Download the Field Programmer User Guide

C B P r o-D ON GLE UG
C L O C KB U I L D E RP R O ™ F I E L D P R O G R A M M E R K I T
1. Introduction and Scope
This document describes how to use the Si538x/4x ClockBuilder Field Programmer Kit (“CBPROG-DONGLE”) with
ClockBuilder Pro (“CBPro”) to support four programming models. Refer to the text and table below for supported
uses:
1. In-socket NVM Programming: NVM programming of “base” Si538x/4x devices (e.g., Si5341A-A-GM), or
any other factory “pre-programmed” Si538x/4x device (e.g., Si5341A-A12345-GM) which has unused
NVM banks. Silicon Labs provides 44-pin and 64-pin QFN socket adapter boards for this purpose.
2. In-system NVM Programming: NVM programming of Si538x/4x devices already mounted on a system
PCB. Users are encouraged to include a standard 10-pin header on their PCB to allow the Si538x4x Field
Programmer board and ribbon cable to easily connect to the USB to SPI/I2C adapter.
3. In-system Volatile Register Programming: of devices mounted on a PCB (e.g., use the Wizard and EVB
GUIs to inspect status registers, make volatile configuration updates, debug system firmware, etc.).
4. In-socket Volatile Register Programming: of devices mounted in the socket (e.g., use the Wizard and
EVB GUIs to inspect status registers, make volatile configuration updates, debug system firmware, etc.).
Figure 1. Supported Programming Models
2. Kit Contents
Shown below is a diagram of how the various components in the Field Programmer kit are connected to one of the
QFN socket adapter boards, or to a PCB for in-system programming.
Figure 2. Example Hardware Configuration (Using QFN Socket Board or Customer PCB)
Rev. 1.0 4/15
Copyright © 2015 by Silicon Laboratories
CBPro-DONGLE UG
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Figure 3 shows the kit contents for the CBPROG-DONGLE kit. Note that the 44-pin and 64-pin sockets are sold
separately as part numbers “Si538X4X-44SKT” and “Si538X4X-64SKT”, respectively. The Clock Builder Pro Field
Programmer resources including schematics, layout files, and BOM can be found at
www.silabs.com/CBProgrammer. Note that the sockets are sold as separate kits.
10-Win &emale/&emale
USB
Programming Dongle
Female/&emale
Figure 3. CBPROG-DONGLE Kit Contents
Figure 4. Si538x4x-44SKT-DK (l) and Si538x4x-64SKT-DK (r) Sockets Sold Separately
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3. Software Download and Installation
To install the CBPro software on any Windows 7 (or above) PC, go:
http://www.silabs.com/CBPro and download the ZIP file to install the software on your host PC.
4. Hardware Configuration
The Field Programmer Dongle acts as an interface between the CBPro GUI and the target device (any supported
Si534x or Si538x IC). Connect the provided USB cable to your PC and the CBPROG-DONGLE. The CBPROGDONLGE is then connected to the target device using the provided cables or a programming socket, depending
upon the four ways you may use the programmer as detailed in “5. Ways You can Use the Programmer”.
5. Ways You can Use the Programmer
The following four sections describe four ways you can use the CBPROG-DONGLE.
5.1. In-Socket NVM Programming
This workflow describes the process of programming or “burning” the non-volatile memory (NVM) of loose devices
using the Si538X4X-44SKT or Si538X4X-64SKT boards that feature a programming socket. Once completed, this
flow will “burn” a complete configuration from CBPro into one of the banks of NVM on the device. Devices shipped
from Silicon Labs have two NVM banks available to program (“burn”).
The steps needed to program a device’s NVM are as follows:
1. Assuming the CBPro software installs without error, connect the CBPROG-DONGLE adapter with the USB
cable to the PC on which CBPro was installed. Use the USB extender cable (provided with the kit) if your
host PC is located far from the CBPROG-DONGLE.
Figure 5. PC to CBPROG-DONGLE Connection
2. Insert a base or previously pre-programmed (e.g. OPN) Si538x/4x device into the QFN socket.
Socket and DUT Orientation: It is important to ensure the DUT is in the correct orientation before powering
up the board. If not orientated correctly the software has a feature to auto-detect it is not able to read the
part. Likely the reason is there is no part in the socket or it is oriented incorrectly. The part will not be
damaged if oriented incorrectly. The DUT has two circles on the part. The smaller circle is the pin 1
indicator. Pin 1 on the socket is lined up with the U1 and dot symbol on the silk screen.
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Figure 6. Correct Orientation of a DUT in the QFN Socket
Note: Power is not applied to the socket’s VDD and VDDA pins unless explicit action by you within CBPro. It is safe to:
1. Insert or remove a DUT in the socket before or after the socket has been connected to the main board.
2. Insert or remove a DUT in the socket before or after power has been applied to the main board by connecting the USB
cable to your PC.
As will be discussed in the walk-through that follows, power is only applied to the DUT when you explicitly scan for
a DUT or initiate a burn. Power is automatically off at all other times.
3. Connect the QFN Field Programmer Socket Board with the DUT into the CBPROG-DONGLE. Use the
male-to-female ribbon cable if needed.
Figure 7. System from PC to Programming CBPROG-DONGLE Board to QFN Field Programmer
Socket Board
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4. Start ClockBuilder Pro by locating the icon (see Figure 8) on your desktop or Windows Start Menu.
