCKS
AND
FRAME SYNCS
AGCKO
SIFSK
ACTIVE CLOCK
AND FRAME SYNC
GENERATOR
SCK
CLK
OUTPUT SHIFT
REGISTER
SOD
SIOLB
1
SID
OCK
16
M
U
X
INPUT SHIFT
REGISTER
0
ICK
16
SIB
REGISTER
IINTSEL[1:0]
OINTSEL[1:0]
16
SIINT
(TO
CORES)
INPUT
SIGNALING
OPTIONAL
EXPANSION
(µ-LAW OR A-LAW)
OPTIONAL
COMPRESSION
(µ-LAW OR A-LAW)
16
INPUT
REQUEST
(TO DMAU)
SOINT
(TO
CORES)
OUTPUT
SIGNALING
16
SIDR
REGISTER
OUTPUT
REQUEST
SODR
REGISTER
16
16
16
DSI
MUX
16
16
16
SDB
16
16
CONTROL AND
STATUS REGISTERS
SCON〈0—12〉
IFIX[4]
DDO
16
INPUT
CHANNEL
INDEX REGISTERS
OUTPUT
CHANNEL
INDEX REGISTERS
ICIX〈0—1〉
OCIX〈0—1〉
TO
DMAU
OFIX[4]
STAT
16
FSTAT
IFIX[3:0]
MUX
16
MUX
OFIX[3:0]
SOCIX
SICIX
Note:
The signals within ovals are control/status register bits. SIOLB is SCON10[8]. IFIX[6:0] is FSTAT[6:0]. OFIX[6:0] is
FSTAT[14:8].
Figure 40. SIU Block Diagram
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.1 Hardware Interface
The system interface to the SIU consists of seven pins, described in Table 88.
Table 88. SIU External Interface
Pin†
SID
Type
I
SICK
I/O/Z
SIFS
I/O/Z
SIU Input
Frame Sync
SOD
O/Z
SIU Output
Data
SOCK I/O/Z
SIU Output
Bit Clock
SOFS I/O/Z
SIU Output
Frame Sync
SCK
I
Name
SIU Input
Data
SIU Input
Bit Clock
SIU External
Clock Source
Description
The SIU latches data from SID into its input shift register. By default, the SIU latches data from
SID on each falling edge of the input bit clock.
By default, SICK is configured as an input (passive) that provides the serial input bit clock. Alternatively, the SIU can generate the input bit clock internally and can drive this clock onto the SICK
output (active).
SIFS specifies the beginning of a new input frame. By default, SIFS is active-high and is configured as an input (passive). Alternatively, the SIU can generate the input frame sync internally
and can drive this sync onto the SIFS output (active). To support a 2x ST-bus interface, SIFS can
be configured as an input that synchronizes the internally generated (active) input and output bit
clocks.
The SIU drives data onto SOD from its output shift register. By default, the SIU drives data onto
SOD on each rising edge of the output bit clock. The SIU 3-states SOD during inactive or
masked channel periods.
By default, SOCK is configured as an input (passive) that provides the serial output bit clock.
Alternatively, the SIU can generate the output bit clock internally and can drive this clock onto the
SOCK output (active).
SOFS specifies the beginning of a new output frame. By default, SOFS is active-high and is configured as an input (passive). Alternatively, the SIU can generate the output frame sync internally
and can drive this sync onto the SOFS output (active).
SCK is an input that provides an external clock source for generating the active mode input and
output bit clocks and frame syncs.
† The name of the pins has a 0 suffix for SIU0 and a 1 suffix for SIU1.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.2 Pin Conditioning Logic, Bit Clock Selection Logic, and Frame Sync Selection Logic
Figure 41 on page 156 diagrams the pin conditioning logic, bit clock selection logic, and frame sync selection logic.
This logic is controlled by fields in the SCON10, SCON3, SCON2, and SCON1 registers, as detailed in Table 89.
Input functional timing is described in detail in Section 4.16.3 on page 157. Output functional timing is described in
detail in Section 4.16.4 on page 158. Active clock and frame sync generation is described in detail in
Section 4.16.5 on page 159. SIU loopback is described in detail in Section 4.16.7 on page 166.
Table 89. Control Register Fields for Pin Conditioning, Bit Clock Selection, and Frame Sync Selection
Field
SIOLB
SCON10[8]
OCKK
SCON10[7]
OCKA
SCON10[6]
OFSK
SCON10[5]
OFSA
SCON10[4]
ICKK
SCON10[3]
ICKA
SCON10[2]
IFSK
SCON10[1]
IFSA
SCON10[0]
OFSE†
SCON3[15]
OCKE†
SCON3[14]
IFSE†
SCON3[7]
ICKE†
SCON3[6]
ORESET
SCON2[10]
OFSDLY[1:0]
SCON2[9:8]
IRESET
SCON1[10]
IFSDLY[1:0]
SCON1[9:8]
Value
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
00
01
10
0
1
00
01
10
Description
Disable SIU loopback mode.
Enable SIU loopback mode.
The SIU drives output data onto SOD on the rising edge of the output bit clock.
The SIU drives output data onto SOD on the falling edge of the output bit clock.
The output bit clock is provided externally on the SOCK pin (passive).
The output bit clock is internally generated (active).
The output frame sync is active-high.
The output frame sync is active-low.
The output frame sync is provided externally on the SOFS pin (passive).
The output frame sync is internally generated (active).
The SIU latches input data from SID on the falling edge of the output bit clock.
The SIU latches input data from SID on the rising edge of the output bit clock.
The input bit clock is provided externally on the SICK pin (passive).
The input bit clock is internally generated (active).
The input frame sync is active-high.
The input frame sync is active-low.
The input frame sync is provided externally on the SIFS pin (passive).
The input frame sync is internally generated (active).
Do not drive internally generated output frame sync onto SOFS.
Drive internally generated output frame sync onto SOFS.
Do not drive internally generated output bit clock onto SOCK.
Drive internally generated output bit clock onto SOCK.
Do not drive internally generated input frame sync onto SIFS.
Drive internally generated input frame sync onto SIFS.
Do not drive internally generated input bit clock onto SICK.
Drive internally generated input bit clock onto SICK.
Activate output section and begin output processing after next output frame sync.
Deactivate output section and initialize bit and frame counters.
Do not delay output frame sync.
Delay output frame sync by one cycle of the output bit clock.
Delay output frame sync by two cycles of the output bit clock.
Activate input section and begin input processing after next input frame sync.
Deactivate input section and initialize bit and frame counters.
Do not delay input frame sync.
Delay input frame sync by one cycle of the input bit clock.
Delay input frame sync by two cycles of the input bit clock.
† Set this field in active mode only, i.e., if the corresponding OCKA/OFSA/ICKA/IFSA field is set.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.2 Pin Conditioning Logic, Bit Clock Selection Logic, and Frame Sync Selection Logic (continued)
IFSE
ICK
IFSK
ICK
DELAY
D
Q
D
Q
2
ACTIVE/PASSIVE
M
1 U
X
IRESET
SIFS
0
IFSK
M
U
X
0
1
M
U
X
IFS
0
1
SIFSK
(TO ACTIVE
CLOCK GENERATOR)
IFSA
LOOPBACK
IFSDLY[1:0]
SIOLB
AGFS
(FROM ACTIVE
CLOCK GENERATOR)
OFSA
OFSK
OFSDLY[1:0]
ORESET
1
0
SOFS
M
U
X
0
M
1 U
X
ACTIVE/PASSIVE
D
Q
D
Q
OFS
2
DELAY
OFSE
OFSK
ICKE
ICKK
OCK
OCK
ACTIVE/PASSIVE
SICK
0
ICKK
LOOPBACK
M
U
X
0
1
M
U
X
ICK
1
AGCKI
(FROM ACTIVE
CLOCK GENERATOR)
ICKA
AGCKO
(FROM ACTIVE
CLOCK GENERATOR)
OCKA
SIOLB
OCKK
1
0
SOCK
M
U
X
OCK
ACTIVE/PASSIVE
OCKE
OCKK
PIN CONDITIONING
Note:
CLOCK AND FRAME SYNC SELECTION
The signals within ovals are control register fields. SIOLB is SCON10[8], IFSE is SCON3[7], IFSK is SCON10[1], IFSA is SCON10[0],
IRESET is SCON1[10], IFSDLY[1:0] is SCON1[9:8], OFSE is SCON3[15], OFSK is SCON10[5], OFSA is SCON10[4], ORESET is
SCON2[10], OFSDLY[1:0] is SCON2[9:8], ICKE is SCON3[6], ICKK is SCON10[3], ICKA is SCON10[2], OCKE is SCON3[14], OCKK is
SCON10[7], and OCKA is SCON10[6].
Figure 41. Pin Conditioning Logic, Bit Clock Selection Logic, and Frame Sync Selection Logic
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.3 Basic Input Processing
The SIU begins input processing when the user software clears the IRESET field (SCON1[10]). The system application must ensure that the input bit clock is
applied before IRESET is cleared. If an input bit clock
is active (internally generated), the user program must
wait at least two bit clock cycles between changing
AGRESET (SCON12[15]) and clearing IRESET. If the
DMAU is used to service the SIU, the user software
must activate the DMAU channel before clearing
IRESET.
Figure 42 illustrates the default functional input timing.
SICK (SIU input bit clock) synchronizes all SIU input
transactions. The SIU samples SIFS (SIU input frame
sync) on the rising edge of SICK. If the SIU detects a
rising edge of SIFS, it initiates input processing for a
new frame. The SIU latches data bits from SID (SIU
input data) on the falling edge of SICK for active channels (i.e., channels selected via software).
Serial Input Functional Timing
SICK
To vary the functional input timing from the default
operation described above, either core can program
control register fields as follows:
!
If either core sets the ICKK field (SCON10[3]—see
Table 111 on page 189), the SIU inverts SICK and:
— Detects the assertion of SIFS on the falling edge
of SICK.
— Latches data from SID on each rising edge of
SICK.
!
If the software sets the IFSK field (SCON10[1]), SIFS
is active-low and the start of a new frame is specified
by a high-to-low transition (falling edge) on SIFS,
detected by an activating edge1 of the input bit clock.
!
By default, the SIU latches the first data bit of an
input frame from SID one phase of SICK after the
detection of the input frame sync. Either core can
increase this delay by one or two input bit clock
cycles by programming the IFSDLY[1:0] field
(SCON1[9:8]—see Table 102 on page 184).
An externally generated input bit clock can drive SICK
(passive mode) or the SIU can generate an internal
input bit clock that can be applied to SICK (active
mode). An externally generated input frame sync can
drive SIFS (passive mode) or the SIU can generate an
internal input frame sync that can be applied to SIFS
(active mode). See Section 4.16.5 on page 159 for
details on clock and frame sync generation.
Note: The combination of passive input bit clock and
active input frame sync is not supported.
SIFS
START OF
FRAME
SID
B0
DATA
LATCHED
B1
DATA
LATCHED
Figure 42. Default Serial Input Functional Timing
The SIU clocks the data for the selected channel into a
16-bit input shift register (see Figure 40 on page 153).
After the SIU clocks in a complete 4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits,
or 16 bits according to the ISIZE[1:0] field
(SCON0[4:3]—see Table 101 on page 183), it transfers
the data to SIB (serial input buffer register) and sets the
SIBV (serial input buffer valid) flag (STAT[1]—see
Table 116 on page 195). SIB is not a user-accessible
register. Either core can program the IMSB field
(SCON0[2]) to select MSB- or LSB-first data transfer
from the input shift register to SIB. For data lengths
that are less than 16 bits, the SIU right justifies the data
(places the data in the lower bit positions) in SIB and
fills the upper bits with zeros.
1. The activating edge of the input bit clock is the rising edge of the
clock if the ICKK field (SCON10[3]) is cleared and the falling edge
of the clock if the ICKK field is set.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.3 Basic Input Processing (continued)
processing for a new frame. The SIU drives data bits
onto SOD (SIU output data) on the rising edge of
SOCK for active channels (i.e., channels selected via
software). The SIU 3-states SOD for inactive channels
and during idle periods. (See Section 4.16.8 on
page 166 for details.)
If SIDR (serial input data register) is empty (the SIDV
flag (STAT[0]) is cleared), the following actions occur:
SOCK
1. The SIU formats the data (µ-law, A-law, or no modification) in SIB according to the IFORMAT[1:0] field
(SCON0[1:0]—see Table 101 on page 183).
SOFS
2. The SIU transfers the formatted data to SIDR.
START OF
FRAME
3. The SIU clears the SIBV (serial input buffer valid)
flag (STAT[1]).
SOD
B0
B1
4. The SIU sets the SIDV flag to indicate that SIDR is
full.
Figure 43. Default Serial Output Functional Timing
5. The SIU signals the DMAU that serial input data is
ready for transfer to memory.
To vary the serial function output timing from the
default operation described above, either core can program control register fields as follows:
6. If the IINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11]—see
Table 111 on page 189) equals two, the SIU asserts
the SIINT interrupt to the cores to request service.
!
If either core sets the OCKK field (SCON10[7]—see
Table 111 on page 189), the SIU inverts SOCK and:
— Detects the assertion of SOFS on the falling edge
of SOCK.
— Drives data onto SOD on each falling edge of
SOCK.
!
If either core sets the OFSK field (SCON10[5]),
SOFS is active-low and the start of a new frame is
specified by a high-to-low transition (falling edge) on
SOFS, detected by an activating edge1 of the output
bit clock.
!
By default, the SIU drives output data onto SOD
immediately after the detection of the output frame
sync. Either core can program the OFSDLY[1:0] field
(SCON2[9:8]—see Table 103 on page 185) to cause
the SIU to delay driving data onto SOD by one or two
output bit clock cycles.
Data remains in SIDR and SIDV remains set until the
data is read by the DMAU or by one of the cores. After
SIDR has been read, the DSP16410CG clears the
SIDV flag.
If new data is completely shifted in before the old data
in SIB is transferred to SIDR (i.e., while SIBV and SIDV
are both set), an input buffer overflow occurs and the
new data overwrites the old data. The SIU sets the
IOFLOW field (STAT[6]) to reflect this error condition.
If the IINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11]) equals three,
the SIU asserts the SIINT interrupt to the cores to
reflect this condition.
4.16.4 Basic Output Processing
The SIU begins output processing when the user software clears the ORESET field (SCON2[10]). The system application must ensure that the output bit clock is
applied before ORESET is cleared. If an output bit
clock is active (internally generated), the user program
must wait at least four bit clock cycles between changing AGRESET (SCON12[15]) and clearing ORESET. If
the DMAU is used to service the SIU, the user software
must activate the DMAU channel before clearing
ORESET.
Figure 43 illustrates the default serial functional output
timing. SOCK (SIU output bit clock) synchronizes all
SIU output transactions. The SIU samples SOFS (SIU
output frame sync) on the rising edge of SOCK. If the
SIU detects a rising edge of SOFS, it initiates output
158
SOCK can provide an externally generated output bit
clock (passive mode) or the SIU can generate an internal output bit clock (active mode) that can be applied to
SOCK. SOFS can provide an externally generated
output frame sync (passive mode) or the SIU can generate an internal output frame sync (active mode) that
can be applied to SOFS. See Section 4.16.5 on
page 159 for details on clock and frame sync generation.
Note: The combination of passive output bit clock and
active output frame sync is not supported.
1. The activating edge of the output bit clock is the rising edge if the
OCKK field (SCON10[7]) is cleared and falling edge if the OCKK
field is set.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.4 Basic Output Processing (continued)
The DMAU or either of the cores writes output data into
SODR (serial output data register). See Figure 40 on
page 153. If SODR is empty, the SIU clears the SODV
flag (serial output data valid, STAT[3]—Table 116 on
page 195). This indicates that a core or the DMAU can
write new data to SODR. The following describes the
sequence of events that follow this condition:
1. The SIU signals the DMAU that it is ready to accept
new data. If the OINTSEL[1:0] field
(SCON10[14:13]) equals two, the SIU generates the
SOINT interrupt signal to both cores.
2. The DMAU or one of the cores writes SODR with
new data.
3. The SIU sets SODV to indicate that SODR is full.
4. At the beginning of the time slot for the next active
channel (on an activating edge of the output bit
clock), the SIU transfers the contents of SODR to
the 16-bit output shift register, clears SODV, and
drives the first data bit onto SOD. While transferring
the data from SODR to the output shift register, the
SIU formats the data (µ-law, A-law, or no modification) according to the value of the OFORMAT[1:0]
field (SCON0[9:8]—see Table 101 on page 183).
Based on the value of the OMSB field (SCON0[10]),
the SIU shifts the data out LSB-first or MSB-first.
Based on the value of the OSIZE[1:0] field
(SCON0[12:11]), the SIU drives 4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits,
or 16 bits of the data in the output shift register onto
SOD. If OSIZE[1:0] is programmed to select a data
size of 4 bits, 8 bits, or 12 bits, the data must be
right-justified in (placed in the least significant bits
of) the 16-bit SODR register.
Output buffer underflow can occur if the DMAU or core
does not write new data into SODR before the contents
of SODR are to be transferred to the output shift register. Specifically, an output buffer underflow occurs if all
three of the following conditions exist:
!
SODR is empty (SODV = 0).
!
The output shift register is empty.
!
The time slot for an active channel is pending.
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If output buffer underflow occurs, the SIU sets the
OUFLOW field (STAT[7]) and continues to output the
old data in SODR (repeats step 4) for any active channels until the DMAU or core writes new data to SODR.
If the OINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[14:13]) equals
three, the SIU asserts the SOINT interrupt to notify the
cores of the underflow condition.
4.16.5 Clock and Frame Sync Generation
Generation of the SIU bit clocks (SICK and SOCK) and
frame syncs (SIFS and SOFS) can be active or passive. In active mode, these signals can be derived
from the DSP clock, CLK, or from an external clock
source applied to the SCK pin. In either case, the
active clock source is divided down by a programmable
clock divider to generate the desired bit clock and
frame sync frequencies. In passive mode, the external
clock source applied to the SICK pin is used directly as
the input bit clock, the signal applied to SIFS is used
directly as the input frame sync, the clock source
applied to the SOCK pin is used directly as the output
bit clock, and the signal applied to SOFS is used as the
output frame sync. All of the bit fields that control bit
clock and frame sync generation are summarized in
Table 90 on page 162.
The input section and the output section of each SIU
operate independently and require individual clock
sources to be specified.
Note: The combination of passive input bit clock and
active input frame sync is not supported, and the
combination of passive output bit clock and
active output frame sync is not supported. If the
combination of an active bit clock and a passive
frame sync is selected, the frame sync must be
derived from the bit clock and must meet the timing requirements specified in Section 11.11.
The default operation specifies that the SIU clocks
input data bits from SID on the falling edge of SICK and
drive output data bits onto SOD on the rising edge of
SOCK. The DSP16410CG can invert the polarity
(active level) of the SICK pin by setting the ICKK field
(SCON10[3]—see Table 111 on page 189) and the
polarity (active level) of the SOCK pin by setting the
OCKK field (SCON10[7]). The SIU can generate one
or both bit clocks internally (active) or externally
(passive). Setting the ICKA field (SCON10[2]) puts
SICK into active mode, and setting the OCKA field
(SCON10[6]) puts SOCK into active mode.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.5 Clock and Frame Sync
Generation (continued)
Active bit clocks are generated by dividing down either
the internal clock (CLK) or a clock source applied to the
SCK pin, depending on the AGEXT field
(SCON12[12]—see Table 113 on page 193). The
active clock generator must also be enabled by clearing the AGRESET field (SCON12[15]) and programming a divide ratio into the AGCKLIM[7:0] field
(SCON11[7:0]—see Table 112 on page 192). If either
bit clock is internally generated, the corresponding
clock pin (SICK or SOCK) is an output that can be
turned off by clearing the ICKE field (SCON3[6]—see
Table 104 on page 186) or the OCKE field
(SCON3[14]—see Table 104 on page 186), placing the
corresponding pin into 3-state.
Passive bit clocks are externally generated and applied
directly to the corresponding SICK or SOCK pins. In
this case, the ICKA or OCKA field (SCON10[2] or
SCON10[6]) is cleared. The program should disable
the active clock generator by setting the AGRESET
field (SCON12[15]) only if both clocks and both frame
syncs are externally generated.
The default operation of the SIU specifies the active
level of the input and output frame sync pins to be
active-high, so the rising edge of SIFS or SOFS indicates the beginning of an input or output frame,
respectively. The program can invert the active level
(active-low) by setting the IFSK and OFSK fields
(SCON10[1] and SCON10[5]). The program can configure one or both frame syncs as internally generated
(active) or externally generated (passive), based on the
states of the IFSA and OFSA fields (SCON10[0] and
SCON10[4]).
Passive frame syncs are externally generated and
applied directly to the SIFS or SOFS pins. In this case,
the IFSA field (SCON10[0]—see Table 111 on
page 189) or the OFSA field (SCON10[4]) is cleared.
The program should disable the active clock generator
by setting the AGRESET field (SCON12[15]—see
Table 113 on page 193) only if both frame syncs and
both bit clocks are externally generated.
The active clock generator has the ability to synchronize to an external source (SIFS). If the AGSYNC field
of (SCON12[14]) is set, the internal clock generator is
synchronized by SIFS. This feature is used only if an
external clock source is applied to the SCK pin and
drives the internal clock generator, i.e., if the program
set the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]). A typical application for using external synchronization is an ST-bus
interface that employs a 2X external clock source. This
feature is discussed in more detail in Section 4.16.6 on
page 164.
The active clock generator also has the ability to provide additional input data setup time if an external
source (the SCK pin, selected by AGEXT = 1) is
selected to generate the input and output bit clocks.
If the I2XDLY field (SCON1[11]—see Table 102 on
page 184) is set, the high phase of the internally generated input bit clock, ICK, is stretched by one SCK
phase, providing extra data capture time. This feature
is illustrated in Figure 53 on page 181.
The relative location of data bit 0 of a new frame can be
delayed by a maximum of two bit clock periods with
respect to the location of the frame sync. This feature
is controlled by the IFSDLY[1:0] field (SCON1[9:8]—
see Table 102 on page 184) for input and the OFSDLY[1:0] field (SCON2[9:8]—see Table 103 on
page 185) for output. The location of the leading edge
of frame sync is approximately coincident with bit 0 by
default. However, bit 0 can be delayed by one or two
bit clocks after frame sync as shown in Figure 44.
The active frame syncs are generated by dividing down
the internally generated active mode bit clock. The
active clock generator must also be enabled by clearing the AGRESET field (SCON12[15]) and by programming a divide ratio into the AGFSLIM[10:0] field
(SCON12[10:0]). If either frame sync is internally generated, the corresponding frame sync pin (SIFS or
SOFS) is an output that can be turned off by clearing
the IFSE field (SCON3[7]—see Table 104 on
page 186) or the OFSE field (SCON3[15]—see
Table 104 on page 186), placing the corresponding pin
into 3-state.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.5 Clock and Frame Sync Generation (continued)
Frame Sync to Data Delay Timing
S〈I,O〉CK
S〈I,O〉FS
S〈I,O〉D
(〈I,O〉FSDLY = 0)
Bn – 2
Bn – 1
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
S〈I,O〉D
(〈I,O〉FSDLY = 1)
Bn – 3
Bn – 2
Bn – 1
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
S〈I,O〉D
(〈I,O〉FSDLY = 2)
Bn – 4
Bn – 3
Bn – 2
Bn – 1
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
5-7849 (F)
Figure 44. Frame Sync to Data Delay Timing
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.5 Clock and Frame Sync Generation (continued)
Table 90. A Summary of Bit Clock and Frame Sync Control Register Fields
Bit Field
AGRESET
AGSYNC
Register
SCON12[15]
SCON12[14]
SCKK
AGEXT
SCON12[13]
SCON12[12]
AGFSLIM[10:0]
SCON12[10:0]
AGCKLIM[7:0]
SCON11[7:0]
SIOLB
OCKK
OCKA†
SCON10[8]
SCON10[7]
SCON10[6]
OFSK
OFSA†
SCON10[5]
SCON10[4]
ICKK
ICKA†
SCON10[3]
SCON10[2]
IFSK
IFSA†
SCON10[1]
SCON10[0]
IFSE
ICKE
OFSE
OCKE
I2XDLY
SCON3[7]
SCON3[6]
SCON3[15]
SCON3[14]
SCON1[11]
Description
Enables the internal active clock divider/generator.
Enables synchronization of the internal active clock generator to SIFS. If set,
AGEXT must also be set. This feature is enabled for 2x ST-bus operation.
Defines the active level of the external clock source, SCK.
Defines the clock source to the internal clock divider/generator (either the DSP
CLK or external SCK pin).
Defines the clock divider ratio for the internal generation of frame syncs (active
mode).
Defines the clock divider ratio for the internal generation of bit clocks (active
mode).
Enables SIU loopback mode. See Section 4.16.7 on page 166.
Defines the active level of the SOCK pin.
Defines SOCK as internally (active mode, SOCK is an output) or externally (passive mode, SOCK is an input) generated.
Defines the active level of the SOFS pin.
Defines SOFS as internally (active mode, SOFS is an output) or externally (passive mode, SOFS is an input) generated.
Defines the active level of the SICK pin.
Defines SICK as internally (SICK is an output) or externally (SICK is an input)
generated.
Defines the active level of the SIFS pin.
Defines SIFS as internally (active mode, SIFS is an output) or externally (passive
mode, SIFS is an input) generated.
For active mode SIFS, this bit determines if the SIFS pin is driven as an output.
For active mode SICK, this bit determines if the SICK pin is driven as an output.
For active mode SOFS, this bit determines if the SOFS pin is driven as an output.
For active mode SOCK, this bit determines if the SOCK pin is driven as an output.
If set, the SIU stretches the high phase of the internally generated input bit clock,
ICK, by one SCK phase to provide additional serial input data setup (capture)
time. This feature is valid only if AGEXT = 1 and ICKA = 1.
† The combination of passive output bit clock (OCKA = 0) and active output frame sync (OFSA = 1) is not supported. The combination of passive input bit clock (ICKA = 0) and active input frame sync (IFSA = 1) is not supported.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
!
Example 2 shows the bit field values if both bit clocks
and frame syncs are active and generated directly
from the internal clock, CLK. This example assumes
that the SICK, SOCK, SIFS, and SOFS pins are outputs driven by the SIU.
!
Example 3 shows the bit field values if both bit clocks
and the output frame sync are active and generated
directly from the external clock source applied to the
SCK pin. The SIFS pin is driven by an external
source and is used to synchronize the internal frame
bit counter. The SICK, SOCK, and SOFS pins are
not driven by the SIU, and the high phase of the
internal input bit clock is stretched. These settings
are valid for a double-rate clock ST-bus interface.
The effect of these SIU control register settings is
illustrated by Figure 53 on page 181.
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.5 Clock and Frame Sync
Generation (continued)
Table 91 offers three typical settings for the SIU control
register fields that determine bit clock and frame sync
generation. The term as required used in this table
refers to the user’s system requirements.
!
Example 1 shows the bit field values if both bit clocks
and frame syncs are supplied directly from an external serial device (e.g., a codec).
Table 91. Examples of Bit Clock and Frame Sync Control Register Fields
Bit Field
Register
Example 1
All Passive
Example 2
All Active (CLK)
AGRESET
AGSYNC
SCKK
AGEXT
AGFSLIM[10:0]
AGCKLIM[7:0]
SIOLB
OCKK
OCKA†
OFSK
OFSA†
ICKK
ICKA†
IFSK
IFSA†
IFSE
ICKE
OFSE
OCKE
I2XDLY
SCON12[15]
SCON12[14]
SCON12[13]
SCON12[12]
SCON12[10:0]
SCON11[7:0]
SCON10[8]
SCON10[7]
SCON10[6]
SCON10[5]
SCON10[4]
SCON10[3]
SCON10[2]
SCON10[1]
SCON10[0]
SCON3[7]
SCON3[6]
SCON3[15]
SCON3[14]
SCON1[11]
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
as required
0
as required
0
as required
0
as required
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
as required
as required
0
as required
1
as required
1
as required
1
as required
1
1
1
1
1
0
Example 3
All Active (SCK)
Double-Rate ST-Bus
0
1
1
1
as required
1
0
as required
1
as required
1
as required
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
1
† The combination of passive output bit clock (OCKA = 0) and active output frame sync (OFSA = 1) is not supported. The combination of passive input bit clock (ICKA = 0) and active input frame sync (IFSA = 1) is not supported.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.6 ST-Bus Timing Examples
Figures 45 and 46 illustrate SIU timing examples for 2x ST-bus compatibility, which requires active clock generation with SCK as the clock source and SIFS synchronization enabled (AGEXT = 1, IFSA = 1, and AGSYNC = 1).
The input frame sync, SIFS, is externally generated.
Figure 45 illustrates the functional timing of the internally generated bit clocks, ICK and OCK, assuming the bit
clock divide ratio is two (AGCKLIM = 1). This results in bit clocks that have a period that is twice the period of SCK.
Since the divide ratio is even, the duty cycle of the generated bit clock is 50%. Also shown are the internally generated frame syncs, IFS and OFS. Refer to Figure 40 on page 153 for a block diagram of the internal clock generator.
Clock and Frame Sync Generation with External Clock and Synchronization
(AGCKLIM = 1, SCKK = 1, IFSK = 1, SIFS Has No Effect)
SCK
SIFS
TACKG
OCK
ICK
OFS
IFS
SOD
BN – 1
BN
B0
B1
Note: The timing reference TACKG is the active clock period determined by the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]).
Figure 45. Clock and Frame Sync Generation with External Clock and Synchronization
(AGEXT = AGSYNC = IFSA = IFSK = 1 and Timing Requires No Resynchronization)
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.6 ST-Bus Timing Examples (continued)
Figure 46 illustrates the functional timing of the internally generated bit clocks and frame syncs, ICK, OCK, IFS,
and OFS, assuming the bit clock divide ratio is two (AGCKLIM = 1, same as Figure 45 on page 164) and SIFS is
asserted while the internally generated bit clocks are high. In this case, the internal bit clocks are forced to remain
high at the falling edge of SIFS. This effectively stretches the internal bit clocks by one SCK cycle, synchronizing
the internal bit clocks to the external frame sync, SIFS. As a result, the first frame following synchronization is
lost. The SIU 3-states the SOD pin during the lost frame. Subsequent frames are synchronized and function correctly. The dotted lines in this figure show the location of SIFS and the active bit clocks and syncs if SIFS had
occurred one SCK cycle later (i.e., if the internal frame bit counter had expired prior to the assertion of SIFS, the
same as Figure 45).
Clock and Frame Sync Generation with External Clock and Synchronization
(AGCKLIM = 1, SCKK = 1, IFSK = 1, SIFS Causes Resynchronization)
SCK
SIFS
OCK
ICK
OFS
IFS
SOD
BN – 2
BN – 1
BN
THIS FRAME IS LOST
Figure 46. Clock and Frame Sync Generation with External Clock and Synchronization
(AGEXT = AGSYNC = IFSA = IFSK = 1 and Timing Requires Resynchronization)
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
2. The user’s code can define all the SIU clocks and
syncs to be passive. See Section 4.16.5 for information on configuring the bit clocks and frame syncs
as active or passive. The system must supply a bit
clock to the SOCK pin and a frame sync to the
SOFS pin.
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.7 SIU Loopback
Each SIU of the DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
includes an internal diagnostic mode to verify functionality of the SIU without requiring system intervention. If
the SIOLB field (SCON10[8]—see Table 111 on
page 189) is set, the SIU output data pin (SOD) is internally looped back to the SIU input data pin (SID), the
output bit clock is internally connected to the input bit
clock, and the output frame sync is internally connected to the input frame sync. Any input at the SID
pin is ignored while loopback is enabled.
There are two ways that SIU loopback can be used:
1. The user’s code can define the output bit clock and
output frame sync to be active and the input bit clock
and input frame sync to be passive. See
Section 4.16.5 for information on configuring the bit
clocks and frame syncs as active or passive. If SIU
loopback is enabled, the active signals generate the
necessary clocks and frame syncs for the SIU to
send and receive data to itself. Unless enabled by
the user, the SICK, SOCK, SIFS, and SOFS pins are
3-state. To enable these outputs, set the ICKE,
OCKE, IFSE, and OFSE fields (see SCON3 in
Table 104 on page 186).
4.16.8 Basic Frame Structure
The primary data structure processed by the SIU is a
frame, a sequence of bits that is initiated by a frame
sync. Each input and output frame is composed of a
number of channels, as determined by the IFLIM[6:0]
field (SCON1[6:0]—Table 102 on page 184) for input
and the OFLIM[6:0] field (SCON2[6:0]—Table 103 on
page 185) for output. Each channel consists of 4 bits,
8 bits, 12 bits, or 16 bits, as determined by the
ISIZE[1:0] and OSIZE[1:0] fields (SCON0[4:3] and
SCON0[12:11]—see Table 101 on page 183), and has
a programmable data format (µ-law, A-law, or linear) as
determined by the IFORMAT[1:0] and OFORMAT[1:0]
fields (SCON0[1:0] and SCON0[9:8]). All channels in a
frame must have the same data length and data format. Figure 47 illustrates the basic frame structure
assuming five channels per frame (〈I,O〉IFLIM[6:0] = 4)
and a channel size of 8 bits (〈I,O〉SIZE[1:0] = 0).
Figure 48 on page 167 illustrates the same frame
structure with idle time. The SIU 3-states the SOD pin
during idle time.
Note: If the output section is configured for a one-channel frame (OFLIM[6:0] = 0x0) and a passive
frame sync (OFSA(SCON10[4]) = 0), the SOFS
frame sync interval must be constant and a multiple of the OCK output bit clock.
Basic Frame Structure
FRAME PERIOD
〈I,O〉FS
〈I,O〉CK
S〈I,O〉D
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
CHANNEL
〈I,O〉SIZE
CHANNEL 0
CHANNEL 1
CHANNEL 2
CHANNEL 3
CHANNEL 4
CHANNEL 0
FRAME
〈I,O〉FLIM + 1 CHANNELS
Figure 47. Basic Frame Structure
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.8 Basic Frame Structure (continued)
FRAME PERIOD
〈I,O〉FS
〈I,O〉CK
S〈I,O〉D
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 4 5
CHANNEL
〈I,O〉SIZE
CHANNEL 0
CHANNEL 1
CHANNEL 2
CHANNEL 3
CHANNEL 4
IDLE†
CHANNEL 0
FRAME
〈I,O〉FLIM + 1 CHANNELS
† The SIU 3-states SOD during idle time.
Figure 48. Basic Frame Structure with Idle Time
To assist channel selection within a frame, a frame is
partitioned into a maximum of eight subframes. Each
subframe has 16 logical channels, for a total channel
capacity of 128 channels per frame.
4.16.9 Assigning SIU Logical Channels to DMAU
Channels
Regardless of the operating mode, the channel index
registers for the SIU must be initialized via software if
the DMAU is used to transfer data to and from memory.
There are a total of four 16-bit channel index registers:
two for input (ICIX〈0—1〉) and two for output
(OCIX〈0—1〉). Each bit corresponds to one logical
channel within the currently selected even or odd subframe. These bit fields determine the assignment of
logical channels within a subframe to a specific DMAU
SWT channel dedicated to that SIU. Recall that two
bidirectional SWT channels of the DMAU support each
SIU so that logical channels can be routed to two separate memory spaces.
to the currently selected even output subframe, as
determined by the OSFID_E[1:0] field
(SCON3[9:8]—see Table 104 on page 186). OCIX1
corresponds to the currently selected odd output subframe, as determined by the OSFID_O[1:0] field
(SCON3[12:11]). In frame mode, ICIX〈0—1〉 and
OCIX〈0—1〉 are circularly mapped to multiple channels
in the frame as illustrated by Table 120 on page 197
and Table 119 on page 196.
If a bit field of SIU0’s ICIX〈0—1〉 or OCIX〈0—1〉 register is cleared, the corresponding logical channel of
SIU0 is assigned to SWT0. If a bit field of these registers is set to one, the corresponding logical channel of
SIU0 is assigned to SWT1. If a bit field of SIU1’s
ICIX〈0—1〉 or OCIX〈0—1〉 register is cleared, the corresponding logical channel of SIU1 is assigned to
SWT2. If a bit field of these same registers is set to
one, the corresponding logical channel of SIU1 is
assigned to SWT3. For example, to assign SIU0 input
channels 0 to 7 to SWT0 and 8 to 15 to SWT1, the
value written to ICIX0 is 0xFF00.
In channel mode, ICIX0 corresponds to the currently
selected even input subframe, as determined by the
ISFID_E[1:0] field (SCON3[1:0]—see Table 104 on
page 186). ICIX1 corresponds to the currently selected
odd input subframe, as determined by the
ISFID_O[1:0] field (SCON3[4:3]). OCIX0 corresponds
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
(SCON1[6:0]) and OFLIM[6:0] field (SCON2[6:0])
define the number of channels in each input and output
frame.
4.16.10 Frame Error Detection and Reporting
If using frame mode, the user performs the following
steps in software:
The SIU supports back-to-back frame processing.
However, when a frame has completed, the SIU stops
processing until the beginning of another frame is
detected by sampling a new frame sync. If the new
frame sync is detected before a frame has completed,
the following actions are taken by the SIU:
1. An interrupt request is generated, if enabled. Specifically, if the occurrence of SIFS is detected before
the end of the input frame, an input error has
occurred. If enabled via the IINTSEL[1:0] field
(SCON10[12:11]—see Table 111 on page 189), the
SIINT interrupt is asserted to the DSP cores. If the
occurrence of SOFS is detected before the end of
the output frame, an output error has occurred. If
enabled via the OINTSEL[1:0] field
(SCON10[14:13]), the SOINT interrupt is asserted to
the cores.
2. The IFERR flag (input frame error) or OFERR flag
(output frame error) is set in the STAT register
(Table 116 on page 195), as appropriate. All subframe, channel, and bit counters are reinitialized and
a new input or output frame transaction is initiated.
The data from the incomplete frame can be erroneous and the core software should perform error
recovery in response to the setting of IFERR or
OFERR.
3. If the SIU is in passive mode (clocks and frame sync
are externally generated) or in active mode with the
AGSYNC field (SCON12[14]) cleared, the new
frame transaction begins immediately after the new
frame sync is detected. If the SIU is in active mode
with AGSYNC set and an externally generated clock
is applied to SCK, the new frame transaction begins
after the detection of the first frame sync that does
not cause resynchronization of the bit clocks. See
Section 4.16.6 on page 164 for details on resynchronizing bit clocks in active mode.
4.16.11 Frame Mode
Frame mode allows for a high channel capacity, but
sacrifices channel selectivity. A program selects frame
mode by setting the IFRAME field (SCON1[7]—
Table 102 on page 184) for input and the OFRAME
field (SCON2[7]—see Table 103 on page 185) for
output. In this mode, the SIU processes all channels in
the frame. A maximum of 128 consecutive channels in
the frame can be accessed. The IFLIM[6:0] field
168
1. Configure the number of channels in the frame
structure (1 to 128) by programming the IFLIM[6:0]
field with the input frame size, and the OFLIM[6:0]
field with the output frame size. The input and output frame size is the number of channels minus
one. For simple serial communications (one channel per frame), these fields should be programmed
to zero.
2. Configure the channel size (4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits, or
16 bits) by writing the ISIZE[1:0] and OSIZE[1:0]
fields (SCON0[4:3] and SCON0[12:11]—Table 101
on page 183). Select LSB-first or MSB-first by programming the IMSB and OMSB fields (SCON0[2]
and SCON0[10]). Configure the data format by programming the IFORMAT[1:0] and OFORMAT[1:0]
fields (SCON0[1:0] and SCON0[9:8]).
3. Program the 16-bit channel index registers,
ICIX〈0—1〉 and OCIX〈0—1〉 (Table 118 on
page 196), to assign specific SIU input and output
channels to be routed to one of two DMAU SWT
channels (SWT0 or SWT1 for SIU0; SWT2 or SWT3
for SIU1). The maximum number of channels that
ICIX〈0—1〉 or OCIX〈0—1〉 can specify is 32 (two
16-bit registers). If the number of channels is
greater than 32, the DMAU routing specified for
channels 0—31 is applied to channels 32—63,
channels 64—95, etc., as shown in Table 120 on
page 197 and Table 119 on page 196. For the special case of simple serial communications (one
channel per frame), program channels 0 and 1 to the
same value, i.e., program ICIX〈0—1〉[1:0] to the
same value for input and OCIX〈0—1〉[1:0] to the
same value for output.
4. Enable frame mode by setting IFRAME (SCON1[7])
and OFRAME (SCON2[7]).
5. Disable channel mode by clearing the ISFIDV_E
field (SCON3[2]—see Table 104 on page 186),
ISFIDV_O field (SCON3[5]), OSFIDV_E field
(SCON3[10]), and OSFIDV_O field (SCON3[13]).
6. Select passive vs. active bit clocks and frame syncs
(see Section 4.16.5 on page 159 for details).
7. Program the IINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11])
and OINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[14:13]) as
required by the application.
8. Begin input and output processing by clearing the
IRESET field (SCON1[10]) and the ORESET field
(SCON2[10]).
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
!
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in
Two Subframes or Less
Compared to frame mode, channel mode provides for
channel selectivity with minimal core overhead at the
expense of channel density. For input, this mode is
selected if the following conditions are met:
!
The IFRAME field (SCON1[7]—see Table 102 on
page 184) is cleared.
!
The ISFIDV_E field (SCON3[2]—see Table 104 on
page 186), the ISFIDV_O field (SCON3[5]), or both
are set.
For output, channel mode is selected if the following
conditions are met:
!
The OSFIDV_E field (SCON3[10]), the OSFIDV_O
field (SCON3[13]), or both are set.
In this mode, the SIU processes a maximum of
32 channels within a given frame. The maximum
frame size is 128 channels. The IFLIM[6:0] field
(SCON1[6:0]—Table 102 on page 184) for input and
the OFLIM[6:0] field (SCON2[6:0]—Table 103 on
page 185) for output define the number of channels in
the frame structure.
