201009 ANG september env report

all you can eat
the cup leaf caterpillar has a taste for eucalypt
alcoa anglesea
2010
environment report
september
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT SEPTEMBER 2010
air
Air Monitoring
Stack Monitors
Average
Maximum
Opacity g/min 10-minute average
0.060
0.191
61.45
82.42
Ambient Monitors
SO2 1 hour ppb
Average
Maximum
Community Centre
1
69
Primary School
1
113
Mt Ingoldsby
1
85
Scout Camp
7
119
Camp Wilkin
1
80
Camp Road
1
94
Stack SO2 kg/min 1-hour average
Licence limit 100kg/min
Ambient Monitors
SO2 Maximum 1 hour averages (ppb)
Date
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Comm Centre
0
0
5
69
0
0
0
30
13
0
0
49
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
2
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
Primary School
1
0
3
69
5
0
0
3
113
0
0
60
18
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
14
0
0
0
Mt Ingoldsby
0
0
2
85
0
0
3
22
7
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Scout Camp
10
0
5
1
5
73
5
2
2
43
108
4
4
1
104
4
0
1
1
1
0
0
3
119
89
97
114
67
1
89
Camp Wilkin
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
80
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
2
Camp Road
3
0
1
94
9
0
1
1
53
0
0
71
17
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
7
49
0
0
1
EPA Air Quality Objective 200
Alcoa Local Standard 170
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT SEPTEMBER 2010
water
Water Storage
Barwon Water storage levels for the Geelong system at 72.4% capacity. Stage 1 water restrictions apply.
Water discharge
ML
September
Total
Ashponds (SP1)
111.6
1006.1
Mine (SP4)
0
0
Water Monitoring
16/09/2010
SP1
Ashpond
SP4
Mine
SP3
EPA Limit
Lab Result
4 - 10
7.2
3
Susp Solids
100
<4
100
discharge
30
<4
Colour
50
0.85
50
at
50
18
Aluminium
10
0.12
10
time
5.5
73*
Iron
10
0.22
20
of
4.0
0.59
Zinc
0.4
0.29
2.0
sampling
0.3
1.3*
pH
EPA Limit
Lab Result
Final
9
EPA Limit
No
5
Lab Result
9
4.1*
* NB: The results at SP3 appear to be outside EPA limits, but this is due to the pH levels in the natural tributaries to the Anglesea River impacting on our licenced discharge point. Alcoa Anglesea’s EPA licence includes
provision for such conditions. This is a natural phenomenon that has generated much interest locally, to learn more visit: www.ccma.vic.gov.au/documents/AngleseaRiverFAQ.pdf Further information will also be provided in
next month’s Alcoa Anglesea Environment Report.
WATER WATER USE PER MONTH (ML)
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUG
SEPT
Town Water
1.2
1.0
2.7
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
1.9
0.6
Bore Water
284
258
283
244
237
210
203
155
181
Mine Water
112
52
98
72
102
76
85
97
90
OCT
NOV
DEC
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT SEPTEMBER 2010
cup leaf moth
Trees in the Anglesea region have been impacted this
spring. You may have seen eucalypt trees in the area
with leaves that look like they have been sucked dry.
The cause has been the Cup Leaf Moth.
These
Alcoa Anglesea is a member of the Surf Coast Shi
(SCS) Flora and Fauna Action Group (FFAG). The SCS
received numerous enquiries about the large scale
defoliation of eucalypt trees in the region; however they
were unsure of the reason for the damage. The Shire
raised the issue at the October meeting of the FFAG.
ANGAIR and our own Mine Environmental Scientist, Elise
Jeffery, noted that they had seen the effects of the moth
more than five years ago. During that episode, Parks
Victoria sent samples of the caterpillar to Museum
Victoria for analysis and they were confirmed at the Cup
Leaf Moth, Limacodes longerans.
The caterpillar larval stage causes the damage to the
trees, with the leaves being completely or partially eaten
or cut off so they fall to the ground. Generally, the
caterpillars are present in small numbers in the
ecosystem. However sporadic outbreaks, like those that
have been seen in recent time across the Shire, may
cause severe damage with trees completely defoliated
over a large area. The good news is that the trees will
usually recover.
The Plant of the Anglesea Heath article below features
the Eucalyptus baxteri plant a favourite food of the cup
leaf moth.
Cup Leaf Moths belong to a small group of moths that
have unusual slug-like caterpillars which are often
beautifully marked and coloured. The caterpillars have
clusters of retractable spines on their bodies that can
inflict a sharp and painful sting, likened to that of a nettle
sting. They do not have legs like other caterpillars, but
glide over the leaf surface like a snail or slug. They
derive their name from the cup shaped cocoons made
by the caterpillars when they pupate.