Figure 8. ClockBuilder Pro Icon
5. The ClockBuilder Pro Wizard main menu should now appear as shown in Figure 9.
Select the “NVM Burn Tool” as shown. Do not select EVB GUI.
Figure 9. ClockBuilder Pro Wizard
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6. In the Burn NVM tool window:
a. Step 1: Make sure “Kit Field Programmer Socket Board” is selected.
b. Step 2: Select “Scan”.
If the device is properly orientated in the socket, the middle section of the window will show information
about the detected device, including how many NVM banks are available to burn. In socket mode, the
CBPROG-DONGLE always communicates in 4-wire SPI host interface mode.
c. Step 3: Click on “Select Project File”.
Figure 10. Field Programmer Screen
d. Step 4: Navigate to and select your CBPro project file in the Windows file browser:
Figure 11. Navigating to CBPro Project File
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e. Step 5: After selecting the project file, select “Burn NVM” as shown in Figure 12.
Figure 12. Click on Burn NVM
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f. A series of status windows will appear as shown if the target DUT in the socket is successfully
“burned”.
Figure 13. Status Windows
When you click OK, the DUT will be rescanned and you should see the number of banks available to burn
decrease by 1.
Note that you may remove the newly programmed DUT at any time: power to the DUT is turned off immediately
after scan and burn operations complete.
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5.2. In-System NVM Programming
This workflow describes the process of programming or “burning” the non-volatile memory (NVMN) of a device
mounted on a PCB, and your goal is to reprogram a device’s NVM with a different configuration from a CBPro
project file. Once completed, this flow will “burn” a complete configuration from CBPro into one of the banks of
NVM on the device, assuming an open NVM bank is available. Devices shipped from Silicon Labs always have to
2 NVM banks available to program (“burn”). If you don’t know how many banks are still open to burn on your target
device, have no fear, as the kit’s software automatically detects and reports the number of remaining NVM banks.
The steps needed to program an “in-system” device’s NVM are as follows:
1. Assuming the CBPro software installs without error (see "3. Software Download and Installation" on page
3), connect the adapter (CBPROG-DONGLE) board with the USB cable to the PC on which CBPro was
installed. Use the USB extender cable (provided with the kit) if your host PC is located far from the
CBPROG-DONGLE.
Figure 14. PC to CBPROG-DONGLE Connection
2. Lookup and verify the host I/O mode (I2C or SPI), the I2C address, and the interface I/O voltage level
compatibility of your host’s I/O voltage (for I2C or SPI) and the DUT’s.
The value set at the DUT’s register address of 0x09043 determines how the I/O supply voltages must be
configured to communicate reliably with the CBPROG-DONGLE. You can look up your DUT’s host I/O
voltage using the “OPN Lookup” option in the NVM Burn tool as shown in Figure 15.
Figure 15. OPN Lookup Option
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If you have a custom OPN mounted on your board (a part number with a 5 digit code in the middle of the part
number, such as Si5346B-A03260-GM), you should look up the host I/O setting (located at address of 0x09043) by
selecting the OPN Lookup option. A browser will open and you will then enter in your custom OPN, as shown
below.
a. Select “Clock or Buffer”.
b. Enter in your full ordering part number (OPN). E.g., Si5346B-A03260-GM.
c. Click the blue arrow to lookup your OPN to verify the host I/O voltage setting of your DUT.
Figure 16. OPN Lookup
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3. When the utility displays the OPN’s files, click on Addendum to verify the I/O Power Supply setting of your
DUT in the Data Sheet Addendum.
“VDD Core” indicates the I/O supply for the I2C/SPI interface will operate from a 1.8 V supply.
“VDDA 3.3 V” indicates the I/O supply for the I2C/SPI interface will operate from a 3.3 V supply.
Figure 17. Finding the I/O Power Supply Type
Figure 18 shows an example data sheet addendum showing VDDA (3.3 V).
Figure 18. Finding VDDA Value
4. Connect/wire the pins of the CBPROG-DONGLE to your host system with the target Si538x4x device. Use
the male-to-female ribbon cable to connect to your host board fitted with a standard 10-pin header. This
assumes you included the 10-pin header on your PCB and followed the recommended pinout and
connections to the target Si438x/4x on your PCB. Note the pinout diagram and descriptions in the table
below.
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Figure 19. Interface Pins on Header (Front View of CBPROG-DONGLE)
Table 1. Interface Pin Connections from CBPROG-DONGLE
Pin #
Description
Wire to Your PCB?
9
A0_CSB
3- or 4-Wire SPI
10
VDD
Never
Supplies the Core
VDD voltage to the
DUT when using a
programming Field
Programmer Socket
Board. Do not use
this pin for in-system
programming.
Supplies the Core
VDD voltage to the
DUT when using a
programming Field
Programmer Socket
Board. Do not use
this pin for in-system
programming.
7
SDA_SDIO
Always
Serial data signal for
I2C transactions.
Serial data out to
Bidirectional Serial
DUT for 4-wire SPI
data for 3-wire SPI
transactions (MOSI). transactions (SDIO).
8
I2C_SEL1
Never
Used to set I2C_SEL
signal high to set the
DUT for I2C communication. (Refer to
specific part pinout
and the programming
Field Programmer
Socket Board to
determine whether to
use I2C_SEL1 or
I2C_SEL2)
Used to put I2C_SEL signal low for
SPI communication.