To assist with channel selection, both input and output
frames are divided into eight subframes: four even (0,
2, 4, 6) and four odd (1, 3, 5, 7). The SIU can enable
only one even and one odd subframe at any one time.
Each subframe contains 16 channels1 that can be individually enabled. Figure 49 shows a 128-channel
frame and the relationship between frames, subframes,
and logical channels. Table 92 on page 170 specifies
the association of channel numbers to even and odd
subframes.
The OFRAME field (SCON2[7]—see Table 102 on
page 184) is cleared.
Channel Mode on a 128-Channel Frame
128-CHANNEL FRAME
〈I,O〉FLIM = 0x7F
〈I,O〉FRAME = 0x0
SYNC
; DEFINE AS 128-CHANNEL FRAME
; TRANSFER ONLY SELECTED CHANNELS
8 SUBFRAMES PER TDM FRAME
16 CHANNELS PER SUBFRAME
EVEN
ODD
SUBFRAME SUBFRAME
[16:31]
[0:15]
DATA
EVEN
SUBFRAME
[32:47]
ODD
EVEN
SUBFRAME SUBFRAME
[48:63]
[64:79]
SUBFRAME 2
00
1
2
13
ODD
EVEN
ODD
SUBFRAME SUBFRAME SUBFRAME
[80:95]
[96:111]
[112:127]
SUBFRAME 5
14
15
16 BITS PER CHANNEL
0
〈I,O〉SFID_E = 1
; SUBFRAME 2 SELECTED
〈I,O〉SFIDV_E = 1
; ALLOW INDIVIDUAL CHANNEL SELECTION
〈I,O〉SFVEC_E = 0xFFFF ; ALL 16 CHANNELS ACCESSIBLE
OSFMSK_E = 0x7FF9
; MASK ALL OUTPUT CHANNELS
; EXCEPT 15, 2, 1
1
2
13
; MASK ALL OUTPUT CHANNELS
; EXCEPT 1 AND 14
CHANNEL DATA BITS
ACTIVE CHANNELS
CHANNEL DATA BITS
15
〈I,O〉SFID_O = 2
; SUBFRAME 5 SELECTED
〈I,O〉SFIDV_O = 1
; ALLOW INDIVIDUAL CHANNEL SELECTION
〈I,O〉SFVEC_O = 0xFFFF ; ALL 16 CHANNELS ACCESSIBLE
OSFMSK_O = 0xBFFD
MASKED CHANNELS
14
0
1
2
〈I,O〉ISIZE = 1
〈I,O〉MSB = 1
13
14
15
; 16-BIT CHANNELS
; MSB SHIFTED FIRST
Figure 49. Channel Mode on a 128-Channel Frame
1. It is assumed that for channel mode, the number of channels per frame as determined by the IFLIM[6:0] and OFLIM[6:0] fields is evenly
divisible by 16. This results in exactly 16 channels per subframe. If the number of channels per frame is not evenly divisible by 16, the last
subframe is a partial subframe of less than 16 channels. If this is the case and if interrupts are programmed to occur on subframe boundaries (see Figure 51 on page 176), then an interrupt is not generated for the partial subframe.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in Two Subframes or Less (continued)
Table 92. Subframe Definition
Even Subframes
Subframe
0
2
4
6
Odd Subframes
Channels
0—15
32—47
64—79
96—111
For SIU processing of specific logical channels, the
user enables at least one active even or odd subframe
within the input and output frames and defines the
even (0, 2, 4, or 6) or odd (1, 3, 5, or 7) input and output subframe ID. Within each active subframe, active
input channels and active output channels are individually selected via the channel activation vectors. These
features are controlled by the SIU control memorymapped registers, SCON〈3—9〉.
170
Subframe
1
3
5
7
Channels
16—31
48—63
80—95
112—127
In channel mode, the SIU drives data onto the SOD pin
only during the time slots for active output channels.
Otherwise, the SIU 3-states SOD. Similarly, in channel
mode, the SIU latches input data bits only during the
time slots for active input channels.
If the DMAU is used to transfer SIU input data to memory, each active input channel (time slot) can be individually routed to a specific SWT channel. See
Section 4.16.9 on page 167 for details.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in
Two Subframes or Less (continued)
If using channel mode, the user performs the following
steps in software:
1. Configure the number of channels in the frame
structure (1 to 128) by programming the IFLIM[6:0]
field (SCON1[6:0]—see Table 102 on page 184) with
the frame size for input and the OFLIM[6:0] field
(SCON2[6:0]—see Table 103 on page 185) with the
frame size for output.
2. Configure the channel size (4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits, or
16 bits) by writing the ISIZE[1:0] and OSIZE[1:0]
fields (SCON0[4:3] and SCON0[12:11]—see
Table 101 on page 183). Select LSB-first or MSBfirst by programming the IMSB and OMSB fields
(SCON0[2] and SCON0[10]). Configure the data
format by programming the IFORMAT[1:0] and
OFORMAT[1:0] fields (SCON0[1:0] and
SCON0[9:8]).
3. Disable frame mode by clearing the IFRAME field
(SCON1[7]—see Table 102 on page 184) and the
OFRAME field (SCON2[7]—see Table 103 on
page 185).
4. Select the number of subframes (one or two) to be
enabled. If two subframes are enabled, one must be
even and one must be odd. See step 5.
5. Select the active subframe(s) and channels within
each subframe. Tables 93 to 97 further detail the bit
fields described below:
— To activate an even input subframe, set the
ISFIDV_E field (SCON3[2]—see Table 104 on
page 186). Also program the ISFID_E[1:0] field
(SCON3[1:0]) with the address of the active even
subframe (active subframe number is
2 × ISFID_E). Within the active subframe, up to
16 logical channels can be individually enabled
via the ISFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON4—see
Table 105 on page 187). For each enabled channel, assign one of two DMAU SWT channels by
setting or clearing the corresponding bit in ICIX0
(Table 120 on page 197).
— To activate an odd input subframe, set the
ISFIDV_O field (SCON3[5]—see Table 104 on
page 186). Also program the ISFID_O[1:0] field
(SCON3[4:3]) with the address of the active odd
subframe (active subframe number is
(2 × ISFID_O) + 1). Within the active subframe,
up to 16 logical channels can be individually
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enabled via the ISFVEC_O[15:0] field
(SCON5—see Table 106 on page 187). For each
enabled channel, assign one of two DMAU SWT
channels by setting or clearing the corresponding
bit in ICIX1 (Table 120 on page 197).
— To activate an even output subframe, set the
OSFIDV_E field (SCON3[10]). Also program the
OSFID_E[1:0] field (SCON3[9:8]) with the
address of the active even subframe (active subframe number is 2 × OSFID_E). Within the
active subframe, up to 16 logical channels can be
individually enabled via the OSFVEC_E[15:0]
field (SCON6—see Table 107 on page 188). Any
enabled channel can be individually masked via
the OSFMSK_E[15:0] field (SCON8—see
Table 109 on page 188). Masking an output
channel retains the data structure (the DMAU
counters are updated) but does not drive data
onto SOD for that channel period. For each
enabled channel, assign one of two DMAU SWT
channels by setting or clearing the corresponding
bit in OCIX0 (Table 119 on page 196).
— To activate an odd output subframe, set the
OSFIDV_O field (SCON3[13]). Also program the
OSFID_O[1:0] field (SCON3[12:11]) with the
address of the active odd subframe (active subframe number is (2 × OSFID_O) + 1). Within the
active subframe, up to 16 logical channels can be
individually enabled via the OSFVEC_O[15:0]
field (SCON7—see Table 108 on page 188). Any
enabled channel can be individually masked via
the OSFMSK_O[15:0] field (SCON9—see
Table 110 on page 188). Masking an output
channel retains the data structure (the DMAU
counters are updated) but does not drive data
onto SOD for that channel period. For each
enabled channel, assign one of two DMAU SWT
channels by setting or clearing the corresponding
bit in OCIX1 (Table 119 on page 196).
6. Select passive vs. active bit clocks and frame syncs
(see Table 4.16.5 on page 159 for details).
7. Program the IINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11])
OINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[14:13]) as required by
the application.
8. Begin processing the active channels by clearing the
IRESET field (SCON1[10]—see Table 102 on
page 184) and the ORESET field (SCON2[10]—see
Table 103 on page 185). Further user software
intervention for SIU configuration is only required to
redefine the subframe enable, the subframe ID, or
the active channels within a subframe and their
associated channel index values.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in Two Subframes or Less (continued)
Table 93. Location of Control Fields Used in Channel Mode
Input/
Output
Input
Output
Even Subframe Control
Field
Register
ISFIDV_E
ISFID_E[1:0]
ISFVEC_E[15:0]
OSFIDV_E
OSFID_E[1:0]
OSFVEC_E[15:0]
OSFMSK_E[15:0]
SCON3[2]
SCON3[1:0]
SCON4[15:0]
SCON3[10]
SCON3[9:8]
SCON6[15:0]
SCON8[15:0]
Odd Subframe Control
Field
Register
ISFIDV_O
ISFID_O[1:0]
ISFVEC_O[15:0]
OSFIDV_O
OSFID_O[1:0]
OSFVEC_O[15:0]
OSFMSK_O[15:0]
SCON3[5]
SCON3[4:3]
SCON5[15:0]
SCON3[13]
SCON3[12:11]
SCON7[15:0]
SCON9[15:0]
Description
Subframe ID valid (enable).
Subframe ID.
Channel activation vector.
Subframe ID valid (enable).
Subframe ID.
Channel activation vector.
Channel masking vector.
Table 94. Description of Control Fields Used in Channel Mode
Input/
Output
Input
Output
Field
Even Subframe Control
Description
Field
Odd Subframe Control
Description
ISFIDV_E
ISFID_E[1:0]
Enable even input subframes.
Select one of four even input
subframes 0, 2, 4, or 6
(active subframe = 2 × ISFID_E).
ISFIDV_O
ISFID_O[1:0]
ISFVEC_E[15:0]
Bit vector activates up to
16 logical channels independently within selected even input
subframe.
Enable even output subframes.
Select one of four even output
subframes 0, 2, 4, or 6
(active subframe =
2 × OSFID_E).
Bit vector activates up to
16 logical channels independently within selected even output subframe.
Bit vector selects up to 16 logical
channels independently within
selected even output subframe to
be masked†.
ISFVEC_O[15:0]
OSFIDV_E
OSFID_E[1:0]
OSFVEC_E[15:0]
OSFMSK_E[15:0]
OSFIDV_O
OSFID_O[1:0]
OSFVEC_O[15:0]
OSFMSK_O[15:0]
Enable odd input subframes.
Select one of four odd input subframes 1, 3, 5, or 7
(active subframe =
(2 × ISFID_O) + 1).
Bit vector activates up to 16 logical
channels independently within
selected odd input subframe.
Enable odd output subframes.
Select one of four odd output subframes 1, 3, 5, or 7
(active subframe =
(2 × OSFID_O) + 1).
Bit vector activates up to 16 logical
channels independently within
selected odd output subframe.
Bit vector selects up to 16 logical
channels independently within
selected odd output subframe to be
masked†.
† If an output channel is masked, then the SOD pin is forced to the high-impedance state during that channel’s time slot.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in Two Subframes or Less (continued)
Table 95. Subframe Selection
Input/
Output
Even/Odd
Subframes
To Select
Subframe
Input
Even
0
2
4
6
1
3
5
7
0
2
4
6
1
3
5
7
Odd
Output
Even
Odd
Set Control Bit
Name
Location
ISFIDV_E
SCON3[2]
Configure Control Field
Name
Location
ISFID_E[1:0]
SCON3[1:0]
ISFIDV_O
SCON3[5]
ISFID_O[1:0]
SCON3[4:3]
OSFIDV_E
SCON3[10]
OSFID_E[1:0]
SCON3[9:8]
OSFIDV_O
SCON3[13]
OSFID_O[1:0]
SCON3[12:11]
Value
0
1
2
3
0
1
2
3
0
1
2
3
0
1
2
3
Table 96. Channel Activation Within a Selected Subframe
Input/
Output
Input
Output
Selected
Even/Odd
Subframe
Even
Odd
Even
Odd
Control Field
Location
Name
ISFVEC_E[15:0]
ISFVEC_O[15:0]
OSFVEC_E[15:0]
OSFVEC_O[15:0]
SCON4[15:0]
SCON5[15:0]
SCON6[15:0]
SCON7[15:0]
Description
See Figure 50 on page 174
See Figure 50 on page 174
See Figure 50 on page 174
See Figure 50 on page 174
Table 97. Channel Masking Within a Selected Subframe
Input/
Output
Output
Selected
Even/Odd
Subframe
Even
Odd
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Control Field
Description
Name
Location
OSFMSK_E[15:0]
OSFMSK_O[15:0]
SCON8[15:0]
SCON9[15:0]
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See Figure 50 on page 174
See Figure 50 on page 174
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.12 Channel Mode—32 Channels or Less in Two Subframes or Less (continued)
Subframe and Channel Selection in Channel Mode
EVEN SUBFRAMES
SELECT SUBFRAME 6 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 3)
CH
111
CH
110
CH
109
CH
108
CH
107
CH
106
CH
105
CH
104
CH
103
CH
102
CH
101
CH
100
CH
99
CH
98
CH
97
CH
96
SELECT SUBFRAME 4 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 2)
CH
79
CH
78
CH
77
CH
76
CH
75
CH
74
CH
73
CH
72
CH
71
CH
70
CH
69
CH
68
CH
67
CH
66
CH
65
CH
64
SELECT SUBFRAME 2 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 1)
CH
47
CH
46
CH
45
CH
44
CH
43
CH
42
CH
41
CH
40
CH
39
CH
38
CH
37
CH
36
CH
35
CH
34
CH
33
CH
32
SELECT SUBFRAME 0 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 0)
CH
15
CH
14
CH
13
CH
12
CH
11
CH
10
CH
9
CH
8
CH
7
CH
6
CH
5
CH
4
CH
3
CH
2
CH
1
CH
0
BIT
15
BIT
14
BIT
13
BIT
12
BIT
11
BIT
10
BIT
9
BIT
8
BIT
7
BIT
6
BIT
5
BIT
4
BIT
3
BIT
2
BIT
1
BIT
0
SELECT SUBFRAME 7 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 3)
CH
127
CH
126
CH
125
CH
124
CH
123
CH
122
CH
121
CH
120
CH
119
CH
118
CH
117
CH
116
CH
115
CH
114
CH
113
CH
112
SELECT SUBFRAME 5 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 2)
CH
95
CH
94
CH
93
CH
92
CH
91
CH
90
CH
89
CH
88
CH
87
CH
86
CH
85
CH
84
CH
83
CH
82
CH
81
CH
80
SELECT SUBFRAME 3 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 1)
CH
63
CH
62
CH
61
CH
60
CH
59
CH
58
CH
57
CH
56
CH
55
CH
54
CH
53
CH
52
CH
51
CH
50
CH
49
CH
48
SELECT SUBFRAME 1 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 0)
CH
31
CH
30
CH
29
CH
28
CH
27
CH
26
CH
25
CH
24
CH
23
CH
22
CH
21
CH
20
CH
19
CH
18
CH
17
CH
16
BIT
15
BIT
14
BIT
13
BIT
12
BIT
11
BIT
10
BIT
9
BIT
8
BIT
7
BIT
6
BIT
5
BIT
4
BIT
3
BIT
2
BIT
1
BIT
0
ACTIVATE/MASK CHANNEL CONTROL:
ISFVEC_E[15:0] (if ISFIDV_E = 1)
OSFVEC_E[15:0] (if OSFIDV_E = 1)
OSFMSK_E[15:0] (if OSFIDV_E = 1)
ODD SUBFRAMES
ACTIVATE/MASK CHANNEL CONTROL:
ISFVEC_O[15:0] (if ISFIDV_O = 1)
OSFVEC_O[15:0] (if OSFIDV_O = 1)
OSFMSK_O[15:0] (if OSFIDV_O = 1)
Figure 50. Subframe and Channel Selection in Channel Mode
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.13 Channel Mode—Up to 128 Channels in a
Maximum of Eight Subframes
The SIU has the ability to process a maximum of
128 channels in channel mode if the SIU control is
properly synchronized with core intervention. The
steps required for the additional channel processing
are the same as for the channel mode discussed in
Section 4.16.12. However, the SIU control registers
must be reconfigured with greater frequency, costing
additional core overhead. In this case, subframe activation and channel definition within a subframe can
occur as often as every subframe boundary.
The SIU has the ability to interrupt either core at frame
boundaries, subframe boundaries, channel boundaries, or if an error is detected (overflow or underflow).
The interrupt signal trigger is determined by the IINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11]—see Table 111 on
page 189) for input processing and by the OINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[14:13]) for output processing.
When servicing subframe boundary interrupts generated by SIU0 or SIU1, either CORE0 or CORE1 can
modify the input and output subframe and channel control fields without affecting the current subframe being
processed. Specifically, the cores can modify the
OSFID_E[1:0] and OSFID_O[1:0] fields (SCON3—see
Table 104 on page 186), the ISFID_E[1:0] and
ISFID_O[1:0] fields (SCON3—see Table 104 on
page 186), the ISFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON4—see
Table 105 on page 187), the ISFVEC_O[15:0] field
(SCON5—see Table 106 on page 187), the
OSFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON6—see Table 107 on
page 188), the OSFVEC_O[15:0] field (SCON7—see
Table 108 on page 188), the OSFMSK_E[15:0] field
(SCON8—see Table 109 on page 188), and the
OSFMSK_O[15:0] field (SCON9—see Table 110 on
page 188). This is also true for the ICIX0, ICIX1,
OCIX0, and OCIX1 registers (see Table 120 on
page 197 and Table 119 on page 196). The SIU
latches the values in these control bit fields at the
beginning of every subframe.
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If one of the cores uses this feature in an SIINT or
SOINT interrupt service routine (ISR), the SIU can be
programmed to individually select channels for input or
output anywhere within the frame. The user can take
advantage of this feature by updating the input and output subframe and channel control fields after each subframe is processed, allowing channels in more than
two subframes to be processed during each frame.
This requires the ISR to count the subframe interrupts
and program the necessary SIU control registers with
the appropriate values to process the next desired subframe. The user also has the option of programming
the input and output subframe and channel control
fields two subframes in advance, because these bit
fields are double-buffered. For example, if the active
subframe is even, the user’s ISR can reprogram the
control bit fields with the appropriate values for the next
even subframe without disturbing the processing of the
currently active subframe.
In channel mode, the SIU drives data onto the SOD pin
only during the time slots for active output channels.
Otherwise, the SIU 3-states SOD. Similarly, in channel
mode, the SIU latches input data bits only during the
time slots for active input channels.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.13 Channel Mode—Up to 128 Channels in a Maximum of Eight Subframes (continued)
Figure 51 illustrates the conditions under which the SIINT or SOINT input or output interrupt is asserted if the IINTSEL[1:0] or OINTSEL[1:0] field (SCON10[12:11] or SCON10[14:13]—see Table 111 on page 189) is programmed
to cause the SIU to generate interrupts on subframe boundaries. The SIU computes the current channel number
modulo 16. It compares this value to 15 and generates SIINT or SOINT if there is a match. This notifies the cores
of the completion of the subframe.
Generating Interrupts on Subframe Boundaries
EVEN SUBFRAMES
SELECT SUBFRAME 6 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 3)
CH
111
CH
110
CH
109
CH
108
CH
107
CH
106
CH
100
CH
99
CH
98
CH
97
CH
96
SELECT SUBFRAME 4 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 2)
CH
79
CH
78
CH
77
CH
76
CH
75
CH
74
CH
68
CH
67
CH
66
CH
65
CH
64
SELECT SUBFRAME 2 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 1)
CH
47
CH
46
CH
45
CH
44
CH
43
CH
42
CH
36
CH
35
CH
34
CH
33
CH
32
SELECT SUBFRAME 0 (〈I,O〉SFID_E = 0)
CH
15
CH
14
CH
13
CH
12
CH
11
CH
10
CH
4
CH
3
CH
2
CH
1
CH
0
(CURRENT CHANNEL NUMBER)MODULO 16 = 15
ODD SUBFRAMES
SELECT SUBFRAME 7 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 3)
CH
127
CH
126
CH
125
CH
124
CH
123
CH
122
CH
116
CH
115
CH
114
CH
113
CH
112
SELECT SUBFRAME 5 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 2)
CH
95
CH
94
CH
93
CH
92
CH
91
CH
90
CH
84
CH
83
CH
82
CH
81
CH
80
SELECT SUBFRAME 3 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 1)
CH
63
CH
62
CH
61
CH
60
CH
59
CH
58
CH
52
CH
51
CH
50
CH
49
CH
48
SELECT SUBFRAME 1 (〈I,O〉SFID_O = 0)
CH
31
CH
30
CH
29
CH
28
CH
27
CH
26
CH
20
CH
19
CH
18
CH
17
CH
16
(CURRENT CHANNEL NUMBER)MODULO 16 = 15
Figure 51. Generating Interrupts on Subframe Boundaries
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.13 Channel Mode—Up to 128 Channels in a
Maximum of Eight Subframes (continued)
For example, the following steps are performed by software running in CORE0 to use SIU0 to process input
channels 2, 3, 18, 20, 36, 55, 78, 100, and 111 as part
of a 128-channel input frame. It is assumed that the
DMAU SWT0 and SWT1 channels are used to transfer
the input data to memory.
1. Initialize the SWT0 and SWT1 channels (see
Section 4.13.5 on page 87).
2. Configure the channel size (4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits, or
16 bits) by writing the ISIZE[1:0] field
(SCON0[4:3]—Table 101 on page 183). Select
LSB-first or MSB-first by programming the IMSB
field (SCON0[2]). Configure the data format by programming the IFORMAT[1:0] field (SCON0[1:0]).
3. Configure SIU0 for a 128-channel input frame structure by programming the IFLIM[6:0] field
(SCON1[6:0]—Table 102 on page 184) to 127.
Enable channel mode with two active subframes by
clearing the IFRAME field (SCON1[7]) and setting
the ISFIDV_E and ISFIDV_O fields
(SCON3[2,5]—Table 104 on page 186). Program
input interrupts to occur at every subframe boundary
by programming the IINTSEL[1:0] field
(SCON10[12:11]—Table 111 on page 189) to 0x1.
4. Program SIU0 with the active channels for the first
even (channels 2 and 3) and odd (18 and 20)
subframes. This is accomplished by writing the first
subframe IDs (0 and 1) to the ISFID_E[1:0] and
ISFID_O[1:0] fields (SCON3—see Table 104 on
page 186) and enabling the channels within these
subframes via the ISFVEC_E[15:0] field
(SCON4—see Table 105 on page 187) and
ISFVEC_O[15:0] field (SCON5—see Table 106 on
page 187). In summary, ISFID_E[1:0] = 0,
ISFID_O[1:0] = 0, ISVEC_E[15:0] = 0xC, and
ISVEC_O[15:0] = 0x14.
6. Enable the SIINT interrupt (see Section 4.4.6 on
page 31) and the SWT0 and SWT1 channels of the
DMAU by setting the DRUN[1:0] fields
(DMCON0[5:4]—Table 31 on page 71). Create a
software-managed subframe counter and initialize
the counter to zero. Clear the IRESET field
(SCON1[10]—see Table 102 on page 184) to begin
input data processing by SIU0. CORE0 can continue to process the user’s application.
7. When the SIINT interrupt occurs, CORE0’s ISR
immediately reads the software-managed subframe
counter to determine the current subframe in
progress and increments the counter by one. The
ISR then reprograms the SIU to process the next
even subframe. In this example, the next even subframe is 2, so ISFID_E[1:0] is programmed to 0x1.
The active channel for this subframe is 36, so
ISVEC_E[15:0] is written with 0x10. ICIX0 also must
be reprogrammed to assign channel 36 to either
SWT0 or SWT1. If SWT1 is selected, then
ICIX0 = 0x10. This active channel setting takes
place at the next subframe boundary. This ISR is
now complete and CORE0 returns to the previous
activity.
8. When the next SIINT interrupt occurs, CORE0’s ISR
again reads the subframe counter to determine the
current subframe in progress. If the counter value is
7, it is reset to zero; otherwise, the value is incremented by one. The ISR then reprograms SIU0 to
process the next odd subframe. In this example, the
next odd subframe is 3, so ISFID_O[1:0] is programmed to 0x1. The desired active channel for this
subframe is 55, so ISVEC_O[15:0] is written with
0x80. ICIX1 must also be reprogrammed to assign
channel 55 to either SWT0 or SWT1. If SWT1 is
selected, then ICIX1 = 0x80. This active channel
setting takes place at the next subframe boundary.
This ISR is now complete, and CORE0 returns to the
previous activity.
9. Steps 7 and 8 are repeated indefinitely, processing
all eight subframes and then beginning again with
subframe 0 of the next frame.
5. Program the input channel index registers to assign
each channel to either SWT0 or SWT1. The SWT
channel chosen determines the destination of the
data. In this example, channels 2 and 18 are
assigned to SWT0, and channels 3 and 20 are
assigned to SWT1. Therefore, ICIX0 = 0x8 and
ICIX1 = 0x10.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.14 SIU Examples
The following sections illustrate examples of single-channel I/O and the ST-bus interface.
4.16.14.1 Single-Channel I/O
If the SIU is interfaced directly to a single codec, the program typically configures the SIU as follows:
1. Enable frame mode operation, one channel per frame.
2. Configure the data length as required by the external device (4 bits, 8 bits, 12 bits, or 16 bits).
3. Enable passive bit clocks and frame syncs, configured as required by the external device. See Table 91 on
page 163.
This configuration assumes that the codec device generates the bit clock and frame sync.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.14 SIU Examples (continued)
4.16.14.2 ST-Bus Interface
The SIU is compatible with the MITEL ® ST-bus. Both single-rate and double-rate clock protocols are supported.
Table 98 describes the SIU control field settings and resulting signals for both protocols.
Table 98. Control Register and Field Configuration for ST-Bus Interface
Control Field
OSIZE[1:0]
ISIZE[1:0]
I2XDLY
IFSDLY[1:0]
OFSDLY[1:0]
OFSE
OCKE
IFSE
ICKE
SIOLB
OCKK
OCKA
OFSK
OFSA
ICKK
ICKA
IFSK
IFSA
AGCKLIM[7:0]
AGRESET
AGSYNC
SCKK
AGEXT
Description
SCON0[12:11]
SCON0[4:3]
SCON1[11]
SCON1[9:8]
SCON2[9:8]
SCON3[15]
Clear for 8-bit output data.
Clear for 8-bit input data.
Set to extend high phase of ICK.
Clear for no IFS delay.
Clear for no OFS delay.
For active OFS, selects whether OFS is driven onto SOFS
pin.
SCON3[14] Clear to not drive active OCK onto SOCK pin.
SCON3[7]
For active IFS, selects whether IFS is driven onto SIFS pin.
SCON3[6]
Clear to not drive active ICK onto SICK pin.
SCON10[8] Clear to disable loopback.
SCON10[7] Clear to drive output data on rising edge of output bit clock.
SCON10[6] Clear to select passive OCK. Set to select active OCK.
SCON10[5] Set to invert OFS (active-low frame sync).
SCON10[4] Clear to select passive OFS. Set to select active OFS.
SCON10[3] Clear to capture input data on falling edge of input bit clock.
SCON10[2] Clear to select passive ICK. Set to select active ICK.
SCON10[1] Set to invert IFS.
SCON10[0] Clear to select passive IFS. Set to select active IFS.
SCON11[7:0] Active bit clock divide ratio.
SCON12[15]
SCON12[14]
SCON12[13]
SCON12[12]
Clear to activate active clock and frame sync generator.
Set to synchronize active generated bit clocks to SIFS pin.
Set to invert SCK. Clear if AGEXT is cleared.
Clear to select CLK as source for active clock and frame sync
generator. Set to select SCK as source for active clock and
frame sync generator.
AGFSLIM[10:0] SCON12[10:0] Active frame sync divide ratio.
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Value
Value
(Single-Rate (Double-Rate
Clock)
Clock)
00
00
00
00
0
1
00
00
00
00
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
X
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
X
1
X
1
X
1
1
1
1
(ICK and OCK
are SCK/2)
0
1
1
1
X
0x3FF
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.14 SIU Examples (continued)
4.16.14.2 ST-Bus Interface (continued)
Table 99 describes the SIU control registers and control register fields that must be configured as required by the
particular system application using an ST-bus interface.
Table 99. Control Register and Fields That Are Configured as Required for ST-Bus Interface
Control Register or
Description
Field
OMSB
SCON0[10] Selects LSB- or MSB-first output data.
OFORMAT[1:0]
SCON0[9:8] Selects linear, µ-law, or A-law output format.
IMSB
SCON0[2]
Selects LSB- or MSB-first input data.
IFORMAT[1:0]
SCON0[1:0] Selects linear, µ-law, or A-law input format.
IFRAME
SCON1[7]
Clear to select input channel mode. Set to select input frame mode.
IFLIM[6:0]
SCON1[6:0] Program to 127 for 128 channels per input frame.
OFRAME
SCON2[7]
Clear to select output channel mode. Set to select output frame mode.
OFLIM[6:0]
SCON2[6:0] Program to 127 for 128 channels per output frame.
OSFIDV_O
SCON3[13] Set to enable odd output subframes.
OSFID_O[1:0]
SCON3[12:11] Selects odd output subframe 1, 3, 5, or 7.
OSFIDV_E
SCON3[10] Set to enable even output subframes.
OSFID_E[1:0]
SCON3[9:8] Selects even output subframe 0, 2, 4, or 6.
ISFIDV_O
SCON3[5]
Set to enable odd input subframes.
ISFID_O[1:0]
SCON3[4:3] Selects odd input subframe 1, 3, 5, or 7.
ISFIDV_E
SCON3[2]
Set to enable even input subframes.
ISFID_E[1:0]
SCON3[1:0] Selects even input subframe 0, 2, 4, or 6.
ISFVEC_E[15:0]
SCON4[15:0] Set to enable corresponding channel of the selected even input subframe.
ISFVEC_O[15:0]
SCON5[15:0] Set to enable corresponding channel of the selected odd input subframe.
OSFVEC_E[15:0]
SCON6[15:0] Set to enable corresponding channel of the selected even output subframe.
OSFVEC_O[15:0]
SCON7[15:0] Set to enable corresponding channel of the selected odd output subframe.
OSFMSK_E[15:0]
SCON8[15:0] Set to mask corresponding channel of the selected even output subframe.
OSFMSK_O[15:0]
SCON9[15:0] Set to mask corresponding channel of the selected odd output subframe.
OINTSEL[1:0]
SCON10[14:13] Selects one of four conditions for which the SIU output interrupt (SOINT) is asserted.
IINTSEL[1:0]
SCON10[12:11] Selects one of four conditions for which the SIU input interrupt (SIINT) is asserted.
ICIX0[15:0]
Input channel index for the active even input subframe—selects one of two DMAU SWT channels (SWT0
or SWT1 for SIU0; SWT2 or SWT3 for SIU1) for each logical channel in the active even input subframe.
ICIX1[15:0]
Input channel index for the active odd input subframe—selects one of two DMAU SWT channels (SWT0
or SWT1 for SIU0; SWT2 or SWT3 for SIU1) for each logical channel in the active odd input subframe.
OCIX0[15:0]
Input channel index for the active even output subframe—selects one of two DMAU SWT channels
(SWT0 or SWT1 for SIU0; SWT2 or SWT3 for SIU1) for each logical channel in the active even output
subframe.
OCIX1[15:0]
Input channel index for the active odd output subframe—selects one of two DMAU SWT channels
(SWT0 or SWT1 for SIU0; SWT2 or SWT3 for SIU1) for each logical channel in the active odd output
subframe.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.14 SIU Examples (continued)
4.16.14.2 ST-Bus Interface (continued)
Figure 52 illustrates ST-bus operation with a single-rate clock.
ST-Bus Single Rate Clock
S〈IO〉CK
S〈IO〉FS
ICK
OCK
SID
BN – 2
BN – 1
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
SOD
BN – 2
BN – 1
B0
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
Figure 52. ST-Bus Single-Rate Clock
Figure 53 illustrates ST-bus operation with a double-rate clock applied to SCK, with an active mode bit clock and
output frame sync generation for internal use only. In addition, this figure assumes the use of SIFS for external
clock synchronization (AGSYNC = 1) of both the input and output bit clocks. ICK, OCK, IFS, and OFS are the
internally generated bit clocks and frame syncs. Refer to Figure 40 on page 153 to review the block diagram of the
internal clock generator.
ST-Bus Double Rate Clock
SCK
ICK
OCK
SIFS
IFS
OFS
CAPTURE
SID
SOD
BN – 2
BN – 2
BN – 1
BN – 1
B0
B0
B1
B1
B2
B2
B3
B3
B4
B4
B5
B5
B6
B6
B7
B7
Figure 53. ST-Bus Double-Rate Clock
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
!
One read-only input data register (SIDR)
!
One write-only output register (SODR)
!
Two input channel index registers (ICIX〈0—1〉)
4.16.15 Registers
!
Two output channel index registers (OCIX〈0—1〉)
Each SIU contains 21 control, status, and data registers as summarized in Table 100. These can be functionally grouped as:
All of these 16-bit registers are aligned on even
addresses in DSP16410CG shared I/O memory space.
The remainder of this section provides detail on each of
these registers.
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
!
Thirteen control registers (SCON〈0—12〉)
!
Two status registers (STAT and FSTAT)
Table 100 summarizes all the SIU memory-mapped
registers. Tables 101 through 119 describe each register individually.
Table 100. SIU Registers
Register
Name
Address
SIU0
SIU1
SCON0 0x43000 0x44000
SCON1 0x43002 0x44002
SCON2 0x43004 0x44004
SCON3 0x43006 0x44006
SCON4 0x43008 0x44008
SCON5 0x4300A 0x4400A
SCON6 0x4300C 0x4400C
SCON7 0x4300E 0x4400E
SCON8 0x43010 0x44010
SCON9 0x43012 0x44012
SCON10 0x43014 0x44014
SCON11 0x43016 0x44016
SCON12 0x43018 0x44018
SIDR
0x4301A 0x4401A
SODR
0x4301C 0x4401C
STAT
0x4301E 0x4401E
FSTAT 0x43020 0x44020
OCIX0
0x43030 0x44030
OCIX1
0x43032 0x44032
ICIX0
0x43040 0x44040
ICIX1
0x43042 0x44042
Description
SIU Input/Output General Control
SIU Input Frame Control
SIU Output Frame Control
SIU Input/Output Subframe Control
SIU Input Even Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Input Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Output Even Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Output Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Output Even Subframe Mask Vector Control
SIU Output Odd Subframe Mask Vector Control
SIU Input/Output General Control
SIU Input/Output Active Clock Control
SIU Input/Output Active Frame Sync Control
SIU Input Data
SIU Output Data
SIU Input/Output General Status
SIU Input/Output Frame Status
SIU Output Channel Index for Even Subframes
SIU Output Channel Index for Odd Subframes
SIU Input Channel Index for Even Subframes
SIU Input Channel Index for Odd Subframes
Size
(Bits)†
R/W
Type‡
Reset
Value
16
R/W
control
16
16
16
16
R
data
W
R/W§ c & s
R
status
R/W control
0x0000
0x0400
0x0400
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x8000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
16
R/W
0x0000
control
† The SIU memory-mapped register sizes represent bits used. The registers are right-justified and padded to 32 bits (the unused upper bits are zerofilled).
‡ c & s means control and status.
§ All bits of STAT are readable, and some can be written with one to clear them.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 101. SCON0 (SIU Input/Output General Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43000 for SIU0 and 0x44000 for SIU1.
15—13
12—11
10
9—8
7—5
4—3
2
1—0
Reserved
OSIZE[1:0]
OMSB
OFORMAT[1:0]
Reserved
ISIZE[1:0]
IMSB
IFORMAT[1:0]
Bit
15—13
12—11
10
9—8
Field
Reserved
OSIZE[1:0]†
Value
0
0
1
2
3
†
OMSB
0
1
OFORMAT[1:0]† 00
01
10
11
7—5
4—3
Reserved
ISIZE[1:0]§
2
IMSB§
1—0
IFORMAT[1:0]§
0
0
1
2
3
0
1
00
01
10
11
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
The channel size for serial output data is 8 bits‡.
The channel size for serial output data is 16 bits.
The channel size for serial output data is 4 bits‡.
The channel size for serial output data is 12 bits‡.
Shift data out onto SOD pin least significant bit (LSB) first.
Shift data out onto SOD pin most significant bit (MSB) first.
When transferring data from the SODR register to the output shift register, do not format (modify) the data.
Reserved.
When transferring 16-bit data from the SODR register to the output shift
register, convert the most significant 14 bits of SODR (SODR[15:2]) from
linear PCM format to 8-bit µ-law PCM format, place the result into the
lower half of the output shift register, and clear the upper half. Ignore the
least significant 2 bits of SODR.
When transferring 16-bit data from the SODR register to the output shift
register, convert the most significant 13 bits of SODR (SODR[15:3]) from
linear PCM format to 8-bit A-law PCM format, place the result into the
lower half of the output shift register, and clear the upper half. Ignore the
least significant 3 bits of SODR.
Reserved—write with zero.
The channel size for serial input data is 8 bits††.
The channel size for serial input data is 16 bits.
The channel size for serial input data is 4 bits††.
The channel size for serial input data is 12 bits††.
Capture input data from SID pin least significant bit (LSB) first.
Capture input data from SID pin most significant bit (MSB) first.
When transferring 16-bit data from the SIB‡‡ register to the SIDR register,
do not format (modify) the data.
Reserved.
When transferring data from the SIB‡‡ register to the SIDR register, convert the lower 8 bits of SIB (SIB[7:0]) from µ-law PCM format to 14-bit linear PCM format, place the result into the 14 most significant bits of SIDR
(SIDR[15:2]), and clear the least significant 2 bits of SIDR (SIDR[1:0]).
When transferring data from the SIB‡‡ register to the SIDR register, convert the lower 8 bits of SIB (SIB[7:0]) from A-law PCM format to 13-bit linear PCM format, place the result into the 13 most significant bits of SIDR
(SIDR[15:3]), and clear the least significant 3 bits of SIDR (SIDR[2:0]).
R/W Reset Value
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
00
R/W
R/W
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
00
†
‡
§
††
If the ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
The SIU shifts data from the low portion of the output shift register onto the SOD pin and ignores the high portion of the register.
If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
The SIU right justifies the received serial input data, i.e., it places the data in the least significant bit positions of the 16-bit serial input buffer
register and fills the upper bits with zeros.
‡‡ The SIB register is an intermediate register that holds the contents of the input shift register and is not user accessible.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 102. SCON1 (SIU Input Frame Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43002 for SIU0 and 0x44002 for SIU1.
15—12
11
10
9—8
7
6—0
Reserved
I2XDLY
IRESET
IFSDLY[1:0]
IFRAME
IFLIM[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15—12
11
Reserved
I2XDLY†
0
0
10
9—8
7
6—0
Description
R/W
Reserved—write with zero.
Do not stretch the active generated input bit clock (ICK) relative to the activemode generated output bit clock (OCK), i.e., ICK and OCK are identical and inphase.
1
Stretch the high phase of the active generated input clock (ICK) by one SCK
phase relative to the active generated output bit clock (OCK) to provide additional input serial data capture time.
IRESET
0
Activate input section and begin input processing at the start of the first active
input channel.
1
Deactivate input section and initialize bit and frame counters.
00
No input frame sync delay—capture input data from SID pin starting with the
IFSDLY[1:0]†
same internal bit clock (ICK) that latches the input frame sync (SIFS pin for passive sync or IFS signal for active generated sync).
01
One-cycle input frame sync delay—capture input data from SID pin starting one
bit clock (ICK) after the bit clock that latches the input frame sync (SIFS pin for
passive sync or IFS signal for active generated sync).
10
Two-cycle input frame sync delay—capture input data from SID pin starting two
bit clocks (ICK) after the bit clock that latches the input frame sync (SIFS pin for
passive sync or IFS signal for active generated sync).
11
Reserved.
IFRAME†
0
Channel mode—base the input transfer decision on the ISFIDV_E field
(SCON3[2]), the ISFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON4[15:0]), the ISFIDV_O field
(SCON3[5]), and the ISFVEC_O[15:0] field (SCON5[15:0]).
1
Frame mode—capture all IFLIM + 1 channels in the frame.
IFLIM[6:0]† 0—127 Input frame channel count limit—the number of channels in the input frame is
IFLIM + 1.
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
0
0
R/W
1
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
0
† If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 103. SCON2 (SIU Output Frame Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43004 for SIU0 and 0x44004 for SIU1.
15—11
10
9—8
7
6—0
Reserved
ORESET
OFSDLY[1:0]
OFRAME
OFLIM[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15—11
10
Reserved
ORESET
0
0
9—8
7
6—0
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Activate output section, request output service from the DMAU, and drive SOD
pin at the start of the first active output channel.
1
Deactivate output section and initialize bit and frame counters.
00
No output frame sync delay—drive output data onto SOD pin starting with the
OFSDLY[1:0]†
same internal bit clock (OCK) that latches the output frame sync (SOFS pin for
passive sync or OFS signal for active generated sync).
01
One-cycle output frame sync delay—drive output data onto SOD pin starting
one bit clock (OCK) after the bit clock that latches the output frame sync
(SOFS pin for passive sync or OFS signal for active generated sync).
10
Two-cycle output frame sync delay—drive output data onto SOD pin starting
two bit clocks (OCK) after the bit clock that latches output frame sync (SOFS
pin for passive sync or OFS signal for active generated sync).
11
Reserved.
0
Channel mode—base the output transfer decision on the OSFIDV_E field
OFRAME†
(SCON3[10]), the OSFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON6[15:0]), the OSFIDV_O field
(SCON3[13]), and the OSFVEC_O[15:0] field (SCON7[15:0]).
1
Frame mode—transmit all OFLIM + 1 channels in the frame.
OFLIM[6:0]† 0—127 Output frame channel count limit—the number of channels in the output frame
is OFLIM + 1.
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
R/W
1
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
0
† If the ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 104. SCON3 (SIU Input/Output Subframe Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43006 for SIU0 and 0x44006 for SIU1.