PLANTS OF THE ANGLESEA HEATH
BROWN STRINGYBARK (Eucalyptus baxteri)
Size:
Habitat:
Form:
Distribution:
Bark:
Foliage:
Flowers:
Fruit:
Did you know?
3 up to 40m
damp and valley sclerophyll forests
of foothills
variable, medium sized tree with a
rounded crown
Victoria, New South Wales and
South Australia
brown, fibrous and stringy, persistent
to small branches
juvenile - opposite and ovate, paler
green with wavy edges
adult - thick, glossy green broadlanceolate leaves, 30mm x 15 cm
white profuse flowers
December - April
clusters of 7 – 15 round fruit, usually
4 short valves slightly projecting
the size of this tree is determined by
the quality of the soil on which it is
grown
BROWN STRINGYBARK
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT SEPTEMBER 2010
LAND
RAINFALL (mm)
Long Term Average
2010 Rainfall
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUG
SEPT
42.9
41.6
40.2
51.9
59.9
59.1
63.0
65.8
66.9
5.0
67.0
63.0
57.0
30.2
71.8
47.4
121.2
56.8
OCT
NOV
DEC
WATER
TOWN WATER USE (ML)
2000
2009
2010
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
Amenity Water Use
1.0
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.1
1.7
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
Process Water use
2.0
1.1
0.6
1.1
0.9
1.1
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
1.8
0.4
OCT
NOV
DEC
AIR
GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) TOTAL (Mt) & GHG EMISSION EFFICIENCY (t/mwH)
GHG t
GHG t/MWh
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
f orecast
1227846
1265103
1504860
1448793
1468098
1309674
1491486
1396713
1452351
1361632
1445999
1.24
1.19
1.21
1.21
1.20
1.21
1.20
1.18
1.23
1.22
1.19
ANGLESEA ENVIRONMENT REPORT SEPTEMBER 2010
environmental improvement
Environmental Management Targets
September
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Reportable Environmental Incidents
0
0
0
0
Env Near Miss vs Env Incident Run Rate (ratio)
6
4.4
4.4
2.5
100
100
100
90
September
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Ambient SO2 (no. readings > 200ppb)
0
0
0
0
Stack SO2 (no. hrs > 100kg/min)
0
0
0
0
SO2 Load Reductions (lost MWh)
19
146
195
NA
1.20
1.19
1.19
1.20
0
0
0
0
September
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Town Water (ML)
0.6
10.5
14.0
14.2
Bore Water (ML)
181
2054
2739
4000
Waste Targets
September
2010 Total
2010 Forecast
2010 Target
Waste to Landfill (t)
0
3.32
4.4
8
Solid Prescribed Waste to Landfill (t)
0
0
0
0
Monthly EHS ASAT Audit Completion (%)
Air Emission Targets
GHG Efficiency (t CO2 e/MWh)
Opacity (10 min av > 0.25g/m3 norm ops)
Water Targets
Mine Rehabilitation Targets
2010 Total
2010 Target
2010 Area to Clear (ha)
3.1
3.1
2010 Area to Rehabilitate (ha)
5.4
> 3.1
OUR ENVIRONMENT AND OUR EMPLOYEE
Hi Elise! What is the damage to the Eucalyptus leaves we
can see in the Anglesea area?
The defoliation of Eucalyptus trees in the Anglesea area, and
across the Surf Coast, is caused by the caterpillar of the Cup Leaf
Moth. It is the caterpillar (larval stage) that causes the damage to
the leaves, not the moth. The caterpillars feed on the leaves of
Eucalypts with many leaves completely or partially eaten and
many more are cut off and fall to the ground resulting in bare
branches.
Have we seen this damage by the Cup Leaf Moth before?
A similar occurrence of defoliation occurred in the Bald Hills area
of the Anglesea Heath over five years ago. Dale Fuller from
Parks Victoria sent off a sample of one the caterpillars to Museum
Victoria for identification and they informed us it was the
caterpillar of the Cup Leaf Moth. The trees recovered with new
leaf growth the following spring.
Has the moth/caterpillar had any effect on our rehabilitated
areas? Is there anything that we can do to minimise the
damage?
As the caterpillars predominantly feed on eucalypt leaves, there is
little impact on our mine rehabilitated areas. Our mine
rehabilitation is young with few developed trees, so the areas
aren’t able to provide a sufficient food source.
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