(Refer to specific part
pinout and the programming Field Programmer Socket
Board to determine
whether to use I2C_SEL1 or I2C_SEL2)
12
I2 C
4-wire SPI
3-wire SPI
Can be used to set
Drives the chip select Drives the chip select
I2C address bit A0
signal during SPI
signal during SPI
high or low. Routed
transactions
transactions
to A0 DUT pin on the
programming Field
Programmer Socket
Boards.
Rev. 1.0
Supplies the core
VDD voltage to the
DUT when using a
programming Field
Programmer Socket
Board. Do not use
this pin for in-system
programming.
Used to put I2C_SEL signal low for
SPI communication.
(Refer to specific part
pinout and the programming Field Programmer Socket
Board to determine
whether to use I2C_SEL1 or I2C_SEL2)
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Table 1. Interface Pin Connections from CBPROG-DONGLE (Continued)
Pin #
Description
Wire to Your PCB?
5
A1_SDO
4-Wire SPI Only
6
I2C_SEL2
Never
3
SCLK
Always
4
VDDA_VDDS
Never
1
GND
Always
2
ID
Never
4-wire SPI
I2 C
3-wire SPI
Can be used to set
Serial data from DUT Not used
I2C address bit A1
for 4-wire SPI transhigh or low. Routed actions (MISO).
to A1 DUT pin on the
programming Field
Programmer Socket
Boards.
Used to set I2C_SEL
signal high to set the
DUT for I2C communication. (Refer to
specific part pinout
and the programming
Field Programmer
Socket Board to
determine whether to
use I2C_SEL1 or
I2C_SEL2)
Used to put I2C_SEL signal low for
SPI communication.
(Refer to specific part
pinout and the programming Field Programmer Socket
Board to determine
whether to use I2C_SEL1 or I2C_SEL2)
Used to put I2C_SEL signal low for
SPI communication.
(Refer to specific part
pinout and the programming Field Programmer Socket
Board to determine
whether to use I2C_SEL1 or I2C_SEL2)
Serial clock signal for Serial clock signal for Serial clock signal for
I2C transactions.
SPI transactions.
SPI transactions.
Supplies the VDDA
and VDDS voltages
to the DUT when
using a programming Field Programmer Socket Board.
Do not use this pin
for in-system programming.
Supplies the VDDA
and VDDS voltages
to the DUT when
using a programming Field Programmer Socket Board.
Do not use this pin
for in-system programming.
Supplies the VDDA
and VDDS voltages
to the DUT when
using a programming Field Programmer Socket Board.
Do not use this pin
for in-system programming.
GND
GND
GND
The programming
Field Programmer
Socket Boards provide a voltage on this
pin to identify the
board. For in-system programming,
this pin should be
grounded or not connected to any signal.
The programming
Field Programmer
Socket Boards provide a voltage on this
pin to identify the
board. For in-system programming,
this pin should be
grounded or not connected to any signal.
The programming
Field Programmer
Socket Boards provide a voltage on this
pin to identify the
board. For in-system programming,
this pin should be
grounded or not connected to any signal.
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5.2.1. I2C Hardware Configuration
For I2C Communication connecting to an external DUT board, the following pins should be used from the:
CBPROG-DONGLE pins
Pin
3: Serial Clock SCLK
7: Serial Data SDA
Pin 1: Ground
DUT pins
Pin
A0/CS:
Drive this pin high or low to set the I2C Address.
Drive this pin high or low to set the I2C Address.
VDDA: The DUT should be externally powered. VDDA must be set to 3.3 V.
VDD: The core voltage must be set to 1.8 V.
A1/SDO:
Figure 20. Example I2C Connection to External System Target Board Using Jumper Wires
(Si5346-EVB)
When using SPI Communication with long wires as shown above it is advisable to use 6 Mb/s bus speed or less.
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5.2.2. SPI 3-Wire Hardware Configuration
For 3-wire SPI communication, when connecting to an external DUT board, the following pins should be used from
the MCU CBPROG-DONGLE.
CBPROG-DONGLE pins
Pin
3: Serial Clock SCLK
7: Serial Data SDIO for Data In and Out
Pin 9: A0_CSB for Chip Select
Pin 1: Ground
DUT PINS
Pin
VDDA:
The DUT should be externally powered. VDDA must be set to 3.3 V.
VDD: The core voltage must be set to 1.8 V.
5.2.3. SPI 4-Wire Hardware Configuration
For 4-wire SPI communication, when connecting to an external DUT board, the following pins should be used from
the MCU CBPROG-DONGLE.
CBPROG-DONGLE pins
Pin
3: Serial Clock SCLK
Pin 7: Serial Data SDIO for Data In to DUT (MOSI)
Pin 5: A1_SDO for Data Out of DUT (MISO)
Pin 9: A0_CSB for Chip Select
Pin 1: Ground
DUT PINS
VDDA:
The DUT should be externally powered. VDDA must be set to 3.3 V.
VDD: The core voltage must be set to 1.8 V.