15
14
13
12—11
10
9—8
OFSE
OCKE
OSFIDV_O
OSFID_O[1:0]
OSFIDV_E
OSFID_E[1:0]
7
6
5
4—3
2
1—0
IFSE
ICKE
ISFIDV_O
ISFID_O[1:0]
ISFIDV_E
ISFID_E[1:0]
Bit
Field
Value
Description
15
OFSE
(active mode only)
14
OCKE
(active mode only)
13
OSFIDV_O
(channel mode only)
0
1
0
1
0
12—11
OSFID_O[1:0]
(channel mode only)
10
OSFIDV_E
(channel mode only)
9—8
OSFID_E[1:0]
(channel mode only)
7
IFSE
(active mode only)
6
ICKE
(active mode only)
5
ISFIDV_O
(channel mode only)
4—3
ISFID_O[1:0]
(channel mode only)
2
ISFIDV_E
(channel mode only)
Do not drive internally generated frame sync onto SOFS pin.
Drive internally generated frame sync onto SOFS pin.
Do not drive internally generated clock onto SOCK pin.
Drive internally generated clock onto SOCK pin.
Odd output subframe vector valid. Disable odd output subframes. In frame
mode (OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1), this field must be cleared.
Odd output subframe vector valid. Enable odd output subframes.
For odd subframes, the output subframe ID of the subframe under
1
control of the OSFVEC_O[15:0] field (SCON7[15:0]) and the
3
OSFMSK_O[15:0] field (SCON9[15:0]) is:
5
2 × OSFID_O + 1
7
as shown at right.
Even output subframe vector valid. Disable even output subframes. In
frame mode (OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1), this field must be cleared.
Even output subframe vector valid. Enable even output subframes.
For even subframes, the output subframe ID of the subframe under
0
control of the OSFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON6[15:0]) and the
2
OSFMSK_E[15:0] field (SCON8[15:0]) is:
4
2 × OSFID_E
6
as shown at right.
Do not drive internally generated frame sync onto SIFS pin.
Active mode only. Drive internally generated frame sync onto SIFS pin.
Do not drive internally generated clock onto SICK pin.
Active mode only. Drive internally generated clock onto SICK pin.
Odd input subframe vector valid. Disable odd input subframes. In frame
mode (OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1), this field must be cleared.
Odd input subframe vector valid. Enable odd input subframes.
For odd subframes, the input subframe ID of the subframe under con- 1
trol of the ISFVEC_O[15:0] field (SCON5[15:0]) is:
3
2 × ISFID_O + 1
5
as shown at right.
7
Even input subframe vector valid. Disable even input subframes. In frame
mode (OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1), this field must be cleared.
Even input subframe vector valid. Enable even input subframes.
0
For even subframes, the input subframe ID of the subframe under
control of the ISFVEC_E[15:0] field (SCON4[15:0]) is:
2
2 × ISFID_E
4
as shown at right.
6
1—0
186
ISFID_E[1:0]
(channel mode only)
1
00
01
10
11
0
1
00
01
10
11
0
1
0
1
0
1
00
01
10
11
0
1
00
01
10
11
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R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
00
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 105. SCON4 (SIU Input Even Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43008 for SIU0 and 0x44008 for SIU1.
15—0
ISFVEC_E[15:0]
Bit
Field
15—0 ISFVEC_E[15:0]
Value
0
1
Description
The corresponding channel of the selected even input subframe is disabled.
The corresponding channel of the selected even input subframe is enabled.
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
Table 106. SCON5 (SIU Input Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4300A for SIU0 and 0x4400A for SIU1.
15—0
ISFVEC_O[15:0]
Bit
Field
15—0 ISFVEC_O[15:0]
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Value
0
1
Description
The corresponding channel of the selected odd input subframe is disabled.
The corresponding channel of the selected odd input subframe is enabled.
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R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 107. SCON6 (SIU Output Even Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4300C for SIU0 and 0x4400C for SIU1.
15—0
OSFVEC_E[15:0]
Bit
Field
15—0 OSFVEC_E[15:0]
Value
0
1
Description
R/W Reset
Value
The corresponding channel of the selected even output subframe is disabled. R/W
0
The corresponding channel of the selected even output subframe is enabled.
Table 108. SCON7 (SIU Output Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4300E for SIU0 and 0x4400E for SIU1.
15—0
OSFVEC_O[15:0]
Bit
Field
15—0 OSFVEC_O[15:0]
Value
0
1
Description
The corresponding channel of the selected odd output subframe is disabled.
The corresponding channel of the selected odd output subframe is enabled.
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
Table 109. SCON8 (SIU Output Even Subframe Mask Vector Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43010 for SIU0 and 0x44010 for SIU1.
15—0
OSFMSK_E[15:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15—0
OSFMSK_E[15:0]
0
1
Description
Do not mask the corresponding output channel.
For an active even subframe, mask the corresponding output channel (do
not drive SOD during the output time slot).
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
Table 110. SCON9 (SIU Output Odd Subframe Mask Vector Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43012 for SIU0 and 0x44012 for SIU1.
15—0
OSFMSK_O[15:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15—0
OSFMSK_O[15:0]
0
1
188
Description
Do not mask the corresponding output channel.
For an active odd subframe, mask the corresponding output channel (do
not drive SOD during the output time slot).
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R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 111. SCON10 (SIU Input/Output General Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43014 for SIU0 and 0x44014 for SIU1.
15
14—13
12—11
10—9
Reserved
OINTSEL[1:0]
IINTSEL[1:0]
Reserved
Bit
Field
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
SIOLB OCKK OCKA OFSK OFSA ICKK ICKA IFSK IFSA
Value
Description
15
Reserved
14—13 OINTSEL[1:0]
0
00
01
10
11
12—11 IINTSEL[1:0]
00
01
10
11
10—9
8
Reserved
SIOLB‡
0
0
1
7
OCKK§
0
Reserved—write with zero.
Assert output interrupt (SOINT) after output frame sync detected.
Assert output interrupt (SOINT) after output subframe transfer complete.
Assert output interrupt (SOINT) after output channel transfer complete.
Assert output interrupt (SOINT) after output frame error or output underflow error
occurs†.
Assert input interrupt (SIINT) after input frame sync detected.
Assert input interrupt (SIINT) after input subframe transfer complete.
Assert input interrupt (SIINT) after input channel transfer complete.
Assert input interrupt (SIINT) after input frame error or input overflow error
occurs†.
Reserved—write with zero.
Normal operation.
Place SIU in loopback mode (SOD internally connected to SID, OCK internally
connected to ICK, OFS internally connected to IFS).
Drive output data onto the SOD pin on the rising edge of the output bit clock pin
(SOCK).
! If OCKA is 0 (passive clock), do not invert SOCK to generate the internal output bit clock (OCK).
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
R/W 00
R/W
00
R/W
R/W
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
If OCKA is 1 (active clock), do not invert the active generated output bit clock
(OCK) before applying to the SOCK pin.
Drive output data onto the SOD pin on the falling edge of the output bit clock pin
(SOCK).
! If OCKA is 0 (passive clock), invert SOCK to generate the internal output bit
clock (OCK).
!
1
If OCKA is 1 (active clock), invert the active generated output bit clock (OCK)
before applying to the SOCK pin.
Passive mode output clock††—drive the internal output bit clock (OCK) from the
external output bit clock pin (SOCK pin modified according to OCKK). The SIU
configures SOCK as an input.
Active mode output clock—drive the internal output bit clock (OCK) from the
active generated output bit clock derived from CLK or SCK. The SIU configures
SOCK as an output.
!
6
OCKA§
0
1
†
‡
§
††
To determine the type of error, the program can read the contents of the STAT register (see Table 116 on page 195).
If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) or ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
If the ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
The combination of passive output bit clock (OCKA = 0) and active output frame sync (OFSA = 1) is not supported. The combination of passive input bit clock (ICKA = 0) and active input frame sync (IFSA = 1) is not supported.
§§ If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 111. SCON10 (SIU Input/Output General Control) Register (continued)
Bit
Field
Value
Description
5
OFSK§
0
The external output frame sync pin (SOFS) is active-high.
! If OFSA is 0 (passive sync), do not invert SOFS to generate the internal output
frame sync (OFS).
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
If OFSA is 1 (active sync), do not invert the active generated output frame sync
(OFS) before applying to the SOFS pin.
The external output frame sync pin (SOFS) is active-low.
! If OFSA is 0 (passive sync), invert SOFS to generate the internal output frame
sync (OFS).
!
1
If OFSA is 1 (active sync), invert the active generated output frame sync (OFS)
before applying to the SOFS pin.
Passive mode output frame sync—drive the internal output frame sync (OFS)
R/W
from the external output frame sync pin (SOFS modified according to OFSK and
SCON2[OFSDLY]). The SIU configures SOFS as an input.
Active mode output frame sync††—drive the internal output frame sync (OFS)
from the active generated frame sync (AGFS) modified according to
SCON2[OFSDLY]. The SIU configures SOFS as an output.
Capture input data from the SID pin on the falling edge of the input bit clock pin R/W
(SICK).
! If ICKA is 0 (passive clock), do not invert the input bit clock pin (SICK) to generate ICK.
!
4
OFSA§
0
1
3
ICKK§§
0
0
0
If ICKA is 1 (active clock), do not invert the active generated input bit clock
(ICK) before applying to the SICK pin.
Capture input data from the SID pin on the rising edge of the input bit clock pin
(SICK).
! If ICKA is 0 (passive clock), invert SICK to generate the internal input bit clock
(ICK).
!
1
If ICKA is 1 (active clock), invert the active generated input bit clock (ICK)
before applying to the SICK pin.
Passive mode input bit clock††—drive the internal input bit clock (ICK) from the
R/W
external input bit clock pin (SICK pin modified according to ICKK). The SIU configures SICK as an input.
Active mode input bit clock—drive the internal input bit clock (ICK) from the active
generated input bit clock derived from CLK or SCK. The SIU configures SICK as
an output.
!
2
ICKA§§
0
1
†
‡
§
††
0
To determine the type of error, the program can read the contents of the STAT register (see Table 116 on page 195).
If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) or ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
If the ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
The combination of passive output bit clock (OCKA = 0) and active output frame sync (OFSA = 1) is not supported. The combination of passive input bit clock (ICKA = 0) and active input frame sync (IFSA = 1) is not supported.
§§ If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 111. SCON10 (SIU Input/Output General Control) Register (continued)
Bit
Field
Value
1
IFSK§§
0
Description
The external input frame sync pin (SIFS) is active-high.
! If IFSA is 0 (passive sync), do not invert SIFS to generate the internal input
frame sync (IFS).
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
0
If IFSA is 1 (active sync), do not invert the active generated input frame sync
(IFS) before applying to the SIFS pin.
The external input frame sync pin (SIFS) is active-low.
! If IFSA is 0 (passive sync), invert the input frame sync pin (SIFS) to generate
the internal input frame sync (IFS).
!
1
If IFSA is 1 (active sync), invert the active generated input frame sync (IFS)
before applying to the SIFS pin.
Passive mode input frame sync—drive the internal input frame sync (IFS) from
the external input frame sync pin (SIFS) modified according to IFSK and
SCON1[IFSDLY]. The SIU configures SIFS as an input.
Active mode input frame sync††—drive the internal input frame sync (IFS) from
the active generated frame sync (AGFS) modified according to
SCON1[IFSDLY]. If SCON12[AGSYNC] is cleared, the SIU configures SIFS as
an output. If SCON12[AGSYNC] is set, the SIU configures SIFS as an input for
the purpose of synchronizing the active generated bit clocks.
!
0
IFSA§§
0
1
†
‡
§
††
R/W
0
To determine the type of error, the program can read the contents of the STAT register (see Table 116 on page 195).
If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) or ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
If the ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
The combination of passive output bit clock (OCKA = 0) and active output frame sync (OFSA = 1) is not supported. The combination of passive input bit clock (ICKA = 0) and active input frame sync (IFSA = 1) is not supported.
§§ If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 112. SCON11 (SIU Input/Output Active Clock Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43016 for SIU0 and 0x44016 for SIU1.
Bit
Field
15—8
7—0
Reserved
AGCKLIM[7:0]
Value
Description
R/W Reset
Value
15—8
Reserved
0
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
0
7—0 AGCKLIM[7:0]† 0—255 Active clock divide ratio—controls the period and duty cycle of the active gener- R/W
0
ated input and output bit clocks (ICK and OCK).
The period of ICK and OCK (TAGCK) is:
TAGCK = TCKAG × (max(1, AGCKLIM[7:0]) + 1)
where TCKAG is the period of the clock source‡ for ICK and OCK.
The high and low times of ICK and OCK (TAGCKH and TAGCKL) are:
TAGCKH = TCKAG × int((max(1, AGCKLIM[7:0]) + 2) ÷ 2)
TAGCKL = TCKAG × int((max(1, AGCKLIM[7:0]) + 1) ÷ 2)
where TCKAG is the period of the clock source§ for ICK and OCK and int( ) is the
integer function (truncation).
The following table illustrates examples:
AGCKLIM[7:0]
0 or 1
2
3
4
5
6
254
255
Bit Clock
Period
TAGCK
2 × TCKAG
3 × TCKAG
4 × TCKAG
5 × TCKAG
6 × TCKAG
7 × TCKAG
255 × TCKAG
256 × TCKAG
High Time
Low Time
TAGCKH
1 × TCKAG
2 × TCKAG
2 × TCKAG
3 × TCKAG
3 × TCKAG
4 × TCKAG
128 × TCKAG
128 × TCKAG
TAGCKL
1 × TCKAG
1 × TCKAG
2 × TCKAG
2 × TCKAG
3 × TCKAG
3 × TCKAG
127 × TCKAG
128 × TCKAG
† If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) or ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
‡ The clock source is selected by SCON12[AGEXT] as either the SCK pin (modified by SCON12[SCKK]) or the processor clock, CLK.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 113. SCON12 (SIU Input/Output Active Frame Sync Control) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43018 for SIU0 and 0x44018 for SIU1.
15
14
13
12
11
10—0
AGRESET
AGSYNC
SCKK
AGEXT
Reserved
AGFSLIM[10:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
AGRESET†
14
AGSYNC†
0
1
0
1
13
SCKK†
0
1
Description
R/W Reset
Value
R/W
1
Activate the active clock and frame sync generator.
Deactivate the active clock and frame sync generator.
Do not synchronize the active generated input and output bit clocks to an
R/W
external source.
Configure the external input frame sync (SIFS) pin as an input and synchronize the active generated input and output bit clocks to SIFS.
Do not invert the SCK pin before applying it to the active clock generator, i.e., R/W
if SCK is selected as the active clock source‡, the rising edge of the active
generated input and output bit clocks is generated by the rising edge of SCK.
Invert the SCK pin before applying it to the active clock generator, i.e., if SCK
is selected as the active clock source‡, the rising edge of the active generated input and output bit clocks is generated by the falling edge of SCK.
Caution: Set this bit only if AGEXT is also set.
0
The processor clock (CLK) is the clock source for the active clock and frame R/W
12
sync generator.
1
The SCK pin (modified according to SCKK) is the clock source for the active
clock and frame sync generator.
11
Reserved
0
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
R/W
10—0 AGFSLIM[10:0]† 0—2047 Active frame sync divide ratio—controls the period and duty cycle of the
active generated frame syncs (IFS and OFS).
The period of IFS and OFS (TAGFS) is:
AGEXT†
0
0
0
0
0
TAGFS = TAGCK × (max(1, AGFSLIM[10:0]) + 1)
where TAGCK is the period of the clock source§ for IFS and OFS.
The high and low times of IFS and OFS (TAGFSH and TAGFSL) are:
TAGFSH = TAGCK × int((max(1, AGFSLIM[10:0]) + 1) ÷ 2)
TAGFSL = TAGCK × int((max(1, AGFSLIM[10:0]) + 2) ÷ 2)
where TAGCK is the period of the clock source§ for IFS and OFS and int( ) is
the integer function (truncation).
The following table illustrates examples:
Frame Sync
Period
AGFSLIM[10:0]
TAGFS
15
16 × TAGCK
16
17 × TAGCK
2047
2048 × TAGCK
High Time
Low Time
TAGFSH
8 × TAGCK
8 × TAGCK
1024 × TAGCK
TAGFSL
8 × TAGCK
9 × TAGCK
1024 × TAGCK
† If the IRESET field (SCON1[10]) or ORESET field (SCON2[10]) is cleared, do not change the value in this field.
‡ SCK is selected as the clock source for the active clock generator if AGEXT is 1.
§ The clock source is the active generated bit clock with period TAGCK.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 114. SIDR (SIU Input Data) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4301A for SIU0 and 0x4401A for SIU1.
15—0
Serial Input Data
Bit
15—0
Field
Serial Input Data
Description
Read-only 16-bit serial input data. The SIU can optionally expand the
data in the input shift register before latching it into SIDR. The user
program controls this optional expansion by configuring the IFORMAT[1:0] field (SCON0[1:0]—Table 101 on page 183).
R/W
R
Reset Value
0
R/W
W
Reset Value
0
Table 115. SODR (SIU Output Data) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4301C for SIU0 and 0x4401C for SIU1.
15—0
Serial Output Data
Bit
15—0
194
Field
Serial Output Data
Description
Write-only 16-bit serial output data. The SIU optionally compresses
the data in SODR before latching it into the output shift register. The
user program controls this optional compression by configuring the
OFORMAT[1:0] field (SCON0[9:8]—Table 101 on page 183).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 116. STAT (SIU Input/Output General Status) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x4301E for SIU0 and 0x4401E for SIU1.
15—8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Reserved
OUFLOW
IOFLOW
OFERR
IFERR
SODV
Reserved
SIBV
SIDV
Bit
Field
Value
15—8
7
Reserved
OUFLOW†
6
IOFLOW†
5
OFERR†
4
IFERR†
3
SODV
2
1
Reserved
SIBV
0
SIDV
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Output underflow error has not occurred.
Output underflow error has occurred.
Input overflow error has not occurred.
Input overflow error has occurred.
Output frame error has not occurred.
Output frame error has occurred.
Input frame error has not occurred.
Input frame error has occurred.
SODR does not contain valid data.
SODR contains valid data.
Reserved—write with zero.
SIB‡ does not contain valid data.
SIB‡ contains valid data.
SIDR does not contain valid data.
SIDR contains valid data.
R/W
R/W
R/Clear
Reset
Value
0
0
R/Clear
0
R/Clear
0
R/Clear
0
R
0
R/W
R
0
0
R
0
† The programmer clears this bit by writing it with 1. Writing 0 to this bit leaves it unchanged.
‡ The SIB register is an intermediate register that holds the contents of the input shift register and is not user accessible.
Table 117. FSTAT (SIU Input/Output Frame Status) Register
The memory address for this register is 0x43020 for SIU0 and 0x44020 for SIU1.
15
14—8
7
6—0
OACTIVE
OFIX[6:0]
IACTIVE
IFIX[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
OACTIVE
0
1
Description
No output channels have been processed.
At least one output channel has been processed following output section reset
(ORESET(SCON2[10]) = 0). (Distinguishes the first (index 0) and last (index
n × 8) output subframes.)
14—8 OFIX[6:0] 0—127 Channel index of the next enabled output channel.
7
IACTIVE
0
No input channels have been processed.
1
At least one input channel has been processed following input section reset
(IRESET(SCON1[10]) = 0). (Distinguishes the first (index 0) and last (index
n × 8) input subframes.)
6—0 IFIX[6:0] 0—127 Current input channel index.
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R/W
R
Reset
Value
0
R
R
0
0
R
0
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 118. OCIX〈0—1〉 and ICIX〈0—1〉 (SIU Output and Input Channel Index) Registers
Register
OCIX0
OCIX1
ICIX0
ICIX1
Address
SIU0
SIU1
0x43030 0x44030
0x43032 0x44032
0x43040 0x44040
0x43042 0x44042
Description
See
Output channel index for the active even subframe.
Output channel index for the active odd subframe.
Input channel index for the active even subframe.
Input channel index for the active odd subframe.
Table 119
Table 119
Table 120 on page 197
Table 120 on page 197
Table 119. OCIX〈0—1〉 (SIU Output Channel Index) Registers
See Table 118 for the memory addresses of these registers.
15
Channel Mode
(Each bit is mapped
to a logical channel
in the active subframe)
Frame Mode†
(Each bit is circularly
mapped to four logical channels)
OCIX0
OCIX1
OCIX0
OCIX1
Bit
Value
15—0
0
1
14
13
Subframe 0 15 14 13
Subframe 2 47 46 45
Subframe 4 79 78 77
Subframe 6 111 110 109
Subframe 1 31 30 29
Subframe 3 63 62 61
Subframe 5 95 94 93
Subframe 7 127 126 125
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
12
44
76
108
28
60
92
124
11
43
75
107
27
59
91
123
10
42
74
106
26
58
90
122
9
41
73
105
25
57
89
121
8
40
72
104
24
56
88
120
7
39
71
103
23
55
87
119
6
38
70
102
22
54
86
118
5
37
69
101
21
53
85
117
4
36
68
100
20
52
84
116
3
35
67
99
19
51
83
115
2
34
66
98
18
50
82
114
1
33
65
97
17
49
81
113
0
32
64
96
16
48
80
112
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
15
47
79
111
31
63
95
127
14
46
78
110
30
62
94
126
13
45
77
109
29
61
93
125
12
44
76
108
28
60
92
124
11
43
75
107
27
59
91
123
10
42
74
106
26
58
90
122
9
41
73
105
25
57
89
121
8
40
72
104
24
56
88
120
7
39
71
103
23
55
87
119
6
38
70
102
22
54
86
118
5
37
69
101
21
53
85
117
4
36
68
100
20
52
84
116
3
35
67
99
19
51
83
115
2
34
66
98
18
50
82
114
1
33
65
97
17
49
81
113
0
32
64
96
16
48
80
112
Description
(SIU0)
Use DMAU Channel SWT0 for output to the
logical channel shown above.
Use DMAU Channel SWT1 for output to the
logical channel shown above.
Description
(SIU1)
Use DMAU Channel SWT2 for output to the
logical channel shown above.
Use DMAU Channel SWT3 for output to the
logical channel shown above.
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
0
† If the number of logical channels per frame is one (OFLIM[6:0](SCON2[6:0]) = 0) in frame mode, bits 1 and 0 of OCIX0 (OCIX0[1:0]) must be programmed with the same value.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.16 Serial Interface Unit (SIU) (continued)
4.16.15 Registers (continued)
Table 120. ICIX〈0—1〉 (SIU Input Channel Index) Registers
See Table 118 on page 196 for the memory addresses of these registers.
15
Channel Mode
(Each bit is mapped
to a logical channel
in the active subframe)
Frame Mode†
(Each bit is circularly
mapped to four logical channels)
ICIX0
ICIX1
ICIX0
ICIX1
Bit
Value
15—0
0
1
14
13
Subframe 0 15 14 13
Subframe 2 47 46 45
Subframe 4 79 78 77
Subframe 6 111 110 109
Subframe 1 31 30 29
Subframe 3 63 62 61
Subframe 5 95 94 93
Subframe 7 127 126 125
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
12
44
76
108
28
60
92
124
11
43
75
107
27
59
91
123
10
42
74
106
26
58
90
122
9
41
73
105
25
57
89
121
8
40
72
104
24
56
88
120
7
39
71
103
23
55
87
119
6
38
70
102
22
54
86
118
5
37
69
101
21
53
85
117
4
36
68
100
20
52
84
116
3
35
67
99
19
51
83
115
2
34
66
98
18
50
82
114
1
33
65
97
17
49
81
113
0
32
64
96
16
48
80
112
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
15
47
79
111
31
63
95
127
14
46
78
110
30
62
94
126
13
45
77
109
29
61
93
125
12
44
76
108
28
60
92
124
11
43
75
107
27
59
91
123
10
42
74
106
26
58
90
122
9
41
73
105
25
57
89
121
8
40
72
104
24
56
88
120
7
39
71
103
23
55
87
119
6
38
70
102
22
54
86
118
5
37
69
101
21
53
85
117
4
36
68
100
20
52
84
116
3
35
67
99
19
51
83
115
2
34
66
98
18
50
82
114
1
33
65
97
17
49
81
113
0
32
64
96
16
48
80
112
Description
(SIU0)
Use DMAU Channel SWT0 for input from the
logical channel shown above.
Use DMAU Channel SWT1 for input from the
logical channel shown above.
Description
(SIU1)
Use DMAU Channel SWT2 for input from the
logical channel shown above.
Use DMAU Channel SWT3 for input from the
logical channel shown above.
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
0
† If the number of logical channels per frame is one (IFLIM[6:0](SCON1[6:0]) = 0) in frame mode, bits 1 and 0 of ICIX0 (ICIX0[1:0]) must be programmed
with the same value.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
DSP16410CG consumes less power if clocked with
CKI.
4.17 Internal Clock Selection
!
The DSP16410CG internal clock can be driven from
one of two sources. The primary source clock is an onchip programmable clock synthesizer that can be
driven by an external clock input pin (CKI) at a fraction
of the required instruction rate. The clock synthesizer
is based on a phase-lock loop (PLL). The terms clock
synthesizer and PLL are used interchangeably.
Section 4.18 describes the PLL and its associated
pllcon, pllfrq, and plldly registers in detail.
Note: Internal clock functions for the DSP16410CG are
controlled by CORE0 because the registers
pllcon, pllfrq, and plldly are only available to
programs executing in CORE0.
Figure 54 illustrates the internal clock selection logic
that selects the internal clock (fCLK) from one of the following two source clocks:
!
PLL: The PLL generates a source clock with a programmable frequency. If the PLL is selected as the
source clock, fCLK has the frequency and duty cycle
of the PLL output fSYN.
After device reset, the default source clock signal is
CKI.
The programmer can select the PLL as the source
clock by setting the PLLSEL field (pllcon[0]—see
Table 122 on page 200). Before selecting the PLL as
the clock source, the user program must first enable
(power up) the PLL by setting the PLLEN field
(pllcon[1]) and then wait for the PLL to lock. See
Section 4.18 for details.
Table 121 summarizes the selection of the two source
clocks as a function of the PLLSEL field.
Table 121. Source Clock Selection
CKI: This pin is driven by an external oscillator or the
pin’s associated boundary-scan logic under JTAG
control. If CKI is selected as the source clock, fCLK
has the frequency and duty cycle of fCKI. The
PLLSEL
(pllcon[0])
0
1
fCLK
Description
fCKI
fSYN
CKI pin
PLL
Internal Clock Selection Logic
PLLSEL
(pllcon[0])
CKI
fCKI
0
SYNC
MUX†
fCLK
CLK
1
fCKI
fSYN
PLL
PLLEN
(pllcon[1])
CLOCK SELECTION LOGIC
† The multiplexer is designed so that no partial clocks or glitching occurs.
Figure 54. Internal Clock Selection Logic
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
the divided input clock frequency (fCKI/(D + 2)), and the
VCO output frequency (fVCO). The values of M, D, and
f(OD) must be chosen to meet these requirements.
4.18 Clock Synthesis
Figure 55 is a block diagram of the clock synthesizer,
or phase-lock loop (PLL). CORE0 enables, selects,
and configures the PLL by writing to three registers,
pllcon, pllfrq, and plldly (see Section 4.18.3 on
page 200). pllcon is used to enable and select the PLL
clock synthesizer (see Section 4.17). pllfrq determines
the frequency multiplier of the PLL (see
Section 4.18.1). Before selecting the PLL as the clock
source, the user program must first enable (power up)
the PLL by setting the PLLEN field (pllcon[1]) and then
wait for the PLL to lock. plldly is used for PLL LOCK
flag generation (see Section 4.18.2).
4.18.1 PLL Operating Frequency
The PLL-synthesized clock frequency is determined by
the fields of the pllfrq register. The synthesized clock
frequency is calculated as:
(M + 2)
f SYN = f CKI ⋅ --------------------------------------( D + 2 ) ⋅ f ( OD )
In the formula above, fSYN is the frequency of the clock
generated by the PLL, (M + 2) is the frequency multiplier, (D + 2) is the feedback divisor, and f(OD) is the
output frequency divisor. The values of M, D, and f(OD)
are determined by the M[8:0], D[4:0], and OD[1:0]
fields of pllfrq as defined in Table 123 on page 200.
Table 183 on page 276 specifies the minimum and
maximum values for the input clock frequency (fCKI),
CKI
fCKI
÷(D + 2)
PHASE
DETECTOR
CHARGE
PUMP
4.18.2 PLL LOCK Flag Generation
The DSP16410CG does not provide a PLL-generated
status flag that indicates when the PLL has locked.
Instead, a user-programmable register, plldly
(Table 124 on page 200), and an associated delay
counter is used for this purpose. If the pllcon register is
written to enable the PLL, the delay counter is loaded
with the value in plldly. The PLL decrements this
counter for each subsequent cycle of the DSP input
clock (CKI). When the counter reaches zero, the LOCK
status flag is asserted. The state of the LOCK flag can
be tested by conditional instructions (Section 6.1.1)
and is also visible in the alf register (Table 140 on
page 233). The LOCK flag is cleared by a device reset
or a write to the pllcon register.
The PLL requires 0.5 ms to achieve lock. The application software should set the plldly register to a value
that produces a minimum delay of 0.5 ms. The register
setting needed to achieve this delay is dependent on
the frequency of the input clock (CKI). The programmed value for plldly that results in a countdown
delay of 0.5 ms is the following:
plldly = 500 x fCKI
where fCKI is the input clock frequency in MHz.
See Section 4.18.4 for PLL programming examples
that include the use of plldly.
fVCO
÷f(OD)
VCO
OD
(pllfrq[15:14])
D
(pllfrq[13:9])
fSYN
PLLEN
(pllcon[1])
÷(M + 2)
PLL
M
(pllfrq[8:0])
Figure 55. Clock Synthesizer (PLL) Block Diagram
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.18 Clock Synthesis (continued)
4.18.3 PLL Registers
Table 122. pllcon (Phase-Lock Loop Control) Register
Note: pllcon is accessible in CORE0 only.
15—2
1
0
Reserved
PLLEN
PLLSEL
Bit
15—2
1
Field
Reserved
PLLEN
0
PLLSEL
Value
—
0
1
0
1
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Disable (power down) the PLL.
Enable (power up) the PLL.
Select the CKI input as the internal clock (CLK) source.
Select the PLL as the internal clock (CLK) source.
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0
0
R/W
0
Table 123. pllfrq (Phase-Lock Loop Frequency Control) Register
Note: pllfrq is accessible in CORE0 only.
15—14
13—9
8—0
OD[1:0]
D[4:0]
M[8:0]
Bit
15—14
Field
OD[1:0]
13—9
8—0
D[4:0]
M[8:0]
Value
00
01
10
11
0—31
0—511
Description
f(OD) = 2. Divide VCO output by 2.
f(OD) = 4. Divide VCO output by 4.
f(OD) = 4. Divide VCO output by 4.
f(OD) = 8. Divide VCO output by 8.
Divide fCKI by this value plus two (D + 2).
Multiply fCKI by this value plus two (M + 2).
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
00
R/W
R/W
00000
000000000
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0x1388
Table 124. plldly (Phase-Lock Loop Delay Control) Register
Note: plldly is accessible in CORE0 only.
15—0
DLY[15:0]
Bit
15—0
15—0
DLY[15:0]
Value
—
Description
The contents of DLY[15:0] are loaded into the PLL delay
counter after a pllcon register write. If PLLEN
(pllcon[1]) is 1, the counter decrements each CKI cycle.
When the counter reaches zero, the LOCK flag† for both
CORE0 and CORE1 is asserted.
† The state of the LOCK flag can be tested by conditional instructions (Section 6.1.1) and is also visible in the alf register (Table 140 on
page 233). The LOCK flag is cleared by a device reset or a write to the pllcon register.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.18 Clock Synthesis (continued)
4.18.4 PLL Programming Examples
The following examples illustrate the recommended PLL programming sequence.
PLL programming example 1: CKI = 10 MHz, CLK = 150 MHz.
pllcon=0x0000
plldly=0x1388
pllfrq=0x003A
pllcon=0x0002
4*nop
pllwait:
if lock goto pllon
goto pllwait
pllon:
pllcon=0x0003
//
//
//
//
//
Turn off the PLL
Set countdown delay = 0.5 ms (500 x 10 = 5000 = 0x1388)
OD=0, D=0, M=58. fsyn=10*(58+2)/((0+2)*(2)). VCO=300 MHz
Turn on PLL
Wait for pllcon write to complete
// Wait for countdown to complete
// Select PLL as CLK source
PLL programming example 2: CKI = 13.5 MHz, CLK = 162 MHz.
pllcon=0x0000
plldly=0x1A5E
pllfrq=0x002E
pllcon=0x0002
4*nop
pllwait:
if lock goto pllon
goto pllwait
pllon:
pllcon=0x0003
//
//
//
//
//
Turn off the PLL
Set countdown delay = 0.5 ms (500 x 13.5 = 6750 = 0x1A5E)
OD=0, D=0, M=46. fsyn=13.5*(46+2)/((0+2)*(2)).VCO=324 MHz
Turn on PLL
Wait for pllcon write to complete
// Wait for countdown to complete
// Select PLL as CLK source
4.18.5 Powering Down the PLL
Clearing the PLLEN field (pllcon[1]) powers down the PLL. Do not power down the PLL (do not clear PLLEN)
when it is selected as the clock source (PLLSEL (pllcon[0]) = 1). The PLL must be deselected as the clock source
prior to or concurrent with powering down the PLL. See Section 4.20 for general information on power management.
Caution: Do not power down the PLL (PLLEN = 0) while it is selected as the clock source (PLLSEL = 1). If
this occurs, the device halts because it has no clock source and cannot operate. To recover from
this condition, the RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N pins must be asserted to reset the device.
4.18.6 Phase-Lock Loop (PLL) Frequency Accuracy and Jitter
Although the average frequency of the PLL output has almost the same relative accuracy as the input clock, noise
sources within the DSP16410CG produce jitter on the PLL clock. The PLL is guaranteed to have sufficiently low jitter to operate the DSP16410CG. However, if the PLL clock is used as the clock source for external devices via the
ECKO pin, do not apply this clock to jitter-sensitive devices. See Table 183 on page 276 for the input jitter requirements for the PLL.
Note: Jitter on the ECKO output clock pin does not need to be taken into account with respect to the timing requirements and characteristics specified in Section 11.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.19 External Clock Selection
The ECKO pin can be programmed using the
ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111)
to select one of the following outputs:
1. CLK/2: The internal clock CLK divided by 2.
2. CLK: The internal clock CLK.
3. CKI: The buffered CKI pin.
4. ZERO: Logic low.
202
After reset, the ECKO output pin is configured as
CLK/2 and CLK is configured as CKI. Therefore, after
reset, ECKO is configured as CKI/2.
The logic that controls the ECKO pin is illustrated in
Figure 56 on page 204. If the application does not
require a clock on the ECKO pin, the user can program
ECKO as logic low during initialization to reduce power
consumption.
Note: Although ECON1 can be accessed by either
core, the programmer should select only one
core (such as CORE0) to control the ECKO pin.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
The DSP16410CG includes additional mechanisms for
saving power that are independent of standby mode:
4.20 Power Management
1. CORE0 can temporarily select the CKI pin as the
source clock to the cores and peripherals by clearing
the PLLSEL field (pllcon[0]—see Table 122 on
page 200). To save additional power, CORE0 can
temporarily disable (power down) the PLL by clearing the PLLEN field (pllcon[1]).
A program running in a core can place that core into
low-power standby mode by setting the AWAIT field
(alf[15]—see Table 140 on page 233). In this mode,
the clock to that core and its associated TPRAM are
disabled except for the minimum core circuitry required
to process an incoming interrupt or trap. The clock to
the peripherals is unaffected.
Figure 56 on page 204 illustrates the following:
!
Distribution of CLK to the cores and peripherals.
!
Function of the AWAIT field.
!
Interrupts to the core used to exit low-power standby
mode.
!
ECKO pin selection logic (see Section 4.19 on
page 202 for details).
If a core is in low-power standby mode, program execution in that core is suspended without loss of state. If
an interrupt that was enabled by that core occurs or if a
trap occurs, the core clears its AWAIT field, exits lowpower standby mode, resumes program execution, and
services the interrupt or trap. See Section 4.4.5 on
page 30 and Section 4.4.6 on page 31 for information
on enabling interrupts.
If the DMAU accesses the TPRAM while the associated core is in standby mode, the clock to the TPRAM
is re-enabled for that access. However, if the core
goes into standby mode while an access to a memory
component is in progress, it locks out the DMAU from
accessing that component. To prevent locking out the
DMAU, the user program must use the macro
SLEEP_ALF () in the 16410.h file. The 16410.h file is
included with the Agere software generation system
(SGS) tools. Using SLEEP_ALF () guarantees that the
core completes all pending memory accesses before
entering standby mode.
SLEEP_ALF () expands to the following:
2. CORE0 can drive the ECKO1 pin low by programming the ECKO[1:0] field (ECON1[1:0]—see
Table 60 on page 111) to 0x3.
3. Each core can power down one or both of its timers
(set timer〈0,1〉c[6]). See Section 4.10 on page 53
for details.
Prior to entering standby mode, CORE0 can perform
any of the above steps to save additional power. Prior
to entering standby mode, CORE1 can direct CORE0
to perform steps 1 and 2, and CORE1 can perform
step 3 directly. (See Section 4.8 on page 46 for information on core-to-core communication.)
An interrupt causes the associated core to exit standby
mode and immediately service the interrupt. If the program running in CORE0 selects the CKI pin as the
source clock before entering standby mode, that clock
is selected as the source clock immediately after the
core exits standby mode. Likewise, if the program running in CORE0 disables the PLL before entering
standby mode, the PLL is disabled immediately after
the core exits standby mode. Assuming the PLL is the
source clock for normal operation, the CORE0 program
must re-enable and then reselect the PLL after exiting
standby mode in order to resume full-speed processing. Only CORE0 can control the PLL and clock selection. Therefore, if CORE1 exits standby mode and
needs to resume full-speed execution, it must direct
CORE0 to enable and reselect the PLL.
Note: If CORE0 selects the CKI pin as the source clock
before entering standby mode, the peripherals
also operate at the slower rate. This can result
in an increased delay for a peripheral to interrupt
the core to exit standby mode.
.align
goto .+1
alf=0x8000
3*nop
1. Although ECON1 can be accessed by either core, the programmer should select only one core (such as CORE0) to control the
ECKO pin.
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.20 Power Management (continued)
Power Management and Clock Distribution
CLK†
CKI
÷2
MUX
CLK/2
ECKO
0
2
AWAIT
(alf[15])
AWAIT
(alf[15])
SYNC
GATE
CLOCK
ECKO[1:0]
(ECON1[1:0])
CLOCK
TPRAM0
TPRAM1
CORE0
CORE1
CLK
CLK
IMUX0‡
IMUX1‡
DMAU
PIU
MGU1
SIU1
TIME0
TIME1
TIMER1_1
2
SIU0
INT[1:0]
2
2
MGU0
2
TIMER0_1
TIMER1_0
SEMI
TIMER0_0
2
PHINT
MGIBF
10
SIGINT, PTRAP
10
MXI[9:0]
XIO
XIO
MXI[9:0]
INTERRUPT
LOGIC
SIGINT, PTRAP
2
DMINT[5:4]
PHINT
INT[1:0]
MGIBF
TIME1
TIME0
INTERRUPT
LOGIC
DMINT[5:4]
SYNC
GATE
INT[1:0]
† CLK is described in Section 4.17.
‡ The IMUX is described in Section 4.4.2.
Figure 56. Power Management and Clock Distribution
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4 Hardware Architecture (continued)
4.20 Power Management (continued)
Wake-up latency is the delay from the time that the core exits standby mode (due to an interrupt) to the time that
the core resumes full-speed execution. The wake-up latency is dependent on the configuration of clocks prior to
entering standby mode, as summarized in Table 125. The programmer must ensure that the wake-up latency is
acceptable in the application. Table 125 also illustrates the trade-off of wake-up latency vs. power consumption.
Disabling the PLL during low-power standby mode results in the minimum power consumption and highest wakeup latency. See Section 10.3 on page 269 and Section 11.2 on page 277 for details on power dissipation and
wake-up latency for various operating modes.
Table 125. Wake-Up Latency and Power Consumption for Low-Power Standby Mode
Source Clock
Selected In Standby
Mode
PLL
CKI Pin
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Status of PLL In
Standby Mode
Wake-Up Latency
Latency vs. Power Consumption Trade-Off
Enabled
Enabled
Disabled
3 PLL cycles
3 CKI cycles
3 CKI cycles +
PLL lock-in time
Minimum wake-up latency (highest power)
—
Minimum power (highest wake-up latency)
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5 Processor Boot-Up and Memory Download
The state of the EXM pin at the time of reset determines whether CORE0 and CORE1 boot from their internal boot
ROMs or from external memory, as specified in Table 126.
Table 126. Core Boot-Up After Reset
State of EXM Pin
on Rising Edge of RSTN
CORE0 Begins
Executing Code From:
CORE1 Begins
Executing Code From:
EXM = 0
IROM0 (address 0x20000)
IROM1 (address 0x20000)
EXM = 1
EROM (address 0x80000)
EROM (address 0x80000)
Table 127 summarizes the contents of the internal boot ROMs, IROM0 and IROM1. The contents of IROM0 and
IROM1 are identical.
Table 127. Contents of IROM0 and IROM1 Boot ROMs
Address or Address Range
0x20000
Code
Instruction: goto 0x20800 (boot routine).
0x20004—0x203FF
Reserved for HDS code.
0x20800—0x208FF
Boot routine.
0x20FFE—0x20FFF
Processor type: 0x00000004.
If the cores boot from their internal boot ROMs, then they execute a boot routine that is described in Section 5.1.
This routine simply waits for an external host to download code and data into the TPRAMs via the PIU. When the
download is complete, the boot routine causes each core to branch to the first location in its TPRAM.
If the cores boot from EROM, then the user must place a boot routine for both cores into EROM prior to reset.
Section 5.2 on page 207 outlines a boot routine that downloads code and data into the TPRAMs via the DMAU and
then causes each core to branch to the first location in its own TPRAM.