5. After verifying the CBPROG-DONGLE to DUT connections as noted above, execute the following steps in
the “Burn NVM” menu. This example assumes a DUT is configured with the host I2C interface operating in
3.3 V I/O mode with an I2C address of 0x6F, and an I2C bus speed of 100 kHz.
Figure 21. Selecting the I2C Configuration Options
Note: 100 kHz I2C bus speed is recommended to avoid programming errors. The CBPro burn tool will always read back the
programmed NVM to verify the DUT was programmed correctly.
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6. After entering in the fields noted above, select “Scan” to initiate detection of your target DUT.
7. Assuming your DUT was properly detected, the Burn NVM window will appear again, showing the
presence of the DUT, its DESIGN_ID value, and the # of NVM banks available (in this case, there are no
more NVM banks available to burn).
Figure 22. Board Information and NVM Burn Banks Available
8. Navigate to and select your CBPro project file in the Windows file browser.
Figure 23. Navigating to CBPro Project File
9. After selecting the project file, select “Burn NVM” as shown:
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Figure 24. Select Burn NVM if Fewer than 3 Banks Burned
5.3. In-System Volatile Register Programming and Register Debug
This workflow allows users to use the full CBPro configuration Wizard and EVB GUI to make volatile changes to a
device’s configuration and inspect the state of various status registers. There are two ways you can interact with
your PCB-based DUT using the field programmer:
Use
CBPro Wizard to edit your device configuration, and write out changes directly to your DUT.
the EVB GUI, to inspect registers
All of the relevant CBPro features available when working with a Silicon Labs EVB will be available to you, with
these exceptions:
Launch
There
is no voltage regulator control or voltage/current readings of any kind
You must configure the host interface settings so that CBPro can use the DUT correct communication
scheme/wire out.
If you write out your design/project file, all registers configured via the “Host Interface” section of the wizard
are written to the DUT (these registers are skipped when writing a design to a Silicon Labs EVB).
5.3.1. Using the CBPro Wizard with Your PCB-Based DUT
When you launch the CBPro wizard, instead of clicking the NVM Burn Tool, open your existing project file:
Figure 25. Open Design Project File, and see Field Programmer Detected
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In the design dashboard, you will see a pulldown to configure the host interface between the CBPROG-DONGLE
and your PCB:
Figure 26. Pull Down Menu for Communication Options
Click the pulldown and configure the interface:
Figure 27. Communication Configuration Window
Once configured, you can write out your design to DUT using the button on the dashboard:
Or on any configuration page in the wizard:
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5.3.2. Using the EVB GUI with your PCB-Based DUT
You launch the EVB GUI that same way you would when working with a Silicon Labs EVB:
1. From the CBPro wizard home page:
2. From the CBPro wizard design dashboard (you have opened a project file):
3. From the EVB GUI shortcut on the desktop or Windows Start Menu.
Similar to the dashboard and burn tool, you must configure the host interface options. These are available in a
panel in the upper right hand corner of the EVB GUI window.
Figure 28. Socket or In-System Programming Options
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First select either the Kit socket board if the socket is attached. Otherwise select “Wired to your own board”.
Click the Config button to modify the host interface options.
Once configured, you can then turn on the socket power to do the following:
Write
a project file to the device (File menu)
DUT status registers
Peek/poke arbitrary DUT registers
Click the “Rescan” button to update the configuration options to the last command selected.
Inspect
5.3.3. Socket Detection in EVB GUI
Putting the device into the socket in the wrong orientation will not ruin the device, and the software does detect an
orientation error. The first two images on the left show wrong orientation. The image on the right shows the proper
orientation. The software automatically keeps the power off if it detects that the device is in an orientation that could
damage the chip and won’t allow the socket power to be turned on.
Figure 29. Socket Detection Results with Part in Different Orientations
It is advised to review the socket orientation and chip to ensure everything is correct. Make sure that the smaller
dot on the chip is lined up in the corner where the U1 is located on the socket as shown below.
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Figure 30. Correct Orientation of Device in Socket
5.4. In-Socket Volatile Register Programming and Register Debug
This workflow allows users to use the full CBPro configuration Wizard and EVB GUI to make volatile changes to a
device’s configuration and inspect the state of various status registers. There are two ways you can interact with
your PCB-based DUT using the field programmer:
Use
CBPro Wizard to edit your device configuration, and write out changes directly to your DUT.
Launch the EVB GUI, to inspect registers
All of the relevant CBPro features available when working with a Silicon Labs EVB will be available to you, without
any exceptions. The details of this workflow are the same as above. The IO voltage is set to 3.3 V within the
hardware appropriately, and does not require any external configuration.
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+V
DD+
GND
1
2
3
4
BUSY_LED_B
SF3
1
1
2
READY_LED_B
PASS_LED_B
C8
1uF
5V
C9
10uF
TP10
NI
A0_CSB_SPI_PU_EN
SDA_SDIO_SPI_PU_EN
MCU_A1_SDO_SPI_PU_EN
SCLK_SPI_PU_EN
(SS)
A0_CSB
(MOSI)
SDA_SDIO
(MISO)
MCU_A1_SDO
(SCLK)
SCLK
LED Spacer Mounts
470
R64
D5
SP0503BAHT
FB1
R63
470
22ohm @ 100MHz
2
2
2
2
2,3
2,3
2
2,3
SF4
LTL-14CHJ
D15
Ready/Busy
Red
Green
LTL-14CHJ
D14
Red
2
JP1
GND
BOOTLDR
C2CK
C2D
C8051F380
U2
R3
100
P4.0
P4.1
P4.2
P4.3
P4.4
P4.5
P4.6
P4.7
P3.0
P3.1
P3.2
P3.3
P3.4
P3.5
P3.6
P3.7
P2.0
P2.1
P2.2
P2.3
P2.4
P2.5
P2.6
P2.7
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
C3
1uF
P1.0
P1.1
P1.2
P1.3
P1.4
P1.5
P1.6
P1.7
5V
MCU
Programming
RST/C2CK
C2D
D+
D-
P0.7
P0.6
P0.5
P0.4
P0.3
P0.2
P0.1
P0.0
HEADER 4X1
13
14
8
9
47
48
1
2
3
4
5
6
C2
1uF
VDD_MCU
R67
10K
R65
1K
VDD_MCU
VDD_MCU
FAIL_LED_B
PASS_LED_B
BUSY_LED_B
READY_LED_B
R62
499
VDDA_VDDS
This MCU pin is
used to drive the
VDDA_VDDS net and
detect an incorrect
catastraphic
orientation of a
44-pin DUT. Two
incorrect positions
short VDDA_VDDS to
gnd.
3
2,3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
C4
0.1uF
TP7
ID
NI
ENCLOSURE
J3
Black plastic
enclosure for the
assembled circuit
board.
VDDA_VDDS_25VB
A1_SDO
VDD_SHDNB
VDD_33VB
VDD_25VB
VDDIO_ENB
VDDIO_33VB
VDDIO_25VB
VDDA_VDDS_SHDNB
VDDA_VDDS_33VB
2
2
3
3
2
2
SPI_3W _EN
MCU_A1_SDO_ENB
I2C_LS_SHDNB
I2C_XL_SHDNB
I2C_SEL1
I2C_SEL2
2
2
ID 3
SDA
SCL
TP8
GND
NI
1
R1
1K
VDD_MCU
2
0
R68
V-
5
-
+
4
3
VDD_MCU
V+
C5
4.7uF
AD8628
U4
NI
Figure 31. CBPROG-DONGLE Schematic (1 of 3)
1K
R12
C11
1uF
R11
1K
VDD_MCU
TP9
NI
VDD_MCU is
supplied by the
internal regulator
of the MCU
10
VDD
Green
REGIN
VBUS
FAIL_LED_B
J2
USB Type B
SH
SH
Rev. 1.0
6
5
NI
C7
0.1uF
C6
0.1uF
1
2
C10
1uF
NI
GND
I/O
5V
U1
VDD
VDD_pin
5
4
3
6
GND
IN1
IN2
IN3
IN4
VDD
C40
1uF
NI
NC
NC
ADG712
U3
4
12
VDDA_VDDS
VDDA_VDDS_pin
ADC Switching
and Buffering
10.0K
±0.1%
R9
5
1
16
9
8
13
NC3
NC2
NC1
NC0
R10
10.0K
±0.1%
DS2431
Board Serial
Number IC
3
11
12
GND
7
14
S1
2
D1
11
S2
D2
15
S3
D3
6
S4
D4
7
22
10
Pass/Fail
CBPr o-D O NG L E UG
6. Schematics
6.1. CBPROG-DONGLE Schematic
1,2,3
1,2,3
A0_CSB
SCLK
SDA_SDIO
Rev. 1.0
1
SCL
1
5
I2C_LS_SHDNB
SDA
1
I2C signals from MCU
SPI signals from MCU
(SS)
(SCLK)
1,2,3
(MOSI)
MCU_A1_SDO
1
(MISO)
C35
0.1uF
B
VDD_IO
6
R14
2.49K
R15
2.49K
NLSV1T244
U17
5
VDD_MCU
1
A
R16
10K
OEB
VCCB
GND
VCCA
3
4
2
5
7
6
8
PCA9517D
EN
SCLB
SDAB
VCCB
U6
C13
0.1uF
GND
SCLA
SDAA
VCCA
1
4
2
3
4
1
C14
0.1uF
VDD_IO
MCU_A1_SDO_ENB
C38
0.1uF
1
3
5
2
R50
20K
SPI_3W _EN
ADG719
GND
D
VDD
U16
0
NI
R60
R51
20K
IN
S2
S1
1
6
4
1
I2C_XL_SHDNB
3
0 NI
R61
R13
10K
MCU_A1_SDO_SPI_PU_EN
SDA_SDIO_SPI_PU_EN
SCLK_SPI_PU_EN
A0_CSB_SPI_PU_EN
VDD_IO
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
C37
0.1uF
GND
EN
VCC
GND
BUS2
BUS1
U5
GND
IN1
IN2
IN3
IN4
VDD
3
R55
402
R56
402
NC
NC
5
4
6
2
I2C bus accelerator
for long bus lines
and capacitance
loading beyond
400pF.
LTC4311
C12
0.1uF
5
1
16
9
8
13
Figure 32. CBPROG-DONGLE Schematic (2 of 3)
I2C voltage level shifter
VDD_MCU
10K
R59
C36
0.1uF
5V
Allows switching
between 3-wire and
4-wire SPI.
VDD_IO
14
S1
2
D1
11
S2
D2
15
S3
6
S4
D3
7
D4
10
SPI A1_SDO (MISO)
voltage level
shifter
5V
R57
402
R58
402
Switchable
Pull-ups for
the SPI bus.