Note: After the deassertion of RSTN and during the execution of the boot routine, the clock synthesizer (PLL) is
disabled and the frequency of the internal clock (CLK) is the same as the input clock pin (CKI).
5.1 IROM Boot Routine and Host Download Via PIU
CORE0 and CORE1 boot from IROM0 and IROM1 if the EXM pin is low when RSTN is deasserted. The boot routine in IROM0 is identical to that in IROM1. The routine polls for the PHINT interrupt condition1 in the ins register
(Table 150 on page 240) to determine when the external host has completed downloading to TPRAM via the PIU.
While the cores wait for PHINT to be set, the host can download code and data to any of the memory spaces in the
Z-memory space, summarized below:
!
Internal memory and I/O:
— TPRAM0
— TPRAM1
— Internal I/O (includes SLM and memory-mapped peripheral registers)
!
External memory and I/O:
— EIO space
— ERAM space
— EROM space
1. Interrupts remain globally disabled during execution of the boot routine, and the PHINT interrupt condition is detected by polling.
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5 Processor Boot-Up and Memory Download (continued)
5.1 IROM Boot Routine and Host Download Via PIU (continued)
The host accesses DSP16410CG memory by executing commands that cause the PIU to use the DMAU bypass
channel for downloading. See Section 4.15.5 on page 145 for details. When the host has completed the download, it asserts the PHINT interrupt and sets the PHINT interrupt pending status field (ins[13]—see Table 150 on
page 240) by writing the HINT field (PCON[4]—see Table 73 on page 134). After each boot routine detects the
assertion of PHINT, it branches to the first location of TPRAM (TPRAM0 for CORE0 and TPRAM1 for CORE1).
The boot routine is shown below:
.rsect “.rom”
// Address 0x20000
goto PUPBOOT
// Branch to boot routine.
// Other Vectors, HDS code, and Production test code go here.
.rsect “.PowerUpBoot”
PUPBOOT:
pollboot:
// Address 20800
pt0=0
a0=ins
a0 & 0x0000002000
if eq goto pollboot
r0=0x41000
a0=0x0010
ins=0xffff
*r0=a0
a0=0; r0=0
goto pt0
// Check ins[PHINT].
// Wait for ins[PHINT] to be set.
// Point to the PCON register.
//
//
//
//
Clear pending interrupts in ins.
Write PCON to clear HINT bit.
Cleanup.
Jump to user code.
5.2 EROM Boot Routine and DMAU Download
CORE0 and CORE1 both boot from EROM at address 0x80000 if the EXM pin is high when RSTN is deasserted.
The cores access EROM via the SEMI, and the SEMI interleaves the accesses so that CORE0 executes the
instruction at address 0x80000 first, then CORE1 executes the instruction at address 0x80000 next, etc. The user
must place a boot routine for both cores into EROM prior to reset. This boot routine can contain instructions to
download code and data from ERAM to internal memory (TPRAM0 and TPRAM1) via the DMAU. The download
can be performed either by both cores or by one core while the other core waits. In either case, the boot routine
must distinguish whether CORE0 or CORE1 is executing it. It does this by reading the processor ID (pid) register
(Table 153 on page 240). CORE0’s pid register contains 0x0 and CORE1’s pid register contains 0x1. After determining the processor ID, the boot routine can branch to the correct boot procedure for that core. Once the download is complete, both cores can terminate their boot procedures by executing the following instructions:
pt0=0x0
nop
goto pt0
This causes CORE0 to begin executing instructions at address 0x0 of TPRAM0 and CORE1 to begin executing
instructions at address 0x0 of TPRAM1.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference
The DSP16410CG instruction set consists of both 16-bit and 32-bit wide instructions and resembles C-code.
Table 128 defines the seven types of instructions. The assembler translates a line of assembly code into the most
efficient DSP16410CG instruction(s). See Table 130 on page 216 for instruction set notation conventions.
Table 128. DSP16410CG Instruction Groups
Instruction
Group
MAC
F Title
(If Applicable)
F1 TRANSFER
F1E TRANSFER
if CON F1E
Special
Function
if CON F2
ifc CON F2
if CON F2E
ifc CON F2E
ALU
F3
if CON F3E
BMU
F4
if CON F4E
Data Move
and
Pointer
Arithmetic
—
Control
—
Cache
—
Description
The powerful MAC instruction group is the primary group of instructions used for signal processing. Up to two data transfers can be combined with up to four parallel
DAU operations in a single MAC instruction to execute simultaneously†. The DAU
operation combinations include (but are not limited to) either a dual-MAC‡ operation,
an ALU operation and a BMU operation, or an ALU/ACS operation and an
ADDER/ACS operation. The F1E instructions that do not include a transfer statement can execute conditionally based on the state of flags§.
Special functions include rounding, negation, absolute value, and fixed arithmetic left
and right shift operations. The operands are an accumulator, another DAU register,
or an accumulator and another DAU register. Some special function instructions
increment counters. Special functions execute conditionally based on the state of
flags§.
ALU instructions operate on two accumulators or on an accumulator and another
DAU register. Many instructions can also operate on an accumulator and an immediate data word. The ALU operations are add, subtract, logical AND, logical OR,
exclusive OR, maximum, minimum, and divide-step. Some F3E instructions include
a parallel ADDER operation. The F3E instructions can execute conditionally based
on the state of flags§.
Full barrel shifting, exponent computation, normalization computation, bit-field
extraction or insertion, and data shuffling between two accumulators are BMU operations that act on the accumulators. BMU operations are controlled by an accumulator, an auxiliary register, or a 16-bit immediate value. The F4E instructions can
execute conditionally based on the state of flags§.
Data move instructions transfer data between two registers or between a register
and memory. This instruction group also supports immediate loads of registers, conditional register-to-register moves, pipeline block moves, and specialized stack
operations. Pointer arithmetic instructions perform arithmetic on data pointers and
do not perform a memory access.
The control instruction group contains branch and call subroutine instructions with
either a 20-bit absolute address or a 12-bit or 16-bit PC-relative address. This group
also includes instructions to enable and disable interrupts. Some control instructions
can execute conditionally based on the state of processor flags§.
Cache instructions implement low-overhead loops by loading a set of up to
31 instructions into cache memory and repetitively executing them as many as
216 – 1 times.
† Executes in one instruction cycle in most cases.
‡ A dual-MAC operation consists of two multiplies and an add or subtract operation by the ALU, an add or subtract operation by the ADDER, or
both.
§ See Section 6.1.1 on page 224 for a description of processor flags.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual for a detailed description of:
!
The instruction set
!
Pipeline hazards1
!
Instruction encoding formats and field descriptions
!
Instruction set reference
Table 129 on page 210 lists the entire instruction set with its cycle performance and the number of memory locations required for each. Figure 57 is an illustration of a single row of the table and a description of how to interpret
its contents.
INSTRUCTIONS ARE GROUPED INTO
CATEGORIES (ONE OF SEVEN).
F TITLE
(IF APPLICABLE).
FLAGS AFFECTED BY
THIS INSTRUCTION†.
Instruction
Flags
szlme
QUANTITY OF PROGRAM MEMORY
USED BY THE INSTRUCTION.
(EITHER 1 OR 2 16-bit WORDS).
Cycles
Out
In
Words
ALU Group
aD = aS OP 〈aTE, pE〉
(F3)
INSTRUCTION SYNTAX.
szlm–
1
1
1
THE NUMBER OF INSTRUCTION CYCLES
USED WHEN THE INSTRUCTION IS EXECUTED OUTSIDE OF THE CACHE.
THE NUMBER OF INSTRUCTION CYCLES
USED WHEN THE INSTRUCTION IS EXECUTED INSIDE OF THE CACHE. A DASH
(—) INDICATES THE INSTRUCTION IS NOT
CACHEABLE.
† szlme corresponds to the LMI (s), LEQ (z), LLV (l), LMV (m), and EPAR (e) flags. If a letter appears in this column, the corresponding flag is
affected by this instruction. If a dash appears in this column, the corresponding flag is unaffected by this instruction. In the example shown,
the instruction affects all flags except for EPAR. For MAC group instructions with both an ALU/ACS operation and an ADDER or BMU operation, the ALU/ACS result affects the LMI, LEQ, LLV, and LMV flags, and the EPAR flag is unaffected.
Figure 57. Interpretation of the Instruction Set Summary Table
Table 130 on page 216 summarizes the instruction set notation conventions for interpreting the instruction syntax
descriptions. Table 131 on page 217 is an overall replacement table that summarizes the replacement for every
upper-case character string in the instruction set summary table (Table 129 on page 210) except for F1 and F1E in
the MAC instruction group. Table 132 on page 220 describes the replacement for the F1 field, and Table 133 on
page 222 describes the replacement for the F1E field.
1. A pipeline hazard occurs when a write to a register precedes an access that uses the same register and that register is not updated because
of pipeline timing. The DSP16000 assembler automatically inserts a nop in this case to avoid the hazard.
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6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 129. Instruction Set Summary
Instruction
Multiply/Accumulate (MAC) Group
Y
F1
x〈h,l〉 = Y
F1
y〈h,l〉 = Y
F1
a 〈h,l〉 = Y
F1
Y = y〈h,l〉
F1
Y = aT〈h,l〉
F1
yh = aTh
F1
yh = Y
F1
if CON F1E
F1E yh,l = aTEh,l
F1E aTEh,l = yh,l
F1E y = aE_Ph
F1E aE_Ph = y
xh,l = YE
F1E
yh,l = YE
F1E
aTEh,l = YE
F1E
aE_Ph = YE
F1E
YE = xh,l
F1E
YE = yh,l
F1E
YE = aTEh,l
F1E
YE = aE_Ph
F1E
yh
r0
=
rNE
+
jhb
F1E
= *r0
YE
F1E
F1E
F1E
F1E
F1E y = aE_Ph
F1E yh = aTEh
F1E aTEh = yh
yh,l = YE‡
F1E
yh,l = YE
F1E
YE = yh,l
F1E
yh = YE‡
F1E
YE = a6_7h
F1E
YE = a6h‡
F1E
YE = a6h‡
F1E
Flags
szlme
xh = X
xh = X
xh,l = XE
aTEh,l = XE
aE_Ph = XE
x h = XE
x h = XE
xh = XE
a4h = XE
xh = XE
xh = XE
a4_5h = XE
xh = XE
xh = XE
a4h = XE
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
Cycles
Out
In
1
Words
1
1
1
2
1+XC†
1
1+XC†
† XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and can only be avoided by use of the cache.
‡ For this transfer, the postincrement options *rME and *rME–– are not available for double-word loads.
§ The – (40-bit subtraction) operation is encoded as aDE =aSE +IM16 with the IM16 value negated.
†† For conditional branch instructions, the execution time is two cycles if the branch is not taken.
‡‡ The instruction performs the same function whether or not near (optional) is included.
§§ Not including the N instructions.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 129. Instruction Set Summary (continued)
Instruction
Multiply/Accumulate (MAC) Group (continued)
r0 = rNE+jlb
F1E yh = *r0
j=k
F1E
Special Function Group
if CON aD = aS>>〈1,4,8,16〉
ifc CON aD = aS>>〈1,4,8,16〉
if CON aD = aS
ifc CON aD = aS
if CON aD = –aS
ifc CON aD = –aS
if CON aD = ~aS
ifc CON aD = ~aS
if CON aD = rnd(aS)
ifc CON aD = rnd(aS)
if CON aDh=aSh+1
ifc CON aDh = aSh+1
if CON aD = aS+1
ifc CON aD = aS+1
if CON aD = 〈y,p0〉
ifc CON aD = 〈y,p0〉
if CON aD = aS<<〈1,4,8,16〉
ifc CON aD = aS<<〈1,4,8,16〉
if CON aDE = aSE>>〈1,2,4,8,16〉
ifc CON aDE = aSE>>〈1,2,4,8,16〉
if CON aDE = aSE
ifc CON aDE = aSE
if CON aDE = –aSE
ifc CON aDE = –aSE
if CON aDE = ~aSE
ifc CON aDE = ~aSE
if CON aDE = rnd(〈aSE,pE〉)
ifc CON aDE = rnd(〈aSE,pE〉)
if CON aDE = rnd(–pE)
ifc CON aDE = rnd(–pE)
if CON aDE = rnd(aSE+pE)
ifc CON aDE = rnd(aSE+pE)
if CON aDE = rnd(aSE–pE)
ifc CON aDE = rnd(aSE–pE)
Flags
szlme
k = XE
XE
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
(F2E)
Cycles
Out
In
Words
szlme
szlme
1+XC†
1
2
szlme
szlme
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
1
1
1
1
1
2
† XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and can only be avoided by use of the cache.
‡ For this transfer, the postincrement options *rME and *rME–– are not available for double-word loads.
§ The – (40-bit subtraction) operation is encoded as aDE =aSE +IM16 with the IM16 value negated.
†† For conditional branch instructions, the execution time is two cycles if the branch is not taken.
‡‡ The instruction performs the same function whether or not near (optional) is included.
§§ Not including the N instructions.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 129. Instruction Set Summary (continued)
Instruction
Special Function Group (continued)
(F2E)
if CON aDE = abs(aSE)
ifc CON aDE = abs(aSE)
(F2E)
(F2E)
if CON aDE = aSEh+1
ifc CON aDEh = aSEh+1
(F2E)
(F2E)
if CON aDE = aSE+1
ifc CON aDE = aSE+1
(F2E)
(F2E)
if CON aDE = 〈y,pE〉
ifc CON aDE = 〈y,pE〉
(F2E)
(F2E)
if CON aDE = 〈–y,–pE〉
ifc CON aDE = 〈–y,–pE〉
(F2E)
(F2E)
if CON aDE = aSE<<〈1,2,4,8,16〉
ifc CON aDE = aSE<<〈1,2,4,8,16〉
(F2E)
ALU Group
aD = aS OP 〈aTE,pE〉
(F3)
aD = 〈aTE,pE〉 – aS
(F3)
aD = FUNC(aS,〈aTE,pE〉)
(F3)
aS – 〈aTE,pE〉
(F3)
aS&〈aTE,pE〉
(F3)
(F3E)
if CON aDE = aSE OP 〈pE,y〉
(F3E)
if CON aDE = aSE OP aTE
(F3E)
if CON aDE = 〈pE,y〉–aSE
(F3E)
if CON aDE = FUNC(aSE,〈pE,y〉)
(F3E)
if CON aDE = FUNC(aSE,aTE)
(F3E)
if CON aSE – 〈pE,y〉
(F3E)
if CON aSE&〈pE,y〉
CON
aSE
–
aTE
(F3E)
if
(F3E)
if CON aSE&aTE
aDPE = aSPE±aTPE
(F3E)
if CON aDEE = aSEE±aTEE
if CON aDE = aSE+aTE
else aDE = aSE–aTE
(F3E)
aDE = aSE〈h,l〉 OP IM16§
(F3 with immediate)
aDE = IM16–aSE〈h,l〉
(F3 with immediate)
aSE〈h,l〉 – IM16
(F3 with immediate)
aSE〈h,l〉 & IM16
(F3 with immediate)
Flags
szlme
Cycles
Out
In
Words
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlme
szlme
1
1
2
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
szlm–
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
† XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and can only be avoided by use of the cache.
‡ For this transfer, the postincrement options *rME and *rME–– are not available for double-word loads.
§ The – (40-bit subtraction) operation is encoded as aDE =aSE +IM16 with the IM16 value negated.
†† For conditional branch instructions, the execution time is two cycles if the branch is not taken.
‡‡ The instruction performs the same function whether or not near (optional) is included.
§§ Not including the N instructions.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 129. Instruction Set Summary (continued)
Instruction
BMU Group
aD = aS SHIFT 〈aTEh,arM〉
aDh = exp(aTE)
aD = norm(aS, 〈aTEh,arM〉)
aD = extracts(aS,aTEh)
aD = extractz(aS,aTEh)
aD = inserts(aS,aTEh)
aD = insertz(aS,aTEh)
aD = extract(aS,arM)
aD = extracts(aS,arM)
aD = extractz(aS,arM)
aD = insert(aS,arM)
aD = inserts(aS,arM)
aD = insertz(aS,arM)
aD = aS:aTE
aDE = extract(aSE,IM8W,IM8O)
aDE = extracts(aSE,IM8W,IM8O)
aDE = extractz(aSE,IM8W,IM8O)
aDE = insert(aSE,IM8W,IM8O)
aDE = inserts(aSE,IM8W,IM8O)
aDE = insertz(aSE,IM8W,IM8O)
aDE=aSE SHIFT IM16
if CON aDE = aSE SHIFT〈aTEh,arM〉
if CON aDEh = exp(aTE)
if CON aDE = norm(aSE,〈aTEh,arM〉)
if CON aDE = extracts(aSE,aTEh)
if CON aDE = extractz(aSE,aTEh)
if CON aDE = inserts(aSE,aTEh)
if CON aDE = insertz(aSE,aTEh)
if CON aDE = extract(aSE,arM)
if CON aDE = extracts(aSE,arM)
if CON aDE = extractz(aSE,arM)
if CON aDE = insert(aSE,arM)
if CON aDE = inserts(aSE,arM)
if CON aDE = insertz(aSE,arM)
if CON aDE = aSE:aTE
Flags
szlme
(F4)
(F4)
(F4)
(F4)
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
(F4)
szlme
(F4)
szlme
(F4)
szlme
(F4)
(F4 with immediate)
szlm–
szlme
(F4 with immediate)
szlme
(F4 with immediate)
(F4E)
(F4E)
(F4E)
(F4E)
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
szlme
(F4E)
szlme
(F4E)
szlme
(F4E)
szlme
(F4E)
szlm–
Cycles
Out
In
Words
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
† XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and can only be avoided by use of the cache.
‡ For this transfer, the postincrement options *rME and *rME–– are not available for double-word loads.
§ The – (40-bit subtraction) operation is encoded as aDE =aSE +IM16 with the IM16 value negated.
†† For conditional branch instructions, the execution time is two cycles if the branch is not taken.
‡‡ The instruction performs the same function whether or not near (optional) is included.
§§ Not including the N instructions.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 129. Instruction Set Summary (continued)
Instruction
Data Move and Pointer Arithmetic Group
RAB = IM20
RA = IM4
RAD = RAS
if CON RABD = RABS
RB = aTE〈h,l〉
aTE〈h,l〉 = RB
RA = Y
Y = RA
RAB = YE
YE = RC
RAB = *sp++2
*sp––2 = RC
sp––2
*sp = RC
push RC
pop RAB
r3––sizeof(RAB)
RA = *(sp+IM5)
*(sp+IM5) = RA
RAB = *(RP+IM12)
*(RP+IM12) = RC
RAB = *(RP+〈j,k〉)
*(RP+〈j,k〉) = RC
RY = RP+IM12
RY = RP+〈j,k〉
RAB = *r7
r7 = sp+IM11
*r7 = RC
r7 = sp+IM11
YE‡ = xh
xh = XE
Flags
szlme
Cycles
Out
In
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Words
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1+XC†
1
2
† XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and can only be avoided by use of the cache.
‡ For this transfer, the postincrement options *rME and *rME–– are not available for double-word loads.
§ The – (40-bit subtraction) operation is encoded as aDE =aSE +IM16 with the IM16 value negated.
†† For conditional branch instructions, the execution time is two cycles if the branch is not taken.
‡‡ The instruction performs the same function whether or not near (optional) is included.
§§ Not including the N instructions.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 129. Instruction Set Summary (continued)
Instruction
Control Group
near goto IM12‡‡
near call IM12‡‡
if CON goto IM16
if CON call IM16
far goto IM20
far call IM20
if CON goto ptE
if CON call ptE
if CON call pr
tcall
icall IM6
if CON return
ireturn
treturn
ei
di
Cache Group
do K {N_INSTR}
redo K
do cloop {N_INSTR}
redo cloop
Flags
szlme
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Cycles
Out
In
Words
3
—
1
3††
—
2
3
—
3††
—
3
—
3††
3
—
—
1
1
1§§
2
1§§
2
—
—
—
—
1
1§§
1
1§§
1
† XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and can only be avoided by use of the cache.
‡ For this transfer, the postincrement options *rME and *rME–– are not available for double-word loads.
§ The – (40-bit subtraction) operation is encoded as aDE =aSE +IM16 with the IM16 value negated.
†† For conditional branch instructions, the execution time is two cycles if the branch is not taken.
‡‡ The instruction performs the same function whether or not near (optional) is included.
§§ Not including the N instructions.
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Data Sheet
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6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 130 defines the symbols used in instruction descriptions. Some symbols and characters are part of the
instruction syntax, and must appear as shown within the instruction. Other symbols are representational and are
replaced by other characters. The table groups these two types of symbols separately.
Table 130. Notation Conventions for Instruction Set Descriptions
Symbol
Part of
Syntax
Not Part
of Syntax
(Replaced)
Meaning
16-bit x 16-bit multiplication resulting in a 32-bit product.
Exception: if used as a prefix to an address register, denotes register-indirect addressing, e.g.,
*r3.
**2
Squaring is a 16-bit x 16-bit multiplication of the operand with itself, resulting in a 32-bit product.
+
40-bit addition †.
–
40-bit subtraction†.
++
Register postincrement.
––
Register postdecrement.
>>
Arithmetic right shift (with sign-extension from bit 39).
<<
Arithmetic left shift (padded with zeros).
>>>
Logical right shift (zero guard bits before shift).
<<<
Logical left shift (padded with zeros; sign-extended from bit 31).
&
40-bit bitwise logical AND †.
|
40-bit bitwise logical OR †.
^
40-bit bitwise logical exclusive-OR†.
:
Register shuffle‡.
~
One's complement (bitwise inverse).
( )
Parentheses enclose multiple operands delimited by commas that are also part of the syntax.
{ }
Braces enclose multiple instructions within a cache loop.
_
The underscore character indicates an accumulator vector (concatenation of the high halves of a
(underscore) pair of sequential accumulators, e.g., a0_1h).
lower-case Lower-case characters appear as shown in the instruction.
〈〉
Angle brackets enclose items delimited by commas, one of which must be chosen.
Mid braces enclose one or more optional items delimited by commas.

±
Replaced by either + or –.
UPPERUpper-case characters, character strings, and characters plus numerals (e.g., M, CON, and
CASE
IM16) are replaced. Replacement tables accompany each instruction group description.
F Titles
Represents a statement of a DAU function:
F1
MAC.
F1E
Extended MAC.
F2
Special function.
F2E
Extended special function.
F3
ALU.
F3E
Extended ALU.
F4
BMU.
F4E
Extended BMU.
*
† The ALU/ACS and ADDER perform 40-bit operations, but the operands can be 16 bits, 32 bits, or 40 bits. In the special case of the split-mode
F1E instruction (xh=aSPEh±yh xl =aSPEl±yl aDE=aSEE+p0+p1 p0=xh**2 p1=xl**2), the ALU performs two 16-bit addition/subtraction operations in parallel.
‡ Note that this symbol does not denote compound addressing as it does for the DSP16XX family.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 131. Overall Replacement Table
Symbol
aD
aS
aT
Used in
Instruction
Type(s)
F1, F2, F3,
F4
Replaced By
Description
a0 or a1
(DSP16XX-compatible)
D indicates destination of an operation.
S indicates source of an operation.
T indicates an accumulator that is the source of a data
transfer.
indicates an accumulator other than the destination
accumulator.
D indicates destination of an operation. S indicates
source of an operation. T indicates an accumulator
that is either an additional source for an operation or
the source or destination of a data transfer. E indicates the extended set of accumulators.
F1
a
aDE
aSE
aTE
aDEE
aSEE
aTEE
F1E, F2E,
F3/E, F4/E
F1E, F3/E,
F4/E,
data move
F1E, F3E
F3E
a0, a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, or a7
a〈DPE – 1〉 → a0, a2, a4, or a6
a〈SPE – 1〉 → a0, a2, a4, or a6
a〈TPE – 1〉 → a0, a2, a4, or a6
aDPE
aSPE
aTPE
F1E, F3E
F3E
a〈DEE + 1〉 → a1, a3, a5, or a7
a〈SEE + 1〉 → a1, a3, a5, or a7
a〈TEE + 1〉 → a1, a3, a5, or a7
aE_Ph
F1E
a0_1h, a2_3h, a4_5h, or a6_7h
arM
CON
FUNC
F4, F4E
F1E, F2,
F2E, F3E,
F4E,
control,
data move
F3, F3E
ar0, ar1, ar2, or ar3
mi, pl, eq, ne, lvs, lvc, mvs, mvc, heads,
tails, c0ge, c0lt, c1ge, c1lt, true, false, gt,
le, oddp, evenp, smvs, smvc, jobf, jibe,
jcont, lock, mgibe, mgobf, somef, somet,
allf, or allt
max, min, or divs
IM4
data move
4-bit unsigned immediate value (0 to 15)
4-bit signed immediate value (–8 to +7)
IM5
IM6
IM8O
IM8W
IM11
data move
control
F4
5-bit unsigned immediate value (0 to 31)
6-bit unsigned immediate value (0 to 63)
8-bit unsigned immediate value (0 to 255)
data move
11-bit unsigned immediate value
(0 to 2047)
D indicates destination of an operation. S indicates
source of an operation. T indicates an accumulator
that is either an additional source for an operation or
the source or destination of a data transfer. The first E
indicates an even accumulator that is paired with its
corresponding paired extended (odd) accumulator,
i.e., the matching aDPE, aSPE, or aTPE accumulator.
The second E indicates the extended set of accumulators.
P indicates an odd accumulator that is paired with an
even extended accumulator, i.e., the matching aDEE,
aSEE, or aTEE accumulator. E indicates the
extended set of accumulators.
An accumulator vector, i.e., the concatenated 16-bit
high halves of two adjacent accumulators to form a
32-bit vector.
One of the four auxiliary accumulators.
Conditional mnemonics.
Certain instructions are conditionally executed, e.g.,
if CON F2E. See Table 134 on page 224.
One of three ALU functions: maximum, minimum, or
divide-step.
Signed/unsigned status of the IM4 value matches that
of the destination register of the data move assignment instruction.
Added to stack pointer sp to form stack address.
Vector for icall instruction.
Offset and width for bit-field insert and extract instructions. The BMU truncates these values to 6 bits.
Added to stack pointer sp to form stack address.
† The size of the transfer (single- or double-word) depends on the size of the register on the other side of the equal sign.
‡ These postmodification options are not available for a double-word load except for a load of an accumulator vector.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 131. Overall Replacement Table (continued)
Symbol
IM12
Used in
Instruction
Type(s)
control
Replaced By
Description
12-bit signed immediate value
(–2048 to +2047)
PC-relative near address for goto and call instructions.
Postmodification to a general YAAU pointer register to
form address for data move.
Added to the value of a general YAAU pointer register,
and the result is stored into any YAAU register.
Offset for conditional PC-relative goto/call instructions.
Operand for ALU or BMU operation.
Absolute (unsigned) far address for goto and call
instructions. For data move instructions, the
signed/unsigned status of the IM20 value matches
that of the destination register of the assignment
instruction.
For the do K {N_INSTR} and redo K cache instructions.
data move
and
pointer
arithmetic
IM16
control
IM20
F3, F4
control,
data move
K
N
OP
pE
ptE
RA
RAD
RAS
RB
RAB
RABD
RABS
RC
rM
cache
F1, F1E, F3,
F3E
F2E, F3,
F3E
F1E, control,
data move
data move
16-bit signed immediate value
(–32,768 to +32,767)
20-bit unsigned immediate value
(0 to 1,048,576)
20-bit signed immediate value
(–524,288 to 524,287)
1 to 127 or the value in cloop
1 to 31
+, –, &, |, or ^
p0 or p1
pt0 or pt1
40-bit ALU operation.
One of the product registers as source for a special
function or ALU operation.
One of the two XAAU pointer registers as address for
an XE memory access (see XE entry in this table).
One of the main core registers that is specified as the
source or destination of a data move operation. The
subscripts are used to indicate that two different registers can be specified, e.g., RAD = RAS describes a
register-to-register move instruction where RAD and
RAS are, in general, two different registers.
One of the secondary registers that is specified as the
source or destination of a data move operation. This
set includes core and off-core registers.
a0, a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, a7, a0h, a1h,
a2h, a3h, a4h, a5h, a6h, a7h, a0l, a1l, a2l,
a3l, a4l, a5l, a6l, a7l, alf, auc0, c0, c1, c2,
h, i, j, k, p0, p0h, p0l, p1, p1h, p1l, pr,
psw0, pt0, pt1, r0, r1, r2, r3, r4, r5, r6, r7,
rb0, rb1, re0, re1, sp, x, xh, xl, y, yh, or yl
core
a0g, a1g, a2g, a3g, a4g, a5g,
a6g, a7g, a0_1h, a2_3h, a4_5h,
a6_7h, ar0, ar1, ar2, ar3, auc1,
cloop, cstate, csave, inc0, inc1, ins,
pi, psw1, ptrap, vbase, or vsw
off-core
cbit, imux, jiob, mgi, mgo, pid,
pllcon, pllfrq, plldly, sbit, signal,
timer0, timer1, timer0c, timer1c
Any of the RA or RB registers
Any one of the registers in the main (RA) or second(see rows above)
ary (RB) sets of registers that is specified as the
source or destination of a data move operation. The
subscripts are used to indicate that two different registers can be specified.
Any of the RA registers or any of the core RB Any core register that is specified as the source of a
registers (see rows above)
data move operation.
F1,
r0, r1, r2, or r3
One of four general YAAU pointer registers used for a
data move
Y-memory access (see Y entry in this table).
† The size of the transfer (single- or double-word) depends on the size of the register on the other side of the equal sign.
‡ These postmodification options are not available for a double-word load except for a load of an accumulator vector.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 131. Overall Replacement Table (continued)
Symbol
rME
Used in
Instruction
Type(s)
F1E,
data move
Replaced By
Description
r0, r1, r2, r3, r4, r5, r6, or r7
One of eight general YAAU pointer registers used for
a YE-memory access (see YE entry in this table). E
indicates the extended set of pointer registers.
One of seven general YAAU pointer registers used for
a table look-up pointer update.
One of seven general YAAU pointer registers or the
YAAU stack pointer.
Any one of the YAAU registers, including the stack
pointer, circular buffer pointers, and increment registers.
A single-word location pointed to by pt0.
A single-word location pointed to by rM.
Modification of rM pointer register (no memory
access).
A single- or double-word† location pointed to by rM.
A single-word or double-word† memory location
pointed to by ptE.
Modification of ptE pointer register (no memory
access).
A single-word or double-word† memory location
pointed to by rME.
Modification of rME pointer register (no memory
access).
rNE
F1E
r1, r2, r3, r4, r5, r6, or r7
RP
data move
and
pointer
arithmetic
r0, r1, r2, r3, r4, r5, r6, or sp
r0, r1, r2, r3, r4, r5, r6, r7, sp,
rb0, rb1, re0, re1, j, or k
F1
F1
F1 Y
*pt0++ or *pt0++i
*rM, *rM++, *rM– –, or *rM++j
rM++, rM– –, or rM++j
data move
F1E,
data move
F1E XE
*rM, *rM++, *rM– –, or *rM++j
*ptE‡, *ptE++, *ptE––‡, *ptE++h,
or *ptE++i
ptE++, ptE––, ptE++h, ptE++i,
or ptE++2
*rME, *rME++, *rME––, *rME++j,
or *rME++k
rME++, rME––, rME++j, rME++k, rME++2,
or rME––2
RY
X
Y
XE
YE
F1E,
data move
F1E YE
† The size of the transfer (single- or double-word) depends on the size of the register on the other side of the equal sign.
‡ These postmodification options are not available for a double-word load except for a load of an accumulator vector.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 132 defines the F1 instruction syntax as any function statement combined with any transfer statement. Two
types of F1 function statements are shown: the MAC (multiply/accumulate) type and the arithmetic/logic type. The
MAC type is formed by combining any two items from the designated ALU and Multiplier columns. The arithmetic/logic type is chosen from the items in the designated F1 Arithmetic/Logic Function Statement column.
Table 132. F1 Instruction Syntax
Combine Any F1 Function Statement with Any Transfer Statement
F1 MAC Function Statement—
Transfer Statement
Combine Any Items in Following Two Columns:
ALU
Multiplier
aD =aS ± p0
(no ALU operation)§
p0 = xh * yh
(no multiply operation)§
F1 Arithmetic/Logic Function Statement (ALU)
aD = aS OP y
aS – y
aS & y
nop†††
(no F1 function statement)§
Y‡
〈x, y, a 〉〈h, l〉 = Y
Y = 〈y, aT〉〈h, l〉
yh = 〈Y, aTh〉
xh = X
††
(no transfer)§§
Cycles
(Out/In
Cache)†
16-Bit
Words
1/1
1/1
1
1/1
1 + XC‡‡/1
1/1
†
‡
Not including conflict, misalignment, or external wait-states (see the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual).
This Y transfer statement must increment or decrement the contents of an rM register. It is not necessary to include the * before the rM register because no access is made to a memory location.
§ Leave the ALU column blank to specify no ALU operation, the multiplier column blank to specify no multiply operation, or both columns
blank to specify no F1 function statement. If both columns are left blank and a transfer statement is used (a transfer-only F1 instruction,
i.e., yh = *r2 xh = *pt0++), the assembler interprets the F1 function statement as a nop.
†† For this instruction, a D must be the opposite of aD, e.g., if aD is a0, aD must be a1 and vice versa.
‡‡ XC is one cycle if XAAU contention occurs and zero cycles otherwise. XAAU contention occurs frequently for these instruction types and
can only be avoided by use of the cache. See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual.
§§ The assembler encodes an instruction that consists of a function statement F1 with no transfer statement as F1 *r0.
††† nop is no-operation. A programmer can write nop with or without an accompanying transfer statement. The assembler encodes nop without a transfer statement as nop *r0.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 133 on page 222 summarizes the syntax for F1E function statements and the following paragraphs describe
each class of instruction.
Note: Each function statement can be combined with a parallel transfer statement to form a single DSP16410CG
instruction.
General-Purpose MAC
Combine any ALU, ADDER, or ALU and ADDER operation from the left column
with any single- or dual-multiply operation from the right column. Either column
can be left blank.1
Additional General-Purpose MAC
These statements are general-purpose. The combinations of operations must be
as shown. The first statement clears two accumulators and both product
registers. The second statement is the equivalent of the F1 statement
aD = p0 p0 = xh * yh except that any accumulator aDE can be specified. The
third statement is the equivalent of the F1 statement aD = p0 except that any
accumulator aDE can be specified. The fourth statement is a no-operation and,
as with all F1E function statements, can be combined with a transfer statement.
Special-Purpose MAC for Mixed Precision
Combine any ADDER operation or any ALU and ADDER operation from the left
column with any dual-multiply operation from the right column. Either column can
be left blank.1 These statements are intended for, but are not limited to, mixedprecision MAC applications. Mixed-precision multiplication is 16 bits x 31 bits.
Special-Purpose MAC for Double Precision
These statements are intended for, but are not limited to, double-precision MAC
applications. The combinations of operations must be as shown. Double-precision multiplication is 31 bits x 31 bits.
Special-Purpose MAC for Viterbi
These statements are intended for, but are not limited to, Viterbi decoding applications. The combinations of operations must be as shown. This group includes
ALU split-mode operations.
Special-Purpose MAC for FFT
This statement is intended for, but is not limited to, FFT applications.
ALU
These statements are ALU operations. The first three statements in this group
are the equivalent of the F1 arithmetic/logic function statements.
Special-Purpose ALU/ACS, ADDER/ACS for Viterbi
These statements are intended for, but are not limited to, Viterbi decoding applications. They provide either an ALU/ACS operation with or without a parallel
ADDER/ACS operation or split-mode ALU and ADDER operations. The combinations of operations must be as shown. This group includes the Viterbi compare
functions.
Special-Purpose ALU, BMU
These statements are intended for, but are not limited to, special-purpose
applications. They provide a BMU operation with or without a parallel ALU operation. The combinations of operations must be as shown.
1. If both columns are left blank and a transfer statement is used, the DSP16000 assembler interprets the F1E function statement as a no-operation (nop).
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6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 133. F1E Function Statement Syntax
General-Purpose MAC Function Statements—Combine Any Items in Two Columns
ALU†
ADDER†
Multipliers
aDE=aSE±p0
p0=xh*yh
p0=xh*yh
p1=xl*yl
aDE=aSE±p0±p1‡
aDEE=aSEE±p0
aDPE=aSPE±p1
p0=xh*yl
p1=xl*yh
p0=xh*yh
p1=xh*yl
(no ALU/ACS or ADDER operation)
p0=xl*yh
p1=xl*yl
(no multiply operation)
ALU†
aDE=0
aDE=p0
aDE=p0
nop
Additional General-Purpose MAC Function Statements
ADDER†
aSE=0
p0=0
p0=xh*yh
Multipliers
p1=0
Special-Purpose MAC Function Statements for Mixed Precision—Combine Any Items in Two Columns
ALU†
ADDER†
Multipliers
aDE=p0+(p1>>15)§
p0=xh*yh
p1=xh*(yl>>>1)
aDEE=aSE+aDPE
aDPE=p0+(p1>>15)§
p0=xl*yh
p1=xl*(yl>>>1)
(no ALU/ACS or ADDER operation)
ALU†
aDEE=aSE+aDPE
aDEE=aSE+aDPE
aDE=aSE+(p0>>1)
aDE=(aSE>>14)+p1
aDE=(aSE>>14)+p1
(no multiply operation)
Special-Purpose MAC Function Statements for Double Precision
ADDER†
Multipliers
aDE=aSE+p0+(p1>>15)‡ §
p0=xh*yh
p1=xh*(yl>>>1)
aDE=aSE+p0+(p1>>15)‡ §
aDE=p0+(p1>>15)§
p0=0
p1=(xl>>>1)*yh
§
aDPE=p0+(p1>>15)
p0=0
p1=(xl>>>1)*yh
aDE=(p0>>1)+(p1>>16)
p0=(xl>>>1)*yh
p1=xh*yh
aDPE=(p0>>1)+(p1>>16)
p0=(xl>>>1)*yh
p1=xh*yh
p0=xh*(yl>>>1)
p0=xh*(yl>>>1)
p1=(xl>>>1)*(yl>>>1)
p1=(xl>>>1)*(yl>>>1)
† DAU flags are affected by the ALU or ALU/ACS operation (except for the split-mode function which does not affect the flags). If there is no ALU or
ALU/ACS operation, the DAU flags are affected by the ADDER or BMU operation.
‡ If auc0[10] (FSAT field) is set, the result of the add/subtract of the first two operands is saturated to 32 bits prior to adding/subtracting the third operand
and the final result is saturated to 32 bits.
§ If auc0[9] = 1, the least significant bit of p1 >> 15 is cleared.
†† This is a 16-bit operation. The DAU stores the result in the high half of the destination accumulator and clears the low half.
‡‡ This split-mode instruction does not affect the DAU flags. Do not set FSAT for this instruction because if FSAT is set, the entire 32 bits are saturated.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
Table 133. F1E Function Statement Syntax (continued)
ALU†
xh=aSPEh+yh xl=aSPEl+yl††
xh=aSPEh–yh xl=aSPEl–yl††
Special-Purpose MAC Function Statements for Viterbi
ADDER†
aDE=aSEE+p0+p1
p0=xh**2
aDE=aSEE+p0+p1
p0=xh**2
aDE=aSE+p0+p1‡
p0=xh**2
Multipliers
p1=xl**2
p1=xl**2
p1=xl**2
Special-Purpose MAC Function Statement for FFT
ADDER†
aDPE=–aSPE+p1
p0=xh*yh
Multipliers
p1=xl*yl
ALU†
aDEE=–aSEE+p0
ALU Function Statements
aDE= aSE OP y
aSE–y
aSE&y
aDE=aDE±aSE
Special-Purpose ALU/ACS, ADDER/ACS Function Statements for Viterbi
ALU/ACS†
ADDER†
aDEE=cmp0(aSEE,aDEE)
aDPE=aDPE+aSPE
aDEE=cmp0(aSEE,aDEE)
aDPE=cmp0(aSPE,aDPE)
aDE=cmp0(aSE,aDE)
aDEE=cmp1(aSE,aDEE)
aDPE=aDEE–aSE
aDEEh=cmp1(aSEEh,aSEEl)††
aDPEh=cmp1(aSPEh,aSPEl)††
aDE=cmp1(aSE,aDE)
aDEE=cmp2(aSE,aDEE)
aDPE=aDEE–aSE
aDE=cmp2(aSE,aDE)
aDEE=aSEE+y
aDPE=aSPE–y
aDEE=aSEE−y
aDPE=aSPE+y
aDEEh=aSEh+yh aDEEl=aSEl+yl‡‡ aDPEh=aSEh−yh aDPEl=aSEl−yl ‡‡
aDEEh=aSEh−yh aDEEl=aSEl−yl ‡‡ aDPEh=aSEh+yh aDPEl=aSEl+yl ‡‡
Special-Purpose ALU, BMU Function Statements
ALU†
BMU†
aDEE=rnd(aDPE)
aDPE=aSEE>>aSPEh
aDE=aSEE>>aSPEh
aDE=abs(aDE)
aSE=aSE<<ar3
aDE=aSE<<ar3
aDE=aSE<<<ar3
aDEE=min(aDPE,aDEE)
aDPEh=exp(aSE)
† DAU flags are affected by the ALU or ALU/ACS operation (except for the split-mode function which does not affect the flags). If there is no ALU or
ALU/ACS operation, the DAU flags are affected by the ADDER or BMU operation.
‡ If auc0[10] (FSAT field) is set, the result of the add/subtract of the first two operands is saturated to 32 bits prior to adding/subtracting the third operand
and the final result is saturated to 32 bits.
§ If auc0[9] = 1, the least significant bit of p1 >> 15 is cleared.
†† This is a 16-bit operation. The DAU stores the result in the high half of the destination accumulator and clears the low half.