4
12
U8
ADG712
1
A0_CSB
SCLK
1,2,3
1,2,3
1,3
1,2,3
SDA_SDIO
A1_SDO
SPI and I2C
signals to DUT
C B P r o -D ON GL E U G
23
Rev. 1.0
A
B
C
1
VDD_25VB
VDDA_VDDS_33VB
VDDA_VDDS_25VB
1
VDDA_VDDS_SHDNB
VDD_33VB
1
VDD_SHDNB
1
1
1
VDDIO_25VB
1
VDDIO_ENB
VDDIO_33VB
1
1
C26
1uF
5V
5V
C31
1uF
10K
R26
C32
1uF
10K
R42
2
3
OUT
10K
R43
4
5
6
8
2
1
C24
0.01uF
FB
OUT
OUT
7
5
4
3
R33
4.42K
R28
1.0
C25
4.7uF
VDD_pin
C27
0.01uF
R34
9.53K
6
8
2
1
FB
OUT
OUT
U14
GND NC
EN
IN
IN
TPS79501
7
5
4
3
1.0
R39
R47
8.06K
C30
1uF
R48
17.4K
1.0
R66
R45
17.4K
R49
21.5K
R41
10K
VDD
VDDA_VDDS
VDDA_VDDS
TP3
NI
R46
21.5K
R40
10K
VDD
TP1
NI
SCLK
1,2
(SCLK)
(MISO) A1_SDO
1,2
A0_CSB
(MOSI) SDA_SDIO
(SS)
1,2
1,2
D6
D7
D11
GL05T-E3-08
GL05T-E3-08
D10
R37
R35
R31
GL05T-E3-08
GL05T-E3-08
0
0
0
0
R29
33pF
C39
9
7
5
3
1
SF1
Interface Connector
10
8
6
4
2
X1
SF2
2X5 Header
9
7
5
3
1
Figure 33. CBPROG-DONGLE Schematic (3 of 3)
C29
0.01uF
VDDA_VDDS_pin
R44
8.06K
C28
1uF
R36
5.9K
R27
10K
VDDA_VDDS
U13
GND NC
EN
IN
IN
TPS79501
VDD
TPS76201
GND FB
EN
IN
U12
3.3V
1
2.5V
5V
3.3V
D
VDD_IO
2.5V
VDDIO
3.3V
24
2.5V
VDD_IO
TP2
NI
10
8
6
4
2
VDD
R38
R32
R30
Bumpers that are
placed on top of
X1 as spacers
between the
conntector and
the lid if the
enclsoure.
0
0
0
VDDA_VDDS
R24
2.49K
VDD_IO
GL05T-E3-08
D8
R25
2.49K
D9
1
1
1
of
GL05T-E3-08
D12
GL05T-E3-08
ID
I2C_SEL2
I2C_SEL1
A
B
C
D
CBPr o-D O NG L E UG
SF1
R3
20K
NI
R1
1K
NI
SF2
C7
10uF
Rev. 1.0
SF3
5
4
3
6
NC3
NC2
NC1
NC0
SF4
U2
DS2431
I2C_SEL
GND
I/O
1
2
TP4
I2C_SEL
NI
10
8
6
4
2
C8
10uF
TP5
ID
NI
X1
10
8
6
4
2
9
7
5
3
1
TP6
GND
9
7
5
3
1
2X5 FEMALE
NI
C4
0.1uF
VDDA_VDDS
A0_CSB
SDA_SDIO
A1_SDO
SCLK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
VDD
C1
0.1uF
VDD
C6
0.1uF
C5
0.1uF
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
48
47
46
45
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
U1
64QFN-SKT, 9x9x0.5mm
VDD
Figure 34. 64-Pin Socket Board Schematic
A0_CSB
SDA_SDIO
A1_SDO
SCLK
TP3
VDDA/VDDS
NI
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
TP2
VDD
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
64
63
62
61
60
59
58
57
56
55
54
53
52
51
50
49
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
ePAD
65
VDDA_VDDS
VDD
NI
I2C_SEL
TP1
VDDS
NI
VDD
C3
0.1uF
0
R2
0.1uF
C2
VDDA_VDDS
C B P r o -D ON GL E U G
25
R3
NI
182
1K
R1
NI
SF1
C6
10uF
SF2
SF3
5
4
3
6
NC3
NC2
NC1
NC0
I2C_SEL1
I2C_SEL2
SF4
U2
DS2431
GND
I/O
TP4
I2C_SEL1
NI
1
2
TP5
I2C_SEL2
NI
VDD
NI
9
7
5
3
1
X2
TP7
GND
10
8
6
4
2
9
7
5
3
1
2X5 FEMALE
NI
TP6
ID
10
8
6
4
2
C7
10uF
NI
TP3
VDDA/VDDS
A0_CSB
A1_SDO
SCLK
SDA_SDIO
C3
0.1uF
VDDA_VDDS
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
VDD
Figure 35. 44-Pin Socket Board Schematic
A0_CSB
SDA_SDIO
A1_SDO
SCLK
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
44
43
42
41
40
39
38
37
36
35
34
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
VDDA_VDDS
C1
0.1uF
NI
TP2
VDD
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
C5
0.1uF
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
U1
VDD
I2C_SEL1
44QFN-SKT, 7x7x0.5mm
I2C_SEL2
ePAD
26
45
VDD
0.1uF
C2
C4
0.1uF
0
R2
VDDS
NI
TP1
VDDA_VDDS
CBPr o-D O NG L E UG