‡‡ This split-mode instruction does not affect the DAU flags. Do not set FSAT for this instruction because if FSAT is set, the entire 32 bits are saturated.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.1 Instruction Set Quick Reference (continued)
6.1.1 Conditions Based on the State of Flags
A conditional instruction begins with either if CON or ifc CON, where CON is replaced with a condition that is
tested. Table 134 describes the complete set of condition codes available for use in conditional instructions. It also
includes the state of the internal flag or flags that cause the condition to be true.
Table 134. DSP16410CG Conditional Mnemonics
CON
Encoding
00000
00001
00010
00011
00100
00101
00110
00111
01000
01001
01010
01011
01100
01101
01110
01111
10000
CON
Mnemonic
mi
pl
eq
ne
lvs
lvc
mvs
mvc
heads
tails
c0ge‡
c0lt‡
c1ge‡
c1lt‡
true
false
gt
10001
le
10010
10011
10100
10101
10110
10111
11000
11001
11010
11011
11100
11101
11110
11111
smvs
smvc
oddp
evenp
jobf
jibe
jcont
lock
mgibe
mgobf
somef
somet
allf
allt
Flag(s)
If CON Is True
LMI = 1
LMI ≠ 1
LEQ = 1
LEQ ≠ 1
LLV = 1
LLV ≠ 1
LMV = 1
LMV ≠ 1
—
—
—
—
—
—
1
0
(LMI ≠ 1)
and (LEQ ≠ 1)
(LMI = 1)
or (LEQ = 1)
SLMV = 1
SLMV ≠ 1
EPAR ≠ 1
EPAR = 1
JOBF = 1
JIBE = 1
JCONT = 1
LOCK = 1
MGIBE = 1
MGOBF = 1
SOMEF = 1
SOMET = 1
ALLF = 1
ALLT = 1
Type†
Description
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Core
Most recent DAU result is negative.
Most recent DAU result is positive or zero.
Most recent DAU result is equal to zero.
Most recent DAU result is not equal to zero.
Most recent DAU result has overflowed 40 bits.
Most recent DAU result has not overflowed 40 bits.
Most recent DAU result has overflowed 32 bits.
Most recent DAU result has not overflowed 32 bits.
Pseudorandom sequence generator output is set.
Pseudorandom bit is cleared.
Current value in counter c0 is greater than or equal to zero.
Current value in counter c0 is less than zero.
Current value in counter c1 is greater than or equal to zero.
Current value in counter c1 is less than zero.
Always.
Never.
Most recent DAU result is greater than zero.
Core
Most recent DAU result is less than or equal to zero.
Core
Core
Core
Core
JTAG
JTAG
JTAG
CLOCK
MGU
MGU
BIO
BIO
BIO
BIO
A previous result has overflowed 32 bits (sticky flag).
A previous result has not overflowed 32 bits since SLMV last cleared.
Most recent 40-bit BMU result has odd parity.
Most recent 40-bit BMU result has even parity.
jiob output buffer full.
jiob input buffer empty.
JTAG continue.
PLL delay counter has reached zero.
Input message buffer register mgi is empty.
Input message buffer register mgo is full.
Some false, some input bits tested did not compare successfully.
Some true, some input bits tested compared successfully.
All false, no BIO input bits tested compared successfully.
All true, all BIO input bits tested compared successfully.
† All peripheral (off-core) flags are accessible in the alf register.
‡ Each test of c0ge or c0lt causes counter c0 to postincrement. Each test of c1ge or c1lt causes counter c1 to postincrement.
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6 Software Architecture (continued)
As shown in Figure 58, the register-mapped registers
consist of three types:
6.2 Registers
Data registers store data either from the result of
instruction execution or from memory. Data registers
become source operands for instructions. This class of
registers also includes postincrement registers whose
contents are added to address registers to form new
addresses.
DSP16410CG registers fall into one of the following
three categories:
■
■
■
Directly program-accessible (or register-mapped)
registers are directly accessible in instructions and
are designated with lower-case bold, e.g., timer0.
These registers are described in Section 6.2.1.
Memory-mapped registers are accessible at a memory address and are designated with upper-case
bold, e.g., DSTAT. These registers are described in
Section 6.2.2 on page 229.
Pin-accessible registers are accessible only through
the external device pins and are designated with
upper-case bold, i.e., ID. Each JTAG port contains
the pin-accessible identification register, ID,
described in Table 148 on page 239. This register is
accessible via its associated JTAG port.
Note: The program counter (PC) is an addressing register not accessible to the programmer or
through external pins. The core automatically
controls this register to properly sequence the
instructions.
6.2.1 Directly Program-Accessible (RegisterMapped) Registers
Figure 58 on page 226 depicts the directly programaccessible (register-mapped) registers. The figure differentiates core and off-core registers. As the figure
indicates, the pllcon, pllfrq, and plldly registers are
available in CORE0 only.
Note: There is write-to-read latency associated with
the pipelined IDB. The assembler compensates
for this. See the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Information Manual for further
details.
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Control and Status registers are used to determine
the state of the machine or to set different configurations to control the machine.
Address registers are used to hold memory location
pointers. In some cases, the user can treat address
registers as general-purpose data registers accessible
by data move instructions.
Table 135 on page 227 summarizes the registermapped registers. It lists all valid register designators
as they appear in an instruction syntax. For each register, the table specifies its size, whether it is readable
or writable, its type, whether it is signed or unsigned,
and the hardware function block in which it is located. It
also indicates whether the register is in the core or is
off-core. Off-core register-mapped registers cannot be
stored to memory in a single instruction. For example,
the following instruction is not allowed and will generate an error by the assembler:
*r0 = mgi
// NOT ALLOWED
To store the contents of an off-core register to memory,
first store the register to an intermediate register and
then store the intermediate register to memory. See the
example below:
a0h = mgi
*r0 = a0h
// a0h is intermediate reg.
// store mgi to memory
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.1 Directly Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers (continued)
DSP16410B Program-Accessible Registers for Each Core
SYS
XAAU
inc0
inc1
ins
20
DAU
pt0
h
x
pt1
i
y
pi
ptrap
p0
pr
20
p1
alf
32
vbase
cloop
20
cstate
a0
a1
16
YAAU
csave
32
a2
r0
j
r1
k
a3
a4
a5
r2
a6
r3
a7
JTAG
r4
rb0
jiob
r5
rb1
r6
re0
auc0
c0
32
r7
re1
auc1
c1
c2
20
psw0
sp
40
ar0
psw1
20
ar1
MGU
signal
vsw
ar2
16
ar3
DSP16000 CORE
16
pid
mgi
mgo
CLOCKS
16
TIMER0
TIMER1
BIO
pllcon
IMUX
timer0c
timer1c
sbit
pllfrq
imux
timer0
timer1
cbit
plldly
16
16
16
16
16
CORE0 ONLY
CONTROL &
STATUS
ADDRESS
DATA
CORE0
Figure 58. DSP16410CG Program-Accessible Registers for Each Core
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.1 Directly Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers (continued)
Table 135. Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers by Type, Listed Alphabetically
Register Name
a0, a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, a7
a0h, a1h, a2h, a3h,
a4h, a5h, a6h, a7h
a0l, a1l, a2l, a3l,
a4l, a5l, a6l, a7l
a0g, a1g, a2g, a3g,
a4g, a5g, a6g, a7g
a0_1h, a2_3h,
a4_5h, a6_7h
alf
ar0, ar1, ar2, ar3
auc0, auc1
c0, c1
c2
cbit
cloop
csave
cstate
h
i
imux
inc0, inc1
ins
j
jhb
jlb
jiob
Description
Accumulators 0—7
Accumulators 0—7,
high halves (bits 31—16)
Accumulators 0—7,
low halves (bits 15—0)
Accumulators 0—7,
guard bits (bits 39—32)
Accumulator vectors
(concatenated high halves
of two adjacent accumulators)
AWAIT and flags
Auxiliary registers 0—3
Arithmetic unit control
Counters 0 and 1
Counter holding register
BIO control
Cache loop count
Cache save
Cache state
Pointer postincrement
Pointer postincrement
Interrupt multiplex control
Interrupt control 0 and 1
Interrupt status
Pointer postincrement/offset
High byte of j (bits 15—8)
Low byte of j (bits 7—0)
JTAG test
Size R/W†
(Bits)
Type‡
Core/
Function
Signed§/
Block
Unsigned Off-Core
signed
core
DAU
signed
core
DAU
40
16
R/W
R/W
data
data
16
R/W
data
signed
core
DAU
8
R/W
data
signed
core
DAU
32
R/W
data
signed
core
DAU
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
32
16
20
20
16
20
20
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/W
R/C††
R/W
c&s
data
c&s
data
data
control
data
control
control
data
data
control
control
status
data
unsigned
signed
unsigned
signed
signed
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
signed
signed
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
signed
core
core
core
core
core
off-core
core
core
core
core
core
off-core
core
core
core
SYS
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
BIO
SYS
SYS
SYS
XAAU
XAAU
IMUX
SYS
SYS
YAAU
R
R
R/W
data
data
data
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
core
core
off-core
YAAU
YAAU
JTAG
R/W
data
signed
core
YAAU
off-core
off-core
core
core
core
core
core
core
core
off-core
MGU
MGU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
XAAU
MGU
20
8
8
k
Pointer postincrement/offset
32
20
mgi
mgo
p0
p0h
p0l
p1
p1h
p1l
pi
pid
Core-to-core message input
Core-to-core message output
Product 0
High half of p0 (bits 31—16)
Low half of p0 (bits 15—0)
Product 1
High half of p1 (bits 31—16)
Low half of p1 (bits 15—0)
Program interrupt return
Processor identification
16
16
32
16
16
32
16
16
20
16
R
data
unsigned
W
data
unsigned
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W address unsigned
R
c & s unsigned
† R indicates that the register is readable by instructions; W indicates the register is writable by instructions.
‡ c & s means control and status.
§ Signed registers are in two’s complement format.
†† C indicates that the register is cleared and not set.
‡‡ The IEN field (bit 14) of the psw1 register is read only (writes to this bit are ignored).
§§ The VALUE[6:0] field (bits 6—0) are read only (writes to these bits are ignored).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.1 Directly Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers (continued)
Table 135. Program-Accessible (Register-Mapped) Registers by Type, Listed Alphabetically (continued)
Register Name
Description
pllcon
Phase-lock loop control
(CORE0 only)
Phase-lock loop delay control
(CORE0 only)
Phase-lock loop frequency control
(CORE0 only)
Subroutine return
Program status words 0 and 1
Pointers 0 and 1 to X-memory space
Program trap return
Pointers 0—7 to Y-memory space
plldly
pllfrq
pr
psw0, psw1
pt0, pt1
ptrap
r0, r1, r2, r3,
r4, r5, r6, r7
rb0, rb1
re0, re1
sbit
signal
sp
timer0, timer1
timer0c, timer1c
vbase
vsw
x
xh
xl
y
yh
yl
Circular buffer pointers 0 and 1
(begin address)
Circular buffer pointers 0 and 1
(end address)
BIO status/control
Core-to-core signal
Stack pointer
Timer running count 0 and 1
for Timer0 and Timer1
Timer control 0 and 1
for Timer0 and Timer1
Vector base offset
Viterbi support word
Multiplier input
High half of x (bits 31—16)
Low half of x (bits 15—0)
Multiplier input
High half of y (bits 31—16)
Low half of y (bits 15—0)
16
R/W
Core/
Function
Signed§/
Block
Unsigned Off-Core
control unsigned off-core
Clocks
16
R/W
control
unsigned
off-core
Clocks
16
R/W
control
unsigned
off-core
Clocks
20
16
20
20
20
R/W
R/W‡‡
R/W
R/W
R/W
address
c&s
address
address
address
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
core
core
core
core
core
XAAU
DAU
XAAU
XAAU
YAAU
20
R/W address unsigned
core
YAAU
20
R/W address unsigned
core
YAAU
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
off-core
off-core
core
off-core
BIO
MGU
YAAU
Timer
unsigned
off-core
Timer
core
core
core
core
core
core
core
core
XAAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
DAU
Size R/W†
(Bits)
16
16
20
16
Type‡
R/W§§ c & s
W
control
R/W address
R/W
data
16
R/W
control
20
16
32
16
16
32
16
16
R/W address unsigned
R/W control unsigned
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
R/W
data
signed
† R indicates that the register is readable by instructions; W indicates the register is writable by instructions.
‡ c & s means control and status.
§ Signed registers are in two’s complement format.
†† C indicates that the register is cleared and not set.
‡‡ The IEN field (bit 14) of the psw1 register is read only (writes to this bit are ignored).
§§ The VALUE[6:0] field (bits 6—0) are read only (writes to these bits are ignored).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.2 Memory-Mapped Registers
The memory-mapped registers located in their associated peripherals are each mapped to an even address. The
sizes of these registers are 16 bits, 20 bits, or 32 bits. A register that is 20 bits or 32 bits must be accessed as an
aligned double word. A register that is 16 bits can be accessed as a single word with an even address or as an
aligned double word with the same even address. If a register that is 16 bits or 20 bits is accessed as a double
word, the contents of the register are right-justified. Memory-mapped registers have the same internal format as
other registers and are different from memory. Figure 59 illustrates three memory-mapped registers.
ADDRESS
REGISTER
0x42060
CTL0
16 bits
0x42040
SBAS0
20 bits
0x4206C
DSTAT
32 bits
Figure 59. Example Memory-Mapped Registers
Note: Accessing memory-mapped registers with an odd address yields undefined results. The memory-mapped
registers are defined by name and equated to their even memory addresses in the include file that is provided with the LUxWORKS tools, 16410_mmregs.h. To differentiate the memory-mapped registers for SIU0
and SIU1, 16410_mmregs.h appends the suffix _U0 or _U1 to the register name. For example,
16410_mmregs.h defines SCON0_U0 as the address for the SIU0 SCON0 register and FSTAT_U1 as the
address for the SIU1 FSTAT register.
Memory-mapped registers are designated with upper-case bold. For example, the 32-bit DMAU status register
DSTAT is mapped to address 0x4206C. The code segment example below accesses DSTAT:
r0 = 0x4206C
nop
a0 = *r0
// Address of DSTAT.
// Copy the contents of DSTAT to a0.
Alternatively:
#include "16410_mmregs.h"
r0 = DSTAT
// Address of DSTAT (DSTAT defined as 0x4206C in 16410_mmregs.h).
nop
a0 = *r0
// Copy the contents of DSTAT to a0.
After the above code segment executes, the register a0 contains the value stored in DSTAT. The peripherals that
contain memory-mapped registers are listed below:
■
DMAU (See Table 136 on page 230).
■
SEMI (See Table 137 on page 231).
■
PIU (See Table 138 on page 232).
■
SIU0 and SIU1 (See Table 139 on page 232.)
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.2 Memory-Mapped Registers (continued)
Table 136 summarizes the DMAU memory-mapped registers. These registers are described in detail in
Section 4.13.2 on page 67.
Table 136. DMAU Memory-Mapped Registers
Type
DMAU Status
DMAU Master Control 0
DMAU Master Control 1
Channel Control
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Address
Destination Address
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Source Count
Destination Count
Register
Name
DSTAT
DMCON0
DMCON1
CTL0
CTL1
CTL2
CTL3
CTL4
CTL5
SADD0
DADD0
SADD1
DADD1
SADD2
DADD2
SADD3
DADD3
SADD4
DADD4
SADD5
DADD5
SCNT0
DCNT0
SCNT1
DCNT1
SCNT2
DCNT2
SCNT3
DCNT3
SCNT4
DCNT4
SCNT5
DCNT5
Channel
Address
All
All
All
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
SWT0
0x4206C
0x4205C
0x4205E
0x42060
0x42062
0x42064
0x42066
0x42068
0x4206A
0x42000
0x42002
0x42004
0x42006
0x42008
0x4200A
0x4200C
0x4200E
0x42010
0x42012
0x42014
0x42016
0x42020
0x42022
0x42024
0x42026
0x42028
0x4202A
0x4202C
0x4202E
0x42030
0x42032
0x42034
0x42036
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
Size
(Bits)
32
16
R/W
Type
status
control
Signed/
Unsigned
unsigned
unsigned
Reset
Value†
X
0
R
R/W
16
R/W
control
unsigned
X
32
R/W
address
unsigned
X
20
R/W
data
unsigned
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. Any reserved fields within the register are reset to zero.
‡ The reindex registers are in sign-magnitude format.
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6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.2 Memory-Mapped Registers (continued)
Table 136. DMAU Memory-Mapped Registers (continued)
Type
Limit
Source Base
Destination Base
Source Base
Destination Base
Source Base
Destination Base
Source Base
Destination Base
Stride
Reindex
Register
Name
LIM0
LIM1
LIM2
LIM3
LIM4
LIM5
SBAS0
DBAS0
SBAS1
DBAS1
SBAS2
DBAS2
SBAS3
DBAS3
STR0
STR1
STR2
STR3
RI0
RI1
RI2
RI3
Channel
Address
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
MMT4
MMT5
SWT0
0x42050
0x42052
0x42054
0x42056
0x42058
0x4205A
0x42040
0x42042
0x42044
0x42046
0x42048
0x4204A
0x4204C
0x4204E
0x42018
0x4201A
0x4201C
0x4201E
0x42038
0x4203A
0x4203C
0x4203E
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
SWT0
SWT1
SWT2
SWT3
Size
(Bits)
20
R/W
Type
data
Signed/
Unsigned
unsigned
Reset
Value†
X
R/W
20
R/W
address
unsigned
X
16
R/W
data
unsigned
X
20
R/W
data
signed‡
X
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset. Any reserved fields within the register are reset to zero.
‡ The reindex registers are in sign-magnitude format.
Table 137 summarizes the SEMI memory-mapped registers. These registers are described in detail in
Section 4.14.4 on page 109.
Table 137. SEMI Memory-Mapped Registers
Register Name
Address
ECON0
ECON1
EXSEG0
EYSEG0
EXSEG1
EYSEG1
0x40000
0x40002
0x40004
0x40006
0x40008
0x4000A
Description
SEMI Control
SEMI Status and Control
External X Segment Register for CORE0
External Y Segment Register for CORE0
External X Segment Register for CORE1
External Y Segment Register for CORE1
Size
(Bits)
16
16
16
R/W
Type
Reset Value
R/W
R/W†
R/W
Control
Control
Address
0x0FFF
0‡
0
† Some bits in this register are read-only or write-only.
‡ With the following exceptions: ECON1[6,4] are a reflection of the state of external pins and are unaffected by reset, and ECON1[5] is set.
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6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.2 Memory-Mapped Registers (continued)
Table 138 summarizes the PIU memory-mapped registers. These registers are described in detail in
Section 4.15.1 on page 133.
Table 138. PIU Registers
Register Name
Address
Description
PCON
PDI
PDO
PA
DSCRATCH
HSCRATCH
0x41000
0x41008
0x4100A
0x41004
0x41002
0x41006
PIU Control and Status
PIU Data In from Host
PIU Data Out to Host
PIU Address for Host Access to DSP Memory
DSP Scratch
Host Scratch
Size
(Bits)
32
32
32
32
R/W
Type†
Reset Value‡
R/W§
R
R/W
R/W
R/W
R
c&s
data
0x5
X
address
data
0x0
0x0
† c & s means control and status.
‡ For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
§ Some bits of PCON are read-only and some bits are writable by either the host or the DSP, but not both.
Table 139 summarizes the SIU memory-mapped registers. These registers are described in detail in
Section 4.16.15 on page 182.
Table 139. SIU Memory-Mapped Registers
Register
Name
Address
SIU0
SIU1
SCON0 0x43000 0x44000
SCON1 0x43002 0x44002
SCON2 0x43004 0x44004
SCON3 0x43006 0x44006
SCON4 0x43008 0x44008
SCON5 0x4300A 0x4400A
SCON6 0x4300C 0x4400C
SCON7 0x4300E 0x4400E
SCON8 0x43010 0x44010
SCON9 0x43012 0x44012
SCON10 0x43014 0x44014
SCON11 0x43016 0x44016
SCON12 0x43018 0x44018
SIDR
0x4301A 0x4401A
SODR
0x4301C 0x4401C
STAT
0x4301E 0x4401E
FSTAT 0x43020 0x44020
OCIX0
0x43030 0x44030
OCIX1
0x43032 0x44032
ICIX0
0x43040 0x44040
ICIX1
0x43042 0x44042
Description
SIU Input/Output General Control
SIU Input Frame Control
SIU Output Frame Control
SIU Input/Output Subframe Control
SIU Input Even Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Input Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Output Even Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Output Odd Subframe Valid Vector Control
SIU Output Even Subframe Mask Vector Control
SIU Output Odd Subframe Mask Vector Control
SIU Input/Output General Control
SIU Input/Output Active Clock Control
SIU Input/Output Active Frame Sync Control
SIU Input Data
SIU Output Data
SIU Input/Output General Status
SIU Input/Output Frame Status
SIU Output Channel Index for Even Subframes
SIU Output Channel Index for Odd Subframes
SIU Input Channel Index for Even Subframes
SIU Input Channel Index for Odd Subframes
Size
(Bits)†
R/W
Type‡
Reset
Value
16
R/W
control
16
16
16
16
R
data
W
R/W§ c & s
R
status
R/W control
0x0000
0x0400
0x0400
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x8000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
0x0000
16
R/W
0x0000
control
† The SIU memory-mapped register sizes represent bits used. The registers are right-justified and padded to 32 bits (the unused upper bits are zerofilled).
‡ c & s means control and status.
§ All bits of STAT are readable, and some can be written with one to clear them.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings
Tables 140—163 describe the encodings of the directly program-accessible registers.
Table 140. alf (AWAIT Low-Power and Flag) Register
15
14—10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
AWAIT
Reserved
JOBF
JIBE
JCONT
LOCK†
MGIBE
MGOBF
SOMEF
SOMET
ALLF
ALLT
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
15
AWAIT
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
—
0
1
0
1
Core operates normally.
Core enters power-saving standby mode.
Reserved—write with zero.
JTAG jiob output buffer is empty.
JTAG jiob output buffer is full.
JTAG jiob input buffer is full.
JTAG jiob input buffer is empty.
JTAG continue flag.
The PLL delay counter has not reached zero.
The PLL delay counter has reached zero.
Core’s input message buffer register mgi is full.
Core’s input message buffer register mgi is empty (waiting to be written by other
core).
Core’s output message buffer register mgo is empty.
Core’s output message buffer register mgo is full (waiting to be read by other
core).
Either all the tested BIO input pins match the test pattern, none of the BIO input
pins are tested, or all the BIO pins are configured as outputs.
SOME false—some or all tested BIO inputs pins do not match the test pattern.
Either none of the tested BIO input pins match the test pattern, none of the BIO
input pins were tested, or all the BIO pins are configured as outputs.
SOME true—some or all tested BIO input pins match the test pattern.
Some or all of the tested BIO input pins match the test pattern.
ALL false—either no tested BIO input bits match the test pattern, none of the
BIO input pins are tested, or all the BIO pins are configured as outputs.
Not all (some or none) of the tested BIO input bits match the test pattern.
ALL true—either all tested BIO input bits match the test pattern, none of the BIO
input pins inputs are tested, or all the BIO pins are configured as outputs.
R/W
Reset
Value‡
0
R/W
R/W
0
X
R/W
X
R/W
R/W
X
0
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
14—10 Reserved
9
JOBF
8
JIBE
7
6
JCONT
LOCK†
5
MGIBE
4
MGOBF
0
1
3
SOMEF
0
2
SOMET
1
0
1
ALLF
0
ALLT
1
0
1
0
1
† LOCK is cleared on device reset or if the pllcon register is written.
‡ For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 141. auc0 (Arithmetic Unit Control 0) Register
15—14
13—11
10
9
8
7
6
5—4
3—2
1—0
P1SHFT[1:0]
Reserved
FSAT
SHFT15
RAND
X=Y=
YCLR
ACLR[1:0]
ASAT[1:0]
P0SHFT[1:0]
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
15—14
P1SHFT[1:0]
Reserved
FSAT
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
9
SHFT15
0
1
R/W
0
8
RAND
R/W
0
7
X=Y=
0
1
0
1
R/W
0
6
YCLR
R/W
0
5
ACLR[1]
R/W
0
4
ACLR[0]
R/W
0
3
ASAT[1]
R/W
0
2
ASAT[0]
R/W
0
1—0
P0SHFT[1:0]
p1 not shifted.
p1>>2.
p1<<2.
p1<<1.
Reserved—write with zero.
Disabled when zero.
Enable 32-bit saturation for the following results: the scaled outputs of the p0 and p1 registers, the intermediate result of the
3-input ADDER†, and the results of the ALU/ACS, ADDER/ACS,
and BMU.
p1>>15 in F1E operations performs normally.
To support GSM-EFR, p1>>15 in F1E operations actually performs (p1>>16)<<1 clearing the least significant bit.
Enable pseudorandom sequence generator (PSG).‡
Reset and disable pseudorandom sequence generator (PSG).
Normal operation.
Data transfer statements that load the y register also load the x
register with the same value.§
The DAU clears yl if it loads yh.
The DAU leaves yl unchanged if it loads yh.
The DAU clears a1l if it loads a1h.
The DAU leaves a1l unchanged if it loads a1h.
The DAU clears a0l if it loads a0h.
The DAU leaves a0l unchanged if it loads a0h.
Enable a1 saturation†† on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a1 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
Enable a0 saturation†† on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a0 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
p0 not shifted.
p0>>2.
p0<<2.
p0<<1.
R/W
13—11
10
00
01
10
11
0
0
1
Reset
Value
00
R/W
00
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
00
01
10
11
†
‡
§
Saturation takes effect only if the ADDER has three input operands and there is no ALU/ACS operation in the same instruction.
After re-enabling the PSG by clearing RAND, the program must wait one instruction cycle before testing the heads or tails condition.
The following apply:
! Instructions that explicitly load any part of the x register (i.e., x, xh, or xl) take precedence over the X=Y= mode.
! Instructions that load yh (but not x or xh) load xh with the same data. If YCLR is zero, the DAU clears yl and xl.
! Instructions that load yl load xl with the same data and leave yh and xh unchanged.
†† If enabled, 32-bit saturation of the accumulator value occurs if the DAU stores the value to memory or to a register. Saturation also applies if the DAU
stores the low half, high half, or guard bits of the accumulator. There is no change to the contents stored in the accumulator; only the value stored to
memory or a register is saturated.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 142. auc1 (Arithmetic Unit Control 1) Register
15
14—12
11—6
5—0
Reserved
XYFBK[2:0]
ACLR[7:2]
ASAT[7:2]
Bit
Field
Value
15
14—12
Reserved
XYFBK[2:0]†
0
000
001
010
011
100
101
110
111
11
ACLR[7]
10
ACLR[6]
9
ACLR[5]
8
ACLR[4]
7
ACLR[3]
6
ACLR[2]
5
ASAT[7]
4
ASAT[6]
3
ASAT[5]
2
ASAT[4]
1
ASAT[3]
0
ASAT[2]
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Normal operation.
Any DAU function result stored into a6[31:0] is also stored into x.‡
Any DAU function result stored into a6[31:16] is also stored into xh.‡
Any DAU function result stored into a6[31:16] is also stored into xh, and any
DAU function result stored into a7[31:16] is also stored into xl.‡
Reserved.
Any DAU function result stored into a6[31:0] is also stored into y.§
Any DAU function result stored into a6[31:16] is also stored into yh.§ ††
Any DAU function result stored into a6[31:16] is also stored into yh, and any
DAU function result stored into a7[31:16] is also stored into yl.§ ‡‡
The DAU clears a7l if it loads a7h.
The DAU leaves a7l unchanged if it loads a7h.
The DAU clears a6l if it loads a6h.
The DAU leaves a6l unchanged if it loads a6h.
The DAU clears a5l if it loads a5h.
The DAU leaves a5l unchanged if it loads a5h.
The DAU clears a4l if it loads a4h.
The DAU leaves a4l unchanged if it loads a4h.
The DAU clears a3l if it loads a3h.
The DAU leaves a3l unchanged if it loads a3h.
The DAU clears a2l if it loads a2h.
The DAU leaves a2l unchanged if it loads a2h.
Enable a7 saturation§§ on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a7 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
Enable a6 saturation§§ on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a6 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
Enable a5 saturation§§ on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a5 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
Enable a4 saturation§§ on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a4 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
Enable a3 saturation§§ on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a3 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
Enable a2 saturation§§ on 32-bit overflow.
Disable a2 saturation on 32-bit overflow.
R/W Reset Value
R/W
R/W
0
000
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
If the application enables any of the XYFBK modes, i.e., XYFBK[2:0] ≠ 000, the following apply:
Only if the DAU writes its result to a6 or a7 (e.g., a6 = a3+p0) will the result be written to x or y. Data transfers or data move operations (e.g.,
a6 = *r2) leave the x or y register unchanged regardless of the state of the XYFBK[2:0] field setting.
! If the instruction itself loads the same portion of the x or y register that the XYFBK[2:0] field specifies, the instruction load takes precedence.
‡ If the application enables the X=Y= mode (auc0[7] = 1), the XYFBK mode takes precedence.
§ If the application enables the X=Y= mode (auc0[7] = 1), the DAU also writes the y register value into the x, xh, or xl register, as appropriate.
†† If the application enables the YCLR mode (auc0[6] = 0), the DAU clears yl.
‡‡ If the application enables the YCLR mode (auc0[6] = 0) and the instruction contains a result written to a6 and the operation writes no result to a7, the
DAU clears yl. If the application enables the YCLR mode and the instruction writes a result to a7, the XYFBK mode takes precedence and the DAU
does not clear yl.
§§ If saturation is enabled and any portion of an accumulator is stored to memory or a register, the DAU saturates the entire accumulator value and
stores the appropriate portion. The DAU does not change the contents of the accumulator.
†
!
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 143. cbit (BIO Control) Register
15
14—8
7
6—0
Reserved
MODE[6:0]/MASK[6:0]
Reserved
DATA[6:0]/PAT[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
14—8
Reserved
MODE[6:0]
(outputs†)
0
0
1
Description
R/W
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
The BIO drives the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin to the correR/W
sponding value in DATA[6:0].
■ If the corresponding DATA[6:0] field is 0, the BIO does not change the state
of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
If the corresponding DATA[6:0] field is 1, the BIO toggles (inverts) the state
of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
The BIO does not test the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin
to determine the state of the BIO flags‡.
The BIO compares the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin to
the corresponding value in the PAT[6:0] field to determine the state of the BIO
flags‡; true if pin matches or false if pin doesn’t match.
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
■ If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 0, the BIO drives the corresponding R/W
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin to logic 0.
Reset
Value
0
0
■
MASK[6:0]
(inputs†)
0
1
7
6—0
Reserved
DATA[6:0]
(outputs†)
0
0
■
1
■
0
0
If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 1, the BIO does not change the
state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 0, the BIO drives the corresponding
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin to logic 1.
If the corresponding MODE[6:0] field is 1, the BIO toggles (inverts) the
state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
If the corresponding MASK[6:0] field is 1, the BIO tests the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin to determine the state of the BIO flags‡;
true if pin is logic 0 or false if pin is logic 1.
If the corresponding MASK[6:0] field is 1, the BIO tests the state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] input pin to determine the state of the BIO flags‡;
true if pin is logic 1 or false if pin is logic 0.
■
PAT[6:0]
(inputs†)
0
1
† An IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is configured as an output if the corresponding DIREC[6:0] field (sbit[14:8]) has been set by the user software. An
IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is configured as an input if the corresponding DIREC[6:0] field has been cleared by the user software or by device reset.
‡ The BIO flags are ALLT, ALLF, SOMET, and SOMEF. See Table 19 on page 52 for details on BIO flags.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 144. cloop (Cache Loop) Register
15—0
Cache Loop Count
Bit
Field
Description
15—0 Cache Loop Count Contains the count for the number of loop iterations for a do K, redo K, do
cloop, or redo cloop instruction. The core decrements cloop after every
loop iteration and cloop contains zero after the loop has completed.
R/W Reset Value
R/W
0
Table 145. csave (Cache Save) Register
31—0
Cache Save
Bit
31—0
Field
Cache Save
Description
R/W Reset Value†
Contains the opcode of the instruction following a do K, redo K, do cloop, or R/W
X
redo cloop instruction.
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
Table 146. cstate (Cache State) Register
15
14
13
12—10
9—5
4—0
SU
EX
LD
Reserved
PTR[4:0]
N[4:0]
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
15
SU
0
The cache is not suspended—the core is not executing an interrupt or trap
service routine that has interrupted or trapped a cache loop.
The cache is suspended—the core is executing an interrupt or trap service
routine that has interrupted or trapped a cache loop.
The core is not executing from cache—it is either loading the cache (executing iteration 1 of a cache loop) or it is not executing a cache loop.
The core is executing from cache—it is executing iteration 2 or higher of a
cache loop.
The core is not loading the cache—it is either not executing a cache loop or
it is executing iteration 2 or higher of a cache loop.
The core is loading the cache—it is executing iteration 1 of a cache loop.
Reserved—write with zero.
Pointer to current instruction in cache to load or execute.
Number of instructions in the cache loop to load/save/restore.
R/W
Reset
Value
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
R/W
R/W
0
0
0
1
14
EX
0
1
13
LD
0
12—10
9—5
4—0
Reserved
PTR[4:0]
N[4:0]†
1
0
0—30
0—31
† After execution of the first do K or do cloop instruction, N[4:0] contains a nonzero value.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 147. imux (Interrupt Multiplex Control) Register
15—14
13—12
11—10
9—8
XIOC[1:0]†
Reserved
IMUX9[1:0]
IMUX8[1:0]
Bit
Field
15—14
XIOC[1:0]†
Controls
Multiplexed
Interrupt
XIO
13—12
11—10
Reserved
IMUX9[1:0]
—
MXI9
9—8
IMUX8[1:0]
MXI8
7
IMUX7
MXI7
6
IMUX6
MXI6
5
IMUX5
MXI5
4
IMUX4
MXI4
3
IMUX3
MXI3
2
IMUX2
MXI2
1
IMUX1
MXI1
0
IMUX0
MXI0
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
IMUX7 IMUX6 IMUX5 IMUX4 IMUX3 IMUX2 IMUX1 IMUX0
Value
Interrupt
Selected
Description
R/W Reset
Value
00
01
10
11
0
00
01
10
11
00
01
10
11
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0 (logic low)
DMINT4
DMINT5
Reserved
—
INT3
POBE
PIBF
Reserved
INT2
POBE
PIBF
Reserved
SIINT1
DDINT2
SOINT1
DSINT2
SIINT0
DDINT0
SOINT0
DSINT0
DDINT2
DDINT3
DSINT2
DSINT3
DDINT0
DDINT1
DSINT0
DSINT1
—
DMAU interrupt for MMT4.
DMAU interrupt for MMT5.
Reserved.
Reserved—write with zero.
Pin.
PIU output buffer empty.
PIU input buffer full.
Reserved.
Pin.
PIU output buffer empty.
PIU input buffer full.
Reserved.
SIU1 input interrupt.
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
SIU1 output interrupt.
DMAU source interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
SIU0 input interrupt.
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
SIU0 output interrupt.
DMAU source interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT3 (SIU1).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT2 (SIU1).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT3 (SIU1).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
DMAU destination interrupt for SWT1 (SIU0).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT0 (SIU0).
DMAU source interrupt for SWT1 (SIU0).
R/W
00
R/W
R/W
0
00
R/W
00
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
† The XIOC[1:0] field controls the XIO interrupt for the other core.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Each JTAG port has a read-only identification register, ID, as defined in Table 148. As specified in the table, the
contents of the ID register for JTAG0 are 0x4C81403B and the contents of the ID register for JTAG1 are
0x5C81403B.
Table 148. ID (JTAG Identification) Registers
31—28
27—19
18—12
11—0
DEVICE OPTIONS
ROMCODE
PART ID
AGERE ID
Bit
31—28
Field
DEVICE OPTIONS
27—19
18—12
11—0
ROMCODE
PART ID
AGERE ID
Value
0x4
0x5
0x190
0x14
0x03B
Description
JTAG0—device options.
JTAG1—device options.
ROMCODE of device.
Part ID—DSP16410CG.
Agere identification.
R/W
R
Reset Value
0x4
0x5
0x190
0x14
0x03B
Table 149. inc0 and inc1 (Interrupt Control) Registers 0 and 1
19—18
17—16
15—14
13—12
11—10
9—8
7—6
5—4
3—2
1—0
inc0 INT1[1:0] INT0[1:0] DMINT5[1:0] DMINT4[1:0] MXI3[1:0] MXI2[1:0] MXI1[1:0] MXI0[1:0] TIME1[1:0] TIME0[1:0]
inc1 MXI9[1:0] MXI8[1:0] MXI7[1:0]
MXI6[1:0] MXI5[1:0] MXI4[1:0] PHINT[1:0] XIO[1:0] SIGINT[1:0] MGIBF[1:0]
Field
INT〈0—1〉[1:0]
DMINT〈4—5〉[1:0]
MXI〈0—9〉[1:0]†
TIME〈0—1〉[1:0]
PHINT[1:0]
XIO[1:0]
SIGINT[1:0]
MGIBF[1:0]
Value
Description
00
Disable the selected interrupt (no priority).
01
Enable the selected interrupt at priority 1 (lowest).
10
Enable the selected interrupt at priority 2.
11
Enable the selected interrupt at priority 3 (highest).
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
00
† See Table 5 on page 28 for definition of MXI〈0—9〉 (IMUX〈0—9〉).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 150. ins (Interrupt Status) Register
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
MXI9
MXI8
MXI7
MXI6
MXI5
MXI4
PHINT
XIO
SIGINT
MGIBF
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
INT1
INT0
DMINT5
DMINT4
MXI3
MXI2
MXI1
MXI0
TIME1
TIME0
R/W
Reset
Value
0
Field
MXI〈0—9〉†
PHINT
XIO
SIGINT
MGIBF
INT〈0—1〉
DMINT〈4—5〉
TIME〈0—1〉
Value
Description
0
Read—corresponding interrupt not pending.
Write—no effect.
1
Read—corresponding interrupt is pending.
Write—clears bit and changes corresponding interrupt status to not
pending.
R/Clear
† See Table 5 on page 28 for definition of MXI〈0—9〉 (IMUX〈0—9〉).
Table 151. mgi (Core-to-Core Message Input) Register
15—0
Message Input
Bit
15—0
Field
Message Input
Description
Full-duplex message buffer that holds the input data word.
R/W Reset Value
R
0
Table 152. mgo (Core-to-Core Message Output) Register
15—0
Message Output
Bit
15—0
Field
Message Output
Description
Full-duplex message buffer that holds the output data word.
R/W Reset Value
W
0
Table 153. pid (Processor Identification) Register
15—0
PID
Bit
15—0
240
Field
PID
Value
0x0000
CORE0
0x0001
CORE1
Description
Processor identification to allow the software to distinguish whether it is running on CORE0 or CORE1.
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R/W
R
Reset Value
0x0000
CORE0
0x0001
CORE1
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 154. pllcon (Phase-Lock Loop Control) Register
Note: pllcon is accessible in CORE0 only.
15—2
1
0
Reserved
PLLEN
PLLSEL
Bit
15—2
1
Field
Reserved
PLLEN
0
PLLSEL
Value
—
0
1
0
1
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Disable (power down) the PLL.
Enable (power up) the PLL.
Select the CKI input as the internal clock (CLK) source.
Select the PLL as the internal clock (CLK) source.
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0
0
R/W
0
Table 155. pllfrq (Phase-Lock Loop Frequency Control) Register
Note: pllfrq is accessible in CORE0 only.
15—14
13—9
8—0
OD[1:0]
D[4:0]
M[8:0]
Bit
15—14
Field
OD[1:0]
13—9
8—0
D[4:0]
M[8:0]
Value
00
01
10
11
0—31
0—511
Description
f(OD) = 2. Divide VCO output by 2.
f(OD) = 4. Divide VCO output by 4.
f(OD) = 4. Divide VCO output by 4.
f(OD) = 8. Divide VCO output by 8.
Divide fCKI by this value plus two (D + 2).
Multiply fCKI by this value plus two (M + 2).
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
00
R/W
R/W
00000
000000000
R/W
R/W
Reset Value
0x1388
Table 156. plldly (Phase-Lock Loop Delay Control) Register
Note: plldly is accessible in CORE0 only.
15—0
DLY[15:0]
Bit
15—0
15—0
DLY[15:0]
Value
—
Description
The contents of DLY[15:0] are loaded into the PLL delay
counter after a pllcon register write. If PLLEN
(pllcon[1]) is 1, the counter decrements each CKI cycle.
When the counter reaches zero, the LOCK flag† for both
CORE0 and CORE1 is asserted.
† The state of the LOCK flag can be tested by conditional instructions (Section 6.1.1) and is also visible in the alf register (Table 140 on page 233). The
LOCK flag is cleared by a device reset or a write to the pllcon register.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 157. psw0 (Processor Status Word 0) Register
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8—5
4
3—0
LMI
LEQ
LLV
LMV
SLLV
SLMV
a1V
a1[35:32]
a0V
a0[35:32]
Bit
Field
Value
15
LMI
14
LEQ
13
LLV
12
LMV
11
SLLV
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
10
SLMV
0
1
9
a1V
0
1
8—5
a1[35:32]
—
4
a0V
0
1
3—0
a0[35:32]
—
Description
R/W
Most recent DAU result‡ is not negative.
Most recent DAU result§ is negative (minus).
Most recent DAU result§ is not zero.
Most recent DAU result§ is zero (equal).
Most recent DAU operation§ did not result in logical overflow.
Most recent DAU operation§ resulted in logical overflow.††
Most recent DAU operation did not result in mathematical overflow.
Most recent DAU operation§ resulted in mathematical overflow.‡‡
Previous DAU operation did not result in logical overflow.
Sticky version of LLV that remains active once set by a DAU operation until
explicitly cleared by a write to psw0.
Previous DAU operation did not result in mathematical overflow.
Sticky version of LMV that remains active once set by a DAU operation until
explicitly cleared by a write to psw0.
The current contents of a1 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a1 are mathematically overflowed.§§
Reflects the four lower guard bits of a1.†††
The current contents of a0 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a0 are mathematically overflowed.§§
Reflects the four lower guard bits of a0.†††
R/W
Reset
Value †
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
X
R/W
XXXX
R/W
X
R/W
XXXX
† In this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ ALU/ACS result or operation if the instruction uses the ALU/ACS; otherwise, ADDER or BMU result, whichever applies.