Rev. 1.0
C B P r o -D ON GL E U G
7. Bill of Materials
7.1. CBPROG-DONGLE Bill of Materials
NI
Quantity
Reference
Value
C2 C3 C8 C11 C26
9 C28 C30 C31 C32 1uF
3
1
9
2
1
2
1
7
1
1
C24 C27 C29
C39
C4 C6 C12 C13
C14 C35 C36 C37
C38
C5 C25
C9
D14 D15
D5
D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D11 D12
FB1
J2
Voltage
Tolerance
Type
PCB_Footprint
ManufacturerPN
Manufacturer
16V
±10%
X7R
C0603
C0603X7R160-105K
Venkel
0.01uF
33pF
16V
25V
±20%
±10%
X7R
C0G
C0603
C0402
C0603X7R160-103M
C0402C0G250-330K
Venkel
Venkel
0.1uF
4.7uF
10uF
LTL-14CHJ
SP0503BAHT
10V
10V
10V
±10%
±20%
±20%
X7R
X7R
X7R
C0402|C0402L
C1206
C1206
LED-T1-KK
SOT143-AKKK|SOT143
C0402X7R100-104K
C1206X7R100-475M
C1206X7R100-106M
LTL-14CHJ
SP0503BAHTG
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
SMT
USB
SOT23-123
L0805
CONN-USB-B
GL05T-E3-08
BLM21PG220SN1
61729-0010BLF
Vishay
MuRata
FCI
GL05T-E3-08
22 Ohm
USB Type B
J3
ENCLOSURE
1
4 R1 R11 R12 R65 1K
R13 R16 R26 R27
R40 R41 R42 R43
R59 R67
10
10K
NI
Rating
20mA
300mW
5A
6000mA
20V
TVS
11V
Dual Common Anode
LITE-ON TECHNOLOGY CORP
Littlefuse
±1%
ThickFilm
N/A
R0402
Emulator7045
CR0402-16W-1001F
Shanghai Zhongxingda Electronics
1/16W
Venkel
1/16W
±1%
ThickFilm
R0402|R0402L
CR0402-16W-1002F
Venkel
4 R14 R15 R24 R25 2.49K
R28
1.0
1
1/16W
1/16W
±1%
±1%
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
R0402
R0402
CR0402-16W-2491F
CR0402-16W-1R00F
Venkel
Venkel
R29 R30 R31 R32
8 R35 R37 R38 R68
R3
1
R33
1
R34
1
R36
1
R39 R66
2
R44 R47
2
R45 R48
2
R46 R49
2
R50 R51
2
0
100
4.42K
9.53K
5.9K
1.0
8.06K
17.4K
21.5K
20K
1A
1/16W
1/16W
1/16W
1/16W
3/4W
1/16W
1/16W
1/16W
1/10W
±1%
±1%
±1%
±1%
±1%
±0.1%
±1%
±1%
±1%
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
±25PPM
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
R0402|R0402L
R0402
R0402
R0402
R0402
R1210
R0402
R0402
R0402
R0603
CR0402-16W-000
CR0402-16W-1000F
CR0402-16W-4421F
CR0402-16W-9531F
CR0402-16W-5901F
CRCW12101R00FKEAHP
TFCR0402-16W-E-8061B
CR0402-16W-1742F
CR0402-16W-2152F
CR0603-10W-2002F
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
Vishay Dale
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
4 R55 R56 R57 R58
R62
1
R63 R64
2
R9 R10
2
SF1 SF2
2
402
499
470
10.0K
BUMPER
1/16W
1/16W
1/16W
1/10W
±1%
±1%
±5%
±0.1%
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
±25PPM
R0402
R0402|R0402L
R0402
R0603
RUBBER_FOOT_0.250"
CR0402-16W-4020F
CR0402-16W-4990F
CR0402-16W-471J
ERA-3AEB103V
SJ5382
Venkel
Venkel
Venkel
Panasonic
3M
Reference
SF3 SF4
U1
U12
U13 U14
U16
U17
U2
U3 U8
U5
U6
X1
Value
SPACER
DS2431
TPS76201
TPS79501
ADG719
NLSV1T244
C8051F380
ADG712
LTC4311
PCA9517D
2X5 Header
Rating
Tolerance
Type
I2C
Shrouded
PCB_Footprint
N/A
SOJ6N4.45P1.27
SOT5N2.8P0.95
DFN8N3.0P0.65E2.4X1.65
SOT6N2.8P0.95
UDFN6N1P0.4
QFP48N9X9P0.5
TSSOP16N6.4P0.65
SC70-6N2.1P0.65
SO8N6.0P1.27
CONN2X5-RA-SBH11
ManufacturerPN
7363
DS2431P+
TPS76201DBV
TPS79501DRBT
ADG719BRTZ
NLSV1T244MUTBG
CF380P1104AGQ
ADG712BRU
LTC4311CSC6#TRMPBF
PCA9517D
SBH11-PBPC-D05-RA-BK
Manufacturer
Keystone Electronics
Maxim
TI
TI
Analog Devices
On Semi
SiLabs
Analog Devices
Linear Technology