§ ALU/ACS result if the DAU operation uses the ALU/ACS; otherwise, ADDER or BMU result, whichever applies.
†† The ALU or ADDER cannot represent the result in 40 bits or the BMU control operand is out of range.
‡‡ The ALU/ACS, ADDER, or BMU cannot represent the result in 32 bits. For the BMU, other conditions can also cause mathematical overflow.
§§ The most recent DAU result that was written to that accumulator resulted in mathematical overflow (LMV) with FSAT = 0.
††† Required for compatibility with DSP16XX family.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 158. psw1 (Processor Status Word 1) Register
15
14
13—12
11—10
9—7
6
5—0
Reserved
IEN
IPLC[1:0]
IPLP[1:0]
Reserved
EPAR
a[7:2]V
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
Reset
Value†
15
14
Reserved
IEN‡
0
0
IPLC[1:0]
Reserved—write with zero.
Hardware interrupts are globally disabled.
Hardware interrupts are globally enabled.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 0; core handles pending interrupts of
priority 1, 2, or 3.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 1; core handles pending interrupts of
priority 2 or 3.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 2; core handles pending interrupts of
priority 3 only.
Current hardware interrupt priority level is 3; core does not handle any pending
interrupts.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 0.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 1.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 2.
Previous hardware interrupt priority level§ was 3.
Reserved—write with zero.
Most recent BMU or special function shift result has odd parity.
Most recent BMU or special function shift result has even parity.
The current contents of a7 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a7 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a6 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a6 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a5 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a5 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a4 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a4 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a3 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a3 are mathematically overflowed.††
The current contents of a2 are not mathematically overflowed.
The current contents of a2 are mathematically overflowed.††
R/W
R
13—12
0
0
1
00
R/W
00
R/W
XX
R/W
R/W
X
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
R/W
X
01
10
11
11—10
IPLP[1:0]
9—7
6
Reserved
EPAR
5
a7V
4
a6V
3
a5V
2
a4V
1
a3V
0
a2V
00
01
10
11
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
1
†
‡
In this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
The user clears this bit by executing a di instruction and sets it by executing an ei or ireturn instruction. The core clears this bit whenever it begins to
service an interrupt.
§ Previous interrupt priority level is the priority level of the interrupt most recently serviced prior to the current interrupt. This field is used for interrupt
nesting.
†† The most recent DAU result that was written to that accumulator resulted in mathematical overflow (LMV) with FSAT = 0.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 159. sbit (BIO Status/Control) Register
\
15
14—8
7
6—0
Reserved
DIREC[6:0]
Reserved
VALUE[6:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15
14—8
Reserved
DIREC[6:0]
(Controls direction of pins)
Reserved
VALUE[6:0]‡
(Current value of
pins)
X
0
Configure the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin as an input.
1
Configure the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin as an output.
X
0
The current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is logic 0.
1
The current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is logic 1.
7
6—0
Description
R/W
Reset
Value†
R/W
0
R/W
0
Reserved—writing to this field has no functional effect.
Reserved—value is read-only and is undefined.
R
R
0
P§
† For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
‡ This field is read-only; writing the VALUE[6:0] field of sbit has no effect. If the user software toggles a bit in the DIREC[6:0] field, there is a latency of
one cycle until the VALUE[6:0] field reflects the current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin. If an IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pin is configured as an output (DIREC[6:0] = 1) and the user software writes cbit to change the state of the pin, there is a latency of two cycles until the VALUE[6:0] field reflects
the current state of the corresponding IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] output pin.
§ The IO〈0,1〉BIT[6:0] pins are configured as inputs after reset. If external circuitry does not drive an IO〈0,1〉BIT[n] pin, the VALUE[n] field is undefined
after reset.
Table 160. signal (Core-to-Core Signal) Register
Bit
Field
Value
15—11
1
Reserved
SIGTRAP
0
SIGINT
0
0
1
0
1
15—11
1
0
Reserved
SIGTRAP
SIGINT
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
No effect.
Trap the other core by asserting its PTRAP signal.
No effect.
Interrupt the other core by asserting its SIGINT interrupt.
R/W
W
W
Reset
Value
0
0
W
0
Note: If the program sets the SIGTRAP or SIGINT field, the MGU automatically clears the field after asserting the trap or interrupt. Therefore, the program must not explicitly clear the field.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 161. timer0c and timer1c (TIMER〈0,1〉 Control) Registers
15—7
6
5
4
3—0
Reserved
PWR_DWN
RELOAD
COUNT
PRESCALE[3:0]
Bit
Field
Value
15—7
6
Reserved
PWR_DWN
5
RELOAD
0
0
1
0
1
4
COUNT
3—0
PRESCALE[3:0]
0
1
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
1010
1011
1100
1101
1110
1111
Description
Reserved—write with zero.
Power up the timer.
Power down the timer†.
Stop decrementing the down counter after it reaches zero.
Automatically reload the down counter from the period register after
the counter reaches zero and continue decrementing the counter
indefinitely.
Hold the down counter at its current value, i.e., stop the timer.
Decrement the down counter, i.e., run the timer.
fCLK/2
Controls the counter prescaler to determine the frequency of the timer, i.e., the frequency of the clock
fCLK/4
applied to the timer down counter. This frequency is a
fCLK/8
ratio of the internal clock frequency fCLK.
fCLK/16
fCLK/32
fCLK/64
fCLK/128
fCLK/256
fCLK/512
fCLK/1024
fCLK/2048
fCLK/4096
fCLK/8192
fCLK/16384
fCLK/32768
fCLK/65536
R/W
R/W
R/W
Reset
Value
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0000
† If TIMER〈0,1〉 is powered down, timer〈0,1〉 cannot be read or written. While the timer is powered down, the state of the down counter and period register remain unchanged.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.3 Register Encodings (continued)
Table 162. timer0 and timer1 (TIMER〈0,1〉 Running Count) Registers
15—0
TIMER〈0,1〉 Down Counter
TIMER〈0,1〉 Period Register
Bit
Field†
Description
R/W‡ Reset
Value§
15—0
Down Counter
If the COUNT field (timer〈0,1〉c[4]) is set, TIMER〈0,1〉 decrements this portion
of the timer〈0,1〉 register every prescale period. When the down counter
reaches zero, TIMER〈0,1〉 generates an interrupt.
15—0
Period Register If the COUNT field (timer〈0,1〉c[4]) and the RELOAD field (timer〈0,1〉c[5]) are
R/W
0
W
X
both set and the down counter contains zero, TIMER〈0,1〉 reloads the down
counter with the contents of this portion of the timer〈0,1〉 register.
† If the user program writes to the timer〈0,1〉 register, TIMER〈0,1〉 loads the 16-bit write value into the down counter and into the period register
simultaneously. If the user program reads the timer〈0,1〉 register, TIMER〈0,1〉 returns the current 16-bit value from the down counter.
‡ To read or write the timer〈0,1〉 register, TIMER〈0,1〉 must be powered up, i.e., the PWR_DWN field (timer〈0,1〉c[6]) must be cleared.
§ For this column, X indicates unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on subsequent reset.
Table 163. vsw (Viterbi Support Word) Register
15—6
5
4
3
Reserved
VEN
MAX
TB2
2
1
0
Reserved CFLAG1 CFLAG0
Bit
Field
Value
Description
R/W
15—6
5
Reserved
VEN
MAX
Reserved—write with zero.
Disables Viterbi side effects.
Enables Viterbi side effects.
The cmp0( ), cmp1( ), and cmp2( ) functions select the minimum value
from the input operands.
The cmp0( ), cmp1( ), and cmp2( ) functions select the maximum
value from the input operands.
For the single-ACS (40-bit) cmp1( ) function, the traceback encoder
stuffs one traceback bit into ar0. For the single-ACS (40-bit) cmp0( )
function, the traceback encoder stuffs one old traceback bit from ar0
into ar1. For the dual-ACS (16-bit) cmp1( ) function, the traceback
encoder stuffs CFLAG into ar0 and ar2.
For the single-ACS (40-bit) cmp1( ) function, the traceback encoder
stuffs two traceback bits into ar0. For the single-ACS (40-bit) cmp0( )
function, the traceback encoder stuffs two old traceback bits from ar0
into ar1.
Reserved—write with zero.
R/W
R/W
4
0
0
1
0
Reset
Value
0
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
R/W
0
1
3
2
1
0
TB2
0
(GSM/IS95compatible
mode)
1
(IS54/IS136compatible
mode)
Reserved
0
CFLAG1
—
CFLAG0
—
Previous value of CFLAG0. The traceback encoder copies the value of
CFLAG0 to CFLAG1 if the DAU executes a cmp2( ) function and
VEN=1.
Previous value of CFLAG†. The traceback encoder copies the value of
CFLAG to CFLAG0 if the DAU executes a cmp2( ) function and
VEN=1.
† For the cmp2(aSE, aDE) function, CFLAG = 0 if MAX = 0 and aSE ≥ aDE or if MAX = 1 and aSE < aDE, and CFLAG= 1 if MAX = 0 and aSE < aDE or if
MAX = 1 and aSE ≥ aDE.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.4 Reset States
Pin reset occurs if a high-to-low transition is applied to the RSTN pin. Tables 164 through 168 show how reset
affects the core and off-core registers. The following bit codes apply:
■
Bit code • indicates that this bit is unknown on powerup reset and unaffected on a subsequent pin reset.
■
Bit code P indicates the value on the corresponding input pin.
Table 164. Core Register States After Reset—40-Bit Registers
Register
a0
a1
a2
a3
a4
a5
a6
a7
Bits 39—0
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
Table 165. Core Register States After Reset—32-Bit Registers
Register
csave
p0
p1
x
y
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Bits 31—0
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.4 Reset States (continued)
Table 166. Core Register States After Reset—20-Bit Registers
Register
h
Bits 19—0
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
XXXX
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
i
inc0
inc1
ins
j
k
PC†
pi
pr
pt0
pt1
ptrap
r0
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
Register
r1
r2
r3
r4
r5
r6
r7
rb0
rb1
re0
re1
sp
vbase
Bits 19—0
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
0010
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
0001
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
0100
† PC resets to 0x20000 (first address of IROM) if the EXM pin is 0 at the time of reset. It resets to 0x80000 (first address of
EROM) if the EXM pin is 1 at the time of reset.
Table 167. Core Register States After Reset—16-Bit Registers
Register
alf
ar0
ar1
ar2
ar3
auc0
auc1
c0
Bits 15—0
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
00••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
Register
c1
c2
cloop
cstate
psw0
psw1
vsw
Bits 15—0
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
0000
00••
••••
0000
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
••••
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
Table 168. Off-Core (Peripheral) Register Reset Values
Register
cbit
imux
mgi
mgo
pid (CORE0)
pid (CORE1)
pllcon
jiob†
Bits 15—0
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
Register
Bits 15—0
pllfrq
•••• •••• ••••
0000 0000 0000
plldly
0000 0000 0000
0001 0011 1000
sbit
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0PPP
signal
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
timer〈0—1〉
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
timer〈0—1〉c
0000 0000 0001
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
•••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• •••• ••••
0000
1000
PPPP
0000
0000
0000
† The jiob register is the only peripheral register that is 32 bits; therefore, the bit pattern shown is for bits 31—0.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.4 Reset States (continued)
Table 169. Memory-Mapped Register Reset Values—32-Bit Registers
Register
DADD〈0—5〉
DSCRATCH
DSTAT
HSCRATCH
PA
PCON
PDI
PDO
SADD〈0—5〉
0000
0000
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0•••
0000
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0•••
Bits 31—0
•••• •••• ••••
0000 0000 0000
•••• •••• ••••
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
0000 0000 0000
•••• •••• ••••
••••
0000
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
••••
0000
••••
0000
0000
0101
0000
0000
••••
Table 170. Memory-Mapped Register Reset Values—20-Bit Registers
Register
DBAS〈0—3〉
DCNT〈0—5〉
LIM〈0—5〉
RI〈0—3〉
SBAS〈0—3〉
SCNT〈0—5〉
Bits 19—0
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
••••
Table 171. Memory-Mapped Register Reset Values—16-Bit Registers
Register
CTL〈0—3〉
CTL〈4—5〉
DMCON〈0—1〉
ECON0
ECON1
EXSEG〈0—1〉
EYSEG〈0—1〉
FSTAT
ICIX〈0—1〉
OCIX〈0—1〉
SCON0
SCON〈1—2〉
SCON〈3—11〉
SCON12
SIDR
SODR
STAT
STR〈0—3〉
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0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
1000
0000
0000
0000
00••
Bits 15—0
0000 00••
0000 00••
0000 0000
1111 1111
0000 0P1P
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0100 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
0000 0000
•••• ••••
••••
•••0
0000
1111
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
••••
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
6 Software Architecture (continued)
6.2 Registers (continued)
6.2.5 RB Field Encoding
Table 172 describes the encoding of the RB field. This information supplements the instruction set encoding information in the DSP16000 Digital Signal Processor Core Instruction Set Reference Manual.
Table 172. RB Field
RB†
000000
000001
000010
000011
000100
000101
000110
000111
001000
001001
001010
001011
001100
001101
001110
001111
Register
a0g
a1g
a2g
a3g
a4g
a5g
a6g
a7g
a0_1h
inc1
a2_3h
inc0
a4_5h
pi
a6_7h
psw1
RB†
010000
010001
010010
010011
010100
010101
010110
010111
011000
011001
011010
011011
011100
011101
011110
011111
Register
Reserved
cloop
cstate
csave
auc1
ptrap
vsw
Reserved
ar0
ar1
ar2
ar3
vbase
ins
Reserved
Reserved
RB†
100000
100001
100010
100011
100100
100101
100110
100111
101000
101001
101010
101011
101100
101101
101110
101111
Register
Reserved
Reserved
plldly
pllfrq
signal
cbit
sbit
timer0c
timer0
timer1c
timer1
mgo
mgi
imux
pid
pllcon
RB†
110000
110001
110010
110011
110100
110101
110110
110111
111000
111001
111010
111011
111100
111101
111110
111111
Register
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
Reserved
jiob
† RB field specifies one of a secondary set of registers as the destination of a data move. Codes 000000 through 011111 correspond to core registers
and codes 100000 through 111111 correspond to off-core (peripheral) registers.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
7 208-Ball PBGA Package Ball Assignments
Figure 60 illustrates the ball assignment for the 208-ball PBGA package. This view is from the top of the package.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
A
VDD2
ED5
ED7
ED9
ED11
ED15
ED17
VSS
VDD1
ED26
ED30
ERWN1
VSS
EION
EA1
VDD2
A
B
ED3
VDD1
ED6
ED8
VSS
ED14
ED16
ED20
ED25
ED27
ED31
EROMN
ERAMN
EA0
VDD1
EA3
B
C
ED2
ED1
ED4
ED10
ED12
VDD1
ED18
ED21
ED24
VDD2
ED29
ERWN0
VDD2
EA2
EA4
EA5
C
D
VSS
ED0
VDD2
VDD1
ED13
VDD2
ED19
ED22
ED23
VSS
ED28
EACKN
VDD1
EA8
EA7
EA6
D
E
EREQN
ERDY
ESIZE
EXM
EA11
EA10
VSS
EA9
E
F
TDO0
ERTYPE
TRST0N
TCK0
VDD2
VDD1
EA12
EA13
F
G
TDI0
TMS0
VDD2
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
EA17
EA16
EA14
EA15
G
H
VDD1A
CKI
VSS1A
RSTN
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
ESEG1
ESEG0
EA18
VSS
H
J
VSS
INT2
INT3
TRAP
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
ESEG2
ESEG3
VDD1
ECKO
J
K
SICK0
SIFS0
INT0
INT1
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
VSS
VDD2
TMS1
TDI1
K
L
SOCK0
SOFS0
VDD1
VDD2
TCK1
TRST1N
SOD1
TDO1
L
M
SOD0
VSS
SID0
SCK0
SID1
SCK1
SOCK1
SOFS1
M
N
IO0BIT5 IO0BIT4
IO0BIT6
VDD1
PD10
PD6
VSS
PD1
PD0
PRDY
VDD2
PCSN
VDD1
VDD2
SIFS1
VSS
N
P
IO0BIT3 IO0BIT2
IO0BIT0
VDD2
PD11
PD7
VDD2
PD2
POBE
PINT
VDD1
PADD3
PADD1
IO1BIT2
IO1BIT0
SICK1
P
R
IO0BIT1
VDD1
EYMODE
PD14
PD13
PD9
PD5
VDD1
PIBF
PODS
PRWN
VSS
PADD0
IO1BIT4
VDD1
IO1BIT1
R
T
VDD2
VSS
PD15
VSS
PD12
PD8
PD4
PD3
VSS
PRDYMD
PIDS
PADD2
IO1BIT6
IO1BIT5
IO1BIT3
VDD2
T
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
Figure 60. 208-Ball PBGA Package Ball Grid Array Assignments (See-Through Top View)
Agere Systems Inc.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
7 208-Ball PBGA Package Ball Assignments (continued)
Table 173 describes the PBGA ball assignments sorted by symbol for the 208-ball package. For each signal or
power/ground connection, this table lists the PBGA coordinate, the symbol name, the type (I = input, O = output,
I/O = input/output, O/Z = 3-state output, P = power, G = ground), and description. Inputs and bidirectional pins do
not maintain full CMOS levels when not driven. They must be pulled to VDD2 or VSS through the appropriate pull
up/down resistor (refer to Section 10.1 on page 267). Unused external SEMI data bus pins (ED[31:0]) can be statically configured as outputs by asserting the EYMODE pin. At full CMOS levels, no significant dc current is drawn.
Table 173. 208-Ball PBGA Ball Assignments Sorted Alphabetically by Symbol
Symbol
CKI
EA[18:0]
208 Ball PBGA Coordinate
Type
Description
H2
I
External Clock Input.
H15, G13, G14, G16, G15, F16, F15, E13,
O External Address Bus, Bits 18—0.
E14, E16, D14, D15, D16, C16, C15, B16,
C14, A15, B14
EACKN
D12
O External Device Acknowledge for External Memory Interface (negative assertion).
ECKO
J16
O Programmable Clock Output.
ED[31:0]
B11, A11, C11, D11, B10, A10, B9, C9, D9, I/O External Memory Data Bus, Bits 31—0.
D8, C8, B8, D7, C7, A7, B7, A6, B6, D5, C5,
A5, C4, A4, B4, A3, B3, A2, C3, B1, C1, C2,
D2
EION
A14
O Enable for External I/O (negative assertion).
ERAMN
B13
O External RAM Enable (negative assertion).
ERDY
E2
I
External Memory Device Ready.
EREQN
E1
I
External Device Request for EMI Interface (negative assertion).
EROMN
B12
O Enable for External ROM (negative assertion).
ERTYPE
F2
I
EROM Type Control:
If 0, asynchronous SRAM mode.
If 1, synchronous SRAM mode.
ERWN0
C12
O Read/Write, Bit 0 (negative assertion).
ERWN1
A12
O Read/Write, Bit 1 (negative assertion).
ESEG[3:0]
J14, J13, H13, H14
O External Segment Address, Bits 3—0.
ESIZE
E3
I
External Memory Bus Size Control:
If 0, 16-bit external interface.
If 1, 32-bit external interface.
EXM
E4
I
External Boot-up Control for CORE0.
EYMODE
R3
I
External Data Bus Mode Configuration Pin.
INT[3:0]
J3, J2, K4, K3
I
External Interrupt Requests 3—0.
IO0BIT[6:0]
N3, N1, N2, P1, P2, R1, P3
I/O BIO0 Status/Control, Bits 6—0.
IO1BIT[6:0]
T13, T14, R14, T15, P14, R16, P15
I/O BIO1 Status/Control, Bits 6—0.
PADD[3:0]
P12, T12, P13, R13
I
PIU Address, Bits 3—0.
PCSN
N12
I
PIU Chip Select (negative assertion).
PD[15:0]
T3, R4, R5, T5, P5, N5, R6, T6, P6, N6, R7, I/O PIU Data Bus, Bits 15—0.
T7, T8, P8, N8, N9
PIBF
R9
O PIU Input Buffer Full Flag.
PIDS
T11
I
PIU Input Data Strobe.
PINT
P10
O PIU Interrupt Request to Host.
POBE
P9
O PIU Output Buffer Empty Flag.
PODS
R10
I
PIU Output Data Strobe.
PRDY
N10
O
PIU Host Ready.
PRDYMD
T10
I
PRDY Mode.
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
7 208-Ball PBGA Package Ball Assignments (continued)
Table 173. 208-Ball PBGA Ball Assignments Sorted Alphabetically by Symbol (continued)
Symbol
PRWN
208 Ball PBGA Coordinate
R11
Type
I
Description
PIU Read/Write (negative assertion).
RSTN
H4
I
Device Reset (negative assertion).
SCK0
M4
I
External Clock for SIU0 Active Generator.
External Clock for SIU1 Active Generator.
SCK1
M14
I
SICK0
K1
I/O
SIU0 Input Clock.
SICK1
P16
I/O
SIU1 Input Clock.
SID0
M3
I
SIU0 Input Data.
SID1
M13
I
SIU1 Input Data.
SIFS0
K2
I/O
SIU0 Input Frame Sync.
SIFS1
N15
I/O
SIU1 Input Frame Sync.
SOCK0
L1
I/O
SIU0 Output Clock.
SOCK1
M15
I/O
SIU1 Output Clock.
SOD0
M1
O/Z SIU0 Output Data.
SOD1
L15
O/Z SIU1 Output Data.
SOFS0
L2
I/O
SIU0 Output Frame Sync.
SOFS1
M16
I/O
SIU1 Output Frame Sync.
TCK0
F4
I
JTAG Test Clock for CORE0.
TCK1
L13
I
JTAG Test Clock for CORE1.
TDI0
G1
I
JTAG Test Data Input for CORE0.
TDI1
K16
I
JTAG Test Data Input for CORE1.
TDO0
F1
O
JTAG Test Data Output for CORE0.
TDO1
L16
O
I
I
I/O
I
I
P
JTAG Test Data Output for CORE1.
TMS0
G2
TMS1
K15
TRAP
TRST0N
J4
F3
TRST1N
VDD1
L14
A9, B2, B15, C6, D4, D13, F14, J15,
L3, N4, N13, P11, R2, R8, R15
H1
VDD1A
VDD2
VSS
VSS1A
A1, A16, C13, D3, D6, F13, G3, K14, L4,
N11, N14, P4, P7, T1, T16, C10
A13, A8, B5, D1, D10, E15, G7, G8, G9,
G10, G4, H7, H8, H9, H10, H16, J1, J7, J8,
J9, J10, K7, K8, K9, K10, K13, M2, N7, N16,
R12, T2, T4, T9
H3
Agere Systems Inc.
JTAG Test Mode Select for CORE0.
JTAG Test Mode Select for CORE1.
TRAP/Breakpoint Indication.
JTAG TAP Controller Reset for CORE0 (negative assertion).
JTAG TAP Controller Reset for CORE1 (negative assertion).
Power Supply for Internal Circuitry.
P
P
Power Supply for PLL Circuitry.
G
Ground.
G
Ground for PLL Circuitry.
Power Supply for External Circuitry (I/O).
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
8 Signal Descriptions
Figure 61 shows the interface pinout for the DSP16410CG. The signals can be separated into nine interfaces as
shown. Following is a description of these interfaces and the signals that comprise them.
DSP16410B Pinout by Interface
SYSTEM AND
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
INTERFACE
SYSTEM
INTERFACE
EA[18:0]
ED[31:0]
ERWN0
ERWN1
ERTYPE
ESEG[3:0]
EION
ERAMN
EROMN
ERDY
EREQN
EACKN
ESIZE
EXM
EYMODE
RSTN
CKI
ECKO
INT[3:0]
TRAP
PIU
INTERFACE
PADD[3:0]
PD[15:0]
PCSN
PIDS
PODS
PRDY
PRDYMD
PRWN
PINT
PIBF
POBE
DSP16410CG
SCK0
SICK0
SID0
SIFS0
SOFS0
SOD0
SOCK0
SIU0
INTERFACE
SCK1
SICK1
SID1
SIFS1
SOFS1
SOD1
SOCK1
SIU1
INTERFACE
TCK0
TDI0
TDO0
TMS0
TRST0N
JTAG0
INTERFACE
TCK1
TDI1
TDO1
TMS1
TRST1N
JTAG1
INTERFACE
IO0BIT[6:0]
IO1BIT[6:0]
BIO
INTERFACE
VDD2
VDD1
VSS
VDD1A
VSS1A
POWER
SUPPLY
Figure 61. DSP16410CG Pinout by Interface
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.2 BIO Interface
8.1 System Interface
IO0BIT[6:0]—BIO Signals: Input/output. Each of
these pins can be independently configured via software as either an input or an output by CORE0. As
outputs, they can be independently set, toggled, or
cleared. As inputs, they can be tested independently
or in combinations for various data patterns.
The system interface consists of the clock, interrupt,
and reset signals for the processor.
RSTN—Device Reset: Negative assertion input. A
high-to-low transition causes the processor to enter the
reset state. See Section 4.3 on page 23 for details.
CKI—Input Clock: The CKI input buffer drives the
internal clock (CLK) directly or drives the on-chip PLL
(see Section 4.17 on page 198). The PLL allows the
CKI input clock to be at a lower frequency than the
internal clock.
ECKO—Programmable Clock Output: Buffered output clock with options programmable via the ECON1
register (see Table 60 on page 111). The selectable
ECKO options are as follows:
!
CLK/2: A free-running output clock at half the frequency of the internal clock. This setting is required
for a synchronous memory interface on SEMI. (This
is the default selection after reset.)
!
CLK: A free-running output clock at the frequency of
the internal clock.
!
CKI: Clock input pin.
!
ZERO: A constant logic 0 output.
INT[3:0]—External Interrupt Requests: Positive
assertion inputs. Hardware interrupts to the
DSP16410CG are edge-sensitive, enabled via the inc0
register (see Table 149 on page 239). If enabled and
asserted properly with no equal- or higher-priority interrupts being serviced, each hardware interrupt causes
the core to vector to the memory location described in
Table 9 on page 33. If an INT[3:0] pin is asserted for at
least the minimum required assertion time (see
Section 11.7 on page 282), the corresponding external
interrupt request is recorded in the ins register (see
Table 150 on page 240). If both INT0 and RSTN are
asserted, all output and bidirectional pins are put in a 3state condition except TDO, which 3-states by JTAG
control.
TRAP—TRAP/Breakpoint Indication: Positive pulse
assertion input/output. If asserted, the processor is put
into the trap condition, which normally causes a branch
to the location vbase + 4. Although normally an input,
this pin can be configured as an output by the HDS
block. As an output, the pin can be used to signal an
HDS breakpoint in a multiple processor environment.
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IO1BIT[6:0]—BIO Signals: Input/output. Each of
these pins can be independently configured via software as either an input or an output by CORE1. As
outputs, they can be independently set, toggled, or
cleared. As inputs, they can be tested independently
or in combinations for various data patterns.
8.3 System and External Memory Interface
ED[31:0]—Bidirectional 32-Bit External Data Bus:
Input/output. The external data bus operates as a
16-bit or 32-bit data bus, as determined by the state of
the ESIZE pin:
!
If defined as a 16-bit bus (ESIZE = 0), the SEMI uses
ED[31:16] and 3-states ED[15:0]. If the cores or the
DMAU attempt to initiate a 32-bit transfer to or from
external memory, the SEMI performs two 16-bit
transfers.
!
If defined as a 32-bit bus (ESIZE = 1), the SEMI uses
ED[31:0]. If the cores or the DMAU attempt to initiate a 16-bit transfer, the SEMI drives ED[31:16] for
accesses to an even address or ED[15:0] for
accesses to an odd address.
If the SEMI is not performing an external access, it
3-states ED[31:0]. If the EYMODE pin is tied high,
ED[31:0] are statically configured as outputs (see
description of EYMODE below).
EYMODE—External Data Bus Mode: Input. This pin
determines the mode of the external data bus. It must
be static and tied to VSS (if the SEMI is used) or VDD2
(if the SEMI is not used). If EYMODE = 1, the external
data bus pins ED[31:0] are statically configured as outputs (regardless of the state of RSTN) and must not be
connected externally. If EYMODE = 0, external pull-up
resistors are needed on ED[31:0]. See Section 10.1 on
page 267 for details.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.3 System and External Memory
Interface (continued)
EA[18:1]—External Address Bus Bits 18—1:
Output. The function of this bus depends on the state
of the ESIZE pin:
!
If the external data bus is configured as a 16-bit bus
(ESIZE = 0), the SEMI places the 18 most significant
bits of the 19-bit external address onto EA[18:1].
!
If the external data bus is configured as a 32-bit bus
(ESIZE = 1), the SEMI places the 18-bit external
address onto EA[18:1].
After an access is complete and before the start of a
new access, the SEMI continues to drive EA[18:1] with
its current state. The SEMI 3-states EA[18:1] if it
grants a request by an external device to access the
external memory (see description of the EREQN pin).
EA0—External Address Bus Bit 0: Output. The function of this bit depends on the state of the ESIZE pin:
!
If the external data bus is configured as a 16-bit bus
(ESIZE = 0), the SEMI places the least significant bit
of the 19-bit external address onto EA0.
!
If the external data bus is configured as a 32-bit bus
(ESIZE = 1), the SEMI does not use EA0 as an
address bit:
— If the selected memory component is configured
as asynchronous1, the SEMI drives EA0 with its
previous value.
— If the selected memory component is configured
as synchronous1, the SEMI drives a negativeassertion write strobe onto EA0 (the SEMI drives
EA0 with the logical AND of ERWN1 and
ERWN0).
After an access is complete and before the start of a
new access, the SEMI continues to drive EA0 with its
current state. The SEMI 3-states EA0 if it grants a
request by an external device to access the external
memory (see description of the EREQN pin).
ESEG[3:0]—External Segment Address:
Output. The external segment address outputs provide
an additional 4 bits of address or decoded enables for
extending the external address range of the
DSP16410CG. The state of ESEG[3:0] is determined
by the EXSEG0, EYSEG0, EXSEG1, and EYSEG1
registers for a CORE0 or CORE1 external memory
access. Refer to Section 4.14.1.4 on page 106 for
more details. If the DMAU accesses external memory,
the SEMI places the contents of the ESEG[3:0] field of
the SADD〈0—5〉 or DADD〈0—5〉 register onto the
ESEG[3:0] pins (see Table 37 on page 77 for details).
If the PIU accesses external memory, the SEMI places
the contents of the ESEG[3:0] field of the PA register
onto the ESEG[3:0] pins (see Table 78 on page 136 for
details). ESEG[3:0] retain their previous state while
the SEMI is not performing external accesses. The
SEMI 3-states ESEG[3:0] if it grants a request by an
external device to access the external memory (see
description of the EREQN pin).
ERWN[1:0]—External Read/Write Not: Output. The
external read/write strobes are two separate write
strobes. In general, if driven high by the SEMI, these
signals indicate an external read access. If driven low,
these signals indicate an external write access. However, the exact function of these pins is qualified by the
value of the ESIZE pin:
!
If ESIZE = 0 (16-bit data bus), ERWN1 is always
inactive (high) and ERWN0 is an active write strobe.
!
If ESIZE = 1 (32-bit data bus), ERWN0 is the write
enable for the upper (most significant) 16 bits of the
data (ED[31:16]) and ERWN1 is the write enable for
the lower (least significant) 16 bits of the data
(ED[15:0]).
The SEMI 3-states ERWN[1:0] if it grants a request by
an external device to access the external memory (see
description of the EREQN pin).
ERAMN—ERAM Space Enable: Negative-assertion
output. The external RAM enable selects the ERAM
memory component (external data memory). For asynchronous accesses, the SEMI asserts ERAMN for the
number of cycles specified by the YATIME[3:0] field
(ECON0[7:4]—see Table 59 on page 110). For synchronous accesses, the SEMI asserts ERAMN for two
instruction cycles (one ECKO cycle2). ERAM is configured as synchronous if the YTYPE field
(ECON1[9]—see Table 60 on page 111) is set. The
SEMI 3-states ERAMN if it grants a request by an
external device to access the external memory (see
description of the EREQN pin).
1. The EROM component is synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is logic 1. The ERAM component is synchronous if YTYPE field (ECON1[9]) is
set. The EIO component is synchronous if the ITYPE field (ECON1[10]) is set. ECON1 is described in Table 60 on page 111.
2. If any memory component is configured as synchronous, ECKO must be programmed as CLK/2, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field
(ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111) must be programmed to 0x0.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.3 System and External Memory
Interface (continued)
EROMN—EROM Space Enable: Negative-assertion
output. The external ROM enable selects the EROM
memory component (external program memory). For
asynchronous accesses, the SEMI asserts EROMN for
the number of cycles specified by the XATIME[3:0] field
(ECON0[3:0]—see Table 59 on page 110). For synchronous accesses, the SEMI asserts EROMN for two
instruction cycles (one ECKO cycle2). EROM is configured as synchronous if the ERTYPE pin is high. The
SEMI 3-states EROMN if it grants a request by an
external device to access the external memory (see
description of the EREQN pin).
EION—EIO Space Enable: Negative-assertion output. The external I/O enable selects the EIO memory
component (external memory-mapped peripherals or
data memory). For asynchronous accesses, the SEMI
asserts EION for the number of cycles specified by the
IATIME[3:0] field (ECON0[11:8]—see Table 59 on
page 110). For synchronous accesses, the SEMI
asserts EION for two instruction cycles (one ECKO
cycle1). EION is configured as synchronous if the
ITYPE field is set (ECON1[10]—see Table 60 on
page 111) is set. The SEMI 3-states EION if it grants a
request by an external device to access the external
memory (see description of the EREQN pin).
ERDY—External Device Ready for SEMI Data: Positive-assertion input. The external READY input is a
control pin that allows an external device to extend an
external asynchronous memory access. If driven low
by the external device, the SEMI extends the current
external memory access that is already in progress. To
guarantee proper operation, ERDY must be driven low
at least 4 CLK cycles before the end of the access and
the enable must be programmed for at least 5 CLK
cycles of assertion (via the YATIME, XATIME, or
IATIME field of ECON0—see Table 59 on page 110).
The SEMI ignores the state of ERDY prior to 4 CLK
cycles before the end of the access. The access is
extended by 4 CLK cycles after ERDY is driven high.
The state of ERDY is readable in the EREADY field
(ECON1[6]—see Table 60 on page 111.
EREQN—External Device Requests Access to
SEMI Bus: Negative-assertion input. An external
device asserts EREQN low to request the external
memory bus for access to external asynchronous
memory. If the NOSHARE field (ECON1[8]—see
Table 60 on page 111) is set, the DSP16410CG
ignores the request. If NOSHARE is cleared, a minimum of four cycles later the SEMI grants the request
by performing the following:
!
First, the SEMI completes any external access that is
already in progress.
!
The SEMI 3-states the address bus and segment
address (EA[18:0] and ESEG[3:0]), the data bus
(ED[31:0]), and all the external enables and strobes
(ERAMN, EROMN, EION, and ERWN[1:0]) until the
external device deasserts EREQN. The SEMI continues to drive ECKO.
!
The SEMI acknowledges the request by asserting
EACKN.
The cores and the DMAU continue processing. If a
core or the DMAU attempts to perform an external
memory access, it stalls until the external device relinquishes the bus. If the external device deasserts
EREQN (changes EREQN from 0 to 1), four cycles
later the SEMI deasserts EACKN (changes EACKN
from 0 to 1). To avoid external bus contention, the
external device must wait for at least ATIMEMAX cycles2
after it deasserts EREQN (changes EREQN from 0 to
1) before reasserting EREQN (changing EREQN from
1 to 0). The software can read the state of the EREQN
pin in the EREQN field (ECON1[4]—see Table 60 on
page 111).
Note: If EREQN is not in use by the application, it must
be tied high.
Note: If ERDY is not in use by the application or if all
external memory is synchronous, ERDY must be
tied high.
1. If any memory component is configured as synchronous, ECKO must be programmed as CLK/2, i.e., the ECKO[1:0] field
(ECON1[1:0]—Table 60 on page 111) must be programmed to 0x0.
2. ATIMEMAX is the greatest of IATIME(ECON0[11:8]), YATIME (ECON0[7:4]), and XATIME (ECON0[3:0]).
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.3 System and External Memory
Interface (continued)
EACKN—DSP16410CG Acknowledges External
Bus Request: Negative-assertion output. The SEMI
acknowledges the request of an external device for
direct access to an asynchronous external memory by
asserting EACKN. See the description of the EREQN
pin on page 257 for details. The software can read the
state of the EACKN pin in the EACKN field
(ECON1[5]—see Table 60 on page 111).
ESIZE—Size of External SEMI Bus: Input. The external data bus size input determines the size of the active
data bus. If ESIZE = 0, the external data bus is configured as 16 bits and the SEMI uses ED[31:16] and
3-states ED[15:0]. If ESIZE = 1, the external data bus
is configured as 32 bits and the SEMI uses ED[31:0].
ERTYPE—EROM Type: Input. The external ROM
type input determines the type of memory device in the
EROM component (selected by the EROMN
enable). If ERTYPE = 0, the EROM component is populated with ROM or asynchronous SRAM, and the
SEMI performs asynchronous accesses to the EROM
component. If ERTYPE = 1, the EROM component is
populated with synchronous ZBT SRAM and the SEMI
performs synchronous accesses to the EROM component.
EXM—Boot Source: Input. The external execution
memory input determines the active memory for program execution after DSP16410CG reset. If EXM = 0
when the RSTN pin makes a low-to-high transition,
both cores begin execution from their internal ROM
(IROM) memory at location 0x20000. If EXM = 1 when
the RSTN pin makes a low-to-high transition, both
cores begin execution from external ROM (EROM)
memory at location 0x80000. If the cores begin execution from external ROM, the SEMI arbitrates the
accesses from the two cores.
8.4 SIU0 Interface
SID0—External Serial Input Data: Input. By default,
data is latched on the SID0 pin on a falling edge of the
input bit clock (SICK0) during a selected channel.
SICK0—Input Bit Clock: Input/output. SICK0 can be
an input (passive input clock) or an output (active input
clock). The SICK0 pin is the input data bit clock. By
default, data on SID0 is latched on a falling edge of this
clock, but the active level of this clock can be changed
by the ICKK field (SCON10[3]—Table 111 on
page 189). SICK0 can be configured via software as
an input (passive, externally generated) or an output
(active, internally generated) via the ICKA field
(SCON10[2]) and the ICKE field
(SCON3[6]—Table 104 on page 186).
SOCK0—Output Bit Clock: Input/output. SOCK0 can
be an input (passive output clock) or an output (active
output clock). The SOCK0 pin is the output data bit
clock. By default, data on SOD0 is driven on a rising
edge of SOCK0 during active channel periods, but the
active level of this clock can be changed by the OCKK
field (SCON10[7]). SOCK0 can be configured via software as an input (passive, externally generated) or an
output (active, internally generated) via the OCKA of
SCON10[6]) and the OCKE field (SCON3[14]).
SIFS0—Input Frame Synchronization: Input/output.
The SIFS0 signal indicates the beginning of a new
input frame. By default, SIFS0 is active-high, and a
low-to-high transition (rising edge) indicates the start of
a new frame. The active level and position of the input
frame sync relative to the first input data bit can be
changed via the IFSK field (SCON10[1]) and the IFSDLY[1:0] field (SCON1[9:8]—Table 102 on page 184),
respectively. SIFS0 can be configured via software as
an input (passive, externally generated) or an output
(active, internally generated) via the IFSA field
(SCON10[0]) and the IFSE field (SCON3[7]).
SOFS0—Output Frame Synchronization: Input/output. The SOFS0 signal indicates the beginning of a
new output frame. By default, SOFS0 is active-high,
and a low-to-high transition (rising edge) indicates the
start of a new frame. The active level and position of
the output frame sync relative to the first output data bit
can be changed via the OFSK field (SCON10[5]) and
the OFSDLY[1:0] field (SCON2[9:8]—Table 103 on
page 185), respectively. SOFS0 can be configured via
software as an input (passive, externally generated) or
an output (active, internally generated) via the OFSA
field (SCON10[4]) and the OFSE field (SCON3[15]).
SOD0—External Serial Output Data: Output. By
default, data is driven onto the SOD0 pin on a rising
edge of the output bit clock (SOCK0) during a selected
and unmasked channel. During inactive or masked
channel periods, SOD0 is 3-state.
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8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.4 SIU0 Interface (continued)
SCK0—External Clock Source: Input. The SCK0 pin
is an input that provides an external clock source for
generating the input and output bit clocks and frame
syncs. If enabled via the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]—
Table 113 on page 193), the clock source applied to
SCK0 replaces the internal clock (CLK) for active mode
timing generation of the bit clocks and frame
syncs. The active level of the clock applied to this pin
can be inverted by setting the SCKK field
(SCON12[13]).
8.5 SIU1 Interface
SID1—External Serial Input Data: Input. By default,
data is latched on the SID1 pin on a falling edge of the
input bit clock, SICK1, during a selected channel.
SOD1—External Serial Output Data: Output. By
default, data is driven onto the SOD1 pin on a rising
edge of the output bit clock, SOCK1, during a selected
and unmasked channel. During inactive or masked
channel periods, SOD1 is 3-state.
SICK1—Input Bit Clock: Input/output. SICK1 can be
an input (passive input clock) or an output (active input
clock). The SICK1 pin is the input data bit clock. By
default, data on SID1 is latched on a falling edge of this
clock, but the active level of this clock can be changed
by the ICKK field (SCON10[3]—Table 111 on
page 189). SICK1 can be configured via software as
an input (passive, externally generated) or an output
(active, internally generated) via the ICKA field
(SCON10[2]) and the ICKE field
(SCON3[6]—Table 104 on page 186).
SIFS1—Input Frame Synchronization: Input/output.
The SIFS1 signal indicates the beginning of a new
input frame. By default, SIFS1 is active-high, and a
low-to-high transition (rising edge) indicates the start of
a new frame. The active level and position of the input
frame sync relative to the first input data bit can be
changed via the IFSK field (SCON10[1]) and the IFSDLY[1:0] field (SCON1[9:8]), respectively. SIFS1 can
be configured via software as an input (passive, externally generated) or an output (active, internally generated) via the IFSA field (SCON10[0]) and the IFSE
(SCON3[7]).
SOFS1—Output Frame Synchronization: Input/output. The SOFS1 signal indicates the beginning of a
new output frame. By default, SOFS1 is active-high,
and a low-to-high transition (rising edge) indicates the
start of a new frame. The active level and position of
the output frame sync relative to the first output data bit
can be changed via the OFSK field (SCON10[5]) and
the OFSDLY[1:0] field (SCON2[9:8]—Table 103 on
page 185), respectively. SOFS1 can be configured via
software as an input (passive, externally generated) or
an output (active, internally generated) via the OFSA
field (SCON10[4]) and the OFSE field (SCON3[15]).
SCK1—External Clock Source: Input. The SCK1 pin
is an input that provides an external clock source for
generating the input and output bit clocks and frame
syncs. If enabled via the AGEXT field of
SCON12[12]—Table 113 on page 193), the clock
source applied to SCK1 replaces the internal clock
(CLK) for active mode timing generation of the bit
clocks and frame syncs. The active level of the clock
applied to this pin can be inverted by setting the SCKK
field (SCON12[13]).
SOCK1—Output Bit Clock: Input/output. SOCK1 can
be an input (passive output clock) or an output (active
output clock). The SOCK1 pin is the output data bit
clock. By default, data on SOD1 is driven on a rising
edge of SOCK1 during active channel periods, but the
active level of this clock can be changed by the OCKK
field (SCON10[7]). SOCK1 can be configured via software as an input (passive, externally generated) or an
output (active, internally generated) via the OCKA field
(SCON10[6]) and the OCKE field (SCON3[14]).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
!
8.6 PIU Interface
The host interface to the PIU consists of 29 pins.
PD[15:0]—16-Bit Bidirectional, Parallel Data Bus:
Input/output. During host data reads, the
DSP16410CG drives the data contained in the PIU output data register (PDO) onto this bus. During host data
writes, data driven by the host onto this bus is latched
into the PIU input data register (PDI). If the PIU is not
selected by the host (PCSN is high), PD[15:0] is 3state.
PADD[3:0]—PIU 4-Bit Address and Control:
Input. This 4-bit address input is driven by the host to
select between various PIU registers and to issue PIU
commands. Refer to Section 4.15.5 on page 145 for
details. If unused, these input pins should be tied low.
POBE—PIU Output Buffer Empty Flag: Output. This
status pin directly reflects the state of the PIU output
data register (PDO). If POBE = 0, the PDO register
contains data ready for the host to read. If POBE = 1,
the PDO register is empty and there is no data for the
host to read. The host can read the state of this pin
any time PCSN is asserted low. The state of this pin is
also reflected in the POBE field of the PCON register.
PIBF—PIU Input Buffer Full Flag: Output. This status pin directly reflects the state of the PIU input data
register (PDI). If PIBF = 0, PDI is empty and the host
can safely write another word to the PIU. If PIBF = 1,
PDI is full with the previous word that was written by
the host. If the host issues another write to the PIU
while PIBF = 1, the previous data in PDI is
overwritten. The host can read this pin any time PCSN
is asserted low. The state of this pin is also reflected in
the PIBF field (PCON[1]—Table 73 on page 134).
PRDY—PIU Host Ready: Output. This status pin
directly reflects the state of the previous PIU host transaction. It is used by the host to extend the current
access until the previous access is complete. The
active state of this pin is determined by the state of the
PRDYMD pin. The state of PRDY is valid only if the
PIU is activated, i.e., if PSTRN is asserted. (See
Section 4.15.2.1 on page 138 for a definition of
PSTRN.)
!
If PRDYMD = 0, PRDY is active-low. If PRDY = 0,
the previous host read or host write is complete, and
the host can continue with the current read or write
transaction. If PRDY = 1, the previous PIU read or
write is still in progress (PDI is still full or PDO is still
empty) and the host must extend the current access
until PRDY = 0.
260
If PRDYMD = 1, PRDY is active-high. If PRDY = 1,
the previous host read or host write is complete, and
the host can continue with the current read or write
transaction. If PRDY = 0, the previous PIU read or
write is still in progress (PDI is still full or PDO is still
empty) and the host must extend the current access
until PRDY = 1.
PINT—PIU Interrupt: Output. Can be set by the
DSP16410CG to generate a host interrupt. If a core
sets the PINT field (PCON[3]—Table 73 on page 134),
the PIU drives the PINT pin high to create a host interrupt. After the host acknowledges the interrupt, it must
clear the PINT field (PCON[3]).
PRDYMD—PIU Ready Pin Mode: Input. Determines
the active state of the PRDY pin. Refer to the PRDY
pin description above. If unused, PRDYMD should be
tied low.
PODS—PIU Output Data Strobe: Input. Function is
dependent upon the host type (Intel or Motorola). If
unused, PODS must be tied high:
!
Intel mode: In this mode, PODS functions as an output data strobe and must be connected to the host
active-low read data strobe. The host read transaction is initiated by the assertion (low) of PCSN and
PODS. It is terminated by the deassertion (high) of
PCSN or PODS.
!
Motorola mode: In this mode, PODS functions as a
data strobe and must be connected to the host data
strobe. The active level of PODS (active-high or
active-low) is determined by the state of the PIDS
pin. A host read or write transaction is initiated by
the assertion of PCSN and PODS. It is terminated
by the deassertion of PCSN or PODS.
PIDS—PIU Input Data Strobe: Input. Function is
dependent upon the host type (Intel or Motorola). If
unused, PIDS must be tied high:
!
Intel mode: In this mode, PIDS functions as an input
data strobe and must be connected to the host
active-low write data strobe. The host write transaction is initiated by the assertion (low) of PCSN and
PIDS. It is terminated by the deassertion (high) of
PCSN or PIDS.
!
Motorola mode: In this mode, the state of PIDS
determines the active level of the host data strobe,
PODS. If PIDS = 0, PODS is an active-high data
strobe. If PIDS = 1, PODS is an active-low data
strobe.
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8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.6 PIU Interface (continued)
PRWN—PIU Read/Write Not: Input. Function is
dependent upon the host type (Intel or Motorola). In
either case, PRWN is driven high by the host during
host reads and driven low by the host during host
writes. PRWN must be stable for the entire access
(while PCSN and the appropriate data strobe are
asserted). If unused, PRWN must be tied high.
!
Intel mode: In this mode, PRWN is connected to the
active-low write data strobe of the host processor,
the same as the PIDS input.
!
Motorola mode: In this mode, PRWN functions as an
active read/write strobe and must be connected to
the RWN output of the Motorola host processor.
PCSN—PIU Chip Select: Negative-assertion input.
PCSN is the chip select from the host for shared-bus
systems. If PCSN = 0, the PIU of the selected
DSP16410CG is active for transfers with the host. If
PCSN = 1, the PIU ignores any activity on PIDS,
PODS, and PRWN, and 3-states PD[15:0]. If unused,
PCSN must be tied high.
TCK0—JTAG Test Clock: Serial shift clock. This signal clocks all data into the port through TDI0 and out of
the port through TDO0. It also controls the port by
latching the TMS0 signal inside the state-machine controller.
TRST0N—JTAG TAP Controller Reset: Negative
assertion. Test reset. If asserted low, resets the
JTAG0 TAP controller. In an application environment,
this pin must be asserted prior to or concurrent with
RSTN. This pin has an internal pull-up resistor.
8.8 JTAG1 Test Interface
The JTAG1 test interface has features that allow programs and data to be downloaded into CORE1 via five
pins. This provides extensive test and diagnostic
capability. In addition, internal circuitry allows the
device to be controlled through the JTAG port to provide on-chip, in-circuit emulation. Agere Systems provides hardware and software tools to interface to the
on-chip HDS via the JTAG port.
Note: JTAG1 provides all JTAG/IEEE 1149.1 standard
test capabilities including boundary scan.
TDI1—JTAG Test Data Input: Serial input signal. All
serial-scanned data and instructions are input on this
pin. This pin has an internal pull-up resistor.
8.7 JTAG0 Test Interface
The JTAG0 test interface has features that allow programs and data to be downloaded into CORE0 via five
pins. This provides extensive test and diagnostic capability. In addition, internal circuitry allows the device to
be controlled through the JTAG port to provide on-chip,
in-circuit emulation. Agere Systems provides hardware
and software tools to interface to the on-chip HDS via
the JTAG port.
Note: JTAG0 provides all JTAG/IEEE 1149.1 standard
test capabilities including boundary scan.
TDI0—JTAG Test Data Input: Serial input signal. All
serial-scanned data and instructions are input on this
pin. This pin has an internal pull-up resistor.
TDO0—JTAG Test Data Output: Serial output signal.
Serial-scanned data and status bits are output on this
pin.
TDO1—JTAG Test Data Output: Serial output signal.
Serial-scanned data and status bits are output on this
pin.
TMS1—JTAG Test Mode Select: Mode control signal
that, combined with TCK1, controls the scan operations. This pin has an internal pull-up resistor.
TCK1—JTAG Test Clock: Serial shift clock. This signal clocks all data into the port through TDI1 and out of
the port through TDO1. It also controls the port by
latching the TMS1 signal inside the state-machine controller.
TRST1N—JTAG TAP Controller Reset: Negative
assertion. Test reset. If asserted low, TRST1N resets
the JTAG1 TAP controller. In an application environment, this pin must be asserted prior to or concurrent
with RSTN. This pin has an internal pull-up resistor.
TMS0—JTAG Test Mode Select: Mode control signal
that, combined with TCK0, controls the scan operations. This pin has an internal pull-up resistor.
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Data Sheet
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8 Signal Descriptions (continued)
8.9 Power and Ground
VDD1—Core Supply Voltage: Supply voltage for the
DSP16000 cores and all internal DSP16410CG circuitry. Required voltage level is 1.575 V nominal.
VDD2—I/O Supply Voltage: Supply voltage for the I/O
pins. Required voltage level is 3.3 V nominal.
VSS—Ground: Ground for core and I/O supplies.
VDD1A—Analog Supply Voltage: Supply voltage for
the PLL circuitry. Required voltage level is 1.575 V
nominal.
VSS1A—Analog Ground: Ground for analog supply.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
9 Device Characteristics
9.1 Absolute Maximum Ratings
Stresses in excess of the absolute maximum ratings can cause permanent damage to the device. These are
absolute stress ratings only. Functional operation of the device is not implied at these or any other conditions in
excess of those given in the operational sections of the data sheet. Exposure to absolute maximum ratings for
extended periods can adversely affect device reliability.
External leads can be bonded and soldered safely at temperatures of up to 235 °C.
Table 174. Absolute Maximum Ratings for Supply Pins
Parameter
Voltage on VDD1 with Respect to Ground
Voltage on VDD1A with Respect to Ground
Voltage on VDD2 with Respect to Ground
Voltage Range on Any Signal Pin
Junction Temperature (TJ)
Storage Temperature Range
Min
Max
Unit
–0.5
–0.5
–0.5
VSS – 0.3
2.0
2.0
4.0
VDD2 + 0.3
4.0
120
150
V
V
V
V
–40
–40
°C
°C
9.2 Handling Precautions
Although electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection circuitry has been designed into this device, proper precautions
must be taken to avoid exposure to ESD and electrical overstress (EOS) during all handling, assembly, and test
operations. Agere employs both a human-body model (HBM) and a charged-device model (CDM) qualification
requirement in order to determine ESD-susceptibility limits and protection design evaluation. ESD voltage thresholds are dependent on the circuit parameters used in each of the models, as defined by JEDEC's JESD22-A114
(HBM) and JESD22-C101 (CDM) standards.
Table 175. Minimum ESD Voltage Thresholds
Device
Minimum HBM Threshold
Minimum CDM Threshold
DSP16410CG
2000 V
1000 V
9.3 Recommended Operating Conditions
Table 176. Recommended Operating Conditions
Maximum
Internal Clock
(CLK) Frequency
Minimum
Internal Clock
(CLK) Period T
195 MHz
5.0 ns
Junction
Temperature TJ (°C)
Min
Max
–40
120
Supply Voltage
VDD1, VDD1A (V)
Min
Max
1.5
1.65
Supply Voltage
VDD2 (V)
Min
Max
3.0
3.6
The ratio of the instruction cycle rate to the input clock frequency is 1:1 without the PLL and
((M + 2)/((D + 2) * f(OD))):1 with the PLL selected. The maximum input clock (CKI pin) frequency when the
PLL is not selected as the device clock source is 50 MHz. The maximum input clock frequency is 40 MHz
when the PLL is selected.
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Data Sheet
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9 Device Characteristics (continued)
9.3 Recommended Operating Conditions (continued)
9.3.1 Package Thermal Considerations
The maximum allowable ambient temperature, TAMAX, is dependent upon the device power dissipation and is determined by the following equation:
TAMAX = TJMAX – PMAX x ΘJA
where PMAX is the maximum device power dissipation for the application, TJMAX is the maximum device junction
temperature specified in Table 177, and ΘJA is the maximum thermal resistance in still-air-ambient specified in
Table 177. See Section 10.3 for information on determining the maximum device power dissipation.
Table 177. Package Thermal Considerations
Device Package
208 PBGA
208 PBGA
Parameter
Maximum Junction Temperature (TJMAX)
Maximum Thermal Resistance in Still-Air-Ambient (ΘJA)
Value
120
27
Unit
°C
°C/W
WARNING: Due to package thermal constraints, proper precautions in the user’s application should be
taken to avoid exceeding the maximum junction temperature of 120 °C. Otherwise, the device
performance and reliability is adversely affected.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements
Electrical characteristics refer to the behavior of the device under specified conditions. Electrical requirements
refer to conditions imposed on the user for proper operation of the device. The parameters below are valid for the
conditions described in the previous section, Section 9.3 on page 263.
Table 178. Electrical Characteristics and Requirements
Parameter
Symbol
Min
Max
Unit
VIL
VIH
–0.3
0.7 × VDD2
0.3 × VDD2
VDD2 + 0.3
V
V
Input Current (except TMS0, TMS1, TDI0, TDI1,
TRST0N, TRST1N):
Low (VIL = 0 V, VDD2 = 3.6 V)
High (VIH = 3.6 V, VDD2 = 3.6 V)
IIL
IIH
–5
—
—
5
µA
µA
Input Current (TMS0, TMS1, TDI0, TDI1,
TRST0N, TRST1N):
Low (VIL = 0 V, VDD2 = 3.6 V)
High (VIH = 3.6 V, VDD2 = 3.6 V)
IIL
IIH
–100
—
—
5
µA
µA
Output Low Voltage (All outputs except ECKO):
Low (IOL = 2.0 mA)
Low (IOL = 50 µA)
VOL
VOL
—
—
0.4
0.2
V
V
Output High Voltage (All outputs except ECKO):
High (IOH = –2.0 mA)
High (IOH = –50 µA)
VOH
VOH
VDD2 – 0.7
VDD2 – 0.2
—
—
V
V
VOL
VOL
—
—
0.4
0.2
V
V
VOH
VOH
VDD2 – 0.7
VDD2 – 0.2
—
—
V
V
IOZL
IOZH
–10
—
—
10
µA
µA
CI
—
5
pF
Input Voltage:
Low
High
Output Low (ECKO):
(IOL = 4.0 mA)
(IOL = 100 µA)
Output High (ECKO):
(IOH = –4.0 mA)
(IOH = –100 µA)
Output 3-State Current:
Low (VDD2 = 3.6 V, VIL = 0 V)
High (VDD2 = 3.6 V, VIH = 3.6 V)
Input Capacitance
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
VDD
VOH (V)
VDD – 0.1
DEVICE
UNDER
TEST
VDD – 0.2
VOH
IOH
VDD – 0.3
VDD – 0.4
0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
IOH (mA)
5-4007(C).a
Figure 62. Plot of VOH vs. IOH Under Typical Operating Conditions
0.4
VOL (V)
0.3
DEVICE
UNDER
TEST
0.2
VOL
IOL
0.1
0
0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
2.5
3.0
3.5
4.0
4.5
5.0
IOL (mA)
5-4008(C).b
Figure 63. Plot of VOL vs. IOL Under Typical Operating Conditions
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.1 Maintenance of Valid Logic Levels for Bidirectional Signals and Unused Inputs
The DSP16410CG does not include any internal circuitry to maintain valid logic levels on input pins or on bidirectional pins that are not driven. For correct device operation and low static power dissipation, valid CMOS levels
must be applied to all input and bidirectional pins. Failure to ensure full CMOS levels (VIL or VIH) on pins that are
not driven (including floating data buses) may result in high static power consumption and possible device failure.
Any unused input pin must be pulled up to the I/O pin supply (VDD2) or pulled down to VSS according to the functional requirements of the pin. The pin can be pulled up or down directly or through a 10 kΩ resistor.
Any unused bidirectional pin, statically configured as an input, should be pulled to VDD2 or VSS through a 10 kΩ
resistor. Any bidirectional pin that is dynamically configured, such as the SEMI or PIU data buses, should be tied to
VDD2 or VSS through a pull-up/down resistor that supports the performance of the circuit. The value of the resistor
should be selected to avoid exceeding the dc voltage and current characteristics of any device attached to the pin.
If the SEMI interface is unused in the system, the EYMODE pin should be connected to VDD2 to force the internal
data bus transceivers to always be in the output mode. This avoids the need to add 32 pull-up resistors to
ED[31:0]. If the SEMI interface is used in the system, the EYMODE pin must be connected to VSS and pull-up or
pull-down resistors must be added to ED[31:0] as described below.
The value of the pull-up resistors used on the SEMI data bus depends on the programmed bus width, 32-bit or
16-bit, as determined by the ESIZE pin. It is recommended that any 16-bit peripheral that is connected to the external memory interface of the DSP16410CG use the upper 16 bits of the data bus (ED[31:16]). This is required if the
external memory interface is configured as a 16-bit interface. For the following configurations, 10 kΩ pull-up or pulldown resistors can be used on the external data bus:
■
32-bit SEMI with no 16-bit peripherals
■
32-bit SEMI with 16-bit peripherals connected to ED[31:16]
■
16-bit interface (ED[31:16] only)
If the DSP16410CG’s external memory interface is configured for 32-bit operation with 16-bit peripherals on the
lower half of the external data bus (ED[15:0]), the external data bus (ED[31:0]) should have 2 kΩ pull-up or pulldown resistors to meet the rise or fall time requirements of the DSP16410CG1.
The different requirements for the size of the pull-up/pull-down resistors arise from the manner in which SEMI
treats 16-bit accesses if the interface is configured for 32-bit operation. If configured as a 32-bit interface and a
16-bit read is performed to a device on the upper half of the data bus, the SEMI latches the value on the upper
16 bits internally onto the lower 16 bits. This ensures that the lower half of the data bus sees valid logic levels both
in this case and also if the bus is operated as a 16-bit bus. However, if a 16-bit read operation is performed (on a
32-bit bus) to a 16-bit peripheral on the lower 16 bits, no data is latched onto the upper 16 bits, resulting in the
upper half of the bus floating. In this case, the smaller pull-up resistors ensure the floating data bits transition to a
valid logic level fast enough to avoid metastability problems when the inputs are latched by the SEMI.
1. The 2 kΩ resistor value assumes a bus loading of 30 pF and also ensures IOL is not violated.
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.2 Analog Power Supply Decoupling
Bypass and decoupling capacitors (0.01 µF, 10 µF) should be placed between the analog supply pin (VDD1A) and
analog ground (VSS1A). These capacitors should be placed as close to the VDD1A pin as possible. This minimizes
ground bounce and supply noise to ensure reliable operation. Refer to Figure 64.
VDDA
VSSA
10 µF
0.1 µF
VSS1A
VDD1A
DSP16410CG
5-8896.b (F)
Figure 64. Analog Supply Bypass and Decoupling Capacitors
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.3 Power Dissipation
The total device power dissipation is comprised of the following two components:
■
The contribution from the VDD1 and VDD1A supplies, referred to as internal power dissipation.
■
The contribution from the VDD2 supply, referred to as I/O power dissipation.
The next two sections specify power dissipation for each component.
10.3.1 Internal Power Dissipation
Internal power dissipation is highly dependent on operating voltage, core program activity, internal peripheral activity, and CLK frequency. Table 179 lists the DSP16410CG typical internal power dissipation contribution for various
conditions. The following conditions are assumed for all cases:
■
VDD1 and VDD1A are both 1.575 V.
■
All memory accesses by the cores and the DMAU are to internal memory.
■
■
SIU0 and SIU1 are operating at 30 MHz in loopback mode. An external device drives the SICK〈0—1〉 and
SOCK〈0—1〉 input pins at 30 MHz, and SIU〈0—1〉 are programmed to select passive input clocks and internal
loopback (the ICKA field (SCON10[2]—Table 111 on page 189) and OCKA field (SCON10[6]) are cleared and
the SIOLB field (SCON10[8]) is set).
The PLL is enabled and selected as the source of the internal clock, CLK. Table 179 specifies the internal power
dissipation for CLK = 195 MHz.
Table 179. Typical Internal Power Dissipation at 1.575 V
Type
Low-power
Standby
Typical
Worst-case‡
Condition
Core Operation
The AWAIT field (alf[15]) is set
in both cores.
Both cores repetitively execute
a 20-tap FIR
filter†.
Both cores execute worst-case
instructions with worst-case
data patterns.
Internal Power Dissipation (W)
DMAU Activity
The DMAU is operating the
MMT4 channel to continuously
transfer data.
CLK = 195 MHz
The DMAU is operating all six
channels (SWT〈0—3〉 and
MMT〈4—5〉) to continuously
transfer data.
1.20
0.27
0.66
† To optimize execution speed, the cores each execute the inner loop of the filter from cache and perform a double-word data access every cycle from
separate modules of TPRAM.
‡ This is an artificial condition that is unlikely to occur for an extended period of time in an actual application because the cores are not performing any
I/O servicing. In an actual application, the cores perform I/O servicing that changes program flow and lowers the power dissipation.
The internal power dissipation for the low-power standby and typical operating modes described in Table 179 is
representative of actual applications. The worst-case internal power dissipation occurs under an artificial condition
that is unlikely to occur for an extended period of time in an actual application. This worst-case power should be
used for the calculation of maximum ambient operating temperature (TAMAX) defined in Section 9.3.1. This value
should also be used for worst-case system power supply design for VDD1 and VDD1A.
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.3 Power Dissipation (continued)
10.3.2 I/O Power Dissipation
I/O power dissipation is highly dependent on operating voltage, I/O loading, and I/O signal frequency. It can be
estimated as:
C L × V DD 2 2 × f
where CL is the load capacitance, VDD2 is the I/O supply voltage, and f is the frequency of output signal.
Table 180 lists the estimated typical I/O power dissipation contribution for each output and I/O pin for a typical
application under specific conditions. The following conditions are assumed for all cases:
■
VDD2 is 3.3 V.
■
The load capacitance for each output and I/O pin is 30 pF.
■
CLK is 195 MHz.
■
Data assumes 32-bit synchronous SEMI operation for maximum bandwidth.
■
SEMI accesses are 50% read, 50% write cycles.
■
On SEMI write cycles, only half of the ED[31:0] pins change state in a given cycle.
■
Memory strobes alternate: EROM—ERAM—EIO.
■
PSTRN determines the access rate to the PIU by the host, assumed to be 30 MHz.
■
All BIO pins are programmed as outputs.
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.3 Power Dissipation (continued)
10.3.2 I/O Power Dissipation (continued)
For applications with values of CL, VDD2, or f that differ from those assumed for Table 180, the above formula can
be used to adjust the I/O power dissipation values in the table.
Table 180. Typical I/O Power Dissipation at 3.3 V
Internal
Peripheral
Pin(s)
Type
No. of
Pins
SEMI†
ED[31:0]
ERWN[1:0]
EA0
EA[18:1]
ESEG[3:0]
EROMN
ERAMN
EION
ECKO
IO〈0—1〉BIT[6:0]
PD[15:0]
PINT
PIBF
POBE
PRDY
SICK〈0—1〉
SOCK〈0—1〉
SOD〈0—1〉
SIFS〈0—1〉
SOFS〈0—1〉
I/O‡
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O§
I/O‡
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
O
32
2
1
18
4
1
1
1
1
14
16
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
BIO〈0—1〉
PIU
SIU〈0—1〉
Effective Signal Frequency I/O Power Dissipation (mW)
(MHz) ECKO = CLK/2
195 MHz
ECKO/4
ECKO/4
ECKO/4
ECKO/2
ECKO/2
ECKO/6
ECKO/6
ECKO/6
ECKO/1
1
30
1
30
30
30
8
8
8
0.03
0.03
127.4
15.8
8.0
286.8
63.8
5.3
5.3
5.3
32.0
4.6
78.5
0.33
9.8
9.8
9.8
5.2
5.2
5.2
0.02
0.02
† It is assumed that the SEMI is configured for a 32-bit external data bus (the ESIZE pin is high), and that the contribution from the EACKN pin is negligible.
‡ It is assumed that the pins switch from input to output at a 50% duty cycle.
§ It is assumed that the corresponding core has configured these pins as outputs.
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.3 Power Dissipation (continued)
10.3.2 I/O Power Dissipation (continued)
Power dissipation due to the input buffers is highly dependent upon the input voltage level. At full CMOS levels,
essentially no dc current is drawn. However, for levels between the power supply rails, especially at or near the
threshold of VDD2/2, high current can flow. See Section 10.1 for more information.
WARNING: The device needs to be clocked for at least seven CKI cycles during reset after powerup
(see Section 11.4 on page 279 for details). Improper reset may cause unpredictable
operation leading to device damage.
10.4 Power Supply Sequencing Issues
The DSP16410CG requires two supply voltages. The use of dual voltages reduces internal device power consumption while supporting standard 3.3 V external interfaces. The external (I/O) power supply voltage is VDD2, the
internal supply voltage is VDD1, and the internal analog supply voltage is VDD1A. VDD1 and VDD1A are typically
generated by the same power supply, with VDD1A receiving enhanced filtering near the device. In the discussion
that follows, VDD1 and VDD1A are assumed to rise and fall together, and are collectively referred to as VDD1
throughout the remainder of this section.
Power supply design is a system issue. Section 10.4.1 describes the recommended power supply sequencing
specifications to avoid inducing latch-up or large currents that may reduce the long term life of the device.
Section 10.4.2 discusses external power sequence protection circuits that may be used to meet the recommendations discussed in Section 10.4.1.
10.4.1 Supply Sequencing Recommendations
Control of powerup and powerdown sequences is recommended to address the following key issues. See
Figure 65 and Table 181 on page 273 for definitions of the terms VSEP, TSEPU, and TSEPD.
1. If the internal supply voltage (VDD1) exceeds the external supply voltage (VDD2) by a specified amount, large
currents may flow through on-chip ESD structures that may reduce the long-term life of the device or induce
latch-up. The difference between the internal and external supply voltages is defined as VSEP. It is recommended that the value of VSEP specified in Table 181 be met during device powerup and device powerdown.
External components may be required to ensure this specification is met (see Section 10.4.2).
2. During powerup, if the external supply voltage (VDD2) exceeds a specified voltage (1.2 V) and the internal supply voltage (VDD1) does not reach a specified voltage (0.6 V) within a specified time interval (TSEPU), large currents may flow through the I/O buffer transistors. This is because the I/O buffer transistors are powered by VDD2
but their control transistors powered by VDD1 are not at valid logic levels. If the requirement for TSEPU cannot be
met, external components are recommended (see Section 10.4.2).
3. During powerdown, if the internal supply voltage (VDD1) falls below a specified voltage (0.6 V) and the external
supply voltage (VDD2) does not fall below a specified voltage (1.2 V) within a specified time interval (TSEPD),
large currents may flow through the I/O buffer transistors. This is because the control transistors (powered by
VDD1) for the I/O buffer transistors are no longer at valid logic levels while the I/O buffer transistors remain powered by VDD2. If the requirement for TSEPD cannot be met, external components are recommended (see
Section 10.4.2).
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.4 Power Supply Sequencing Issues (continued)
10.4.1 Supply Sequencing Recommendations (continued)
VDD2 (EXTERNAL SUPPLY)
dc POWER SUPPLY VOLTAGE
3V
VDD1 (INTERNAL)
2V
VSEP
VSEP
1.2 V
1V
TSEPU
TSEPD
0.6 V
TIME
0930 (F)
Figure 65. Power Supply Sequencing Recommendations
Table 181. Power Sequencing Recommendations
Parameter
VSEP
Value
–0.6 V < VSEP
TSEPU
TSEPD
0 ≤ TSEPU < 50 ms
0 ≤ TSEPD < 100 ms
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Description
VSEP = VDD2 – VDD1. VSEP constraint must be satisfied for the entire
duration of power-on and power-off supply ramp.
Time after VDD2 reaches 1.2 V and before VDD1 reaches 0.6 V.
Time after VDD1 reaches 0.6 V and before VDD2 reaches 1.2 V.
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10 Electrical Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
10.4 Power Supply Sequencing Issues (continued)
10.4.2 External Power Sequence Protection Circuits
This section discusses external power sequence protection circuits which may be used to meet the recommendations discussed in Section 10.4.1. For the purpose of this discussion, the dual supply configuration of Figure 66 will
be used. The recommendations for this series supply system apply to parallel supply configurations where a common power bus simultaneously controls both the internal and external supplies.
VDD2
D1
2.1 V
SYSTEM
POWER BUS
DSP16410CG
D0
EXTERNAL
POWER
REGULATOR
INTERNAL
POWER
REGULATOR
VDD1
1563(F)
Figure 66. Power Supply Example
Figure 66 illustrates a typical supply configuration. The external power regulator provides power to the internal
power regulator.
Use of schottky diode D1 to bootstrap the VDD2 supply from the VDD1 supply is recommended. D1 ensures that the
VSEP recommendation is met during device powerdown and powerup. In addition, D1 protects the DSP16410CG
from damage in the event of an external power regulator failure.
Diode network D0, which may be a series of diodes or a single zener diode, bootstraps the VDD1 supply. After
VDD2 is a fixed voltage above VDD1 (2.1 V as determined by D0), the VDD2 supply will power VDD1 until D0 is cut
off as VDD1 achieves its operating voltage. If TSEPU/TSEPD recommendations are met, D0 is not required. Since D0
protects the DSP16410CG from damage in the event of an internal supply failure and reduces TSEPU, use of D0 is
recommended. To ensure D0 cutoff during normal system operation, D0’s forward voltage (VF) should be 2.1 V. D0
should be selected to ensure a minimum VDD1 of 0.8 V under DSP load.
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements
Timing characteristics refer to the behavior of the device under specified conditions. Timing requirements refer to
conditions imposed on the user for proper operation of the device. All timing data is valid for the following conditions:
TJ = –40 °C to +120 °C (See Section 9.3 on page 263.)
VDD2 = 3.3 V ± 0.3 V, VSS = 0 V (See Section 9.3 on page 263.)
Capacitance load on outputs (CL) = 30 pF
Output characteristics can be derated as a function of load capacitance (CL).
All outputs except ECKO: 0.025 ns/pF ≤ dt/dCL ≤ 0.07 ns/pF for 10 ≤ CL ≤ 100 pF.
For ECKO: 0.018 ns/pF ≤ dt/dCL ≤ 0.03 ns/pF for 0 ≤ CL ≤ 100 pF.
For example, if the actual load capacitance on an output pin is 20 pF instead of 30 pF, the maximum derating for a
rising edge is (20 – 30) pF x 0.07 ns/pF = 0.7 ns less than the specified rise time or delay that includes a rise time.
The minimum derating for the same 20 pF load would be (20 – 30) pF x 0.025 ns/pF = 0.25 ns.
Note: Circuit design and printed circuit board (PCB) layout can have a significant impact on signal integrity and timing of high speed designs such as the DSP16410CG SEMI. For maximum SEMI performance:
■
Minimize loading on the buses and ECKO output clock.
■
Keep PCB traces as short as possible.
■
Add terminations where necessary to maintain signal integrity.
■
Verify design performance through simulation. An IBIS model for design simulation is available through
your Agere Systems field application engineer or sales representative.
Test conditions for inputs:
■
Rise and fall times of 4 ns or less.
■
Timing reference levels for CKI, RSTN, TRST0N, TRST1N, TCK0, and TCK1 are VIH and VIL.
■
Timing reference level for all other inputs is VM (see Table 182).
Test conditions for outputs (unless noted otherwise):
■
CLOAD = 30 pF.
■
Timing reference levels for ECKO are VOH and VOL.
■
Timing reference level for all other outputs is VM (see Table 182).
■
3-state delays measured to the high-impedance state of the output driver.
Unless otherwise noted, ECKO in the timing diagrams is the free-running CLK (ECON1[1:0] (Table 60 on
page 111) = 1).
VM –
5-8215 (F)
Figure 67. Reference Voltage Level for Timing Characteristics and Requirements for Inputs and Outputs
Table 182. Reference Voltage Level for Timing Characteristics and Requirements for Inputs and Outputs
Abbreviated Reference
VM
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Parameter
Reference Voltage Level for Timing Characteristics and
Requirements for Inputs and Outputs
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Value
1.5
Unit
V
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.1 Phase-Lock Loop
Table 183 specifies the timing requirements and characteristics of the phase-lock loop (PLL) clock synthesizer. See
Section 4.18, beginning on page 199, for general information on the PLL. The PLL must be programmed so that
the timing requirements in Table 183 are met.
Table 183. PLL Requirements
Parameter
VCO Frequency Range† (VDD1A = 1.575 V)
Input Jitter at CKI
PLL Lock Time
CKI Frequency with PLL Enabled‡
CKI Frequency with PLL Disabled‡
fCKI/(D§ + 2)
Symbol
fVCO
—
tL
fCKI
fCKI
—
Min
200
—
—
6
0
3
Max
500
100
0.5
40
50
20
Unit
MHz
ps-rms
ms
MHz
MHz
MHz
† The VCO output frequency (fVCO) is fCKI x (M + 2)/(D + 2), where M and D are determined by fields in the pllfrq register (Table 123 on page 200).
‡ The PLL is disabled (powered down) if the PLLEN field (pllcon[1]) is cleared, which is the default after reset. The PLL is enabled (powered up) if the
PLLEN field (pllcon[1]) is set.
§ D is the PLL input divider and is defined by pllfrq[13:9](Table 123 on page 200).
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.2 Wake-Up Latency
Table 184 specifies the wake-up latency for the low-power standby mode. The wake-up latency is the delay
between exiting low-power standby mode and resumption of normal execution. See Section 4.20 on page 203 for
an explanation of low-power standby mode and wake-up latency.
Table 184. Wake-Up Latency
Condition
Low-power Standby Mode
(AWAIT (alf[15]) = 1)
PLL Disabled‡
During Standby
PLL Enabled‡
During Standby
Wake-Up Latency
PLL Deselected† During
PLL Enabled‡ and Selected†
During Normal Execution
Normal Execution
3T§
3T§ + tL††
3T§
3T§
† The PLL is deselected if the PLLSEL field (pllcon[0]) is cleared, which is the default after reset. The PLL is selected if the PLLSEL field
(pllcon[0]) is set.
‡ The PLL is disabled (powered down) if the PLLEN field (pllcon[1]) is cleared, which is the default after reset. The PLL is enabled (powered
up) if the PLLEN field (pllcon[1]) is set.
§ T = CLK clock cycle (fCLK = fCKI if PLL deselected; fCLK = fCKI x ((M + 2)/((D + 2) x f(OD))) if PLL enabled and selected).
†† tL = PLL lock-in time (see Table 183 on page 276).
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.3 DSP Clock Generation
t1
t3
t2
VIH–
CKI VIL–
t5
t4
ECKO VOH–
VOL–
t6
5-4009(F).i
Figure 68. I/O Clock Timing Diagram
Table 185. Timing Requirements for Input Clock
Abbreviated Reference
t1†
t2
t3
Parameter
Clock In Period (high to high)
Clock In Low Time (low to high)
Clock In High Time (high to low)
Min
20
9
9
Max
—‡
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† For the timing requirements shown, it is assumed that CKI (not the PLL output) is selected as the internal clock source. If the PLL is selected as the
internal clock source, the minimum required CKI period is 25 ns and the maximum required CKI period is 167 ns.
‡ Device is fully static, t1 is tested at 100 ns input clock option, and memory hold time is tested at 0.1 s.
Table 186. Timing Characteristics for Output Clock
Abbreviated Reference
t4
t5
t6
Parameter
Clock Out High Delay (low to low)
Clock Out Low Delay (high to high)
Clock Out Period (high to high)
Min
—
—
T†
Max
10
10
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† T = internal clock period (CLK).
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.4 Reset Circuit
The DSP16410CG has three external reset pins: RSTN, TRST0N, TRST1N. At initial powerup or if any supply voltage (VDD1, VDD1A, or VDD2) falls below VDD MIN1, a device reset is required and RSTN, TRST0N, TRST1N must
be asserted simultaneously to initialize the device.
Note: The TRST0N and TRST1N pins must be asserted even if the JTAG controller is not used by the application.
VDD MIN
VDD1,
VDD1A
RAMP
t8
t146
RSTN,
TRST0N,
TRST1N
t153
VIH
VIL
t11
t10
OUTPUT VOH
PINS† VOL
CKI
† When both INT0 and RSTN are asserted, all output and bidirectional pins (except TDO, which 3-states by JTAG control) are put in a
3-state condition. With RSTN asserted and INT0 not asserted, EION, ERAMN, EROMN, EACKN, ERWN0, and ERWN1 outputs are driven
high. EA[18:0], ESEG[3:0], and ECKO are driven low.
Figure 69. Powerup and Device Reset Timing Diagram
Table 187. Timing Requirements for Powerup and Device Reset
Abbreviated Reference
t8
t146
t153
Parameter
RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N Reset Pulse (low to high)
VDD1, VDD1A MIN to RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N Low
RSTN, TRST0N, and TRST1N Rise (low to high)
Min
7T†
2T†
—
Max
—
—
60
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† T = internal clock period (CKI).
Table 188. Timing Characteristics for Device Reset
Abbreviated Reference
t10
t11
Parameter
RSTN Disable Time (low to 3-state)
RSTN Enable Time (high to valid)
Min
—
—
Max
50
50
Unit
ns
ns
Note: The device needs to be clocked for at least seven CKI cycles during reset after powerup. Otherwise, high
currents may flow.
1. See Table 176 on page 263.
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.5 Reset Synchronization
t24
CKI
VIH–
VIL–
t126
RSTN
VIH–
VIL–
FETCH OF FIRST
INSTRUCTION BEGINS
EROMN
(EXM = 1)
5-4011(F).i
Note: See Section 11.9 for timing characteristics of the EROMN pin.
Figure 70. Reset Synchronization Timing
Table 189. Timing Requirements for Reset Synchronization Timing
Abbreviated Reference
t126
t24
Parameter
Reset Setup (high to high)
CKI to Enable Valid
Min
3
4T + 0.5
Max
T/2 – 1†
4T + 4
Unit
ns
ns
† T = internal clock period (CKI).
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.6 JTAG
t12
t155
t13
t14
VIH
VIL
TCK0, TCK1
t15
t156
t16
TMS0, TMS1
VIH
VIL
t17
t18
VIH
TDI0, TDI1
VIL
t19
t20
TDO0, TD01
VOH
VOL
5-4017(F).d
Figure 71. JTAG I/O Timing Diagram
Table 190. Timing Requirements for JTAG I/O
Abbreviated Reference
t12
t13
t14
t155
t156
t15
t16
t17
t18
Parameter
TCK Period (high to high)
TCK High Time (high to low)
TCK Low Time (low to high)
TCK Rise Transition Time (low to high)
TCK Fall Transition Time (high to low)
TMS Setup Time (valid to high)
TMS Hold Time (high to invalid)
TDI Setup Time (valid to high)
TDI Hold Time (high to invalid)
Min
50
22.5
22.5
0.6
0.6
7.5
5
7.5
5
Max
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
V/ns
V/ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Min
—
0
Max
15
—
Unit
ns
ns
Table 191. Timing Characteristics for JTAG I/O
Abbreviated Reference
t19
t20
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Parameter
TDO Delay (low to valid)
TDO Hold (low to invalid)
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.7 Interrupt and Trap
ECKO†
t21
INT‡
t22
5-4018(F).g
† ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
‡ INT is one of INT[3:0] or TRAP.
Figure 72. Interrupt and Trap Timing Diagram
Table 192. Timing Requirements for Interrupt and Trap
Abbreviated Reference
t21
t22
Parameter
Interrupt Setup (high to low)
INT/TRAP Assertion Time (high to low)
Min
8
2T†
Max
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
† T = internal clock period (CLK).
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11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.8 Bit I/O
t144
ECKO
t29
IOBIT
(OUTPUT)
VALID OUTPUT
t28
t27
IOBIT
(INPUT)
DATA INPUT
5-4019(F).c
Figure 73. Write Outputs Followed by Read Inputs (cbit = IMMEDIATE; a1 = sbit) Timing Characteristics
Table 193. Timing Requirements for BIO Input Read
Abbreviated Reference
t27
t28
Parameter
IOBIT Input Setup Time (valid to low)
IOBIT Input Hold Time (low to invalid)
Min
10
0
Max
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
Min
—
1
Max
9
—
Unit
ns
ns
Table 194. Timing Characteristics for BIO Output
Abbreviated Reference
t29
t144
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Parameter
IOBIT Output Valid Time (high to valid)
IOBIT Output Hold Time (high to invalid)
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface
In the following timing diagrams and associated tables:
■
The designation ENABLE refers to one of the following pins: EROMN, ERAMN, or EION. The designation
ENABLES refers to all of the following pins: EROMN, ERAMN, and EION.
■
The designation ERWN refers to:
— The ERWN0 pin if the external data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic low.
— The ERWN1 and ERWN0 pins if the external data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic
high.
— The ERWN1, ERWN0, and EA0 pins if the external data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is
logic high, and if the memory access is synchronous.