NXP
Sullins Connector Solutions
Reference
C10 C40
C7
JP1
R60 R61
TP1 TP2 TP3 TP9
TP10
TP7
TP8
U4
Value
1uF
0.1uF
HEADER 4X1
0
Rating
Type
X7R
X7R
Header
ThickFilm
PCB_Footprint
C0603
C0402|C0402L
CONN-1X4
R0603
ManufacturerPN
C0603X7R160-105K
C0402X7R100-104K
TSW-104-07-T-S
CR0603-16W-000
Manufacturer
Venkel
Venkel
Samtec
Venkel
Loop
Loop
Loop
OPAMP
TESTPOINT
TESTPOINT
TESTPOINT
SOT23-5N
151-207-RC
151-205-RC
151-203-RC
AD8628AUJ-R2
Kobiconn
Kobiconn
Kobiconn
Analog Devices
Quantity
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
Not Installed Components
Quantity
NI
NI
NI
NI
NI
2
1
1
2
NI
NI
NI
NI
5
1
1
1
RED
BLUE
BLACK
AD8628
Voltage
100mA
500mA
LDO
LDO
.9-4.5V
Buffer
MCU
5.5V
Voltage
16V
10V
Tolerance
±10%
±10%
1A
5V
Rev. 1.0
27
CBPr o-D O NG L E UG
7.2. Si538x4x-64SKT-DK Socket Board BOM
NI
Reference
Quantity
Value
Rating
6 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 C6 0.1uF
C7 C8
2
R2
1
SF1
SF2
SF3 SF4
4
U1
1
U2
1
X1
1
10uF
0
BUMPER
64QFN-SKT, 9x9x0.5mm
DS2431
2X5 FEMALE
Not Installed Components
NI
Quantity
NI
NI
1
1
Reference
R1
R3
Value
1K
20K
NI
NI
NI
3
2
1
TP1 TP2 TP3
TP4 TP5
TP6
RED
BLUE
BLACK
Voltage
Tolerance
Type
PCB_Footprint
ManufacturerPN
Manufacturer
10V
±10%
X7R
C0402|C0402L
C0402X7R100-104K
Venkel
10V
±20%
X7R
ThickFilm
C1206
R0402|R0402L
RUBBER_FOOT_SMALL
1A
CONN
C1206X7R100-106M
CR0402-16W-000
SJ61A6
QFN64N9X9P0.5-SKT-WELLS-CTI 790-42064-101G
SOJ6N4.45P1.27
DS2431P+
CONN2X5-FRA-SFH11
SFH11-PBPC-D05-RA-BK
Sullins Connector Solutions
Type
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
PCB_Footprint
R0402
R0402
ManufacturerPN
CR0402-16W-1001F
CR0402-16W-2002F
Manufacturer
Venkel
Venkel
Loop
Loop
Loop
TESTPOINT
TESTPOINT
TESTPOINT
151-207-RC
151-205-RC
151-203-RC
Kobiconn
Kobiconn
Kobiconn
QFN
Rating
1/16W
1/16W
Voltage
Tolerance
±1%
±1%
Venkel
Venkel
3M
Sensata
Maxim
7.3. Si538x4x-44SKT-DK Socket Board Bill of Materials
NI
Reference
Quantity
Value
Rating
5 C1 C2 C3 C4 C5 0.1uF
C6 C7
2
R2
1
4 SF1 SF2 SF3 SF4
U1
1
U2
1
X2
1
Not Installed Components
NI
Quantity
NI
NI
NI
NI
NI
28
10uF
0
BUMPER
44QFN-SKT, 7x7x0.5mm
DS2431
2X5 FEMALE
1
1
Reference
R1
R3
Value
1K
182
3
3
1
TP1 TP2 TP3
TP4 TP5 TP6
TP7
RED
BLUE
BLACK
Voltage
Tolerance
Type
PCB_Footprint
ManufacturerPN
Manufacturer
10V
±10%
X7R
C0402|C0402L
C0402X7R100-104K
Venkel
10V
±20%
X7R
ThickFilm
C1206
R0402|R0402L
RUBBER_FOOT_SMALL
1A
CONN
C1206X7R100-106M
CR0402-16W-000
SJ61A6
QFN44N7X7P0.5-SKT-WELLS-CTI 790-41044-101G
SOJ6N4.45P1.27
DS2431P+
CONN2X5-FRA-SFH11
SFH11-PBPC-D05-RA-BK
Sullins Connector Solutions
Type
ThickFilm
ThickFilm
PCB_Footprint
R0402
R0402
ManufacturerPN
CR0402-16W-1001F
CR0402-16W-1820F
Manufacturer
Venkel
Venkel
Loop
Loop
Loop
TESTPOINT
TESTPOINT
TESTPOINT
151-207-RC
151-205-RC
151-203-RC
Kobiconn
Kobiconn
Kobiconn
QFN
Rating
1/16W
1/16W
Voltage
Tolerance
±1%
±1%
Rev. 1.0
Venkel
Venkel
3M
Sensata
Maxim
C B P r o -D ON GL E U G
CONTACT INFORMATION
Silicon Laboratories Inc.
400 West Cesar Chavez
Austin, TX 78701
Tel: 1+(512) 416-8500
Fax: 1+(512) 416-9669
Toll Free: 1+(877) 444-3032
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