■
The designation EA refers to:
— The external address pins EA[18:0] and the external segment address pins ESEG[3:0] if the external data bus
is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic low.
— The external address pins EA[18:1] and the external segment address pins ESEG[3:0] if the external data bus
is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic high.
■
The designation ED refers to:
— The external data pins ED[31:16] if the external data bus is configured as 16 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic
low.
— The external data pins ED[31:0] if the external data bus is configured as 32 bits, i.e., if the ESIZE pin is logic
high.
■
The designation ATIME refers to IATIME (ECON0[11:8]) for accesses to the EIO space, YATIME (ECON0[7:4])
for accesses to the ERAM space, or XATIME (ECON0[3:0]) for accesses to the EROM space.
ECKO†
t102
t103
ENABLE
t112
t113
ERWN
† ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
Figure 74. Enable and Write Strobe Transition Timing
Table 195. Timing Characteristics for ERWN and Memory Enables
Abbreviated Reference
t102
t103
t112
t113
284
Parameter
ECKO to ENABLE Active (high to low)
ECKO to ENABLE Inactive (high to high)
ECKO to ERWN Active (high to low)
ECKO to ERWN Inactive (high to high)
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Min
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
Max
4
4
4
4
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface (continued)
11.9.1 Asynchronous Interface
ECKO†
t122
EREQN
t122
t123
t129
ED
t127
EA
ENABLES
t128
t125
EACKN
t124
† ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
Figure 75. Timing Diagram for EREQN and EACKN
Table 196. Timing Requirements for EREQN
Abbreviated Reference
t122
t129
Parameter
EREQN Setup (low to high or high to high)
EREQN Deassertion (high to low)
Min
5
ATIMEMAX†
Max
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
Max
6
—
4T‡ + 3
—
3
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† ATIMEMAX = the greatest of IATIME(ECON0[11:8]), YATIME (ECON0[7:4]), and XATIME (ECON0[3:0]}.
Table 197. Timing Characteristics for EACKN and SEMI Bus Disable
Abbreviated Reference
t123
t124
t125
t127
t128
Parameter
Memory Bus Disable Delay (high to 3-state)
EACKN Assertion Delay† (high to low)
EACKN Deassertion Delay (high to high)
Memory Bus Enable Delay (high to active)
EACKN Delay (high to low)
Min
—
4T‡
4T‡
5
—
† If any ENABLE is asserted (low) when EREQN is asserted (low), then the delay occurs from the time that ENABLE is deasserted (high).
(The SEMI does not acknowledge the request by asserting EACKN until it has completed any pending memory accesses.)
‡ T = internal clock period (CLK).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface (continued)
11.9.1 Asynchronous Interface (continued)
ATIME = 3
ECKO†
t90
ENABLE
t93
t92
ED
READ DATA
t91
EA
READ ADDRESS
t95
ERWN
† ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
Figure 76. Asynchronous Read Timing Diagram (RHOLD = 0 and RSETUP = 0)
Table 198. Timing Requirements for Asynchronous Memory Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t92
t93
Parameter
Read Data Setup (valid to ENABLE high)
Read Data Hold (ENABLE high to invalid)
Min
5
0
Max
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
Table 199. Timing Characteristics for Asynchronous Memory Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
Parameter
t90
ENABLE Width (low to high)
t91
Address Delay
(ENABLE low to valid)
t95
ERWN Activation
(ENABLE high to ERWN low)
†
‡
§
††
Min
(T† × ATIME) – 3
—
Max
—
†
2 – (T × RSETUP‡)
Unit
ns
ns
T† × (1 + RHOLD§ +
WSETUP††) – 3
—
—
T = internal clock period (CLK).
RSETUP = ECON0[12].
RHOLD = ECON0[14].
WSETUP = ECON0[13].
Note: The external memory access time from the asserting of ENABLE can be calculated as t90 – (t91 + t92).
286
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface (continued)
11.9.1 Asynchronous Interface (continued)
ATIME = 2
IDLE‡
ATIME = 2
ECKO†
t90
t101
ENABLE
t99
t96
ERWN
t98
EA
WRITE ADDRESS
t100
t97
ED
READ ADDRESS
t114
WRITE DATA
READ DATA
† ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
‡ The idle cycle is caused by the read following the write.
Figure 77. Asynchronous Write Timing Diagram (WHOLD = 0, WSETUP = 0)
Table 200. Timing Characteristics for Asynchronous Memory Write Operations
Abbreviated
Reference
t90
t96
t97
t98
t99
t100
t101
t114
†
‡
§
††
Parameter
ENABLE Width (low to high)
Enable Delay (ERWN high to ENABLE low)
Write Data Setup (valid to ENABLE high)
Write Data Deactivation (ERWN high to 3-state)
Write Address Setup (valid to ENABLE low)
Write Data Activation (ERWN low to low-Z)
Address Hold Time (ENABLE high to invalid)
Write Data Hold Time (ENABLE high to invalid)
Min
T†
(T† × ATIME) – 3
× (1 + WHOLD‡ + RSETUP§) – 3
(T† × ATIME) – 3
—
T† × (1 + WSETUP††) – 3
T† – 2
†
T × (1 + WHOLD‡ ) – 3
T–3
Max
Unit
—
—
—
3
—
—
—
—
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
T = internal clock period (CLK).
WHOLD = ECON0[15].
RSETUP = ECON0[12].
WSETUP = ECON0[13].
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface (continued)
11.9.2 Synchronous Interface
ECKO†
t102
t103
ENABLE
ERWN
EA
READ ADDRESS
READ ADDRESS
WRITE ADDRESS
t107
t106
t105
ED
READ DATA
READ DATA
t104
WRITE DATA
t108
† ECKO reflects CLK/2, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 0.
Figure 78. Synchronous Read Timing Diagram (Read-Read-Write Sequence)
Table 201. Timing Requirements for Synchronous Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t104
t105
Parameter
Read Data Setup (valid to high)
Read Data Hold (high to invalid)
Min
3.75
1
Max
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
Min
0.5
0.5
—
0.5
T† – 3
Max
4
4
3.9
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Table 202. Timing Characteristics for Synchronous Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t102
t103
t106
t107
t108
Parameter
ECKO to ENABLE Active (high to low)
ECKO to ENABLE Inactive (high to high)
Address Delay (high to valid)
Address Hold (high to invalid)
Write Data Active (high to low-Z)
† T = internal clock period (CLK).
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface (continued)
11.9.2 Synchronous Interface (continued)
ECKO†
t102
t103
t112
t113
ENABLE
ERWN
t107
EA
ADDRESS
t106
t110
t109
ED
DATA
t111
† ECKO reflects CLK/2, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 0.
Figure 79. Synchronous Write Timing Diagram
Table 203. Timing Characteristics for Synchronous Write Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t102
t103
t106
t107
t109
t110
t111
t112
t113
Parameter
ECKO to ENABLE Active (high to low)
ECKO to ENABLE Inactive (high to high)
Address Delay (high to valid)
Address Hold (high to invalid)
Write Data Delay (high to valid)
Write Data Hold (high to invalid)
Write Data Deactivation Delay (high to 3-state)
ECKO to ERWN Active (high to low)
ECKO to ERWN Inactive (high to high)
Min
0.5
0.5
—
0.5
—
0.5
—
0.5
0.5
Max
4
4
3.9†
—
4.3‡
—
2.5
4
4
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† For the DSP16410C device, the value of t106 is 2.5 ns maximum.
‡ For the DSP16410C device, the value of t109 is 2.5 ns maximum.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.9 System and External Memory Interface (continued)
11.9.3 ERDY Interface
N × T‡
ATIME †
END OF
ACCESS
(UNSTALLED)
SEMI
SAMPLES
ERDY PIN
END OF
ACCESS
(STALLED)
ECKO§
4T‡
t121
ENABLE
t115
t115
ERDY
N × T‡
4T‡
† ATIME must be programmed as greater than or equal to five CLK cycles. Otherwise, the SEMI ignores the state of ERDY.
‡ T = internal clock period (CLK). N must be greater than or equal to one, i.e., ERDY must be held low for at least one CLK cycle after the
SEMI samples ERDY.
§ ECKO reflects CLK, i.e., ECON1[1:0] = 1.
Figure 80. ERDY Pin Timing Diagram
As indicated in the drawing, the SEMI:
■
Samples the state of ERDY at 4T prior to the end of the access (unstalled). (The end of the access (unstalled)
occurs at ATIME cycles after ENABLE goes low.)
■
Ignores the state of ERDY before the ERDY sample point.
■
Stalls the external memory access by N × T cycles, i.e., by the number of cycles that ERDY is held low following
the ERDY sample point.
Table 204. Timing Requirements for ERDY Pin
Abbreviated Reference
Parameter
t115
ERDY Setup To any ECKO (low to high or high to high)
t121
ERDY Setup To ECKO at End of Unstalled Access (low to high)
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Min
5
4T + 5
Max
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.10 PIU
t65
t60
t60
PSTRN†
t61
t62
PADD[3:0]
t67
t66
PRWN
t63
t64
PD[15:0]
t68
PIBF
t69
t74
PRDY‡
† PSTRN is the logical OR of the PCSN input pin with the exclusive NOR of the PIDS and PODS input pins, i.e.,
PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS).
‡ It is assumed that the PRDYMD pin is logic low, configuring the PRDY pin as active-low.
Figure 81. Host Data Write to PDI Timing Diagram
Table 205. Timing Requirements for PIU Data Write Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t60
t61
t62
t63
t64
t65
t66
t67
t74
Parameter
PSTRN Pulse Width (high to low or low to high)
PADD Setup Time‡ (valid to low)
PADD Hold Time‡ (low to invalid)
PD Setup Time§ (valid to high)
PD Hold Time§ (high to invalid)
PSTRN Request Period (low to low)
PRWN Setup Time‡ (low to low)
PRWN Hold Time§ (high to high)
PSTRN Hold (low to high)
Min
max (2T†, 15)
5
5
6
5
max (5T†, 30)
0
0
1
Max
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† T is the period of the internal clock (CLK).
‡ Time to the falling edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs last.
§ Time to the rising edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs first.
Table 206. Timing Characteristics for PIU Data Write Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t68
t69
Parameter
PIBF Delay† (high to high)
PRDY Delay (low to valid)
Min
1
1
Max
12
12
Unit
ns
ns
† Delay from the rising edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs first.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.10 PIU (continued)
t65
t60
t60
PSTRN†
t61
t62
PADD[3:0]
t71
t73
PD[15:0]
t70
t72
POBE
t69
t74
PRDY‡
† PSTRN is the logical OR of the PCSN input pin with the exclusive NOR of the PIDS and PODS input pins, i.e.,
PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS).
‡ It is assumed that the PRDYMD pin is logic low, configuring the PRDY pin as active-low.
Figure 82. Host Data Read from PDO Timing Diagram
Table 207. Timing Requirements for PIU Data Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t60
t61
t62
t65
t74
Parameter
PSTRN Pulse Width (high to low or low to high)
PADD Setup Time‡ (valid to low)
PADD Hold Time‡ (low to invalid)
PSTRN Request Period (low to low)
PSTRN Hold (low to high)
Min
max (2T†, 15)
5
5
max (5T†, 30)
1
Max
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† T is the period of the internal clock (CLK).
‡ Time to the falling edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs last.
Table 208. Timing Characteristics for PIU Data Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t69
t70
t71
t72
t73
Parameter
PRDY Delay (low to valid)
POBE, PRDY Delays (valid to low)
PD Activation Delay† (low to low-Z)
POBE Delay‡ (high to high)
PD Deactivation Delay‡ (high to 3-state)
Min
1
T–3
1
1
1
Max
12
T
6
12
12
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† Delay from the falling edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs last.
‡ Delay from the rising edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs first.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.10 PIU (continued)
t65
t60
t60
PSTRN†
t61
t62
PADD[3:0]
t67
t66
PRWN
t63
t64
PD[15:0]
t68
PIBF
t69
t74
PRDY‡
† PSTRN is the logical OR of the PCSN input pin with the exclusive NOR of the PIDS and PODS input pins, i.e.,
PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS).
‡ It is assumed that the PRDYMD pin is logic low, configuring the PRDY pin as active-low.
Figure 83. Host Register Write (PAH, PAL, PCON, or HSCRATCH) Timing Diagram
Table 209. Timing Requirements for PIU Register Write Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t60
t61
t62
t63
t64
t65
t66
t67
t74
Parameter
PSTRN Pulse Width (high to low or low to high)
PADD Setup Time‡ (valid to low)
PADD Hold Time‡ (low to invalid)
PD Setup Time§ (valid to high)
PD Hold Time§ (high to invalid)
PSTRN Request Period (low to low)
PRWN Setup Time‡ (low to low)
PRWN Hold Time§ (high to high)
PSTRN Hold (low to high)
Min
max (2T†, 15)
5
5
6
5
max (5T†, 30)
0
0
1
Max
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† T is the period of the internal clock (CLK).
‡ Time to the falling edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs last.
§ Time to the rising edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs first.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.10 PIU (continued)
Table 210. Timing Characteristics for PIU Register Write Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t68
t69
Parameter
PIBF Delay† (high to high)
PRDY Delay (low to valid)
Min
1
1
Max
12
12
Unit
ns
ns
† Delay from the rising edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs first.
t65
t60
t60
PSTRN†
t61
t62
PADD[3:0]
t75
t71
t73
PD[15:0]
5-7853 (F)
† PSTRN is the logical OR of the PCSN input pin with the exclusive NOR of the PIDS and PODS input pins, i.e.,
PSTRN = PCSN | (PIDS ^ PODS).
Figure 84. Host Register Read (PAH, PAL, PCON, or DSCRATCH) Timing Diagram
Table 211. Timing Requirements for PIU Register Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t60
t61
t62
t65
Parameter
PSTRN Pulse Width (high to low or low to high)
PADD Setup Time‡ (valid to low)
PADD Hold Time‡ (low to invalid)
PSTRN Request Period (low to low)
Min
max (2T†, 15)
5
5
max (5T†, 30)
Max
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
† T is the period of the internal clock (CLK).
‡ Time to the falling edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs last.
Table 212. Timing Characteristics for PIU Register Read Operations
Abbreviated Reference
t71
t73
t75§
Parameter
PD Activation Delay† (low to low-Z)
PD Deactivation Delay‡ (high to 3-state)
PD Delay† (low to valid)
Min
1
1
—
Max
6
12
16
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† Delay from the falling edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs last.
‡ Delay from the rising edge of PIDS, PODS, or PCSN, whichever occurs first.
§ For host register read cycles, the time to valid data is defined by parameter t75. PRDY is guaranteed by design to always reflect the ready state (as
determined by the PRDYMD pin) during these accesses.
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU
t30
t32
t31
SICK
t34
t33
SIFS
t34
t33
t35
SID
B0
B1
B0
B2
t36
5-8033 (F)
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with ICKA(SCON10[2]) = 0 for passive mode input clock, ICKK(SCON10[3]) = 0 for no inversion
of SICK, IFSA(SCON10[0]) = 0 for passive mode input frame sync, IFSK(SCON10[1]) = 0 for no inversion of SIFS,
IMSB(SCON0[2]) = 0 for LSB-first input, and IFSDLY[1:0](SCON1[9:8]) = 00 for no input frame sync delay.
Figure 85. SIU Passive Frame and Channel Mode Input Timing Diagram
Table 213. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Frame Mode Input
Abbreviated Reference
t30
t31
t32
t33
t34
t35
t36
Parameter
SICK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SICK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SICK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SIFS Hold Time (high to low or high to high)
SIFS Setup Time (low to high or high to high)
SID Setup Time (valid to low)
SID Hold Time (low to invalid)
Min
25
10
10
10
10
5
8
Max
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Min
61.035
28
28
10
10
5
8
Max
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Table 214. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Channel Mode Input
Abbreviated Reference
t30
t31
t32
t33
t34
t35
t36
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Parameter
SICK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SICK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SICK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SIFS Hold Time (high to low or high to high)
SIFS Setup Time (low to high or high to high)
SID Setup Time (valid to low)
SID Hold Time (low to invalid)
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t37
t39
t38
SOCK
t40
t41
SOFS
SOD
t40
t41
t42
B0
B0
B1
t43
5-8034 (F)
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with OCKA(SCON10[6]) = 0 for passive mode output clock, OCKK(SCON10[7]) = 0 for no inversion of SOCK, OFSA(SCON10[4]) = 0 for passive mode output frame sync, OFSK(SCON10[5]) = 0 for no inversion of SOFS,
OMSB(SCON0[10]) = 0 for LSB-first output, OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1 for frame mode output, and OFSDLY[1:0](SCON2[9:8]) = 00 for
no output frame sync delay.
Figure 86. SIU Passive Frame Mode Output Timing Diagram
Table 215. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Frame Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t37
t38
t39
t40
t41
Parameter
SOCK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SOCK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SOCK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SOFS Hold Time (high to low or high to high)
SOFS Setup Time (low to high or high to high)
Min
25
10
10
10
10
Max
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Table 216. Timing Characteristics for SIU Passive Frame Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t42
t43
296
Parameter
SOD Delay (high to valid)
SOD Hold (high to invalid)
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Min
1
0
Max
16
4
Unit
ns
ns
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t37
t39
t38
SOCK
t40
t41
SOFS
SOD
t40
t41
t42
t44
B0
B0
B1
B1
t43
5-8032
5-8032
(F)(F)
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with OCKA(SCON10[6]) = 0 for passive mode output clock, OCKK(SCON10[7]) = 0 for no inversion of SOCK, OFSA(SCON10[4]) = 0 for passive mode output frame sync, OFSK(SCON10[5]) = 0 for no inversion of SOFS,
OMSB(SCON0[10]) = 0 for LSB-first output, OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 0 for channel mode output, and OFSDLY[1:0](SCON2[9:8]) = 00
for no output frame sync delay.
Figure 87. SIU Passive Channel Mode Output Timing Diagram
Table 217. Timing Requirements for SIU Passive Channel Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t37
t38
t39
t40
t41
Parameter
SOCK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SOCK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SOCK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SOFS Hold Time (high to low or high to high)
SOFS Setup Time (low to high or high to high)
Min
61.035
28
28
10
10
Max
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Table 218. Timing Characteristics for SIU Passive Channel Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t42
t43
t44
Agere Systems Inc.
Parameter
SOD Delay (high to valid)
SOD Hold (high to invalid)
SOD Deactivation Delay (high to 3-state)
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Min
1
0
—
Max
16
4
12
Unit
ns
ns
ns
297
Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t76
t77
t78
SCK
Figure 88. SCK External Clock Source Input Timing Diagram
Table 219. Timing Requirements for SCK External Clock Source
Abbreviated Reference
t76
t77
t78
298
Parameter
SCK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SCK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SCK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
Agere Systems—Proprietary
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Min
25
10
10
Max
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t45
t47
t46
SICK
SIFS
t48
SID
t49
B0
B1
B0
B2
t50
5-8029 (F)
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with ICKA(SCON10[2]) = 1 for active mode input clock, ICKK(SCON10[3]) = 0 for no inversion
of SICK, IFSA(SCON10[0]) = 1 for active mode input frame sync, IFSK(SCON10[1]) = 0 for no inversion of SIFS, IMSB(SCON0[2]) = 0
for LSB-first input, and IFSDLY[1:0](SCON1[9:8]) = 00 for no input frame sync delay.
Figure 89. SIU Active Frame and Channel Mode Input Timing Diagram
Table 220. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Frame Mode Input
Abbreviated Reference
t45
t49
t50
Parameter
SICK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SID Setup Time (valid to low)
SID Hold Time (low to invalid)
Min
25†
9
8
Max
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin, depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]). The
period of SICK is dependent on the period of the active clock source and the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]).
Table 221. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Frame Mode Input
Abbreviated Reference
t46
t47
t48
Parameter
SICK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SICK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SIFS Delay (high to high)
Min
TAGCKH† – 3
TAGCKL† – 3
TCKAG† – 5
Max
TAGCKH† + 3
TAGCKL† + 3
TCKAG† + 5
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† TAGCKH and TAGCKL are dependent on the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]) and the period of the active clock source.
TCKAG is the period of the active clock source. The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin,
depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]).
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
Table 222. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Channel Mode Input
Abbreviated Reference
t45
t49
t50
Parameter
SICK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
SID Setup Time (valid to low)
SID Hold Time (low to invalid)
Min
61.035†
9
8
Max
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin, depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]). The
period of SICK is dependent on the period of the active clock source and the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]).
Table 223. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Channel Mode Input
Abbreviated Reference
t46
t47
t48
Parameter
SICK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SICK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SIFS Delay (high to high)
Min
TAGCKH†
–3
TAGCKL† – 3
TCKAG† – 5
Max
TAGCKH†
+3
TAGCKL† + 3
TCKAG† + 5
Unit
ns
ns
ns
† TAGCKH and TAGCKL are dependent on the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]) and the period of the active clock source.
TCKAG is the period of the active clock source. The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin, depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]).
300
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t51
t53
t52
SOCK
SOFS
t54
t55
SOD
B0
B1
B0
B2
t56
5-8030 (F)
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with OCKA(SCON10[6]) = 1 for active mode output clock, OCKK(SCON10[7]) = 0 for no inversion of SOCK, OFSA(SCON10[4]) = 1 for active mode output frame sync, OFSK(SCON10[5]) = 0 for no inversion of SOFS,
OMSB(SCON0[10]) = 0 for LSB-first output, OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1 for frame mode output, and OFSDLY[1:0](SCON2[9:8]) = 00 for
no output frame sync delay.
Figure 90. SIU Active Frame Mode Output Timing Diagram
Table 224. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Frame Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t51
Parameter
SOCK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
Min
25†
Max
—
Unit
ns
† The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin, depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]). The
period of SOCK is dependent on the period of the active clock source and the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]).
Table 225. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Frame Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t52
t53
t54
t55
t56
Parameter
SOCK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SOCK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SOFS Delay (high to high)
SOD Data Delay (high to valid)
SOD Data Hold (high to invalid)
Min
TAGCKH† – 3
TAGCKL† – 3
TCKAG† – 5
0
–3
Max
TAGCKH† + 3
TAGCKL† + 3
TCKAG† + 5
16
5
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† TAGCKH and TAGCKL are dependent on the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]) and the period of the active clock source.
TCKAG is the period of the active clock source. The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin,
depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]).
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t51
t53
t52
SOCK
SOFS
t54
t55
SOD
B0
B0
B1
t56
t57
5-8028 (F)
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with OCKA(SCON10[6]) = 1 for active mode output clock, OCKK(SCON10[7]) = 0 for no inversion of SOCK, OFSA(SCON10[4]) = 1 for active mode output frame sync, OFSK(SCON10[5]) = 0 for no inversion of SOFS,
OMSB(SCON0[10]) = 0 for LSB-first output, OFRAME(SCON2[7]) = 1 for frame mode output, and OFSDLY[1:0](SCON2[9:8]) = 00 for
no output frame sync delay.
Figure 91. SIU Active Channel Mode Output Timing Diagram
Table 226. Timing Requirements for SIU Active Channel Mode Output
Abbreviated Reference
t51
Parameter
SOCK Bit Clock Period (high to high)
Min
61.035†
Max
—
Unit
ns
† The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin, depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]). The
period of SOCK is dependent on the period of the active clock source and the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]).
Table 227. Timing Characteristics for SIU Active Channel Mode Output
Abbreviated
Reference
t52
t53
t54
t55
t56
t57
Parameter
SOCK Bit Clock High Time (high to low)
SOCK Bit Clock Low Time (low to high)
SOFS Delay (high to high)
SOD Data Delay (high to valid)
SOD Data Hold (high to invalid)
SOD Deactivation Delay (high to 3-state)
Min
Max
Unit
TAGCKH† – 3
TAGCKL† – 3
TCKAG† – 5
0
–3
—
TAGCKH† + 3
TAGCKL† + 3
TCKAG† + 5
16
5
15
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
† TAGCKH and TAGCKL are dependent on the programming of the AGCKLIM[7:0] field (SCON11[7:0]) and the period of the active clock source.
TCKAG is the period of the active clock source. The active clock source is programmed as either the internal clock CLK or the SCK pin,
depending on the AGEXT field (SCON12[12]).
302
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t80
t82
t81
SCK
t84
t83
SIFS
t83
SID
B0
BN – 1
t85
B2
B4
t86
ICK†
† ICK is the internal active generated bit clock shown for reference purposes only.
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with ICKA (SCON10[2]) = 1 for active mode input clock, I2XDLY (SCON1[11]) = 1 for extension
of active input bit clock, IFSA (SCON10[0]) = 1 and AGSYNC (SCON12[14]) = 1 to configure SIFS as an input and to synchronize the
active bit clocks and active frame syncs to SIFS, IFSK (SCON10[1]) = 1 for inversion of SIFS, IMSB (SCON0[2]) = 0 for LSB-first input,
IFSDLY[1:0] (SCON1[9:8]) = 00 for no input frame sync delay, AGEXT (SCON12[12]) = 1 for SCK pin as active clock source, SCKK
(SCON12[13]) = 1 for inversion of SCK, and AGCKLIM[7:0] (SCON11[7:0]) = 1 for an active clock divide ratio of 2.
Figure 92. ST-Bus 2x Input Timing Diagram
Table 228. ST-Bus 2x Input Timing Requirements
Abbreviated Reference
t80
t81
t82
t83
t84
t85
t86
Agere Systems Inc.
Parameter
SCK Clock Period (low to low)
SCK Clock Low Time (low to high)
SCK Clock High Time (high to low)
SIFS Hold (low to low or low to high)
SIFS Setup (low to low)
SID Setup (valid to high)
SID Hold (high to valid)
Agere Systems—Proprietary
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Min
60
30
30
30
20
5
20
Max
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
303
Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
11 Timing Characteristics and Requirements (continued)
11.11 SIU (continued)
t80
t82
t81
SCK
t84
t83
SIFS
t83
SOD
t89
BN – 1
B0
B2
B4
t58
OCK†
† OCK is the internal active generated bit clock shown for reference purposes only.
Note:
It is assumed that the SIU is configured with OCKA (SCON10[6]) = 1 for active mode output clock, IFSA(SCON10[0]) = 1 and AGSYNC
(SCON12[14]) = 1 to configure SIFS as an input and to synchronize the active bit clocks and active frame syncs to SIFS,
OFSA(SCON10[4]) = 1 for active output frame sync, IFSK(SCON10[1]) = 1 for inversion of SIFS, OMSB(SCON0[10]) = 0 for LSB-first
input, OFSDLY[1:0](SCON2[9:8]) = 00 for no output frame sync delay, AGEXT (SCON12[12]) = 1 for SCK pin as active clock source,
SCKK (SCON12[13]) = 1 for inversion of SCK, and AGCKLIM[7:0] (SCON11[7:0]) = 1 for an active clock divide ratio of 2.
Figure 93. ST-Bus 2x Output Timing Diagram
Table 229. ST-Bus 2x Output Timing Requirements
Abbreviated Reference
t80
t81
t82
t83
t84
Parameter
SCK Clock Period (low to low)
SCK Clock Low Time (low to high)
SCK Clock High Time (high to low)
SIFS Hold (low to low or low to high)
SIFS Setup (low to low)
Min
60
30
30
30
20
Max
—
—
—
—
—
Unit
ns
ns
ns
ns
ns
Min
1
0
Max
25
4
Unit
ns
ns
Table 230. ST-Bus 2x Output Timing Characteristics
Abbreviated Reference
t89
t58
304
Parameter
SOD Delay (low to valid)
SOD Hold (high to invalid)
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
12 Appendix—Naming Inconsistencies
Table 231 lists the inconsistencies for pin names between this document and the LUxWORKS debugger.
Table 231. Pin Name Inconsistencies
Data Sheet
Debugger
PRDY
PREADY
PRDYMD
PREADYMD
ERDY
EREADY
Table 232 lists the inconsistencies for register names between this document and the LUxWORKS debugger.
Table 232. Register Name Inconsistencies
Agere Systems Inc.
Data Sheet
Debugger
ECON0
ECN0
ECON1
ECN1
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
13 Outline Diagram—208-Ball PBGA
All dimensions are in millimeters.
17.00 ± 0.20
+ 0.70
15.00 – 0.05
A1 BALL
IDENTIFIER ZONE
+ 0.70
15.00 – 0.05
17.00 ± 0.20
1.91
1.56 ± 0.21
0.80 ± 0.05
0.61 ± 0.06
SEATING PLANE
0.20
0.50 ± 0.10
SOLDER BALL
15 SPACES @ 1.00 = 15.00
1.00
T
R
P
N
+ 0.07
0.63 – 0.13
M
L
K
J
15 SPACES
@ 1.00 = 15.00
H
G
F
E
D
C
B
A
A1 BALL
CORNER
1
2
3 4
5
6
7
8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
5-7809 (F).b
306
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
14 Index
clock
bit 152, 157, 159
phase-lock loop (see clock, PLL)
PLL 198
clock synthesizer (see clock, PLL)
code
boot 39
HDS 39
control block 19
control registers (see registers, control)
counters 20
Symbols
– 216
–– 216
& 216
( ) 216
* 216
**2 216
+ 216
++ 216
: 216
<< 216
<<< 216
>> 216
>>> 216
[ ] 14
^ 216
_ (underscore) 216
{ } 216
| (pipe) 216
~ 216
± 216
〈 〉 216
  216
D
DAU 19, 20
DMAU channel
bypass 86, 133
DMAU channels
MMT 64, 86, 90
memory-mapped registers 91
SWT 64, 83, 84, 87, 152
memory-mapped registers 88
E
exponent computation 223
F
A
absolute value (see function, abs)
ACS 19
ALU/ACS 221
arithmetic unit control registers (see register, auc0; register, auc1)
auc0 (see register, auc0)
auc1 (see register, auc1)
B
BMU 221
boot program 23
bus
XAB 38
XDB 38
YAB 38
YDB 38
ZEAB 38
ZEDB 38
ZIAB 38
ZIDB 38
flag
ALLF 50, 52, 224
ALLT 50, 52, 224
LOCK 224
MGIBE 47, 48, 224
MGOBF 47, 48, 224
SOMEF 50, 52, 224
SOMET 50, 52, 224
flags
conditional instruction 224
PIU
PIBF 134
POBE 134
function
cmp0 20, 223
cmp1 20, 223
cmp2 20, 223
min 223
functions
side effects 20
G
C
guard bits 227
cache 208
instruction 19
circular buffers 20
H
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h (see register, h)
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
holding register (see register, c2)
M
I
macro
SLEEP_ALF () 203
memory
addressing
register-indirect 20
CACHE1 39
EIO 39, 110
ERAM 39, 110
EROM 39, 110
IROM0 39, 206
IROM1 39, 206
shared local (SLM) 39, 43, 45
TPRAM0 39, 44
TPRAM1 39, 44
X- space 38
Y- space 38
Z- space 38
memory-to-memory channels (see DMAU channels,
MMT)
MGU0 46
MGU1 46
modes of operation
channel 152
frame 152
i (see register, i)
instruction
di 25, 30, 31
ei 25, 31
icall IM6 25, 34
ireturn 25, 30, 32
treturn 25, 32
instruction cache 19
instruction set 208
instructions
ALU group 208
ALU/ACS 221
BMU 221
BMU group 208
cache group 208
conditional 224
control group 208
data move and pointer arithmetic group 208
MAC 221
MAC group 208
not cacheable 209
notation conventions 14, 216
F titles 216
lower-case 216
UPPER-CASE 216
special function group 208
interrupt
DMINT4 49
DMINT5 49
MGIBF 47, 48
PHINT 30, 151
PINT 30
priority
assigning 31
SIGINT 47
SIINT 158
software 34
SOINT 159
interrupt multiplexer (IMUX) 28
interrupts 25
hardware 27, 28
PIU 151
ireturn (see instruction, ireturn)
J
j (see register, j)
K
k (see register, k)
308
N
notation (see instructions notation conventions)
P
PC (see register, PC)
pi (see register, pi)
pin
CKI 255
EA0 106, 256
EACKN 103, 258
ECKO 203, 255
EION 104, 122, 136, 257
ERAMN 104, 122, 136, 256
ERDY 103, 118, 257
EREQN 103, 257
EROMN 105, 122, 136, 257
ERTYPE 102, 114, 122, 258
ESIZE 102, 106, 108, 122, 258
EXM 23, 102, 206, 258
PCSN 137, 138, 141, 143, 261
PIBF 137, 140, 146, 260
PIDS 137, 138, 141, 143, 260
PINT 30, 137, 140, 151, 260
POBE 137, 140, 141, 146, 260
PODS 137, 138, 141, 143, 260
PRDY 137, 140, 141, 146, 260
PRDYMD 137, 140, 260
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Data Sheet
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DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
PRWN 137, 138, 143, 261
RSTN 23, 206, 255
SCK0 259
SCK1 259
SICK0 258
SICK1 259
SID0 258
SID1 259
SIFS0 258
SIFS1 259
SOCK 158
SOCK0 258
SOCK1 259
SOD0 258
SOD1 259
SOFS0 258
SOFS1 259
TCK0 261
TCK1 261, 262
TDI0 261
TDI1 261
TDO0 261
TDO1 261
TMS0 261
TMS1 261
TRAP 25, 34, 47, 255
TRST0N 23, 261
TRST1N 23, 261
pins
EA[18:0] 107, 122, 136
EA[18:1] 256
ED[31:0] 106, 122, 255
ERWN[1:0] 105, 122, 256
ESEG[3:0] 39, 106, 107, 112, 122, 256
INT[3:0] 34, 255
IO0BIT[6:0] 50, 255
IO1BIT[6:0] 50, 255
PADD[3:0] 137, 139, 141, 143, 260
PD[15:0] 137, 139, 141, 143, 260
PIU
address and data 139
enable and strobe 138
external interface 137
flags, interrupt, and ready 140
SCK[1:0] 154
SEMI 101
SICK[1:0] 154, 157, 159
SID[1:0] 154, 157, 166
SIFS[1:0] 154, 157, 160
SIU 154
SOCK[1:0] 154, 158, 159
SOD[1:0] 154, 158, 166
SOFS[1:0] 154, 158, 160
postincrement (see registers, postincrement)
powerup reset 247
Agere Systems Inc.
pr (see register, pr)
psw0 (see register, psw0)
psw1 (see register, psw1)
pt0 (see registers, pointer, coefficient (X space,
(pt0—pt1)))
pt1 (see registers, pointer, coefficient (X space,
(pt0—pt1)))
ptrap (see register, ptrap)
R
rb0 (see registers, circular buffer)
rb1 (see registers, circular buffer)
re0 (see registers, circular buffer)
re1 (see registers, circular buffer)
register
alf 51, 233
AWAIT field 203
auc0 20, 234
auc1 20, 235
c0 20
c1 20
c2 20
cbit 51, 52, 236
DATA[6:0]/PAT[6:0] field 50
MODE[6:0]/MASK[6:0] field 50
cloop 237
csave 237
cstate 237
CTL〈0—3〉 74, 83, 84
SIGCON[2:0] field 87
CTL〈4—5〉 76, 86
SIGCON[2:0] field 90
DADD〈0—3〉 83, 84
DADD〈0—5〉 77
DADD〈4—5〉 86
DBAS〈0—3〉 81, 83, 84
DCNT〈0—3〉 79, 83, 85
DCNT〈4—5〉 79, 86
DMAU
memory-mapped
status 69
DMCON0 71, 83, 85, 86
DRUN[1:0] field 87, 88
HPRIM field 93
MINT field 93
SRUN[1:0] field 87
TRIGGER[5:4] field 94
TRIGGER4 field 90
TRIGGER5 field 90
XSIZE4 field 90
XSIZE5 field 90
DMCON1 72
PIUDIS field 86
RESET[5:0] field 94
DSCRATCH 135, 143
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
DSTAT 69, 92
DTAT
ERR[5:0] field 94
ECON0 110
IATIME field 114, 118, 126
RHOLD field 114, 126
RSETUP field 114, 126
SLKA fields 126
WHOLD field 114, 126
WSETUP field 114, 126
XATIME field 114, 118, 126
YATIME field 114, 118, 126
ECON1 111
ECKO field 124
ECKO[1:0] field 122, 202
ECKOB[1:0] and ECKOA[1:0] fields 203
EREADY field 118
ITYPE field 122, 124
WEROM field 39
YTYPE field 114, 122, 124
EXSEG0 112
EXSEG1 112
EYSEG0 113
EYSEG1 113
FSTAT 195
h 20
holding (see register, c2)
HSCRATCH 135
i 20
ICIX〈0—3〉 196
ID 57, 239
imux 25, 28, 238
XIOC[1:0] field 49
inc0 31, 49, 239
inc1 31, 48, 49, 239
ins 32, 37, 240
PHINT interrupt condition field 206
interrupt return (see register, pi)
j 20
k 20
LIM〈0—3〉 80, 83, 85
LIM〈4—5〉 80, 86
mgi 46, 47, 240
mgo 46, 47, 48, 240
OCIX〈0—3〉 196, 196
PA 136
ADD[19:0] field 136
CMP[2:0] field 136
ESEG[3:0] field 136
PAH 136, 143
PAL 136, 143
PC 20, 225
PCON 134, 143
HINT field 30, 151, 207
PINT field 30, 151
310
PDI 135, 141, 143
PDO 135, 141
pi 20, 25
pid 207, 240
pllcon 198, 199, 200, 241
PLLEN field 201, 203
PLLSEL field 198, 203
plldly 198, 199, 200, 241
pllfrq 198, 199, 200, 241
pr 20
psw0 20, 242
psw1 20, 35, 243
IEN field 30
ptrap 20, 25
rb0 (see registers, circular buffer)
rb1 (see registers, circular buffer)
re0 (see registers, circular buffer)
re1 (see registers, circular buffer)
RI〈0—3〉 82, 85
SADD〈0—3〉 83, 84
SADD〈4—5〉 77, 86
SBAS〈0—3〉 81, 83, 84
sbit 50, 52, 244
DIREC[6:0] field 50
VALUE[6:0] field 50
SCNT〈0—3〉 78, 83, 85
SCNT〈4—5〉 78, 86
SCON0 183
IFORMAT[1:0] field 158
IMSB field 157
ISIZE[1:0] field 157
OFORMAT[1:0] field 159
OMSB field 159
OSIZE field 159
SCON1 184
I2XDLY field 160
IFLIM[6:0] field 166
IFSDLY[1:0] field 157, 160
SCON10 189
ICKA field 159
ICKK field 157, 159
IFSA field 160
IFSK field 157, 160
IINTSEL[1:0] field 158
OCKA field 159
OCKK field 158, 159
OFSA field 160
OFSK field 158, 160
OINTSEL[1:0] field 159
SIOLB field 166
SCON11 192
AGCKLIM[7:0] field 160
SCON12 193
AGEXT field 160
AGFSLIM[10:0] field 160
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Use pursuant to Company instructions
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Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
AGRESET field 160
AGSYNC field 160
SCON2 185
OFLIM[6:0] field 166
OFSDLY[1:0] field 158, 160
SCON3 186
ICKE field 160
IFSE field 160
OCKE field 160
OFSE field 160
SCON4 187
SCON5 187
SCON6 188
SCON7 188
SCON8 188
SCON9 188
SIDR 87, 158, 194
signal 47, 47, 244
SODR 87, 159, 194
sp 20
STAT 195
IOFLOW field 158
OUFLOW field 159
SIBV flag 157
SIDV flag 158
SODV flag 159
STR〈0—3〉 82, 85
subroutine return (see register, pr)
timer〈0, 1〉 53, 56, 203, 246
timer〈0, 1〉c 53, 55, 245
COUNT field 53
PRESCALE[3:0] field 53
PWR_DWN field 53
RELOAD field 53
trap return (see register, ptrap)
vbase 20, 32
vector base offset (see register, vbase)
Viterbi support word (see register, vsw)
vsw 20, 246
registers
arithmetic unit control
(See also register, auc0; register, auc1) 20
auxiliary 20
circular buffer 20
control 20
counter (See register, c0; register, c1; register, c2)
data 225
DMAU
memory-mapped 67
address 77
base address 81
channel control 73
destination counter 79
limit 80
master control 71
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reindex 82
source counter 78
stride 82
PIU
memory-mapped 133
address 136
Data 135
scratch 135
pointer 225
coefficient (X space, (pt0—pt1)) 20
data (Y space, (r0—r7)) 20, 208
postincrement 20
(see also register, h; register, i; register, j; register, k)
processor status word (see register, psw0; register,
psw1)
SEMI
memory-mapped
control 109
external segment 112
SIU
memory-mapped 182
status 225
reset
device 23
JTAG controller 24
pin 23
RSTN (see reset, device and reset, pin)
S
shuffling of accumulators (see operations, shuffling of
accumulators)
signal
PTRAP 47
single-cycle squaring (see squaring, single-cycle)
single-word transfer channels (see DMAU channels,
SWT)
SLM 100
squaring
single-cycle 20
status registers (see registers, status)
sync
frame 152, 159
T
TDM 152
TIMER0_0 53
TIMER0_1 53
TIMER1_0 53
TIMER1_1 53
traceback encoder 20
traps 25
treturn (see instruction, treturn)
TRST0N (see reset, device and reset, JTAG controller)
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311
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Data Sheet
May 2003
TRST1N (see reset, device and reset, JTAG controller)
V
vbase (see register, vbase)
vectors
accumulator 227
Viterbi
decoding 19, 20
side effects 19, 20
support word (see register, vsw)
vsw (see register, vsw)
X
XAAU 19, 20, 38
XAAU contention 220
Y
YAAU 20, 38
312
Agere Systems—Proprietary
Use pursuant to Company instructions
Agere Systems Inc.
Advance Data Sheet
May 2003
DSP16410CG Digital Signal Processor
Notes
Agere Systems Inc.
Agere Systems - Proprietary
313
IEEE is a registered trademark of The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc.
ZBT and Zero Bus Turnaround are trademarks of Integrated Device Technology, Inc., and the architecture is supported by Micron Technology,
Inc., and Motorola, Inc.
3M is a registered trademark of Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company.
Intel is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola, Inc.
MITEL is a registered trademark of Mitel Corporation.
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May 2003
DS02-272WINF (Replaces DA02-001WINF)